35 Burst results for "Thousand Years"

What are the origins of English

Tai Asks Why

02:40 min | 3 d ago

What are the origins of English

"Think if it is a bunch of. It is probably a bunch of women, MOMS and aunts on the island of England. That's probably the people who invented the English language and they were called angles. So they didn't even call English. They called it anguish. My Name's Tom Howell and I used to write the Oxford Dictionary encounter and I wrote a book called the Rude Story of English and it is a history of some dudes and some woman thousand five hundred years ago trying to invent the language. So in a sense when you learned English. From the older people in your family. They are inventing English in a way because that is going to be a bit different. From the English that their grandparents spoke and then their great grandparents spoke and so on and so on and so on. Until when you go back far enough, it would be very difficult for us now to understand like great. Great. Great. Great. Great. Great great grandparents, saints which other think of how friend and neighbor are spell differently neighbors eat before I, friend is I before e friend came from one place where they said free owned once upon a time and neighbor came from another place where they were saying. It was actually called a near Ghabbour. You know has GM neighbor Mrs Weird thing we don't pronounce it now. It's just people stop pronouncing it properly but. Once upon a time, they would've been like, no, it's wrong to say neighbor without Jeanette they would have been like the correct way to say that is Nia Gabor because it was a boor who lived near you. So generations go by people make mistakes people say things a bit differently. People put on funny voices. Things Change. Now we say neighbor instead of new? Kabar I guess it is. The English is so complicated because it comes from all around the world. Yeah. What recalled English today like if you look up a word on the Internet to find out where it came from could come from anywhere. Like bungalow comes from India but you know even if you went back all the way to what the angles were saying, their language also came from all around the world like their language came from. Iraq and India and Russia and all kinds of weird places like people have been talking to each other for at least one, hundred, thousand years. So all of us, any point in history might say who invented our language and the odds would almost be some not dudes some arts and mother's thousand, five, hundred years ago. kind of doesn't matter where you are. That's always kind of be the answer.

England Tom Howell Mrs Weird Nia Gabor Oxford Dictionary GM India Jeanette Ghabbour Iraq Russia
Ice Age Temperatures Help Predict Future Warming

60-Second Science

03:18 min | 3 d ago

Ice Age Temperatures Help Predict Future Warming

"How. Much colder wasn't at the peak of the last ice age that's a question. Scientists have been trying to answer for decades, and now they have a new best guess eleven degrees Fahrenheit. That's a lot especially considering it's a global average parts of North America. We're much colder first of all large areas of the northeast were completely under ice. So that would have been pretty chilly wouldn't be living there but even here in the West right where we weren't covered by an ice, she would have been something like twenty degrees. Fahrenheit Lower Jessica tyranny a Paleo climatologist at the University of Arizona tyranny and her colleagues spent years compiling information about. Earth's climate at the height of the last glacial period about twenty thousand years ago. So we obviously don't have to Ramadan in the glacial periods. So we have to instead look for these kinds of standing indicators. One kind of stanton is plankton that lived in the ocean and got preserved in marine sediments. Scientists use these fossils to infer past ocean temperatures by studying changes in the chemistry of their shells and in the kinds of fats and other compounds they produced. Tyranny and her team then combine these data with a climate model to give a full picture of glacial conditions. It's actually technique us every day whether forecasting. What's new is we're using it for the past not the future. So we're actually hind casting if you will rather than forecasting the study is in the journal Nature. The findings suggest that the last ice age was significantly colder than scientists thought and that matters today the reason that. We want to know how cold last ice ages beyond the fact that it's just a cool thing to know. Is that we can actually use it to understand a quantity called climate sensitivity climate sensitivity is a measure of how much the planet warms in response to rising greenhouse gases. In this long ago case, we know how much carbon dioxide concentrations increased between the last ice age in preindustrial period from air bubbles trapped in ancient ice, and now we have tyrannies new results on the temperature difference between glacial and interglacial conditions. Together, these data suggest that low end estimates of climate sensitivity in which greenhouse gases don't cause much warming are unlikely to be correct if we have low climate sensitivity than than, we would be less worried about what all the missions are going to do. And so we can kind of rule those those possibility out know I suppose that's that's not great news.

