24 Burst results for "Three Billion Years"

Determining the Age of Earths Continental Crust

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:42 min | 7 months ago

Determining the Age of Earths Continental Crust

"And you study claims its continental crust. First emerged some three point. Seven billion years ago. The findings presented at the european geological. Union's general assembly showed that the planet's light continental crust formed within the first nine hundred million years of the earth's existence. The continental crust is the layer of grew natick sedimentary amid them offic rocks which forms the continents in the areas of shallow seabed close to their shores is the continental shelves. It's list dance. The janik crust material and therefore floats on top of it unlike previous research which is based on strontium isotopes and marine cabinets which are usually either scarce or altered in rock more than three billion years old new study by scientists from the university of bergen looked at the mineral barrett which forms from sulfates emotion water mixing with barium from hydrothermal vents and thus holds an unchanging record aversion chemistry. Going back through time. The authors calculated the ratio of strontium isotopes in six different deposits of barrack from three different continents range in age from three pointed three point. Five billion years this allowed them to determine win with continental rock populated into the ocean and was incorporated into barrett the authors determined that the weathering started about three point seven billion years ago. That's around five hundred million years earlier than previously thought. The findings provide a new understanding of early ocean chemistry. As well as the onset of plate tectonics and even hope understanding the evolution of the biosphere because once process is like plate tectonics hope established the continents processes like erosion can begin to where the crucial minerals and nutrients into the ocean.

General Assembly University Of Bergen Barrett
What Earth Looked Like 3.2 Billion Years Ago

Short Wave

08:23 min | 9 months ago

What Earth Looked Like 3.2 Billion Years Ago

"We get into it quick very general refresher on plate tectonics the outer layer of our planet. The stuff we're sitting on is made up of a system of hard plates rigid blocks of rock that move relative to each other and they glide around on top of a layer of softer rock that makes up part of the earth's mantle these rafic plates drift around colliding causing each other to crumple or slide over top of one another. It's why we have most of our mountains and earthquakes in roger wants to know in earth's long history when those plates started moving answering that question was a bit of an adventure. Okay so roger to figure out when these plates started shaking and bacon moving around you had to go on a hunt for some very specific rocks. Where did that take you. Yes so we follow the old rocks. We go to the parts of the world Where rocks from three billion years ago are actually preserved And this is hard because actually of plate tectonics so play tectonics life recycles the surface of the earth over and over again only about five percent of the earth's surface represents the first half of our history. Oh that's really interesting in other words if you're a piece of continent three and a half billion years ago there's very little chance. He survived to the present day so specifically we went to an area. north australia. Called the pilbara so this is an area where there isn't a ton of turnover due to plate tectonics so you can find some really old rocks there. That's right yes. Just by the luck of the draw these rocks have been knocked around on the surface of the earth. It probably wandered all the way from the poll to the equator many times but Over the course of these three billion years it was never pushed down into the interior of the earth in which case it would have been heated melted. What is it look like roger. Yeah it's a really beautiful place and most of the terrains. Condie's green rolling hills with these kind of spiky kind of drought resistant. Grasses is better look then. Walk through sense yeah. It's prettier than it. Feels as what you're telling me exactly the same field season. We took these samples. I I made the grave mistake. Taking light-duty hiking shoes that also had some holes in it ended up duct taping my feet every day just armor at a little bit more against the the spiky grass so okay so you're you're hiking along you find iraq they are looking for you. Collect your samples. And then you take them back to your lab and try to determine their magnetic history. What is what is that me. Yeah that's exactly right. So we'd take the rocks from the field We keep track of how the rocks are are oriented so in other words wish science up and then we take it back to our lab and we measured that direction of of the magnetic field in the so turns out all naturally form rocks contain magnetic components. So i mean i mean. I knew that i knew that. Keep going on your then. Totally knew that. Yeah yeah so so. All natural rocks contain these Minerals so these little grains of material that actually are magnetic and they're actually behave like little compass needles. And if you take a take a rock any old rock and you measure in the instruments that we have You can detect the direction that these little magnetic grains are pointing. Wow so you you can literally take rock and say okay. We know this rock was pointing in this direction. That's exactly right. Yeah and The reason this is useful in our in our case is that the magnetic field of the earth exists at different angles in different directions depending on where you are on earth and specifically changing latitude if you go from one latitude to different latitude on on. The earth dangled a maniac field changes. So if you can measure the angle to make field in these rocks you can figure out what latitude through the form that. Wow okay okay so you you you figure that out and then let me know if i have this right then you compare them to nearby rocks that you know the magnetic history of you know which way they were pointing and that helps you understand like when they started moving By looking at our data of where this rock was relative to the equator and comparing to other studies We showed that this rock actually moved from position. Closer to the equator so in in the tropics of the earth to position that's farther from the equator so in kind of the mid-latitudes and and we can quantify how quick this drift was how quick this motion was and from that. We know that this does and was moving at the same rate at the same kinds of velocities that the modern continents move. Oh that's cool and so into you know when that happened because you know the age of the rocks as well. That's right so other people Other workers that have visited rocks before us. have looked at particular parts of these particular mineral grains in these rocks. Tie actually preserve information about how old they are So for each of these measurements of how close the rock was to decatur We can also put an age on that on that position so roger and his team by collecting and analyzing these very very old rocks and australia came up with an estimate. Their research suggests earth's tectonic plates were in motion at least three point two billion years ago. Several hundred million years earlier than we thought and another cool thing about rogers research. It weighs in on a peculiar geoscience mystery. So there's this very long standing question in earth science of how the earth seems to have had water surface for released last four billion years. Rogers says at that time. The son was probably about thirty percent fainter compared to today so the earth shoud have been completely frozen. But he says there's geological evidence liquid water was on the earth surface. Then you know one of the key ingredients that life to evolve on this planet so what could have made the planet warm enough for liquid water. You know where. I'm going with this. So one of the leading hypotheses for why. The earth managed to maintain equilibrium in temperature managed to have this thermostat. Is that plate. Tectonics causes the recycling of carbon into the earth and then also puts out carbon into the atmosphere and it does in such a way that the surface temperature is kept within the within a certain range. So are you telling me that. The movement of the plates that were living on is partially responsible for the development of our atmosphere and the temperature of our planet. Yeah that's exactly right. So this is a question that geologists have been pondering for like a really long time. How how cool it to add this piece to it to defined this out. Yeah yeah it. Felt very gratified to know that we have contributed to resolving this very old question. If feels like it feels like the effort was well worth it was worth the duct tape boots is. What you're telling me that's right. Yeah it was worth the the pokes foot every day every. Step all right roger. Will i really appreciate you. This super fun. Yeah yeah this is really

Roger North Australia Condie Rogers Research Iraq Decatur Rogers Australia
The Most Distant Black Hole Ever Seen

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

03:19 min | 9 months ago

The Most Distant Black Hole Ever Seen

"Astronomers of sudden you record for the most distant quasar ever found the quasar dating back some thirty point one. Three billion years is a thousand times more luminous than the milky way galaxy and is powered by the earliest known supermassive black hole a true monster more than one point six billion times. The mass of the sun the newly discovered quasar jazeera three one three minus eighteen o six and reported in the physical journal letters and on the pre press physics website archive dot. Org doesn't just provide new insights into the evolution of massive galaxies in the universe. It also raises profound questions. About how such massive black holes could have existed just six hundred thirty million years after the big bang. And that's a point underlined by the study's lead author for enjoying from the university of arizona. Who says black holes created by the very first massive stars simply could not have grown that large in only a few hundred million years the most distant quasars a crucial for understanding how the earliest black holes formed and for understanding cosmic realization the last major phase transition of the universe from the cosmic dark ages before the first stars quasars a powerful jets of mass and energy generated by black holes feeding on surrounding material as matter falls into a black hole it forms an accretion disc around the black hole event horizon a point of no return beyond which material falls forever into the singularity a place of infinite density and zero volume scientists understanding of the laws of physics breaks down material on the creation disc is ripped apart of the subatomic level by friction and gravitational forces releasing huge amounts of energy radiating out across the electromagnetic spectrum. The amount of energy emitted by quasars is enormous with massive examples such as this one being visible right across the entire universe. J zero three one three minus eighteen. O six was first spotted in data from the pan stars new kurt hemisphere survey with follow up specter from the keg in north telescopes to measure the size of its central supermassive black hole measurements from spectral lines that originate from the guests around the quasars. Accretion disk allowed astronomers to determine the black mass and study its rapid growth influences. Its environment for such distant. Quasars important spiritual lines are red shifted to knee infrared wavelength by the physical expansion of the universe over the past thirteen point eight billion years. The and jim nine north observations and covered an extremely fast emitting from the quasar in the form of high-velocity winds travelling at twenty percent the speed of light the energy released by such an extreme. I city flow easily. Large enough to impact star formation in the entire quasars galaxy as for the galaxy itself. Well it's undergoing a spirit of star formation producing you stars two hundred times faster than the milky way the combination of this intense star formation a luminous quasar and the high velocity outflow makes jazeera three one three minus eighteen. O six antos galaxy a promising natural barberie for understanding the growth of supermassive black holes and their host galaxies in the early universe.

