36 Burst results for "Three Decade"

Episode 51  Delve Into the Vaults -Death of Gwen Stacy

Relentless Geekery

01:26 min | 4 d ago

Episode 51 Delve Into the Vaults -Death of Gwen Stacy

"You know, going back to the old ones I read. Amazing number one, Twenty-One which I've read before and sequence off and Target old ones. This one still holds up. I think it's still a good well written story and they did it so well they didn't you know it opens with you know well we're not going to reveal the title yet. Do you know the rebate you like and it's weird looking at it now because if you only know Spider-Man from like the even the 80s 90s 2000s the movies, it's it's always Mary Jane, you know, but before that, the first hundred twenty issues, it was Gwen Stacy, and and her dad died and but knew who Peter was and that was like Peter's like oh my God you know, maybe log. Can have a life and he's got Gwen, and then Goblin goes crazy. And it's not even that Goblin kills her. And it's not even a she dies because they're, it's just bought a physics and he did everything he could to save her and he still didn't have enough. That's what he kicked himself for the next three decades. Exactly that. You know, that's, that's well, that's me to put it. You'll find a way to kill him. That still tell her that left him with horrible guilt. You know what I mean? He was trying to save her, he thought he had saved her and then terminal velocity in terms of hitting, but in snapping off, and that looks like it was just going to say that, you know, that the writer was like, I'm going to

Gwen Stacy Peter Mary Jane
Fresh update on "three decade" discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

00:53 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "three decade" discussed on Good Life Project

"Ranked fifty most influential people in india. My guest today. Saad grew is a yogi. Mystic and visionary. He's been conferred three presidential awards in india including one for his environmental work as well as the country's highest annual civilian award for exceptional and distinguished service. He's spoken before the united nations. The world economic forum world bank uk house of lords ted and countless global companies and has also been invited to present at oxford stanford. Harvard yale wharton. Mit and many others and over the year. Assad girl has also launched large scale ecological initiatives that really created a blueprint for economic development. That is ecologically sustainable and three decades ago. He founded ideo foundation a nonprofit human service organization with human wellbeing as its core commitment and the foundation has initiated yoga programs for human transformation and outreach projects to really uplift rural communities it's supported by over eleven million volunteers in more than three hundred centers worldwide. We explore his extraordinary. Life's journey today and then drop into the focus of his latest book karma which has also been a.

Saad Grew India Assad Three Decades Ago Today Oxford Stanford Fifty More Than Three Hundred Center ONE Over Eleven Million Volunteers Ideo Foundation Three Presidential Awards Harvard World Bank House Of Lords Ted Yale Wharton United Nations UK
Supermodel Carolyn Murphy on 20 Yeas as the Face of Estee Lauder

The Glossy Podcast

02:04 min | 2 weeks ago

Supermodel Carolyn Murphy on 20 Yeas as the Face of Estee Lauder

"Today. I sit down with supermodel. Carolyn murphy who has been modeling for thirty years and this year is celebrating twenty years as the face of estee lauder indeed. She is the longest reigning folks model in the industry. I wanted to ask caroline. How modeling has changed in. Three decades including how implementers are impacting the space and how brand partnerships have evolved welcome caroline. Oh my gosh. Thank you for that introduction. I heard as your with you today and to have all the listeners. And yeah there's lots to talk about on so exciting so much to talk about. Let's talk about this twenty year partnership twenty by. Has that made sense. Why has that worked out so well. Well i don't know why i can't really speak for the behalf of the brand south but you know it's crazy. I would have never dreamed that we would be having this conversation. Were i would say that. I was the face of estee lauder twenty years later or actually maybe faces estee lauder to begin with is still when i'm on set and pinching myself. It's like a dream. Come true. Because i grew up with the brand i mean literally i grew up my nana's vanity her white linen and the gold tubes of lipstick and i remember just pining to wear beautiful perfume and going to the beauty counters in seem paulina Cova is the bride. And my mom's sticks advance asians so for me growing up with this brand having my entry point with clinic which you know they own and using the three step and then prescriptive which they also own which was concealing. You're too young for any of this but it's just really it really is phenomenal. And i'm so proud. And i'm so grateful and i'm so honored and i'm still to this day in

Carolyn Murphy Estee Lauder Caroline Paulina Cova
Chad President Deby Dies at 68 After Three-Decade Rule

BBC Newshour

00:40 sec | 3 weeks ago

Chad President Deby Dies at 68 After Three-Decade Rule

"Idriss Deby has died from injuries. We're told sustained on the front line off the battle against rebel forces. This is how the army spokesman General ASM By Amanda A. Guana announced the death. Marshaled each other. It is Debbie signal. The marshal of Chad Idriss Deby it no. As he did every time Republican institutions were gravely threatened, took the lead during a heroic operation. Directed against terrorists who came from Libya. He was wounded in the fighting on passed away shortly after being returned to INGE Amina.

Idriss Deby Amanda A. Guana Chad Idriss Deby Army Debbie Libya Inge Amina
Chad's President Idriss Déby Dies After 'Clashes With Rebels'

BBC Newshour

01:54 min | 3 weeks ago

Chad's President Idriss Déby Dies After 'Clashes With Rebels'

"Today with news that broke in just the last two hours from Chad, the Central African country, which sits south of Libya and also borders Sudan and in Asia. The President Idriss Deby has died from injuries. We're told sustained on the front line off the battle against rebel forces. This is how the army spokesman General ASM By Amanda A. Guana announced the death. Marshaled each other. It is Debbie signal. The marshal of Chad Idriss Deby it no. As he did every time Republican institutions were gravely threatened, took the lead during a heroic operation. Directed against terrorists who came from Libya. He was wounded in the fighting on passed away shortly after being returned to INGE Amina. His death comes just hours after provisional results from the recent presidential election gave him nearly 80% off the votes. This would have been his sixth term in office, running largely unopposed in a country he has ruled for the past three decades. From bases in Libya. Rebels have been advancing on the capital and Janina on president. Debbie had per spooned his victory speech, instead choosing to visit Chadian soldiers. Just a short time ago, we got through to Muhammed Adamu, who is a freelance journalist in the capital, N'Djamena. It was during a battle in North Can Emma but with the charge and rebels who stormed the country from the south side of Libya. They've been progressing till not contempt does roughly 300 kilometers from the capital, N'Djamena, and that's where it will be a one to the front line. And finally he's been wounded and evacuated him to N'Djamena. Where as you know he died. You

Libya Idriss Deby Amanda A. Guana Chad Idriss Deby Inge Amina Debbie Chad Sudan Asia Muhammed Adamu Army Janina Emma
Unforgivable: Jailed former gang members come out as gay

Latino USA

01:37 min | Last month

Unforgivable: Jailed former gang members come out as gay

"A new documentary takes us inside a salvadoran prison and into the world of former gang members who are now a gay a few years ago. Something unusual and kind of incredible happened in prison in western el salvador. The prison was called some francisco. Go out there. And it was entirely dedicated to holding members of el salvador's notorious gangs. Ms thirteen and the eighteenth street gang over the past three decades. These gangs have been in an informal war that is turned el salvador into one of the most violent countries in the world and has forced thousands of salvadorans to leave their country in two thousand seventeen. Nearly all of the inmates inside the prison san francisco go data withdrew from their gangs and converted to christianity evangelical. Churches came to control every part of the prison every part except for one a small isolation block where inmates are locked in around the clock for a variety of reasons and in that isolation block nine men have chosen to live in a single tiny cell about a yard by two yard because they've made a decision. That's unforgivable both to the gangs they were once a part of and to the evangelical church. These men are gay and they've decided not to hide it

El Salvador Francisco San Francisco Evangelical Church
Women Making A Difference In The Community

Casandra Properties Real Estate Podcast

03:09 min | Last month

Women Making A Difference In The Community

"Ladies. Thank you for joining me today here. Yeah it's great to get time to sit down with you guys you know. It seems like we were talking about before we jumped on. The schedules are crazy right now. It almost seems like it's busier now than it ever was before all running in different directions. So it's nice to get a few minutes to sit down and chat. I was wondering if we could jump in. And maybe start with you chris because There's a a very long history between our companies that may even go back and predate you some extent so back thirty plus years ago. My mom worked with richie on the It was his first location for believe it was everything. Yogurt won't think they landed on the staten island mall back. Then you know going back. Three decades plus and watching what you've grown into a several hundred acre amazing campus millions of square feet of hotel hospitality restaurants offices. What has it been like. You know being part of a team. That's grown so exponentially over the last thirty years. Well i've been so blessed to know. The nicole davis since nineteen ninety eight when i worked elsewhere awesome just i knew them as magnificent. Staten islanders and abso- impressed with them as business. People came to work with them in two thousand and eight. And since then i will say that they. They are wonderful business. People there magnanimous people. They're also great teachers. So james one of the things that's been such the the benefit that i can't list in the employee handbook is how much i've learned from them every single day since i started here If i'm being honest and candid nothing in my career or education would have would have said a perfect fit to work in real estate and hospitality. My degrees were in it But what they do is they have such vision. And i think going back to those everything yogurt days you could see it then in nineteen seventy six to say you know what the fast food market is missing healthy food back in the seventies when would to S food chain in. We have very limited offering. You wouldn't be getting a side salad. That's for sure but richard nicole tra- saw an opening in the market. And that really has been the thing that has been the game for them. So yes your mom was wonderful and finding you know working with them on that location for the mall. Their first location ever for their franchise was near wall street in manhattan So you know. The magnificent thing is to see them. Staten islanders with You know taking loans building a business through risk and hard work and building it to as you said a four hundred acre five hundred employees one and a half million square foot asset to our