North America University Of Arizona Jessica
Perfectly preserved prehistoric cave bear discovered on Russian Arctic island

Kottke Ride Home

01:30 min | 3 d ago

Perfectly preserved prehistoric cave bear discovered on Russian Arctic island

"Have just discovered a completely preserved extinct cave bear the ice age cave bear species, Ursus SPILEA S-, which went extinct about fifteen thousand years ago is itself between twenty, two, thousand to thirty, nine, thousand, five, hundred years old and was discovered in the melting permafrost of the of Ski Islands the Southernmost Group of the new Siberian islands. The bear originally found by reindeer herders still has its nose teeth and internal organs intact. It is the first wholly intact cave bear specimen scientists having previously only found skeletons. Quoting Science Alert Cave bears roamed while most of Europe and Asia. Were covered in glaciers sharing the landscape with mammoths, sabertooth cats, and giant ground sloths. The creatures were massive males could weigh up to one ton, which is about five hundred pounds heavier than the largest bears alive today and quote this particular species is believed to be an ancient relative of the Modern Day Brown bear and this specimens precise age will be confirmed wants radiocarbon analysis is done by the team at Eastern Federal University and you could. As the planet warms and more discoveries are being made in the permafrost other fines in recent years include a cave bear cub of forty thousand year old Wolf's head two lion cubs in eighteen, thousand year old puppy, and of course, the remains of woolly mammoths.

Ski Islands Eastern Federal University Wolf Europe Asia
Mars in Opposition

Astronomy Cast

05:56 min | 5 d ago

Mars in Opposition

"Wadham to astronomy, cast our weekly facts based journey through the cosmos where we help you understand not only what we know. But how we know what we know I'm Fraser Cain publisher, of Universe today and with me as always Dr Pamela Gay a senior scientist for the Planetary Science Institute and the Director of Cosmic Quest Pamela. Welcome back from Summer Hiatus I missed you. Thank you. I've missed you too although I have to say it feels like we're like experiencing march. Two. Hundred instead of September at this point time has meaning it doesn't it really has no meaning. Yeah. Yeah. It's a it's a it's a snake in a circle eating its own tail. Made of everything nothing at the same time. I don't know whether I'm coming or going. The days just blur and yet time just takes forever. When do I get my vaccination? You are you are you on I was thinking about this really want to do what I want to go places and see people. That's what I do. To to have gone from having that amazing experience in January where we were together in Hawaii for the W. S meeting. And towards the end of that meeting, we were starting to talk about the news about this strange illness in China and remember the Thursday night on. Talking with a couple of my friends at the conference about. Just want to get home before the illness makes it to Hawaii. And I had no idea that. Nine mice be earlier. Still Yeah, no I guy I had my suspicions but. In. And now I you know we do feel like we're closing in now on the final stretch that more and more vaccines are coming into into the final stage of trials, and there's going to be some kind of roll out but I really hope that that herd immunity will start to get kicked in and we can start to see the end of this hopefully during this season. So we will we will and herd immunity from. Thanks. From getting sick. So we will. Exceed the end of it during the season and. Regular life will return. This season fourteen, our show is major and I feel that having a very cranky year is consistent with going through our teenage ness. Thank you bye-bye. Now this is. All right, every two years or so Mars lines up nicely with the earth it takes only two minutes to communicate with the Rovers. You could see the polar ice caps in a small telescope and it's the best time to send your spacecraft to the Red Planet and also I. Guess. It Mars opposition. Between Your horoscope your Mars horoscope is really good that other works. Maybe, that's Mars in retrograde. That none lucky time. They can happen at the same time whereas in retrograde and an opposition. Yeah. That's true. All right. So so so we're going to talk about how Mars and opposition is a really like the best time for Mars that's Mars really takes over the night sky and shows us what it's got but. Why is Marzano Position? So technically, it is that moment in time when you have the sun, the earth and Mars precisely lined up so that at midnight on earth. Mars is at its highest possible point in our terrestrial sky and if you were to look at it from space. Walk. Would they look from above you're looking down on the solar system and you're looking at? Earth Mars and the sun what would you see? Align they're just nicely in a line. And There's some years where because Mars orbit is a lot more elliptical than earth orbit that we are noticeably closer. There's some years that were noticeably farther apart of back in two thousand and three. There's a lot of Hoopla because we were than. We'd been in hundreds of years would be for another hundred some odd year. He was fifty thousand years was the closest yet had been. Two Thousand and three. And at these closest points, we are more than twenty million miles closer than we are during opposition when Mars is at its far points. So there is a substantial difference, but in the grand scheme of things. Mars is still smaller than allows to see it as a desk without. Really good binoculars or a telescope. So but just to give just to give people a sense of perspective, I mentioned this the beginning of the show it takes two light minutes to communicate with Mars just over two minutes right now we'll win Mars you not position until you can. You know you send your beep boop commands to your over and you're over goes beep boop and sends back it's commands and it's just like you're playing a video game with. Fairly reasonable times, but when Mars is. Old Dial up modem exactly. An Internet game what it gets worse right on average the a the time to transmit to Mars is about twelve and a half minutes and at the very worst when Mars is on the opposite side of the Sun It's twenty minutes. So if you want to send some piece of information to Mars, you've got to wait twenty minutes for the message to get there and then twenty minutes to come back. So. The distances are really significant.