Quasar Jazeera Physical Journal University Of Arizona JIM Barberie
Zoltan Pozsar on What Just Happened with the Treasury Market

Odd Lots

05:46 min | 9 months ago

Zoltan Pozsar on What Just Happened with the Treasury Market

"So joe. it's well. There's been a bit of drama in the treasury market once again. Yeah i noticed. you've got to do one of your tracy. Loa signature things. Were you talk about a move. That happened that's supposed to happen. Like once. every three billion years yes I love talking about those because it really gives everyone the opportunity to show that they've read to books by saying that the world isn't normally distributed but of course out we did see some pretty big moves in the treasury market so first of all the ten year yield jumped up to one point six percent. This was in the last week of february but the really big move came in the five year. And i think that one had something like a seven or eight standard deviation. Move one of those things. That's supposed to happen in like ten million years kind of things and really i know people make fun of standard deviations in sigma events. But really we're talking about the world's most liquid market and stuff like this keeps this. Is i think the fourth big bout of treasury market chaos that we've had in just a couple years so i'm thinking back. We had one in What was it. september twenty nineteen. We had repo madness. Then we had the march joss in twenty twentieth delivered. Us t trades boeing up and then we had a mini rates blowout in october twenty twenty. And now we just had the most recent incident so something is going on and clearly. There is a persistent issue in the us treasury market. There's a lot of things going on at once these days because there seems to be ongoing structural issues questions about liquidity which is weird in a the world's most deep and liquid market and be a market in which the fed is actively supplying a lot of liquidity or very active in the market. And then of course it's interacting with the economic situation nine policy situation because we have this fed that said we're not going to raise rates until the economy hits these benchmarks. Everyone's watching to see the fed's credibility we also have a very rapidly improving economy. We have people warning about inflation for the first time so all kinds of things happening once but yes to your point the big action we've seen we've seen rates at the long end year. Thirty year yields have been rising for awhile since the middle of last year. But it's really the action at the shorter end at striking here. Yeah and of course one of the weird things about last week as you mentioned the economy but we had this big tantrum in bond year yields without a corresponding taper. I guess so. We kind of had a temper tantrum because not that much changed last week. We didn't have fed speakers talking about rates rising or anything like that but we have this huge move in the bond market so a lot of focus on micro structure at the moment a lot of focus on liquidity ease of trading and the overall or of the treasury market. And we have a perfect person to talk about all those things. We're going to be speaking with zoltin. Pose are from credit suisse. I care wait. Let's do it yeah So zoltin i should say in addition to being a strategist over credit. Suisse has also been on the thoughts podcast multiple times. So we will be getting you that tote bag Any day now zoltin. Thank you so much for coming on. Gotten thank you very much for having. I should say one more thing. Which is that every time. There's any volatility in the rates market. Someone ibiza. it says you guys gotta get zoltan on get. It happens every time. Anything takes higher on screen of like overnight funding rates. Whatever like when you have exultant back on the episode so this is a lot of requests for this one. Sorry go on okay. Well on that. No i mean why. Don't we start out with the big question. So every time. There's some sort of chaos in the rates market. Joe gets an ib asking for you to come on the show. There have been a lot of those over the past couple of years and as we were discussing that something you wouldn't necessarily expect for the world's must liquid market so what's going on here. And why do we keep getting these sort of Mini blow ups in rates. I think people get taken out of their positions all the time I mean just to just set the set the stage for the conversation. I think there's there's a number of things that are happening That has happened last week for a number of east now and really since the The democratic when and the blue sweep the treasury curve has been steepening quite remarkable. I mean relative to The slope of curves in germany and france and japan. You know the. Us treasury kirk has gotten quiet. Steve per a number of reasons you had you had The blue sweep. You have the vaccine rollouts. Which is you know happening in the us More rapidly perhaps in other parts of the world you have The market starting to price in recovery The market trying to price in the inpatient and the market is getting Excited about the idea. That book surely comes some fed action and that that is going to try to chase down version of keep it in check and to all of these things. I think have driven the steepening of the curb. But you know the the interesting thing. Is that the steepening of the curve. Has been fairly ordered. Okay and so what happened. Last week was a little bit plumbing related but again the the underlying structural driver of rising yields has been more fundamental.

Treasury Us Treasury FED Zoltin Boeing JOE Suisse Zoltan United States Kirk Germany France Japan Steve
Let's Go Back To Venus!

Short Wave

04:57 min | 11 months ago

Let's Go Back To Venus!

"Ra jeff. So in this episode. We are making the case for exploring venus. Where do you wanna start. Why not start with the history. Venus exploration august twenty six the mariners countdown begins so the very first spacecraft humans ever sent to another planet mariner to and they didn't go to mars. It went to venus the first planet. Humans ever landed a program on that was venus to vienna. That was the soviet union's venera seven That landed on venus's surface in nineteen seventy. Got it okay jeff. So why did planetary exploration start with venus like that well because venus's actually pretty good place to visit it's closer the mars and it looks in some ways a lot like earth similar size thicker atmosphere. Yeah but it's not exactly suitable for humans right venus. It's really hot. I know it's filled with poisonous gases that can kill you. That's true that's all true. Fact check through. Its atmosphere is filled with sulfuric acid and the atmosphere so thick at the surface. It's like being under kilometer of water. Also it's so hot that lead melts. So when the russian venera probes touchdown. Martha gilmore planetary scientist at wesleyan university. She told me they didn't last very long. Those were able to operate for at the best an hour and a half before suffering what we call a thermal death I mean yeah. I mean they did not have a happy end but before they died. They did snap a few grainy photos and what they sent back didn't look great either. This desolate inhospitable world. And nobody's really tried seriously to get any closer since those soviet missions. Yeah and i mean mars by contrast even though it's colder and the atmosphere is thin and it's farther away at least the rovers we send their don't melt. Yeah okay sir. All i can see why. Mars is a favorite destination over venus. Yeah yeah okay. There's an argument to be made but the orbiter said have gone to venus and studied it from above. They're starting to build up this really interesting picture at the planet for starters. Scientists think that venus has had a super interesting past. Gilmore told me that a few billion years ago venus actually had oceans. venus should have had a lot of water and new climate model suggests that water may have persisted for billions of years That's pretty cool. I didn't know venus. Had oceans yeah. Yeah and i mean what's equally. Who is the story of what happened to those oceans so just bear with me for a second Basically the theory is that venus earth had volcanoes that we're putting out tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere now the oceans were scrubbing the atmosphere of the carbon dioxide there literally sucking up the co two as it was released but they couldn't keep up so the co two levels kept rising and just like we see here on earth with global warming The temperature got hotter. The ocean started to evaporate the start to shrink. And if you don't have that ocean you lose that mechanism to pull the o two down into rock and so that co two Has no choice but to stay in the atmosphere so venus keeps getting hotter the disappear entirely the co two levels. Go through the roof. It's this runaway. Greenhouse effect that eventually completely dries the planet out and co two and noxious gases. Blanket the surface. And that's how you get from a nice warm ocean. Venus the past of what we see. Today yeah this is kind of scary to hear in a way jeff because it sounds like climate change on earth i mean. Are we on a road. That's headed towards a venus like future. No no the short answer is no and that's because although the processes are similar there are parallels between earth and venus and climate change. Could get serious. It won't get venus bad because basically the earth is farther from the sun. Gotcha okay so that's not exactly what our earth hasn't store jeff wise. It's still worth it to visit and study venus well. There's this really interesting question of life i mean. I think there's an argument to be made. The venus was more likely to have life on it. In the past the mars ever was venus had this warmer thicker atmosphere and it definitely had oceans. Gilmore thinks that you are some extraterrestrial visitor in your swinging by from some other part of the milky way mars venus and earth would have actually looked a lot alike back. Then you know. Three billion years ago you would have seen three terrestrial planets of which have oceans venus earth and mars and at least on one of those planets life had already evolved and you know has led