Staten Island Mall Nicole Davis Staten Islanders Richie Chris Richard Nicole James Manhattan Staten
Voting Firms Turn To Defamation Lawsuits To Counter False Claims

Morning Edition

02:48 min | 2 months ago

Voting Firms Turn To Defamation Lawsuits To Counter False Claims

"And another election Cos. Smartmatic have also filed defamation lawsuits against Trump allies and pro trump media companies with more likely to come. Bill Adair runs the journalism program of Duke University and founded the fact checking website politic Fact, I think this is a completely new Way of tackling misinformation as a journalist. I am I'm a little bit nervous. The idea of using defamation lawsuits makes us a little bit concerned. In particular, he's worried defamation suits could become a weapon against journalists just doing their jobs. But in the current moment, he's come to believe they have a role to play. We need to incentivize truth and we need to de incentivize. Lying money is what matters to AH Media company. Defamation lawsuit is a big way to do that. The suits appear to be having an effect. An anchor for Newsmax walked out on a live interview with the My Pillow CEO when he started making false claims about Dominion voting machines. Can we get out of here, please? But defamation lawsuits are difficult to win. You need to show the person knew or should have known a statement was false when they made it. George Freeman spent three decades defending people against defamation lawsuits as the in house counsel for the New York Times, He says media organizations have a First Amendment right to report on what important people say, even if it may be untrue. But he says the pro trump outlets like Newsmax and away in May have crossed a legal line by amplifying and appearing to endorse obvious falsehoods. They haven't stepped back, although I don't now. Your signs that they're starting to because they're worried about liability, and I think that's a good thing. Still, Freeman thinks the strongest defamation case is against Trump's lawyer, Rudy Giuliani. He made certain accusations on TV. But then he didn't make those in court because I think he knew you would be subject to discipline and perjury if you made them an official documents, so that would seem to be pretty good evidence that he knew they were false. Yet there are reasons why defamation cases aren't filed more often. Many conspiracy theories don't target a specific person or company and the cases can take years to go through the courts, so it's likely when the next presidential election begins. These lawsuits about the 2020 election will still be grinding along.

Smartmatic Bill Adair Ah Media Newsmax George Freeman Duke University Donald Trump New York Times Rudy Giuliani Freeman
Meteorite recovered in the UK after spectacular fireball in the sky

The Naked Scientists

05:12 min | 2 months ago

Meteorite recovered in the UK after spectacular fireball in the sky

"On the final day of february people in some parts of the uk were treated to a celestial light show as a meteor streaked in from space hundreds of videos viable have since been posted online by amateur photographers. We'll see even more special by analyzing the footage multiple networks of cameras for the first time in three decades in the uk the coporate and as it turns out very rare space rock the caused all this was successfully tracked down and recovered from someone's driveway. Phil sansom spoke to the uk meteo observation networks. Mary mcintyre to hear how it happened. There was a really bright fireball picked up across multiple networks. A week ago on sunday and later in the week we found out the in meteorite fight being recovered and this is an incredibly thing to happen in the uk actually even in the world to recover meteorite that's been seen as a fireball quite ready then we found out that it's one of an extremely rag kind of meteorite just so many special things and we just haven't been able to sleep because we're just so excited such a huge win for citizen science. It really was. Wow and you didn't even know what was coming. Did you just sort of appeared as a flash right. Yeah these things. You can't predict them. They're entirely random pieces of space debris and this one was really unusual because it was captured by so many cameras across the because we had a clear sky across the country. What does it look like. Is it just a bright. The whole sky lynx up or is there like an angle you can see and that's how you figure out where he's going. It depends way you see it from our camera so it was heading straight for us so actually on our camera was just an enormous flash and it was really difficult. Get any data from it. Because she couldn't see a flight path but there's a guy called rigid fleet down in wiltshire. Who caught it side on is the most phenomenal bright thing. Streaking across the sky just resulted in this enormous kind of explosion and it fragmented. We could see that there were multiple fragments there and won't she kind of do the calculations behind the scenes. They can figure out the speed. It was moving the angle through the atmosphere. It's exact path before it been up and once you do all that they can also figure out the mass. And once she know the mashed you can then calculate whether something may have survived and landed the normally something like that would be kind of kept quiet for fear of contamination but because of covid and the fact that the area that they think it landed was basically lots of farmland in the cox worlds. None of us are thought for a second that this would get recovered and if it was recovered not for many days when it been rained on all that stuff so it was. It was just incredible. It could have gone in a stream. I'm guessing it could have gone a sheep's trough and cheap eight it. Many fables in the k. Are thought to survive but the end up in the sea because the small island so who actually found dead and how one of the homeowners at actually heard third on their drives the previous your house and they just didn't think anything of it but once the natural history museum per hour video to local saint. If you see anything please have a look and they went out and there was a fragment some dust and kind of black raise on driveway. And i think a fragment bounced over the the walter. Next door's garden wants. People arrived on the scene from wednesday onwards. There was like a fingertip search of the area remote fragments being found in. We've now found about hundred grams of this. Which is just extraordinary. You said that not only was it. Amazing space rock. It's also a very special kind of space rock. It is it's it's a type of meteorite called a carbonaceous conned right and they're really important because most of them originate from the asteroid belt asteroids themselves the old because that leftover material from when the solar system formed four point five billion years ago. But what's amazing about carbonaceous conroy's they have these tiny little of material that actually predates our solar system some of them have organic materials amino acids in them and to get a sample that is really pristine like this is incredibly rare and so important for scientists to kind of analyze the material and find out the origins of our solar system and before also system. It's just being one of the most amazing stories of the decade and the hasn't been a full that's been found for thirty s in the uk. So it's amazing and what's funny as well as aren't their missions. Going on right now. Sending probes up to asteroids way out in space desperate to try and get any sort of sample from them. And we've just had one line right at our doorstep. It is well. There was actually a mission to the asteroid a writer and the quality of the some police comparible without sample return mission from right and they brought by lake tiny amounts of asteroids. And we've got four hundred grams of this. I mean you can't rely on them landing as a way of analyzing them because it just doesn't happen very often. I take me found all the time. But they've been led on the ground. Who knows how long. And still quite believe israel i just honestly when i found out i just cried because such an amazing

UK Phil Sansom Mary Mcintyre Wiltshire Conroy Israel
One Year Later: Indicators On The Pandemic Economy

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:41 min | 2 months ago

One Year Later: Indicators On The Pandemic Economy

"One of the clearest lessons that we've learned about the pandemic economy is that there are huge gaps between the experiences of different groups of people and he is specific gap that we have been focusing on people who had low wage jobs before the pandemic have been much much more likely to lose their jobs. Then people with high wage jobs the data on this come from a new study by the new york fan and it is quite stark. Yeah by the end of last year there were actually more jobs for people who make high wages than there were before the pandemic this is people who make typically more than about eighty five thousand dollars a year so these include jobs like software developers engineers lawyers corporate executives and these jobs have completely returned not too many of them were ever even lost in the first place even in those terrible months right after the pandemic started now compare that to people who work jobs that typically pay less than thirty thousand dollars a year. Those jobs include things like food servers cashiers home health aides childcare workers and there were still fourteen percent fewer of those jobs at the end of last year that is a staggering gap. We haven't seen anything like this gap between highway jobs and low wage jobs in any of the recessions going back at least three decades and the gap exists now for a kind of obvious reason the unique nature of the pandemic recession. Yes a lot of these. low wage. Jobs are in restaurants bars hotels jobs acquiring a lot of direct human interaction and so a lot of these places had to close or their customers just stopped spending money on them and there is a reason that we're focusing so much on this disparity between low wage and high wage workers it feeds into the other disparities in the economy. A lot of those lower wage jobs are disproportionately done by young workers by workers without college degrees and by black and hispanic workers. And that's a big part of the reason. Why each of these groups also suffered a disproportionate share of the jobs. Lost our second group of indicators is about the economic policy lessons we've learned in the pandemic and here's the i almost impossible to believe indicator as terrible as the economy has been for the past year. There is almost no difference between the sheriff people who are in poverty now versus before the pandemic not only that but this year. The number of people in poverty is expected to fall by more than a third. So that by the end of twenty twenty one there will be more than thirteen million fewer people in poverty than there are right now. The main reason why the. Us government has now passed. Three huge aid and stimulus bill since the start of the pandemic to support the economy and the third bill. Which is president. Joe biden's american rescue plan was just passed by congress yesterday so of course the effects have not yet kicked in but we do know what was in that bill and most importantly we know what it has in common with the to bill signed by president. Donald trump last year which passed with bipartisan support in congress specifically when you look at the money that's being spent by the bills combined by far the biggest chunk of it is the cash that's being sent directly to individuals and families mainly in the form of stimulus checks and unemployment benefits for people who have lost their jobs and the combined scale of the bills is enormous about five trillion dollars in aid for the economy. That is at least three times as much the stimulus money. The government spent to fight the great recession of two thousand eight two thousand nine and just an offer a sense of how much extra money is reaching families because of these bills. Here's what a washington post analysis found. Take a family of four people two parents and two young kids and they live say in massachusetts now soon that one of the two parents lost their job at the beginning of the pandemic and still has not found work. That family in total will end up receiving more than fifty thousand dollars in support from the government that it would not have received without these three bills and the government is paying for all three of these bills by simply borrowing more money and for the most part politicians from both parties. Haven't really made a deal about this. And these are some big changes from how the government has responded to previous recessions like take the great recession of two thousand and eight. When there were extremely loud worries from politicians on both sides about the government barring lots of money to fight the downturn and also a much smaller share of the money back then was used for directly sending cash to people more of the money then we spent on other things like aid to state and local governments infrastructure projects and other investments. Yeah back then. The government was also still more reliant on the federal reserve to respond to recessions but the fed can't directly. Send money to people that they do not have to pay back. It can boost the economy by lending money to financial institutions and certain businesses it can also lower interest rates to convince people and businesses to borrow more money and by the way the fed was still a big part of responding to the covid recession but the us government by using its unique power to send cash directly to people cash. That they don't have to pay back was willing to accept a much bigger role this time. Does this mean that as the economy reopened this year it will bounce back way faster than it did after the two thousand eight recession when the recovery was sluggish until years. We'll find out. Most economists expect it will. They are forecasting that this year the us economy will grow at its fastest pace since nineteen eighty three. And if they're right than the. Us government operating under two different presidents from opposing parties. May well have established a new way to respond to the terrible recessions of the future.

Congress Joe Biden New York Donald Trump Government Jobs FED Washington Post Massachusetts United States Us Government
Idaho ends Powerball in state, fearing foreign participation

America's First News Show

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

Idaho ends Powerball in state, fearing foreign participation

"In the Powerball lottery killed legislation Wednesday that would have allowed the game with huge jackpots to continue in the state after a run of more than three decades. It came after Idaho Lottery officials sought a change in state law because Powerball is expanding to include Australia and 2021, Britain in 2022, But current Idaho law only allows lotteries in the state played by people in the U. S and Canada. Now Idaho was one of the first dates to join Powerball in the 19 nineties. The lottery has since grown to include 45 states to U. S territories and D. C. The Multistate Lottery Association runs the game. Idaho Lottery officials have said it generates about $28 million in sales annually, with schools receiving about $14 million. Per year. So they'd get a little bit more

Idaho U. Multistate Lottery Association Britain Australia Canada
Wrongfully Convicted Dallas Man Set To Be Released After 34 Years

The Dallas Morning News

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

Wrongfully Convicted Dallas Man Set To Be Released After 34 Years

"In crime news. Dallas man imprisoned or three decades in a deadly. Dallas robbery was wrongfully convicted. That's what dallas county prosecutors said. Yesterday ben spencer fifty-six is expected to be released from jail. This week for the first time in thirty four years prosecutors in the district attorney's office who reviewed his case found that previous prosecutors withheld evidence from spencer's defense team about the robbery and slaying of businessman. Jeffrey young spencer always maintained his innocence. Even though admitting guilt could have meant earning parole years ago cynthia garza chief of the conviction integrity unit said in a written statement. We conducted an independent investigation. And when we did that it was apparent that spencer was wrongfully convicted. The district attorney's office would not say whether they plan to retry spencer. A da's office spokeswoman said the conviction integrity unit is still investigating the case

Ben Spencer Dallas Jeffrey Young Spencer Dallas County Cynthia Garza Spencer
Should The Simpsons Cast Be Replaced With AI Voice "Actors"?

Kottke Ride Home

05:49 min | 2 months ago

Should The Simpsons Cast Be Replaced With AI Voice "Actors"?

"With most of the actors who voiced characters on the simpsons well into retirement age and the show seemingly having no intention of ever stopping a meeting. Cut wallover at wired. Uk wondered. could the actors all be replaced with a i rep locations. It makes a bit of sense off the bat. Near the proliferation of deepfakes circulating online aside major movie franchises have increasingly been patching together old footage of actors who have passed away like carrie fisher and the rise of skywalker and paul walker and furious. Seven or even just to fabricate a younger version of an actor who coincidentally had an entire body of work from their teenage years to use as reference points like robert. Downey junior in captain. America's civil war and will smith in jimmy man and with the simpsons. You only have to create the voice shortly. that's far easier especially with over three decades of content to pull from wired turn to tim. Mixed smithers canada-based. Ai researcher and media producer. Who builds a speech model that can be trained to mimic anyone's voice and notably has already recreated homer simpson for a few youtube videos including one where homer stands in for julia roberts in notting hill. Here's how he does it. Quoting wired mic smithers built generic. Ai model that can turn any text into audio speech in english when he wants to make a new voice he tunes the model further with two or three hours of new data of that particular person. Speaking along with a text transcript it focuses in on what makes a homer voice a homer voice and the different frequencies. He says after that it's a matter of asking the model to generate multiple takes. Each one will vary slightly and choosing the best one for your purposes and quotes bonnets. The performance is pretty flat as wired. Says it's quote as if he's reading out something that he doesn't really understand the meaning of and quotes which is pretty apt for homer still in the hut the performance. The show would probably be looking for there are other startups around. The world. Likes an antic in the uk and replica studios in australia. That are working to add. Some of that emotional resonance to a voice is using actual actors to help train them performing different lines over and over again with different emotional tones. Technically if you had someone recite all the existing phonemes in the english language or redescendu since that contained them all you should be able to then piece together any possible words. He wants but in reality. People's accents emotions can change things just slightly enough to make the process exceptionally challenging. Although absolutely doable and the time it takes to train the ai decreases over time with more data. Both semantic and replica studios who work primarily with video games where. There's a lot of intriguing possibilities with things like getting a character to say the player's name or whatever. The player wants them to or having a i basically work as a stand in until a real actor comes on board both of those companies say the actors they work with get paid anytime their voices are used in a game and this is a key element for me. Not just what rights doesn't actor have if they're only ever used to train in ai and not perform roll themselves so to speak but taking this back to the simpsons what rights do actors have whose voices are recreated to be their characters the screen actors guild affords actors certain bargaining rights over the use of their likeness. Which does explicitly extend to a performer's voice and while his protection is being rapidly expanded and reexamined as technology evolves you can impart think crispin glover for its origins after crispin glover declined to revive his role as george mic. Fly in back to the future. Part two they technically recast him. But they saddled the new actor. Geoffrey wiseman with prosthetics and employed classic stage tricks like having him upside down or wearing sunglasses to obscure his features as well as the use of some footage of glover himself from the first movie. Unless you were well aware that glover hadn't returned for the sequel. You probably wouldn't have had any idea that the george mcphee racine was any different from the first movie so glover sued the producers for using his likeness without his permission and for not paying him for the use of the footage. He shot for the first movie. But the legality of all of this now banned far beyond simply using a performance likeness and in many cases. Who is allowed to do what isn't so clear. There's copyright law which could give authority to the studio or whoever owns the rights but that counteracts with the right to publicity basically crispin glover thing and that's especially tenuous with cast as well known as the ones from the simpsons. You know a lot of people know these actors and if in a i replicated homer were out there. Advertising for some product people might assume dan castellaneta who voices homer is endorsing the product even if he had nothing to do with it so it's a tricky path to tread and personally. I'm a bit wary about the idea of ai. Replacing actors were any type of artists. Mean that's not to say that i don't want. Ai involved in arts. I think various tech can produce really rad art. I just don't think it can replace human-made arts and especially with something like the simpsons you know on the one hand. It's been on so long that it's the perfect fodder for ai. Replicated voices because then it could live on beyond the actors. And i guess honor them in some way but on the other hand. It's been so long that there are countless voice actors out there who can nail the characters voices perfectly and probably with more emotion.