Ra Jeff Martha Gilmore Mariners Wesleyan University Jeff Soviet Union Vienna Gilmore Venus Jeff Wise
"three billion years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"three billion years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Principles of life there are two options before us that either we humans are unique in our universe and utterly alone or we are not and if there is other life elsewhere then that means that the great filter the hardest step lies not in our past and our future it means that the challenge that lies ahead of us is more difficult more improbable to overcome them dead molecules organizing themselves into living cells for apes learning to build ships to the moon and rather than having millions of years to try and fail before succeeding we will have one shot to get it right it's a great filter lies in our future then it appears that we are entering it right now now here in the twenty first century four point three billion years after life emerged on earth we are entering the evolutionary step that no life in the universe has ever managed to survive I'll say again had to set this great phrase about ninety years current powerful the for its current lines and our power through technology has been increasing exponentially I've been a wisdom has been increasing a little bit then suddenly not exponential and it's getting these three things gotta check with each other what's going on sustainable level of risk the technology that got us to this point is taking in new shape one that we have encountered before and it is presenting new risks to the survival of our species and indeed life on earth do you right now are living in what may be the beginning of the most.

"three billion years" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:41 min | 2 years ago

"three billion years" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"So peloton puts out this commercial of a husband getting wife peloton the people of crap in their pants over does she scare your skinny framing are up what the issue if the husband what the wife a Whopper onion rings and a shake they've been complaining and whining how dare he by bad food for her if we brought him home in a plastic container you know using plastic there's no winning anymore just so you know below the radar I am yes three days a week from five to six I'm on fox business network for an hour three hours the other days someone might fox news once or twice a week we are million half two million people watch me but out under the radar I am people recognize me every now and then so I come the Kardashian with people follow me around with photos but people recognize me because people watch fox and people love fox of course these people that hate fox to I'm going to the radar and you would not believe the critiques I get from people little old me if I say black they say white the feisty blue they say yellow the face I say up they say down it's just it's amazing I don't think this peloton commercial public Tom Spock is dropped like a couple of billion dollars in market cap off of it and they got this Greta girl out there how I got nothing against again Sir except when she goes out and be yes is the public all we're doomed in ten years out come on sweetheart take a hike you want to go out and be an environmentalist and talk to us about doing better for the environment good but don't tell us what do men ten years what what what what let's see the earth is how long is the worst been here the the age of the earth four point five four three billion years old we are that's a bold that's according to the national Enquirer but give or take get the told us in ten years now with two what what so I have my complaints to we all just get now to him it would it's it's unreal a little itty bitty commercial a little itty bitty commercial you should see the traffic on I. four part people cursing each other out I saw a guy driving eighty miles an hour into traffic and stopped dead sure before she hit up before he hit somebody and he was cursing the person out in front of me even though it was all traffic I can see why we should should should should sell so well not that I do we anyway I just had to bring this up because you know we talk about this stuff for more on TV and and stuff and it's coming what is going on just what blue heck is going on anyway just just some thought hello see came out today they're gonna do impeachment but if you notice she didn't mention any time are they gonna write up articles of impeachment whether it goes anywhere I don't know it you never know if it's going to happen there was back and forth today from the B. S. out of the White House on trade I I really feel like we're in some sort a loony bin at this point in time to be honest with you and as you know our motto stands what we we can't stand any of what we have and we we up there's not one of them we like at this point in time we pretty much done done we're looking for somebody to be your champion and we get to find them what you have to find them if life was a little bit different I would run because I'm the most logical guy in the room balance budgets treat the government like a business we have to care about every time being spent in a larger amongst all the little things so anyway I just had a start with this whining complaining because I'm a critic but I'm a logical critic ladies and gentleman what a concept logical critic well we're heading into the holidays I've got a bunch of emails from you guys on now you know our little thought process do something for somebody you need absolutely nothing from and I'm getting a lot of emails from you guys own so good on you again as you head to the holidays just do something for somebody you need absolutely nothing from if somebody works hard in your building you have offices in go get a fifty dollar little gift card or the little gift certificate to a dinner you will light up the day do you know why do a lot of my youth T. V. from our eight local fox affiliate and there are three people there that move heaven the earth for me and they don't have to they were local news affiliate they have to deal with their own things yet they are always there for me I got a little fifty dollar gift card you should have seen them light up so just what you know the holidays it's a good time right what a time as I've always taught my kids just a few Bucks will make you look like a billionaire I'd be treated as such our for market wrap over today news of the day whatever today yeah we talked the talk markets.

ten years fifty dollar five four three billion years billion dollars three hours three days
"three billion years" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"three billion years" Discussed on KTRH

"Should the fans and media so it is in this way if you find one of the ingredients that goes into the stuff that makes us and it came from the rock in a space more evidence to potential ingredients matter space actually transplanting cells on earth in Texas forty nine three billion years ago the recent story of a twenty seventeen one the first asteroid we've seen that we've interstellar origin underscores the possibility that the study of other star systems correctly Amazon is within our grasp may happen for sooner than our ability to travel to the stores systems are so what's also become evident our solar system is isolated from the rest of the galaxy and indeed is a hard collected will not only exchanges information the magnetic spectrum but also isn't that the change of you can also it took modern instances to determine the origin the stars you know goes on in the center of the explosion laying what we've discovered is that the elements of the table AT the actions of stars manufacture the elements exploded scattered across the galaxy contaminating remission gas clouds them form a next generation Star my point is it possible like Louis you are listening to ground zero we are closer disclosure an international team is brown sugar is essential to life in meteorites the new discovery adds to the growing list of biologically important.

Texas Amazon Louis forty nine three billion years
"three billion years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