Mic Smithers Replica Studios Crispin Glover Carrie Fisher Paul Walker Skywalker Homer Simpson Downey Julia Roberts Notting Hill Glover Homer George Mic Jimmy Geoffrey Wiseman TIM Smith Robert Youtube George Mcphee Racine
CBO expects federal debt to double over next 30 years

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 2 months ago

CBO expects federal debt to double over next 30 years

"The Congressional Budget Office estimates persistent budget deficits will cause the federal debt to double in size over the next thirty years the government's relied on borrowing at low interest rates to help during a financial crisis but as the economy heals the office is forecasting that interest rates will rise and so will spending and this is excluding president Biden's one point nine trillion dollar cope with relief proposal the CBO predicts publicly held debt would equal one hundred two percent of this year's gross domestic product but fast forward three decades and the accumulated debt would grow to two hundred two percent of GDP on the plus side the budget office foresees higher payroll tax revenues and forecasts that social security has another year to twenty thirty two before it's trust funds are exhausted Jackie Quinn Washington

President Biden Congressional Budget Office CBO Government Jackie Quinn Washington
USPS adding up to 165K fuel efficient or electric delivery vehicles

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

00:26 sec | 2 months ago

USPS adding up to 165K fuel efficient or electric delivery vehicles

"Look and see You're getting a new vehicle. And 2023, the U. S Postal Service announced his 200,000 vans, many three decades old. Will be retired Wisconsin company Osh Kosh defense has been tapped to build the new fleet, which will include electric vehicles and modern anti collision technology Postal service describes The deal is the first part of a multi billion dollar tenure efforts to replace the delivery fleet 7

U. S Postal Service Osh Kosh Wisconsin
From ballet dancer to zombie slayer: Cree actor Michael Greyeyes on his prolific career

Unreserved

04:32 min | 3 months ago

From ballet dancer to zombie slayer: Cree actor Michael Greyeyes on his prolific career

"You may have seen my guest today on the small screen and big screens or on the stage. Michael is is a man of many talents. He's a classically trained ballet dancer. Choreographer director playwright and renowned actor over his three decade. Long career michael has appeared in some of the most beloved first nation films like dance me outside and smoke signals. He has taken on challenging roles. Playing indigenous leaders like sitting bull wandering spirit to come see and crazy horse more recently. He's taken the small screen by storm appearing on hit tv shows like fear the walking dead true detective and the soon to be released nbc. Comedy rutherford falls. Michael is net. Oh and a member of the musket lake cremation in sketch. Juan and he joins me now from los angeles. Welcome to the show. Michael falen thank you so much for the invitation. Oh it's so great to have you here so you're in los angeles right now But i wanna go back a bit. Can you tell me about where you grew up. I'm from treaty. Six territory in saskatchewan My mom and dad are from reserves in the middle of saskatchewan. My dad's from moscow. And my mom is from sweet grass and my sister and my family. We lived in a couple of places where in the capelle valley. Of course lebron and then we moved to saskatoon and saskatoon was where i spent my boyhood until i was plucked plucked from the prairies at the age of ten years old to attend canada's national ballet school in toronto and my family and i we moved from treaty six territory to To dish with one spoon territory. So i could pursue dance as as a career potential career and so i wanna talk about your dancing a bit but first i want to know what was it. Like growing up on the prairies. What do you remember What do you remember about growing up on the prairies. So many beautiful things. Obviously that's home. That's that's that's my home. That's where i know about my family. My a my early years. I remember the sunlight of remember the sky. I remember my cousins and all my relatives. And i remember playing just riding my bike with my banana seat all over town. They need to make banana seats again. They're very comfortable. they do they do in los angeles. There's a whole like bike culture. We're fleeing be tricked out bike's banana seats. So you're known primarily as an actor now but as you mentioned you know you got into the entertainment industry in a different way. You started as a dancer as a ballet dancer. So how does a kid growing up in saskatoon and up in the ballet well by accident entirely by axes we were living in saskatoon and my mom was a teacher at the school for the deaf. A very famous School for deaf children in saskatoon and my sister. And i were doing you know little kid things. I was playing hockey of course and my sister was taking dance lessons so mumbai. I we used to week for my sister in the car and i was you know five six years old so i was like a super board super easily so it was like she died. She'd done and i would go up and check on her. I remember the classes at the university of scotch one and it was kind of like this wile experiences little kid i walk in. I'd look for her and then she be dancing with these little girls. In one day. I decided to really kinda pay attention to what they were doing. And i and then. I blurted got ceesay. Teacher overheard me. She said well. Do you think it's easy. Why don't you come on back next week. So i said A will and i told my mom all week. I'm going to dance next week. And she of course you know. I apparently said lots of crazy things as as a boy but as the days got closer. She was like okay he. He's repeating it. He's he's he's he's insistent about this. Why do you think you're going to death sex because the teacher invited me so with my mom and my mom used me. I'm so so sorry. Michael thinks that you've invited him. Smith usually oh yeah yeah yeah come on in. And that's how. It started precocious boy pushing his way into a dance class that he hadn't signed up for.

Saskatoon Rutherford Falls Michael Falen Capelle Valley Los Angeles Saskatchewan Michael National Ballet School NBC Juan School For Deaf Children Lebron Moscow University Of Scotch Toronto Canada Mumbai Hockey Smith
Rush Limbaugh, conservative radio host, dies at 70

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 3 months ago

Rush Limbaugh, conservative radio host, dies at 70

"Opinionated and controversial. Gloves have to come off over the past three decades, he used his nationally syndicated radio broadcast to deliver his conservative ideology. Everybody's making immigration proposals these days. Let me add mind to the mix. Democrats were the frequent subject of his wrath. Barack Obama. Is destroying the United States economy Among Limbaugh's fans President Donald Trump, who awarded Limbaugh the presidential Medal of Freedom during 20 twenties State of the Union address in recognition. Of all that you have done for our nation. Steve Caven, CBS News now former President Trump spoke about Rush Limbaugh today on Fox News. She was just somebody that He loved talking about the

Limbaugh Donald Trump Barack Obama Steve Caven President Trump United States Cbs News Rush Limbaugh Fox News
Damon Johnson misses live concerts

Pantheon

07:43 min | 3 months ago

Damon Johnson misses live concerts

"Nothing better to do during a pandemic than listened to some new tunes. Some stuff you've been wanting to listen to and haven't had the chance to. I know things are starting opened up across the country but it's nevertheless music can always be escape. It can always be a form of healing and rock and roll is always there for you. It's it's loyalty you so please be loyal to rock and roll like to welcome in our next guest. Some really excited about this. I've had the pleasure of seen him live over the last few years with his old band. Black star riders and also solo. I had a pleasure of seeing him up for the winery dogs here in saint charles just outside of chicago couple years ago. Like to welcome in mr damon johnson. What's going on man. How are you good buddy. Thank you for having me on Sure i miss getting to play live shows at all but i definitely miss coming to the greater chicago. Area man there some of the best rock and roll fans in the country right there. Yeah it's always a great seen a great show whenever whenever. There's a live concert here in chicago whether it's a small club theater or arena it it just has an atmosphere that is like no other. It's really cool. I agree man I've been coming to chicago since the early days of brother cane We could have first. Album outweigh back in ninety three and straightaway man chicago and northern illinois radio in general. They really embrace this. And i feel like it's a relationship that i've been really fortunate to have for gosh man crazy number thirty years ago long time and you have some connection here too in chicago. I know steph from f three design. I think he does your local man. Stephon stephan does everything. He's yeah steffen. I think the first thing he did for me was help me. Get my website design in early two thousands and then Bizmart work for me. On my i guess my second solo album which was in a stick record and then when he has started warns. The arm in You know i've been a proud supporter of their clothing company and i love awareness stuff and they're just they're to of my favorite people on the planet. They're like family to us. Yeah i've known stephan for gosh. It's gotta be two decades three decades almost and i used to live with this rock band in chicago and he used to do. They're designed to as well in all their kind of marketing in and You know other kind kinda website and designing stuff. And i've known him so i run into him at shows like him and i always like bump into each other like. Hey man what's going on so it's always good to see him. That's amazing you've known him longer than i have. So that's That's really cool. And i'm i'm so proud of the growth. They've had their company and They're both incredibly talented. And it's inspiring you know for them to start their own kind of mom and pop business as they as they have and they grown it to the level that they have. I'm really proud to be a part of their circle. Well we got lots to get into but we always begin the episode. Every time we have a first time guest the same way and that's the essence of the show. The the question. We always ask just like every rock song has a hook. That sucks you in rock fan has a moment whether it's a band performance a song or album that hook them on rock and roll. What was it for you. Wow that's a big question The thing that hooked me on rock and roll was. I saw kiss on the midnight special on my television. When i was in the seventh grade and i it was the equivalent. I'm sure jay of our older friends. When they saw the beatles on ed sullivan that was the equivalent of that moment for me. No one's ever asked me that question to tell you the truth You know. I grew up my my folks to this day man. Both my parents love music and so it was a very musical household. The radio was always playing in. Dad would buy vinyl records of perjury artists pop artists and but yeah that was when i felt like it was something that was specifically mind. You know my parents not care for kids. They played black diamond complete with this. You know the rising drum riser in the pyro and everything manages your that. Messed me up preordained. I think it put me on the path for sure. Your kiss was an inspiration for a lot of musicians. And i think it was just the the imagery you know the the faces and the explosions and all the stuff. That kind of just pulled you in you know. The music was great too. But it just had like this power over young kids. I mean i got exposed to kiss back in like the early eighties. And i always remember knowing of them in knowing what they look like before i heard their music and then i heard their music and then i was just hooked. Yeah you know. I you know. I'm i'm probably a little older than you. So you know that midnight. Special show man that would have been nineteen seventy seven grow. This was this was early. This was. I believe this was between kiss alive. One destroyer and You know it was cool. Because i had a group of friends at school that you know we were all kind of discovering rock and roll at the same time and i remember that year in school that no kid and leonard skinner. I'm from the south. And so you know sweet home. Alabama was already the national anthem for us. And so you know the musicality of a ban like skinner We love led zeppelin and You know not long after that. We really got into bands like rush pink. Floyd bad company was big call. Rogers greatest singer of all time. You know things like that. So that set the table for me. I guess jay and then the two big bands not long after that you know when i finally started going to concerts where we saw thin lizzy. Ironically i saw them in seventy nine and that was a game changer for me and The the next summer. I saw van halen for the first time and i was cooked like that's it. I'm i gonna play guitar. You know. I have friends who go to college and get a degree and and and pursued that actually and it wasn't until i had already graduated junior college that i really ever thought of even considering it to be possible to play music as living especially for women coming from such rural backgrounds. There was nobody from where i came from. That was a professional musician. You know so. It just didn't seem possible.