10:49 min | 2 years ago

"three billion years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Liberty with a smile cider scared or they see something they want far away because they're happy however usually they don't run the same time or in the same direction yeah where the dogs are running west all the dogs are running west do we expect the dogs to ever stop running we don't know animal behavior can evolve overtime time maybe running forever is just with a dog do now doctor Davenport is there any chance that they're running dogs are somehow related to last night's blue meteor shower or the fact that horses are screen you mean inconclusive well please keep us posted up next where all the children is the onion news network This is Free Talk Live Talk Radio that you control talk about whatever is on your mind that number eight five five four five zero three seven three three it goes eight five five four hundred fifty free as in free of meat meat patties with you tonight it's Michael and mark and as we've been talking about the impossible meats and beyond meats and evidently how their trigger being some people who I kind of feel like they're losing social status although the the complaints being raised so far in this issue or less that and more about okay what you're doing meatless patties and that scrape but you're not doing it right these are still too heavily process why can't you just some spinach between the bonds and call it a day because that's not going to taste anything like meat right marketplace should decide this and concerned whole foods if they I guess they're going to have to determine for themselves if they will lose business by carrying these patties that will eclipse the amount of business that they would gain by having them and that's a decision and after make for themselves I haven't been to a whole foods in at least a year probably wasn't in one before that for another year care about whole foods does go pretty pretty regularly I do not I literally eat whatever I feel like eating and they have that at regular grocery stores you don't have to pay triple for it they can't even be bothered that just go eat somewhere which usually have some sort of highly processed food that tastes good and is quick and not much of a hassle so this is like saying a restaurant a fast food restaurant or a restaurant sorts yeah I tend to not eat a lot of fast food okay whatever it's worth it's ready quickly it is but I mean so like local Burger and you know Indian curry hearing Jane I don't mind waiting five minutes but I'm not going to stand there for ten minutes cooking something it's just not worth my time now okay days but I'm lazy and I don't WanNa be bothered so I'm not going to if you don't feel like cooking feel like cooking I'm not here to tell people that they got to you're probably gonNA eat a healthier diet if you do but you know you're young and that's that and I don't don't okay I don't do it when I'm now I didn't I didn't you know I don't even eat I won't Cook Pretty Much my wife's not in town she'll make ups and things like it heat up on the stove so I really have no opportunity to talk we're not gonna live to fifty so it doesn't matter that's the plan to be sure they knew plant based Burgers have gotten a lot of positive coverage to and they certainly have the impossible burger it was everywhere when Burger King released it and I'm sure they made a killing off of it and some pregnant reviews more focused on describing their taste pretty meaty although some reviewers insist they can still tell the difference well I mean yeah you got people out there who says there's no difference between coke and Pepsi and there's an enormous difference coke is awful Pepsi is good what coke is good Pepsi awful where you from again I I am from Earth where Coca Cola is awful I thought you were from the south and like what I heard sound treasonous I didn't say anything negative about sweet tea mark coke is from Atlanta and I'm sorry I have no Use York for that ultras sweet crap coal Pepsi Yeah I have to go with them sliding words mark with who likes that stuff still Passi so much DR has garbage agree to disagree you got good reach but you don't WanNa fight me but this is a nascent industry evidently at any pushback can have an impact I'm not particularly concerned about pushback from the vegans on this particular subject what I'm not worried about pushback from the begins on anything I mean especially not this right but there's certainly some truth to the critiques on an impossible burgers aren't exactly health food something well look no one's going to burger king expecting health food come on that's not the point Yeah that's not why you go to Burger King The red light district to find a wife go to Burger King for health food I don't think of the beyond Burger addressing the issue of of Health I've considered as addressing the issue of humans consuming too much meat wasn't this supposed to climate change anything that the cows do have a lot of flatulence that's what it is that's being parts but they're more they're not more unhealthy than the meat products they're displacing the impossible Whoa oh dear Lord here's a set for you the impossible walker right help save the planet but it still high-calorie Greasy and probably not a good idea to eat every day so that's the impossible whopper is going to save the planet so who who is out there eating whoppers every day I don't know about whoppers but I do know people who like eat burger king for breakfast every day and their their fat and diabetic and they look like they're about to kill over so for what it's worth there are people especially in a south who do that sort of thing tragically even though they shouldn't because Burger King it's not good you never got the they they get cheap chrysanthemums so and their they taste good so they do and and neither one just the other day good I haven't had one in years but was taking my mom to the airport I was hungry and an hour from the house and so there was definitely a time when I was in college. that I ate burger king almost every single day for about a year but I'm young and in good shape and I do stay active so I wasn't one of those people who just got their four sausage biscuit for Burger King and then went home and sat in front of Television all day so a fast food in general not going to be good but the allegation that the impossible per might help save the planet is among the most absurd things I heard I think the general idea behind that is that it will reduce the calendar House cow flatulence and the amount of astronauts being used for cows also I mean life science oxide is oxidized what good for plants but it's poss- I mean according to climate scientists it's not so hot for you know the greenhouse effect now the research their history and learn about cyanobacteria and how plant life evolved in the first place from said bacteria and they carbon rich atmosphere that contained little or no oxygen three and a half bill Leeann years ago give rise to the plants that we have today because carbon was so abundant they were able to thrive and reproduce and eventually three billion years later you have a bunch of plan you have a bunch of animals working together to keep the atmosphere relatively imbalanced the issue here is really going to be the deforestation for what the for most yeah we yeah we destroyed but you need to force to have you know land to grow things onto sure it admittedly you can can grow more calories in say corn then you can in cows in a given area so well I don't think calorie intake is America's problem no no it's it's something problem though but on the subject of global warming and the atmospheric conditions and all that is a problem that will fix itself just like cyanobacteria consumed too much of the carbon for them to sustain their popular fine yes the question is how will humans be now one of the suggestions is that's one of my criticism it'll be a mass extinction which could be not so hot necessarily bad either you know it's just a change in how things are and that's my issue with the climate change people is that you know they're they're so obsessed with how things are right now that they're willing to just undergo these massive changes in order to maintain the status quo does maintain human dominance nature are you kidding me eight five five four five zero three seven three three give us a call what do you think about climate change and how flatulent send in babies and how and Greta whatever cranfield done filled something like that eight five five four five zero three seven three three I can definitely say that I have found the best crypto currency wallet certainly the best named one I'm mark edge and I love the edge wallet I've been using it for the last few months you can buy sell trade and hold your.

doctor Davenport three billion years five minutes ten minutes
"three billion years" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

10:30 min | 2 years ago

"three billion years" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Welcome back everybody Nick the chilly out here on seven twenty WGN on how how's it going we're live in the diligence skyline studio here until five A. M. C. percentage as the opening bell five Steve Cochran at six with your morning drive in yeah so run piles with us author journalist space expert editor in chief of ad astra magazine joins us once a month to talk space issues in space stories and stuff like that rod welcome back thanks Sir Hey I want to mention guy I think congratulations are in order because you can be working on a documentary with nat geo about the right stuff correct. yes sorry I worked on their Apollo eleven the film last year which was great fun really nice company such as the Los Angeles north valley and and that turned out really well and so they got another contract to do the stock of the right stuff leaders you probably know that your graphic of doing a live action dramatic reinterpretation the right stuff with Leonardo DiCaprio so I guess this is a documentary companion piece to that but the thing that I thought would be so cool about talking to you about it is we're looking for materials met era because the small kind of told in the dead of the moment so extolled as if you're in that time right none of this voice over god stuff and all that right so we're we're reaching out anybody has got materials dating back to that time so if they are uncle your grandfather was you know working on the launch pad or the Australian has the cafeteria but got a picture with Gus Grissom. one of the merger asked not to it we're going from before mercury up through jeopardize that period before Apollo one reaching out to people so that if they got something they want to get in contact my email is cool space news at G. mail dot com. news just broke three words no appeared to gaps edgy mail dot com in the office that can be used will be compensated board but the but the company so you're looking for like select one like audio recordings and pictures home movies anything any anything like that so so still you know print slides audio recordings on a cassette a reel to reel or even that some people had the home record breakers back in that day home movies eight millimeters sixteen so great it does matter if anything the record you piece that history the translated to the space race zero is is a potential interest but I think it's gonna be a lot of fun because we should it's such an exciting time to be dealing with and to have this. stream of telling it in the moment makes it really challenging because you can't you know I don't wanna documentaries we were always able to kind of back off of the fault of the voice over no I don't know what to do here all right to voice over and you're right it real time you read it yeah you don't get it in his later nah you can't do that you're you're from playing from that time to explain so it'll be it'll be really neat how it's great sounds great and again it's us cool space news dot com no cool space news dot. at at G. email dot com cool space new at G. mail dot com if you have any that kind of stuff related to that period during the space program cool space news at G. mail dot com will congratulate some sounds like yeah right well and and you know just working on TV. that makes enough scratch that I can read a couple more books for interest wait just one all right but we we got to us come more tax we get a caller here's Donald go ahead I'll. hi yeah this is sort of a follow up I know what you're talking about the space junk. one novel recently my recent born novel that basically had somebody using the Kessler effect with the added will be I think date where you detonate all your head into a certain kind of certain Caitlyn it's are a bit in the lower level of a certain satellite you could keep the plot it's going to get into this one and this one is kind of chain reaction will create a barrier that the from the lower orbit you know that it did perform proud in reaching a higher order total disrupting indications and also spaceflight because of the I'd love to be a pain in the lower. yes Sir did you see gravity chance the movie did you see did you see did you see gravity. I'm sorry I didn't know it okay so that was a big part of that so even even without a deliberate detonated war get up there there is a body of theory this kept work back the people think even if if just another space craft goes out of control breaking up like that besides the shuttle a space station that these impacts could start happening in this did you get this out of control kind of random kinetic nightmares storm going up there and it just bread and spread the spread you get out of control chain reaction it's all theoretical course and how long it would last anybody's guess but there's so much stuff out there that are currently at the it's a very real. in terms of physics of a real possibility and yes I can create this kind of very very difficult transit for a while that's why people are tried to slow down. the proliferation this stuff which is why people got very upset last year within India large that satellite interceptor that he's that weapon test okay so don't worry you know to out do it ought to come down there in a few hours to a few days the lot of it's still up there so things are hard to predict and control and you know the US and Russia had more practice at the main body else but but even we don't get it right all the time so the lesson that we can have a better. okay all right Donald thanks for your call yeah here's a a text here from our good friend doc who says I've heard. of a rock formation on the surface of Mars that strongly resemble Stonehenge dubbed it Mars hands there are theories of how this could have occurred naturally but the arrangement is extremely similar to Stonehenge what do you know about this. not much I tracked for years and I was right now as to mark books like track those those sightings they came up because I knew we was going to be part of the conversation and there's good pictures or they published a big foot Erro head possibles artillery piece. based on Mars. and you know it's I mean. of course that conversation usually leads to okay masses covering something up right right we thought we could discuss that well it and I remember talking to the lead scientist of the cure us the mission of our call you were out for about a year working on that book I did call curiosity I said you know good just got another big foot setting on Mars the swell the Serbia like spectrum the kind of group it because you know those guys with PhD work at Caltech JPL yeah you know what I love that stuff but as to why he said because if we actually have a dinosaur femur moment up there my budget explodes. nine times in a week and a hundred times a year so if I find a trilobite or an old Chevy carcass or something up there my budget just go through the roof and then I could do a credible science exploration probably send people up there why wouldn't I want that. a good point I think some of the spooky stuff was re CD's parts the landscape where which which may be but he's talking about or they have kind of a sauce thank you dad with you know a more calcified vertical rock senator something and over the millennia winter waters worn away the softer stuff you get these really weird formations what it's almost like a molding process right except rivers and you get them what they call dragon's teeth the network was tearing up the wheeled rover for a while but you get things that look like wrenches and hammers socks and all kinds of stuff yeah left over from this arose to process and it's just million to million the hundreds of millions of years with the water but yeah Marcin just wanna check out that exists on once you know that I was you know when I I I I hadn't heard about that until doc sent in a text that sounds kind of cool I would love to see that if there is if there's something on that and look and then of course you know because it like looks like Stonehenge. again right of course you know we're gonna be talking about conspiracy theories a little bit later on that yeah that's that's right for a conspiracy theory well this looks like a a hello occur a hallmark of a small hill with one two three four five roughly circular rocks on it and I'm only seeing it from overhead yeah you know that that's a lot better because the those things with them we talk to the side but the best pictures that they look again like these rocks that are submitted into the soil after it's been eroded away yeah yeah shadows that really what I don't see it Gail that's the kind of instinct to check it it's it's cool it's cool because considering you know like the the the theories behind Stonehenge being put together by aliens and stuff it's just gonna even further that that theory right there's like they stopped at Mars they've stopped at earth they're gonna stop in other places and leave their stones behind. well it did you leave your stone by. yeah and there was something it was just the other day there was a a piece a new paper released saying that demi's they think Venus may have had a temperate atmosphere that could support open bodies of water stuff a couple of your couple billion years ago they had made two to three billion years ago and that it just got this right away the warning for us your honor is run away greenhouse effect that just destroyed it yeah but more and more there seems to be this body there you say you know. I think there's a chance that advanced civilizations may have popped up throughout the galaxy and beyond a long time ago right and just to make it work on a lake the party because the age of our star and all that right that that's the case that start you worry a little bit does not. tec technical civilization of less than the white themselves out well that would be unfortunate yeah I run hang out okay okay I rods with us run piles with a space expert three one two nine eight one seven two hundred is the phone number we got more to talk about a lot more to talk about with rod and we'll do it after the news which is up after this. on a becoming legal in many states including Illinois pot businesses are going to need someone to hold their banks are allowed to do it but the rules may be about to change five minutes in.

WGN Nick A. M Illinois three billion years billion years five minutes
"three billion years" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"three billion years" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Spend so much time trying to find a solution to the truth. was it really does earlier in the day. I appeal to all these Berg students to get involved. you all have the ability to change and writes. you're going to do. as for my CBS channel four thanks for that idea yeah yeah Friday at the rally said no with it the what anybody just said. he said we are is is not like at some point in our lives we will see the impacts of climate change fry said other alley we are going to be seeing the impacts today tomorrow the week after and it's going to continue to get worse. fifty eight ago Minneapolis man child yeah take of Jacob thrives story that I was looking at this morning when I was kinda gathering crap and I'm trying to get on my screen here but I'll just summarize it it was you know they've discovered evidence that on Venus the planet Venus you know a long time ago they had they had water they believe that that plan that might have supported life in some fashion you know there's indications that that you know this was this was a a planet that that was not too dissimilar from ours you know hundreds of thousands of millions of years ago. what. their climate changed. right because they got further away from the sun yeah and then it became uninhabitable and all of the things that would normally support life with the way it wasn't it wasn't there but the plastic straws it was an S. U. V.'s but that that killed life knowing this that because the climate change it was their relative distance to the sun which is exactly what causes our climate to change so is our relative distance to the sun and there's nothing you can do about it you didn't see the follow up story. they sent a probe to that will fight was it again. but it was an entry to see to me that's ready to start why this is as of I forgot about the fight against what they said of the this in they found evidence of right the plastic straw pull all of Venus was covered with the with the with the plastic bags why do you think it was so bright in the sky. with white plastic bags Venus may have been a temperate planet hosting liquid water for two to three billion years dealing with dramatic transformation starting over seven hundred million years ago resurfaced around eighty percent of the planet this was the climate change that. there was nothing. I do but there's. through all the straws last. from the office right there. S. is climate change a thing it was just a climate of Venus change this is kind of off the subject of my new crime thriller. strong. he was like they stop eating Venetian Calhoun. nobody even there. just want to burn down chick fillet on. voice of the Vikings Paul Allen joins us next..

Jacob Berg CBS fry Vikings Minneapolis Paul Allen U. V. seven hundred million years three billion years eighty percent
"three billion years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"three billion years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Years before in twenty fifteen our Adams picks up that story from the Ted stage. we give you a sense of the time scale at work here. one point three billion years ago or is it just managed to involve multicellular life. since then earth is made and of all. rolls fish plants dinosaurs people and even the internet. about twenty five years ago. lily audacious set of people decided that it would be really neat to build a giant laser detector with which to search for the gravitational waves from things like colliding black holes. the most people thought they were not. but enough people realized that they were brilliant knots that the US National Science Foundation decided to fund their crazy idea so. after decades of development. structure and imagination and breathtaking amount of hard work they build their detector called ligo the laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory. in early September of twenty fifteen. Michael turned on for a final test run while they sorted out a few lingering details. and on September fourteenth. of two thousand fifteen. just days after the detector.

US National Science Foundation Adams Michael three billion years twenty five years
"three billion years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"three billion years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Discovered the very first gravitational wave two years before in twenty fifteen L. Adams picks up that story from the Ted stage. we give you a sense of the time scale at work here. one point three billion years ago or is it just managed to involve multicellular life. since then earth is made and of all. rolls fish plants dinosaurs people and even the internet. about twenty five years ago. lily audacious set of people decided that it would be really neat to build a giant laser detector with which to search for the gravitational waves from things like colliding black holes. now most people thought they were not. but enough people realized that they were brilliant notes that the US National Science Foundation decided to fund other crazy idea so. after decades of development. section and imagination and breathtaking amount of hard work they build their detector called ligo the laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory. in early September of twenty fifteen. Michael turned on for a final test run while they sorted out a few lingering details. and on September fourteenth. of two thousand fifteen. just days.