Chicago Mr Damon Johnson Stephon Stephan Saint Charles Northern Illinois Steffen Steph Stephan Ed Sullivan JAY Beatles Leonard Skinner Skinner Alabama Floyd Rogers Van Halen
Court stays execution of Alabama inmate

News, Traffic and Weather

00:18 sec | 3 months ago

Court stays execution of Alabama inmate

"News A federal appeals court in Atlanta, stay the execution of condemned Alabama murderer Willie B. Smith condemned for shotgunning a woman to death three decades ago. The judges want time to consider defense claims the state didn't give Smith who has an I Q below 75 required assistance with forms impacting the timing of his execution. Alabama's

Willie B. Smith Atlanta Alabama Smith
"three decade" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:54 min | 6 months ago

"three decade" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Dr james writing in in dr suzanne shown harjo who are here with us. Thank you both for being on the line and you know what we got a caller. We're going to say hi to michael who is in hemas pueblo tuned in today on k. Unm in new mexico and michael happy feast as well michael. Thank you for joining your.

michael hemas pueblo Dr james Unm new mexico
"three decade" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:33 min | 6 months ago

"three decade" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Some panis who are killed and decapitated in eighteen sixty nine. So i did that. The study and showed that They were upon because the smith oh smithsonian tried to deny that they were pony even though all the documentation said that they were So you know they're just trying to stonewalled or repatriation from going forward Than that report. I did was was used as part of the evidence submitted as For the enactment of the national museum of american indian. Act and then after nagpur became law. you know. The panis just had a repatriation committee because the pointing nation have been fighting the nebraska historical society to give remains back and that led to the creation of a state law. There that preceded the law. They national repatriation laws So i Became a ball to that way though. We patriation committee at pontiac asked me to go through. All those inventories that are submitted and tenured faculty trying to work for tenure. But this was more important to me than tenure. So i did all those inventories reports and Finally i decided that It'd be best if i wrote a repatriation program pointing. I did so i took some over but i continued to do a lot of consultation meetings the have the party And do research a place like the field museum and started writing a articles about this work as well. So yes about Coastal probably fifteen twenty years and all that much life and in tikos us to the actual act in when it was passed in what was put into it. James anything you want to educate us about I'd like to have suzanne respond to that question. Okay no problem. Suzanne take their well. We did everything steps. We i got the american indian religious freedom act and that was another huge coalition built around all aspects of religious freedom and that was in nineteen seventy eight because we needed a policy umbrella for all of these phone ause that would be warned. More specific but federal repatriations began to take place under the american indian religious freedom act in nineteen seventy eight and seventy nine during the first year of implementation of that act so We pay creation was taking place privately through various methods but sporadic -ly and beginning to take shape under the religious freedom act and then we worked on very specific strategies to gang repatriation law and hard as the strategy involved a large collection that was on the market really and That was the museum of the american indian york and my friend vine lauria junior was part of the reform board of ford. This museum that had been placed in receivership in fact Four doing very bad things and so vine of even though there were a couple of native people on the reform board he said he had no backup and he really needed me to be on their backup for him so he got me on the board and I was voted on to the trustees in nineteen eighty and we and shortly after that i became the executive director of the national congress of american indians so that gave us two very important platforms To work from and we had to marry them so that we could work on both things at the same time. So we were marrying the.

field museum nebraska historical society national museum of american in Suzanne american indian york smithsonian tikos smith pontiac executive director James ford
"three decade" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

02:36 min | 6 months ago

"three decade" Discussed on Native America Calling

"We begin forming a very powerful coalition That began with with people and experiences. And all of that translated directly into policy and law once we started down that road. In so i really appreciate you kind of i guess setting the temperature of the times in exactly what sparked the interest of wanting to do this and know getting those words from your mom. Do something about this And then we get to a point where you see that path and suzanne. When you think of nagpur actually coming to fruition and and being something that was going to be put into law. What was your thought. We got about a minute before break. Well it that that we had laid on given country a lot to do without most of the people i mean we had huge coalition that I mean by the time of passage of nagpur. We had thousands of people working on this nonetheless. There were lots of people who are going to be less with the actual duty of repatriating who did not know what we knew what we had gathered over twenty some years leading toward the actual drafting that we did and the commitment to words on a page so part of it was. How did we get that information out to everyone and you know just hearing. How much of this unfolded i think is really important in. We have a lot of people who've come on this program who have called on nag To make things right or to even bringing ancestors home You know so when we get to the nitty gritty of how this started and you think of maybe ways at nagpur has been applied by your own tribal community. What are your thoughts in when we think of this law how much further. How further does it need to go. Are there improvements that need to be made. We'll hear more of the backstory on this and also how it is being implemented within our tribal communities today and we have space for you to if you have a chapter in this story that you.

nagpur suzanne
"three decade" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:25 min | 6 months ago

"three decade" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Dc is dr. suzanne shown. Harjo she is a founding trustee of the smithsonian national museum of american indian and the president of the morning star institute and suzanne is. Cheyenne and hoagie. Muskogee dr harjo. Thank you for joining us for another native america. Calling. thanks cherif. thanks for having me. And i can only wonder what you were thinking about leading up to this program. Thirty years of nagpur Can't wait to get to that Also joining us today here from tempe. Arizona arizona's dr james writing in. He is a founding member of american indian studies at arizona state university and he is pony dr riding in welcome to native america calling. I should say thank you for joining us for another one. Thank you for inviting me in so when we say nag press sometimes it strikes a lot of things or it's something that Community is called on to bring back the remains of the belongings of loved or of their loved ancestor But there are people who don't know much about it. And so i'd like to just kind of start at the beginning of how we even got to a point where we have an act like this and both of you were instrumental in creating more understanding on this act as years have gone on but also dr harjo in go by suzanne suzanne. You were instrumental in getting nagara past tells a little bit about that well. My involvement goes snack. Almost a half century. Actually to trip nick. With my mother to the museum of the american indian and new york city where we saw so many objectionable Desecrate tori things on display and Things that gave us Nightmares and were so just concerning. My mother was Just charging me with with doing something about this. You have to do something about this. And she went back home and actually started to do something about it by telling people telling me some of her ceremonial man to That they needed to do something about this. They need to convene something so that everyone can say what they're dreaming about what they're experiencing what they're having nightmares about what they're having visions about and to bring that together Because it's happening on large scale. And what the upshot of it was that Cheyenne and arapaho and lakota. Ceremonial people call And put a call out for a lot of us to be at bear butte after ceremonies. So you go through ceremonies in june and then after that to prepare to camp out for four days and so we did that and this gathering became a coalition that.

dr harjo suzanne suzanne smithsonian national museum of founding member america Cheyenne trustee arizona Dc nagpur arizona state university morning star institute Muskogee president new york tempe arapaho
"three decade" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 6 months ago