US National Science Foundation L. Adams Michael three billion years twenty five years twenty fifteen L two years
"three billion years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:14 min | 2 years ago

"three billion years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Human observers had previously thought about animals sounds as very pragmatically oriented kinds of communication having to with mating for example and you didn't want to draw the line quite that sharply you said that in human cultures with sound also has aesthetic value and I mean it sounds to me like you also see the different levels of meaning in sound among these elephants to we do not understand nearly enough about any animal language to be able to go into these these realms at all but when we look at I'm going to move now to the way when we look at the enormous energy that goes into continuously creating new very complex songs and learning them so that all the individuals in his singing population are moving from one to the next to the next we have to ask ourselves what's driving this the only sensible answer the biologist can come up with as well the females like originality we talk about whales of people I usually Justin cells cross the line when they talk about something they call sexual selection right which is the preference by the animals that will choose a mate for a mate the teaser original or has a long beautiful plus more Hey you know or a different kind of song so I think we don't want to cut off the possibility that other animals are in many ways is complex and interesting as a as humans and you you were listening to offense but you've also referred to elephants as great listeners yeah they do something marvelous that I I wish we would do more the time I do find it quicker meetings actually in in Buddhist meetings as well the whole herd and it may be fifty animals will certainly be still completely tell and it's not just the stillness of voice it's a stillness of body so you'll be watching a moving heard they'll be all over the place that we face in all directions doing different things suddenly everything freezes the movie was turned into a still photograph and the freeze may last a whole minute which is a long time listening when they freeze they tighten and lift and spread there here's this tells us this among other things tells us that they're concerned with what's going on over there for a reason well speaking of silence that story about how he became quicker in and held that intersects with this work you too the question is I guess I've always felt that a simpler life would be a good thing for me quicker Sir wonderful practitioners of simplicity they attempt to get their worldly affairs down to a dole roars so that they they can help a little bit in our meeting some of the world's needs a like that and I find that meditation which sometimes I've done as a Quaker on Thompson and other forms I don't know who I should maybe use the word meditation just being silent is a most wonderful way to open up to what is really there I see my responsibility if I have one as being to listen my church's outdoors mostly what's sacred to me is is this planet we live on it's been here for more than four billion years life has been on it only four three billion years as we know it now for a very short time the only planet where life has been found and to me I think is ultimately you know what I considered sacred and I must say that if I could ask these animals that I like so much if there is anything equivalent to what we speak of is being phased out I would love to do that we just don't know we just on a.

four three billion years four billion years
"three billion years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"three billion years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Welcome back. An amazing conversation. I wanna thank Jay Bruce are Fenton will be joining us right after the break. But before we get there. One of the subjects that I speak about most often is Hubble the Hubble space telescope, and how large the universe is and the amount of galaxies out there and the amount of planet inside of each one of those galaxies, and then our own galaxy our Milky Way, and what we are talking about these days when it comes to not on exit planet, but just one lifetime ago. One lifetime nineteen Twenty-three. We thought it was just us. And we were wondering if they were other planets outside of our solar system today. The number is north of one hundred billion planets in our Milky Way. How crazy is that go over to coast to coast AM right now and check this out using. Nearly seventy five hundred individual exposures taken over sixteen years from the Hubble space telescope. Astronomers have pieced together a stunning single image of our evolving universe. This history. Book mosaic displays an unbelievable two hundred and sixty five thousand galaxies stretching back in time. Thirteen point three billion years that's five hundred million years after the big bang. It's one of the most extraordinary images you will ever see. And that's what I'm talking about. This is coast to coast AM. I am your host Jimmy church standing in on this. Now Sunday morning right here in Los Angeles, California. And I'll be right back with our next guest. Bruce are feting. This is coast to coast AM..

Jay Bruce Los Angeles Jimmy church California five hundred million years three billion years sixteen years
"three billion years" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"three billion years" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"I wanna thank MJ NIS. Bruce are Fenton will be joining us right after the break. But before we get there. One of the subjects that I speak about most often is Hubble the Hubble space telescope, and how large the universe is and the amount of galaxies out there and the amount of planet inside of each one of those galaxies, and then our own galaxy and our own Milky Way. And what we are talking about these days when it comes to not only extra planet, but just one lifetime ago. One lifetime nineteen Twenty-three. We thought it was just us. And we were wondering if they were other planets outside of our solar system today. The number is north of one hundred billion planets in our Milky Way. How crazy is that go over to coast to coast AM right now and check this out using. Nearly seventy five hundred individual exposures taken over sixteen years from the Hubble space telescope. Astronomers have pieced together a stunning single image of our evolving universe. This history. Book mosaic displays an unbelievable two hundred and sixty five thousand galaxies stretching back in time. Thirteen point three billion years that's five hundred million years after the big bang. It's one of the most extraordinary images you will ever see. And that's what I'm talking about. This is coast to coast AM. I am your host Jimmy church standing in on this. Now Sunday morning right here in Los Angeles, California. And I'll be right back with our next guest. Bruce are Fenton. This is coast to coast AM..

Bruce Fenton Los Angeles Jimmy church five hundred million years three billion years sixteen years California
"three billion years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"three billion years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Coast AM. Now, here's your guest host Jimmy church. Welcome back. Conversation. I thank MJ benign Bruce are Fenton. We'll be joining us right after the break. But before we get there. One of the subjects that I speak about most often is Hubble the Hubble space telescope, and how large the universe is and the amount of galaxies out there and the amount of planet inside of each one of those galaxies, and then our own galaxy and our own Milky Way. And what we are talking about these days when it comes to extra planets, but just one lifetime ago. One lifetime nineteen Twenty-three. We thought it was just a and we were wondering if they were other planets outside of our solar system today. The number is north of one hundred billion planets in our Milky Way. How crazy is that go over to coast to coast AM right now and check this out using nearly seventy five hundred individual exposures taken over sixteen years from the Hubble space telescope. Astronomers have pieced together a stunning single image of our evolving universe. This history. Book mosaic. Nick displays an unbelievable two hundred and sixty five thousand galaxies stretching back in time. Thirteen point three billion years that's five hundred million years after the big bang. It's one of the most extraordinary images you will ever see. And that's what I'm talking about this coast to coast AM. I am your host Jimmy shirt standing in on this. Now Sunday morning right here in Los Angeles, California. And I'll be right back with our next guest. Bruce are Fenton coast to coast AM. Radio.

Jimmy church Bruce Fenton MJ Los Angeles Nick California five hundred million years three billion years sixteen years
"three billion years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"three billion years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Coast to coast AM. Now, here's your guest host Jimmy church. Welcome back. An amazing conversation. I want to think MJ bananas. Bruce are Fenton will be joining us right after the break. But before we get there. One of the subjects that I speak about most often is Hubble the Hubble space telescope, and how large the universe is and the amount of galaxies out there and the amount of planet inside of each one of those galaxies, and then our own galaxy and our own Milky Way. And what we are talking about these days when it comes to not only Exo planets, but just one lifetime ago. One lifetime nineteen Twenty-three. We thought it was just us. And we were wondering if there were other planets outside of our solar system today. The number is north of one hundred billion planets in our Milky Way. How crazy is that go over to coast to coast AM right now and check this out using. Nearly seventy five hundred individual exposures taken over sixteen years from the Hubble space telescope. Astronomers have pieced together a stunning single image of our evolving universe. This history. Book mosaic displays an unbelievable two hundred and sixty five thousand galaxies stretching back in time. Thirteen point three billion years that's five hundred million years after the big bang. It's one of the most extraordinary images you will ever see. And that's what I'm talking about. This is coast to coast AM. I am your host Jimmy church standing in on this. Now Sunday morning right here in Los Angeles, California. And I'll be right back with our next guest. Bruce are Fenton. This is coast to coast AM..

Jimmy church Bruce Fenton Los Angeles California five hundred million years three billion years sixteen years
"three billion years" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"three billion years" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Jimmy church. Welcome back. Mazing conversation. I'm going take 'em. Jay, Bruce are Fenton will be joining us right after the break. But before we get there. One of the subjects that I speak about most often is Hubble the Hubble space telescope, and how large the universe is and the amount of galaxies out there and the amount of planet inside of each one of those galaxies, and then our own galaxy and our own Milky Way. And what we are talking about these days when it comes to not only extra planets, but just one lifetime ago. One lifetime nineteen Twenty-three. We thought it was just us. And we were wondering if they were other planets outside of our solar system today. The number is north of one hundred billion planets in our Milky Way. How crazy is that go over to coast to coast AM right now and check this out using. Nearly seventy five hundred individual exposures taken over sixteen years from the Hubble space telescope. Astronomers have piece together a stunning single image of our evolving universe. This history. Book mosaic displays an unbelievable two hundred and sixty five thousand galaxies stretching back in time. Thirteen point three billion years that's five hundred million years after the big bang. It's one of the most extraordinary images you will ever see. And that's what I'm talking about. This is coast to coast AM. I am your host Jimmy church standing in on this. Now Sunday morning right here in Los Angeles, California. And I'll be right back with our next guest. Bruce are Fenton. This is coast to coast.