"three decade" Discussed on Native America Calling

"The national native news antonio gonzales the navajo department of health is warning residents of uncontrollable spread of covid nineteen and thirty four communities on the reservation navajo leaders and health professionals are urging residents to take precautions and stay home. The tribe has been hit hard by covid nineteen and saw the first wave peak in the spring strict measures including mandatory mask. Orders curfews and lockdowns are credited to numbers dropping in the summer and fall but his cases start to rise navajo leaders and health officials. Say they're prepared to take extreme action to help prevent the surge from surpassing the first one. Dr jill jim director of the navajo department of health during a virtual town hall this week says many of the cases have been linked to large gatherings and travel off the reservation as we were in many those were at our highest peak in may and at that time. Any what we. Experience is a complete shutdown for a number of much the tribes shutdown government offices and things like that but living in with kobe. Nineteen has teens and perception of how we need to respond has detained. But i'm bill what we experience in on. You never know we might have to do. Extreme mitigation listeners. On to ensure that we stop the spread of covid nineteen so and that will impact our healthcare system as of wednesday the total number of positive covid nineteen cases on the navajo nation. Where twelve thousand. Eight hundred and eighteen native veterans. Were honored wednesday. Virtual events were streamed online including a program to mark the completion of the national native american veterans memorial in washington dc mel sheldon councilman of the tulalip tribes. Who served in vietnam kicked off. The event recognizing veterans for their service. When i got back from vietnam. I was very proud to be a veteran. I was a helicopter pilot at nineteen. We flew in near cambodia and into cambodia and we should as best as we could coming home talking to other veterans knowing that we had done our job. It was a proud tradition for a lot of veterans coming. Home was not always easy and it was. The powwows are tribal communities. Put their arms around us to make us feel proud. Tampa's become hold again as those it were in combat. They were changed in a way that we could help them. He'll help them recover. The memorial is on the grounds of the national museum of the american indian it open to the public on wednesday and recognizes native veterans on a national level. Joe biden is making plans to take over. The federal government is president in preparing for his cabinet. Even as president trump fights the election and has not conceded. The biden harris transition team was announced this week and includes native americans. Kevin washburn chickasaw janey. Hip chickasaw in chris. James eastern band of cherokee washburn law professor and dean and is a former federal official hips leader in native american agriculture and has worked in washington. Dc james has held positions in the federal government and leads a national native economic development organization biden harris transition teams will review agencies to help with the smooth transfer of power tribal leaders and directors of national native organizations across the country recognizing the biden harris projected win and are prepared to move forward with the next administration this week. The alaska federation of natives released a statement of congratulations and said the af looks forward to working with the teams and seeing the new administration's initiatives next year. The national congress of american indians in a statement. Saturday said it looks forward to working with the team to ensure indian country priorities are addressed. I antonio's gonzales.

navajo department of health tulalip tribes antonio gonzales albuquerque america Dr jill jim mel sheldon vietnam lockdowns washington director
"three decade" Discussed on 1A

1A

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"three decade" Discussed on 1A

"Having a more. In depth conversation about him and about how others may regard him. So I, I think all of those things are inside most black people that I know. You know, there is a space within us that as you have, we have experienced police violence in some type of way, whether it was personally or through a third party, you know, someone else is experience. And so I think a lot of that was always in there. So that was unleashed to there's also another black cultural thread in the series which has to do with Latrice in the butlers and their relationship with God. Let's play one more clip in the time we have left this Latrice in a confrontation with pastor Adler who's played by Ron Canada from seven seconds. God didn't run my son down in the street and leave him to die. A man did the trees. I've seen a lot of people through this sort of thing. It's rough, but the ones who come out of it who keep their heads above water, they lean into you. I was in that church singing his praises while my son was dying in a dish lean. You want me to lean. I never prayed for anything harder in my life, inform us on the live all the while. Somebody else was praying for him to die. So I'm done praying to God who answers a murderer over a mother. Those are pretty strong seen Regina to include in very different from what we typically see for how black families deal with tragedy in dramas that revolve around them in their faith. Yes, very different. But also very real, you know, and I applaud Veena Sood of the creator of the show in the writers for digging in deep, but that that's one of the things I think that was fascinating about the role of Latrice is that while just when you just give a description of the character, a woman who's lost her child be to to a police cover up, but that. She so much more than that, and I appreciate it. That in that Vena was able to find this woman and this this couple that did not have the perfect relationship that while they were this, this God fearing couple, they had troubles within their relationship and those things don't go away just because this tragic tragedies occurred and you know, how do you, how do you explain that to your heart and to see this woman struggle with that is something that a lot of people who are religious, especially, you know, in the black community of that are religious in in the black community feel but don't speak about because it's blasphemous in some way. And then we go to let you go in a moment. I know you've got some new projects coming up. You've got the upcoming. Drama if Beale street to talk, which is based on the novel by James Baldwin berry Jenkins who directed moonlight is directing this also and Bill had the question about another project that's coming up, which I'll ask you before we let you go. Bill asks, is there anything Regina can tell us about her upcoming role on the new watchmen series on HBO. I wish I could feel I can't wait to be able to, but I will say this. We are in this alternate. Universes such a strong word but alternate space. And I think it is going to be a again, another opportunity for Damon to have provocative storytelling, but have moments that make you go. Hm. Hm, because fans the graphic novel, watch the movie and walked away feeling a little flat. So we're looking forward to the series. I would hope that that's not how you feel. Regina king EMMY winning and EMMY nominated actress. Her latest project is seven seconds on Netflix, Regina. We appreciate you sharing your stories with us, and thanks very much for talking to us. Thank you. Thanks for having me really. This program comes to you from w. a. m. u. part of American University in Washington, distributed by NPR until we meet again, I'm Joshua Johnson. Thank you so much for listening. This is one..

Regina Latrice EMMY Veena Sood butlers Bill James Baldwin berry Jenkins Ron Canada Vena HBO Joshua Johnson pastor Adler Netflix Damon Washington American University NPR w. a. m. u. seven seconds
"three decade" Discussed on 1A

1A

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"three decade" Discussed on 1A

"Business differences are too great for moon docs to come back that it's going to have to exist as a time capsule of its time, and then somebody else going to have to pick up the baton from here. Yeah, I mean, people I always try to say never say never, but I think there's so much legal stuff involved with that. And you know who owns what? And. Yeah, it's just it's just unfortunate, but Aaron was I think, very honest about his role in it. You know, times when I was speak to him and he just he needed to exit that situation. So his soul could be right. And after that, you know, Aaron went on to have twins, and then another child and it just it just kind of it's interesting how the universe works that way, you know he and his wife were trying before that. And then after that situation removed itself from itself from the from from his his world, other things opened up. Why would say for those who've never seen the boondocks just go watch the Martin Luther King episode. Dow just watch watch that one. That was that was my first episode of boondocks, that was my, yes. I saw that the night it came out. I was. Here in DC would room full of thirty brothers and the whole room got quite as Connecticut. And we watched the episode and I was shook. I was not ready to see, but it was if you've never seen boondocks, just go watch the Martin Luther King episode and all of your black friends will pull thank you for trust me. Yeah, let's let's talk about your current work. You'll latest role in the Netflix drama, seven seconds. It's a limited series that tells the story of Brenton Butler who is a black teenage boy who was killed in a hit and run by a police officer who is white. Now, Regina king plays Latrice Butler, Brenton's mother. It's the role for which she earned her. Fourth EMMY nomination. Here is a piece of Regina kings performance. This is Latrice confronting the officer who ran over her son and left him to die Layton for this moon for a long time. I thought I'd want to see you in handcuffs. Seem drag you to the streets to pay for what you did to my son. Right now. Just wanna know of. He was scared. It was paying. If we call for me. To know those last minutes were for him, Regina king as Latrice Butler in seven seconds. What is it like to kind of deal with a role that heavy as an actor? This character is dealing with a lot of anger and a lot of grief how you channel that as an actor and not have it kind of drown you cou way. I mean, there was a heavy six months shooting that show. I will say. I. Oh. Honestly, because of. I've been asked that question and I don't the answer still hasn't changed. You know, sometimes you're asked something and then when you're asked again, you've been able to think about it a little bit more. And so your answer may shift a bit. I feel like a lot of that was in me because of the relationship between the black community in the police growing up that that that that we had growing up and that was very. Extra sensitive for me having a son and just the fears and concerns that I've always had regarding police violence once. Bye. Son became a teenager because honestly, I don't think I really you thinking about so many other things as you're as you're raising a child. And then that moment comes for for black parents when the who specially parents of sons that you realize it. Oh, wow. Yeah. Now I've got a start..

Latrice Butler Martin Luther King Regina king Brenton Butler Aaron Son Latrice officer EMMY Netflix Dow Connecticut Layton seven seconds six months
"three decade" Discussed on 1A

1A

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"three decade" Discussed on 1A