Jimmy church Fenton Bruce Los Angeles Jay California five hundred million years three billion years sixteen years
"three billion years" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

04:38 min | 3 years ago

"three billion years" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Take a reverse award. Oh, courage. Hold on. I don't have to repeal the. All right. Very very quickly new fiction. Got one two people chameleons fiction. Diamonds fiction and Jupiter fiction. Okay. Not much of this. The new in dropped out. One in three one and three. So so despite being called a gas giant Uber is mostly liquid which. That one is science is absolutely signs by any measure. It is mostly let me give some numbers. I got the numbers down here. Schumpeter actually has we learned a lot from join up. But there's still a lot more to learn in fact, mental stuff like that. Yep. Because you could moderate voice. So the current model of Jupiter is that it really has a thin atmosphere. Just one hundred twenty four kilometers. And then the well thousand climate of liquid will likely hydrogen and forty five thousand clubbers of liquid metallic hydrogen. So it's mostly liquid hydrogen, and then belief that you have liquid helium. And then you have some kind of core. We're not really sure. Then the metallic, right? And then you have the rocky Corp, we don't how don't know really. How big is going to be some core down there. But we don't have. So Steve is the is the Red Eye of Jupiter. That's that's guest service. That's a storm on the atmosphere. Yeah. It's still a big atmosphere. One hundred twenty four but tens of thousands of liquid helium outer skin of Jupiter real. Yes. Just the skin. So a couple of cool facts that came across because of that because you have liquid hydrogen is conductive, right? Can conduct trysofi. So and it's fluid. So you have a fluid Duggal too. That's why. That's how big biggest always is the biggest thing in the solar system. Jupiter's magnetic four hundred fifty million mile, and it generates. Yeah. It's the biggest thing in the solar system, it generates ten million ten million of electric city. So we had a station near Jupiter Jupiter individual. That's really cool. All right. Most diamonds are not made from compressed coal. Jay, you had a problem with that one? I have a big problem with that. Without that one is science. Hit upon it. Most of the diamonds that are mined come from the mantle come from stable diamond region in the mental brought up by volcanoes and is much deeper than coal, very it. Cole is whatever what three kilometers. So why few clubbers and diamonds are made on one hundred fifty. So Why's everybody wrong? It's a myth that is just really percents permeates culture hurts. So what's it made out of carbon but not coke from volcanoes novocaine bring it up. So it's just there's deep carbon in the mantle. What form the how they get there? When he gets compressed all car car. We're made of carbon because it's coming on that. But I'm just trying to visualize. What does it look like where does it look like coal, maybe? The most diets are older than the life that formed coal, right? So it's most of it's three billion years old. Also, how many allergens of carbon are there? And there's a lot it. Looks like diamonds. Jay, I'm still not sold on this. Totally correct. So it's deeper older than coal. So it can't be from call three other sources of diamonds, by the way on earth. That's right. So subduction zones produce a little bit of diamonds very small, though, asteroid impacts produce Nanno diamonds and cubic zirconiums and sometime it's come from space formed somewhere else, and they just know diamonds from heaven, and we make our. Yeah. I remember some planet rain, including artificial. Okay. Number two chameleons do not use their color changing ability for camouflage fate. You think you think that's a fiction that one is science. And all. Don't they said about they're not so color is camouflaged when they change their skin color. It's mood. Ring. Jay's correct..

Jay Cole Schumpeter rocky Corp Steve one hundred twenty four kilome three billion years three kilometers
Was Earth's Oldest Rock Found on the Moon?

BrainStuff

06:53 min | 3 years ago

Was Earth's Oldest Rock Found on the Moon?

"Today's episode is brought to you by listerine ready tabs small discrete tabs, the transform from a solid to a liquid just to switch and swallow no sink required to get that just brushed clean feeling, and they pack a huge punch up to four hours of fresh breath, and the confidence that goes with it on the go wherever life takes you to a surprise meeting a date you want to freshen up for or just from one event to another try listen ready tabs today. Find them near the mouthwash. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Bogle bomb here on February six nineteen seventy-one. Be late astronaut Alan Shepard the commander of NASA's. Apollo fourteen mission was taking a walk on the moon. He and fellow space traveler, Edgar Mitchell were out gathering rocks around a depression called cone crater to quote shepherd himself. Many of these were hand sized grab samples, but the pair took home some larger mementos to one basketball sized rock collected by Shepard earned itself. A nickname big Bertha officially known as lunar sample one four three two one big Bertha weighs about nineteen pounds. That's nine kilograms making it the largest rock that Apollo fourteen brought back to earth and the third largest collected by any of the Apollo missions. Although shepherd found big Bertha on the moon that may not be where it story began. The rock is a Brescia a hodgepodge of geologic fragments called clasps which are held together by cement like mix. A newly published hype. Office says that part of big Bertha formed billions of years ago right here on planet earth. In fact, despite the lunar connection this could represent the oldest earth rock ever discovered. Big Bertha's origins were the focus of a study that was published in January in the journal earth and planetary science letters the paper's authors include an international team of geo. Scientists who looked the moon rocks procured by Apollo fourteen including lunar sample, one four three two one for the most part the classes on this famous Brescia are dark gray. But there's also a lightly colored one that catches the eye. It's made a fell site a kind of all Cannock rock that contains the minerals feld Spar end quartz. The light grade class which is two centimeters that's point seven inches across is loaded with tiny zircon crystals as well many cons contain vital information about what the environment was like when and where they formed close inspection of zircon and big Bertha's light. Patch showed that the crystals were produced by cool oxygen, rich magma. Yet molten rock of the sort doesn't exist anywhere near the moon's surface defined some you'd need to travel more than one hundred miles. That's one hundred sixty two kilometers below the surface of the moon where Shepard and Mitchell found big Bertha. So how did these cons and the class? They belong to end up on the surface of violent impact was probably involved when a meteorite or asteroids smacks into a planet or moon, it can transport material that's buried deep under the crest up to the surface. And as noted earlier big Bertha was found near an impact crater. So case closed, right? Well, maybe not cone crater and expanse measuring about two hundred and fifty feet that seventy six meters. Deep and a thousand feet or three hundred and four meters wide was created roughly twenty six million years ago. Scientists thinks that the violent episode that left this depression behind would have failed to dredge up geologic material lying more than forty five miles or seventy two kilometers underneath the moon. A big Bertha's fell site classed. Could have originated deepen a lunar magma pocket. But it doesn't seem likely. The study authors think different scenario is way, more plausible around twelve miles or nineteen kilometers blow planet earth surface. There's a supply of cool oxidized magma. This is exactly the kind of raw material that probably made his cons on big Bertha's light patch. And by the way, they're con crystals. Have a helpful habit of preserving uranium isotopes? Those can be used for radio metric dating a process that tells us the fell site classed is four point zero to four point one billion years old, but both of these clues together and a potential timeline of events emerges. According to the policies championed in the study, some of that cool oxidized magma lying deep under earth's continental crust hardened into this class between four point zero and four point one billion years ago. We know that our planet was besieged by meteorites in those days a process that by the way created a lot of old Granitz. Repeat impacts would have driven the class ever closer to the surface until finally a projectile hit the earth with enough force to launch the fell site clear out into space. It's estimated that four billion years ago. Our moon was around three times closer to earth than it is right now, the far flung class might have bridged the gap and settled on the moon, but around that time meteorites from space also harassed the moon and approximately three point nine billion years ago. One of these impacts could partially melted. The class and driven it under the lunar surface where it merged with other classes and became part of Brescia then twenty six million years ago, the asteroid strike that gave birth to the cone crater could set big Bertha free propelling it to the spot where Alan shepherd came and grabbed it up one historic day in nineteen seventy-one if the fell site class really did have terrestrial origin. Then ironically enough, it might be the oldest known rock from planet earth. There's a four point zero three billion year. Old rock from Canada's Northwest. Territories that's comparable in age and over in Quebec, the greenstone belt is at least three point nine billion years old out in the Jack hills of Western Australia. Scientists have located circum- that formed roughly four point three seven billion years ago, but these crystals seemingly detached from their original rocks at some point big Bertha's fell site, classed and zircon seemed to have formed simultaneously. This episode was written by Mark van Cini and produced by Tyler clang for I heart media, and how stuff works for more on this and lots of other far flung topics. Visit our home planet. Testif- works dot com. This is April and Cassidy, we're the host of the podcast dressed the history of fashion and this season, we traveled throughout history and around the world to bring you more of the fascinating stories from behind the clothes. We wear we traveled a central Asia tiller all about the resist dyeing technique known as e Kat and to Paris to learn all about the legacy of Christian Dior. We also spore the history of a whole host of topics from plus size fashion or the clothing choices of colts listening to subscribe on apple podcasts or the iheartradio app or wherever else you get your podcast.