"Right? All women are not hose. We're talking twenty twenty-five percent tops. Okay. But if they not all hose than what I got the pay to take them out to eight thin clip from the boondocks. Regina. How did you come to be involved in boondocks so much fun boys? I'll bet. Yeah. I actually I dish ind for Riley and I. After I got the part of Riley, they Aaron was trying to find Huey, Aaron, mcgruder, Korean air mcgruder. Yes, the great Aaron mcgruder. He was trying to find an actor actress or actor for Huey, and I don't know if a lot of people know, but a lot of times with voices that are boys, a lot of the voices are women because they, there are voices, don't change. Whereas if you actually hired a boy, there's a good possibility that the voices going to change. So I did not know that includes shows like the Simpsons, Nancy Cartwright has played Bart Simpson since the show began. Yes, yes. And I didn't know that in Aaron shared that with me when after I got in the part of Riley, so I was additioning I would read Riley with several different performers during that audition process. And I would say a few months went by and they hadn't found Huey and towed Aaron will do, you know, let me audition for Hugh, you know, I've been listening to. To your notes and listening to the things that you want and the cadence that you're looking for just, you know, give me a shot. So I went in and auditioned for Hughie. And as you hear Hueys voices more like mine is just kind of me changing the cadence. You know, like taking breaths in places that a kid would take breath. You know when when kids speak there. They they, they breathe in pause in different places than you do is in adult. And so yeah, that's how that's how it worked out. And in the addition, they asked me, what did I think I could go back and forth between Huey and Riley. So I said, I'll give it a shot and I did in the dish in and I think that also helped solidify, I think Aaron thought that brothers kind kinda sound similar anyway. You know, if you talked to my sister Raina depending on who picks up the phone, you may not know who and we're four years apart. So I think that that worked out in my favor, it's interesting and for those who don't know, we should say Huey is ten years old. The show Riley's eighth or two brothers who move from Chicago to a suburb called woodcrafts to live with their Granddad and try to keep them out of trouble with which they meet mixed success. I hear boondocks compared to another show for. A number of reasons and Chris touched on that in his Email, Chris writes what a misgivings thoughts on the controversy surrounding Aaron mcgruder is removal from the production of the final season of the boondocks and the comparison to Dave Chapelle leaving his show feeling the work was propagating stereotypes instead of critiquing them through the show satire, Regina. He not like that was just an all of that was just a very unfortunate situation. And because of that situation, I don't know that it's ever a possibility for boondocks to come back for anyone that's like just sent that question. I'm answering that one now. It happens. So often in. Filmmaking and. The TV making that the powers that be and the creators have different opinions and. I know that it was very, very difficult for Aaron. I know that it was very difficult for others that were involved who also had to exit the the situation. And I know that it was difficult for Sony to for it to in that way. I mean that that was a show that potentially could have. Never ended because while could you just imagine boondocks now will that's one of another. One of our listeners alluded to Chris tweeted. I've always wanted to know what Regina king and the freemen boys hewing Riley Freeman thought about Trump after the election. We got Hueys view on Barack Obama in season three. What about today? So it sounds like Regina. What you're saying is that the creative and.

Aaron mcgruder Riley Freeman Huey Regina Chris Regina king Hugh Hughie Nancy Cartwright Dave Chapelle Raina Barack Obama Sony Bart Simpson Chicago Trump twenty twenty-five percent four years ten years
"three decade" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"three decade" Discussed on 1A

"'cause they don't just exist in Hollywood didn't? Yes. Well, Leyla I think you hit me with that question of at the at the time. I was actually kinda speaking on it. So yes, I, I feel for myself that remaining loyal to those at our loyal to me has just allow me to navigate these industry waters in a way that win. Times for probably when when it felt like the water was a little choppier I always had that great. Team that that's helping to sell the ship. You know, I. I have been with the same agent and manager for twenty years while twenty plus. Yeah. Yeah. Little over twenty years because my son is twenty two. So I, I, I really feel like keeping that open and honest dialogue with each other has definitely. Been the reason why I've been able to sustain and then my family, you know, I I've got, I'm very close to my mother and my sister and and and and and my. Grandmother, and she's not with this anymore, but my cousins and just people that you know if something's not right, they will let you know even if it's not right in your actions, you know family. That's never been afraid of sharing exactly what they feel about you or the situation. And I think that's been a big part of it as well. We've talked a lot about the metoo movement in Hollywood and how the industry is slowly beginning to acknowledge the diff- disparate treatment that men and women receive in the business. Do you feel like Hollywood is making it easier as making significant steps in dealing with with the issues that that female talents and executives have brought up? Is it easier these days to be a woman in Hollywood? I don't know that it's. Easier. I think that now this, we're, we're at a space where an in place in time that the conversation is is out there and it's in the light. It's not talked about just amongst other women behind closed doors or when they're just feeling safe. I feel like we're in a space now that the safety goes, it's in front of the crammer and that's important. So I think we will see a difference, enhanced vibes rights from two to seven, two American crime. I have enjoyed Regina king and everything. She has done my favorite role of hers though, will always be her detective on Southland. Beverly hill writes, you nailed the role of field as parole officer on shameless. I worked in parole and probation for many years. Your portrayal was completely authentic. Monica writes my Shiro. She is a phenomenal actor. I love everything. She does. Thank you for not staying in the box that others create for you and October's. Finest tweeted just praise every time I hear her voice. All I think about is the boondocks. I have to admit when you said, thank you. Glad to be here. I was like, she sounds a little more Huey than Riley. Reilly's a very distinct voice. Here's a quick clip of Huey and Riley going back and forth about the nature of the opposite sex in an episode of the moon docks. I don't see what the big deal is with Hull's anyway..

Hollywood Regina king Huey Riley Reilly Hull Beverly hill Monica officer twenty years
"three decade" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"three decade" Discussed on 1A

"So the it was a choice to. Not only find something to do that shot in LA, but that did not take up all my time because my agents were very clear with me that will, you know. Shows that have that are in ensemble, you'll be able to work to two or three days in a week, and then have the other days off at some weeks. You might end up being a five day week, but she won't have to be there all day and defeat. The purpose of the reason why you're going to TV anyway. Right? So that that was something that was explained to me, you know, early on and that's how twenty four. I came to be on twenty four. My manager reached out to Joel and let the him them know that I wanted to do TV, and they were like, oh, wow, and so they created that character for me. Was that a difficult decision to to go for the ensemble thing as a way to devote more more attention to your family? What was that thought process like, or was it just kind of an easy like, okay, this is done. I'm doing this. Well, it was. It was. It was difficult to make the decision. Season of not traveling out of the city anymore because you know, you're getting offers for things at really are of interest to you. But. I just was very clear that I wanted to be in home. So once that decision was made and I had not done TV in so long. And when I'm being explained what the landscape of TV is and look like, looks like. I mean, to be honest, I wasn't even really watching TV time, so I just trusting. The team that I had been with for so long in that it supported my choices as an actor for so long that had been pudding. It. Reaching out to producers and studios when scripts would come that were written for a white woman, and you know, putting my name in the hat for that role sold. They had done such a wonderful job in my opinion, with. Honoring me as an actor and not just a black actor run. I just I trusted them with regards to that. Leyla asks, can she talk about the business decision she's made to stay working and relevant for so long as a black woman actress. The business decision. I wonder maybe if by way of if ju by example, you talked about the team that's around you and the way that they view right on roles. I, I'm guessing, yeah, there were probably people you had to surround yourself with to distance yourself from certain circles you had to either run in or create for yourself to create the pipelines that would get you where you needed to go..

Leyla Joel LA three days five day
"three decade" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"three decade" Discussed on 1A

"I remember watching that show in the eighties and feeling like people were paying a little bit too much attention. To Jackie Harry's role, Sandra Clark to kind of, you know, the the, the one who kept talking about me like I feel like she kinda overshadowed the show and two, two seven was about more than that. You feel like people kind of got what you were trying to say. Then he, you know, I don't know. I think I was too young to even be thinking about it that deep, you know, I think I was. I was thirteen I think when we did the pilot so fourteen once it actually went to series. So I was just at that point just trying to represent teenagers in what I know what I felt like I was seeing, you know, I didn't. I didn't really see me on TV that often, you know there were a few shows but not many. So just like that the girl that I that I know the girl that I am the the, the, the, though young girl that actually has. Mother and father in the home? I, I do remember like thinking that when I was a teen doing the show that this is this is not something you see often seeing this family that is a middle class family that is not poor, not rich, but there are just some Americans, you know. Love in each other in trying to follow their dreams. And I did feel that I felt like that was very great to be a part of it seems like a number of the shows that people know you the most for at least that folks have been commenting to us the most for have been more on samba programs than what you might consider like a star vehicle kind of show even seven seconds which this latest EMMY nomination is a very ensemble focused show. You know, the episode spend at least as much time with characters like Kay, Jay, the assistant district attorney or Pete the police officer as they do with your character. Latrice wonder how being in those on psalm will shows has kind of worked for work for you. Well, I will say that that has choice. I very early on when my son was about nine years old. You know, I made the decision to. To not take projects that were outside of LA because I didn't want to miss out on any of those. Those life moments that happen when you when your child is is growing and at that time it kind of meant that if I was going to do that, that meant that my movie career was going to have to go on the back burner. So I had not done TV since two to seven, almost other than like, like, I think I did like a little quick thing on on the show called the northern exposure. And I think I did so something like on living single..

Jackie Harry Sandra Clark EMMY officer Kay Pete Jay seven seconds nine years
"three decade" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"three decade" Discussed on 1A

"That's not the narrative I was creating for myself, unquote. What kind of narrative did you feel you were? Do you feel is being created for you and what kind of narrative did you wanna create? Well, I've felt like a what was being creative for me was a girl in the hood. And it's interesting because after that, I've felt like mother and wife was what was falling into and being. Ask to play consistently. And I think, you know, I, I look at it two ways. Part of it. I look at it as a compliment that perhaps I've done my performance was believable enough for strong enough that people believe you to be that person in perfect to play that mother or or play this girl in the hood. I just again back to what we were, I speaking about the narrative. I want it for myself was just a passionate artist that honors the art that I was chosen to. Share so that that's that's the narrative. And I think that's the narrative that I'm I'm creating now I know that you did not want to be stereotyped as a girl in the hood, but my first recollection of your work was as Brenda onto who was a girl who kind of lived in the hood. So it's a different, but it today, but it's a different kind of character. I understand what you mean in that kind of like boys in the hood way as opposed to lie, oh, here's a girl and she lives in a neighborhood. So I and I think a number of people recognize you from that sitcom on NBC here is a clip from nineteen five of Regina king as Brenda in two, two, seven. Wait on kit. Sure. On. We both feel fine. Right. Admit. I understand. Can you can come out now. Gbi king has Brenda onto two seven talk about how that how that role came about and what you were expecting from it, if anything? Oh, gosh. First of all, just hear my voice. Are you? Okay. Was that a little too real. Well, I mean, you know, I heard a little of you Ian Riley in there. You know, I was trying to, we'll get to Houston rally in a minute. We have plenty of people who have written in like all I can hear see lien Riley who you from boondock, but we'll get to them in a second. Yeah, it's it's fun. Yeah, we'll get to that in the second. That came to be. Tucci seven was actually a stage play before it was a television show written by Christine, Houston, and. I actually played a character named sweetie in the stage play who lived around the corner from the building of two to seven. And when Marlin Christine sold it to NBC to become a show, everyone that was in the stage play, had the opportunity to audition for a role that you know was close to the the if if you fit the character description. So there was the role of Brenda Mary's daughter. So I ought dish in for that, and I think it was something insane like eight, nine auditions later I was shooting the pilot of two to seven. Did you get the sense that the country kinda got what two two seven was really about..

Brenda Mary NBC Ian Riley Houston Marlin Christine Tucci Gbi
"three decade" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"three decade" Discussed on 1A

"This is humiliating and I'm pregnant and I'm incapable of bullets to featured roles in television. She voiced both main characters in the animated series. The boondocks come on Granddad and Riley don't need no babysitter. We could take care of ourselves years now, like we're gonna try to kill each other and play detective. Lydia Adams in the crime drama Southland. I don't like the fact that if this girl was found in an alley in Brentwood, this would be front page news king also when a critics choice award for HBO's the leftovers two Emmys for ABC's American crime. And she's an EMMY nominee for playing a grieving mother in the Netflix series, seven seconds, and she joins us now from NPR west near Los Angeles. Regina king. Welcome to one a. Hello. Thanks for having me. Thank you for making time for us. Is there a common thread between all the different parts that you take, you know, when you select a role, are there certain kinds that you have. Always gravitated towards or always passed on? No, I wouldn't say that there's certain kinds that I've always gravitated to, but I would say that I always gravitate to things that are interesting to me and and I think that that is that would be the common thread that even if the final product wasn't exactly what. I expected or was something that I was in -ticipant ING. The initially it was something that I thought was interesting story. You've been in the business for for some time. Now, are there any particular changes that you've seen in the last few years that kind of stand out the most to you? Yes. I mean, I think we are starting to see more roles where you have female characters that are more layered that aren't just someone's wife or just someone's mother, but just more complicated as human beings actually are. So I feel like I'm, we're starting to see more of that. And I also feel like we're starting to see. More roles that that are played by women of color, and the character doesn't have anything to do with their color, and it's it's slow, but I am seeing you said in an interview with vulture back in twenty fifteen and after boys in the hood, you saw quote that I was being stereotyped a lot of us were, I didn't want to be part of that..

Regina king Lydia Adams EMMY Riley HBO Los Angeles Brentwood Netflix NPR ABC seven seconds
"three decade" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"three decade" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"You know three decade mattel's about this kind of this oped piece he wrote in now when we found out that the supreme court a kind of al paled most of the third attempt by the trump administration on the travel ban and asset you off it did actually in you know i'm typically more under aristide helium side of the rational animal than the political animal in a funny way but this ban from the very beginning i just had such a strong reaction because it's so wrong headed from the standpoint of security and from the standpoint of really protecting the united states so it's you know it's not even that i've got a a response from the standpoint of you know the importance of immigration in the history of this nation that's important to talk about rate it's not that it's a matter of protecting religious freedom and holding to that you know would stubbornly although i think that's really important to it's just the wrong headedness of thinking that by doing a cabinet kinda broad brush stroke in preventing people from coming to this country that you're doing something on the site of security especially when extremism is one of the most serious things facing is today and i can't think of a worst enemy to extremism then education and i can't think of a better education than one that brings people together in order to explore their differences and come to respect one another not in spite of those differences but because of them aren't will give more invap with the president of united world college victoria more and when we come back by the way if you wanna call in talk to her he's fine with putting on headphones answering questions to your comments for thoughts maybe you worry student or maybe you have been to the united were college and you f thoughts about it four two four twelve sixty four to four twelve sixty liked call in and talk to victoria moral be right back eighteen minutes after three friday afternoon here and talked well 60 k t r c no no mine i'm all in a coma marcel with that we'll be coming right back to the.

mattel travel ban united states president coma eighteen minutes three decade 60 k
"three decade" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"three decade" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

"Dodgers also pinchhit for their cleanup hitter because the analytics say that bench guy was not good enough to start is really the key to winning the world series game the biggest world series game and dodgers recent three decade long history let me ask you if the analytics said that you should pull steph curry out in the middle of the third quarter is it really good basketball is it really good for the fans the consumer the network the sport if ball analytics say benched tom brady middle of the second quarter yeah but he's analytics say it if conner make david in the stanley cup final sydney crosby you got a bench those guys third period that's what baseball analytics is now selling us how 'bout we go look at the history of major league baseball let's just distil it down the world series the greatest moments included reggie jackson curt schilling willie mays derek jeter mariana rivera kirk gibson madison baumgartner sandy colfax randy johnson now that against kanta my ada but he's not on that list i'm never going to believe at the end of a world series in the biggest games of the year you don't want steph curry sydney crosby clayton kershaw your best baseball players on the field i don't care what analytics say because their regular season analytic is not a postseason analytic and these games matter more and players are more anxious in stars or stars because they step up i don't care what the regular season says plan in san diego in june is not playing in houston in october.

Dodgers basketball conner david world series randy johnson houston tom brady stanley cup sydney baseball reggie jackson steph curry san diego three decade
"three decade" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"three decade" Discussed on KTRH

"That area yet at ten twelve it and all the way round the area the shooter was well prepared i mean he had been up there planning probably scouting the area for days and are we a citizen have to be better prepared i think one of the things that we will get is we studied every match shooting going back 1980 and there are several things that you can do to help you and your family survive at that event like that finding cover very very important there were several structures out there on the property vending booth other areas where you could find cover and that's anything sean it's going to protect you promote bullet steal metal it could be a vending machine it could be equipment it could be a generator and if you can't bind cover buying can feel met i thought that be ip 10 emptied out quickly when the shooting started people should have gone into the tent to be concealed an out of bed shooters lineup site so there's a lot of and they would be doing protecting our kid growing talk your family even before we go to one of those event i've got six kid sean in i talked might be it every time we go to our vet and say hey if anything happened daddy take care yet and this is what we're going to do and this is where we're going to meet be situationally aware o i air but even if you're still situationally aware i mean there's certain things we can't stop and live life and go into a concert is part of living life go only two of sporting event is part of living wife puerta go into a mall as part of living life and you could live like you just need to be prepared not paranoid you need to be able to size up the situation i've been in law enforcement or three decade and i do it is a matter of practice i think with a little training that everybody can do that everybody.

law enforcement three decade
"three decade" Discussed on WMEX 1510 AM

WMEX 1510 AM

02:11 min | 4 years ago

"three decade" Discussed on WMEX 1510 AM

"Doing how is it that this was just an immediate slim dunk in the court system that's right well so under under the constitution that was the case back in nineteen ninety called them clement diversion versus smith where i'm justice scalia actually wrote an opinion that said that if you have a law that applies to everybody it doesn't target people of faith or seemed to be picking on people have certainly religions then that's not protected by the first amendment now religious organisations thought that that was absurd those those of us have been working in in religious ministry thought that was a crazy result um and it goes against the supreme court's decision three decade the prior to that but as a result of that that we um the federal government past rift for the religious freedom restoration act which was an attempt to restore as its name implies religious freedom by going back to the pre employment divisions verses smith standard now what ruthless says is that when you have a situation like this that you have a law that applies equally to everybody a we which called a neutral lov general applicability that when you have that you have a balancing test you balance the burden the the the federal law causes to the religious believer with um what's called a compelling interest of the government so what this is designed to do is if there's they truly compelling interest then there's some leeway for the government they have to show that though that their interest is truly compelling and that their compelling interest of the way the enforcing it is the least restrictive means that is it it's the least burdensome to religion means that they can come up with and so what the government has been arguing and all of this litigation uh most recently in zulu which was the case that little sisters of the poor um and several other religious organization brought against government the when supreme court challenging this with government argued as that they had a compelling interest that it was an interest of the highest order in requiring religious ministries to provide this insurance coverage now the little sisters the poor and like fleeing ministry of the christian misteri alliance all of the religious organizations.

smith scalia first amendment religious freedom restoration federal law insurance coverage three decade