Bertha Cone Crater Alan Shepard Brescia Alan Shepherd Edgar Mitchell Lauren Bogle Nasa Apollo Missions Commander Apollo Asia Testif Christian Dior Cassidy Canada Apple Mark Van Cini Paris Granitz
"three billion years" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:37 min | 3 years ago

"three billion years" Discussed on KTRH

"Like a circle around. Mas. And they close on the circle that you actually drew this a quieter on Google MAs. And and I can I can turn the globe. And basically just goes through for a fax this article. And one of them is Danica. And you probably not the second one. Is that nicotine formation? I think you've. Yeah. We've talked about that before. Yes. And this guy's back to the time. Something Benz Landon was alive, and he came up with this idea of this poll being at that position at the time. But somewhat after that after he died, this king's valley thing became more popular. And that's also on this quieter. And then there's this fourth that formation that I just found that I ride in this peer reviewed piper bat and it's cold offense. And it's it's it's possibly a representation of plants, and it's also exactly on the equator. So the theory is basically. If elected happen, then the post out move after that impact, and it sort of warm MAs up, and eventually the pulse settled in his one position. And then the artifacts all formed in but this so would have been probably a few years ago. Now were they formed by extraterrestrials who visited Mars or were they made by inhabitants of Mars? Well, it's very difficult to say, you know, again, this is just a speculation because it's so long ago. Nice. Scientist would would think it's very unlikely that that life could evolve on Mazda quickly enough for that to happen especially Indian, Bob. So it's unlikely from that point of view on the the the artifacts really show any sort of high technology, so. The possibility of the does fit. The fact is if this wasn't I I mean to reforming project, then then I guess seated knives, and eventually the life that they stated grew up, and and build these things and then eventually died away because now sort of Friday's again, you know, it is kind of a crude form of architecture. Is it it is very correct. Yeah. Yeah. I think another important point with is is probably because I thought about it for a long time. But I don't think this is a particularly threatening thing for people to worry about if this if all of this did happen like three billion years ago. So whoever did this is long gone, otherwise, we would see them everywhere. We'll have the galaxy with Sadie and everything or they may they may be Greg. Well, that's that's the idea that the United they seated on my eyes and on this probably evolved up to become out. And that's why we look like these faces, and that's very possible very possible. Greg stay with us. We're gonna take this quick break. But we're gonna come right back and continue talking about this. And then later on tonight, we'll take some phone calls about this. Take a look at the pictures. If you can't get up to our website at coast to coast, AM dot com, and lex tells us that the resolution will look better if you make your browser a little smaller so play with your little computer that way and go to our website at coast to coast, a m dot com are special guest from Australia live, Greg arm. His book is free for download why we must go to Mars. Never miss a detail.

Greg arm Google Benz Landon nicotine Mazda Scientist lex Australia Sadie three billion years
"three billion years" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"three billion years" Discussed on Science Talk

"Go for three billion years, ultimately circle the sun, nothing more complex than clumps of microbes agitated in our planet's primordial ocean. It was out there floating in space when cells on earth began to cooperate building bodies and grouping themselves into tissues, it arked through Cambridge skies when the major branches of the tree of life emerged from our common stock, and when the lobe thin fish climbed out from the seas. It was their tracing endless ellipses in the void. They're moving. Always moving silently above when the dinosaurs were new and Qatar is nothing bigger. Than a bug there in the sky over every muddy Spinosaurus every quarrelsome Veloce raptor every bloodthirsty t Rex and their unbeknownst to every insatiable dreadnought his. When the reign of the dinosaurs came crashing down in cosmic accident. It was there to witness the rise of the mammals and the ascent of the apes through which our solar system became aware of it self and now after a long prelude we twins of the same womb borrow phrase from the poet Marge piercy, the apes overthe, and ultimately are set to me in a most improbable rendezvous. Tonight, like a paleontologist revealing a dinosaur bone and linking its existence to our own new horizons will drill into our ancient past as it flies by this tiny frozen world. And we'll glimpse of fossilized moment in time a moment that led to the coalescence of our planets to the transformation of geology into biology and the evolution of spectacular an improbable creatures such as dinosaurs. And ourselves from this lonely vantage point near the ends of our solar systems. New horizons will offer the world the humbling perspective that only deep time and deep space can provide as a digs like pickaxe in the sky into our wondrous past. Thank you. Thanks to the Johns Hopkins applied physics lab. And to Ken Vara for green lighting, my use of their audio. We'll be back in a few days with the more traditional episode of science talk till then checkout, WWW dot scientific American dot com for our continuing coverage of the new horizons mission and for all your science news and follow us on Twitter where you get a tweet whenever a new item hits the website. Our Twitter name is at Siam for scientific American science stock. I'm Steve Mirsky. Thanks for clicking on us.

Twitter Marge piercy Cambridge skies Steve Mirsky Qatar Ken Vara Johns Hopkins three billion years
Anthony Bourdain, celebrity chef and CNN host, dead in apparent suicide at 61

24 Hour News

02:34 min | 3 years ago

Anthony Bourdain, celebrity chef and CNN host, dead in apparent suicide at 61

"In for celebrity chef anthony bourdain ap correspondent warren levinson reports celebrities and chefs alike are reacting on twitter gordon ramsay said on twitter that anthony bourdain brought the world into our homes and inspired many people to explore cultures andrew zimmer host of bizarre foods wrote that a part of his heart is truly broken adam richmond the actor and host of man vs food tweeted why for dane who was sixty one was found dead in a hotel in eastern france near the borders with switzerland and germany cnn says he was shooting a segment of his series parts unknown in strasbourg warren levinson new york new discoveries on mars provide the best evidence yet of the possibility of life on the red planet nasa scientists say the mars rover curiosity is found the potential building blocks of life on an ancient lake bed the organic molecules preserved in three billion year old bedrock suggests conditions on mars may have once been conducive to life and it leaves open the possibility that microorganisms once populated the red planet and still might curiosity is also confirmed seasonal increases of methane in the martian atmosphere researchers say they can't rule out a biological source scientists say more powerful spacecraft will be needed to prove whether life ever existed on mars a rare links has been captured in catalonia three years after it was released in portugal spanish environmental scientists said the te'o a four year old liberian links had been spotted on the outskirts of boss celona on may the twenty ninth they said the links was captured wednesday by local foreigner and flora authorities along with members of a european animal conservation project the liberian links is a critically endangered species and hasn't been seen in catalonia since the early twentieth century the te'o was born in captivity and released into the wild in poetry goals valet do guadiana natural park in two thousand fifteen with a gps tracker cola which soon stopped working in good health the feline has been released back into the wild in and lucia with a new tracking collar sorry it's pitchy progressive casualty insurance company.

Warren Levinson Lucia Portugal Martian York Strasbourg CNN Germany Andrew Zimmer Gordon Ramsay Catalonia Switzerland France Dane Adam Richmond Anthony Bourdain Twitter