Mars Hawaii Dr Pamela Gay Planetary Science Institute Fraser Cain Rovers China Scientist Publisher Director W. S
Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

The Science Show

11:14 min | Last week

Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

"Recently Assad with some research colleagues at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, a look at a brand new science article in which are climate model for the first time had recreated the climate on earth over the last three million years, which covers the entire geological pleistocene epoch. The Pleistocene is so important as it constitutes a point of reference for life on. Earth. Because although sure our planet has existed for four point, five, billion years it's only in the last million years. That earth has looked at least roughly in the way as we know it, the continents were roughly where they are today. The North and South Poles were covered with ice. The atmosphere had a similar chemical composition to what we have today. Planet, Earth. Our earth has only existed for three million years. All, comparisons further back in time are quite meaningless. And the manuscript I hold in my hand is not just reaching. My brain is also striking straight into my heart. A deep humility settles in when look at the graph showing the variations in mean global temperature on earth over the past three, million years it shows that we have never throughout the whole plasticine exceeded two degrees global warming compared to our pre industrial average temperature of approximately fourteen degrees. Never. This means that Earth despite all the stresses and natural shocks from fluctuations and Solar Radiation Volcanic eruptions, asteroid impacts and earthquakes has regulated itself within an incredibly narrow range minus four degrees. Celsius were in deep ice age plus two degree Celsius. We're in a warm interglacial period lasting three million years. It's absolutely incredible. Especially since we know why. It's earth's ability to self regulate the ability of the oceans to absorb and store heat the ability of the ice sheets to reflect solar radiation the ability of the forests to absorb carbon dioxide and the ability to be a safe and store greenhouse gases. The planet is a biophysical self playing piano whose music sheet stays. Within the minus four plus to scale. If that is not caused for humidity than I do not know what humidity is. And a deep concern in hundred and fifty years. In the geological blink of an eye, we risk now tearing this Planetary Symphony to shreds. Let that sink in. The global average temperature is now changing hundred and seventy times faster than over the last seven thousand years and it's doing. So in the wrong direction upwards when the current orbital forcing meaning are distance to the sun and the current low level of solar activity means that the temperature should in fact, be slowing down. You don't have to be a physicist to understand that we have a problem. Climate skeptics like to argue that historically the climate has fluctuated so much. So why shouldn't it be fluctuating now? Obviously. It fluctuates. But we are now racing towards plus three to plus four degrees warming. Sceptics like to bring up the little ice age the time when Swedish King Call The tenth Gustav Marched His army across the deep frozen great belt and the little belt in sixteen fifty eight to beat the Danes or that the vikings grew grapes in Greenland during the medieval warm period. Yes. Of course, this is true but it all occurred within the natural boundaries of minus four and plus two degrees. And it's here within this sweet spot that we must remain for our own sakes and our future? In August two, thousand, eighteen at the peak of that year's drought and fires in Sweden and Europe. We published a scientific paper where we tried to establish whether we are at risk of pushing the entire planet away from its current state of equilibrium, the Holocene epoch where we have been since the last ice age. This is fundamental. Our Planet Earth can be in three different states. It can be in a deep ice age as it was twenty thousand years ago with large is. Extending over the northern and Southern Hemisphere with over two kilometers of ice above our heads here in Sweden an ice extending as far south as Berlin. This is an equilibrium state as it is not only lower solar radiation that keeps earth in an ice age. It is also the feedbacks caused by ice. As the ice sheets grow earth gets whiter, which means that more more incoming heat from the sun is reflected back to space more ice means it gets colder which means even more is and suddenly you have a self reinforcing mechanism. This is what makes an ice age and equilibrium earth remains. They're not only because of the external forces from the sun but also thanks to these inbuilt biophysical processes in this case, the color of ice. Earth can also be in an interglacial an intermediate state, which is what we have today where was still have permanent is sites at the polls and we have glaciers on land and the biosphere with forests, grasslands, and lakes roughly as Earth as we know it. It is these two equilibrium states and only these two states that the planet has been over the last three million years that is during the entire Pleistocene. But then there is a third state when earth tips over from self cooling feedback loops to self heating feedback loops, which leads to an inevitable journey to becoming a hot tropical planet that is four, five, six, potentially seven, eight degrees warmer than today where in principle, all the ice has gone and the surface of the ocean is more than fifty meters higher than it is today and where the conditions for live is fundamentally different all over the entire planet. This is what we call hothouse earth. Or Highs Zaid hot time in German where the article when we published it drew so much attention doing this burning heat wave in the summer of twenty eighteen that highs Zaid was chosen as the word of the year in Germany. In this research, we tried for the first time to identify the global mean temperature at which we are in danger of tipping over from our current state, the Holocene interglacial, and embarking on a journey that would inevitably take us to highlight our conclusion is that we cannot exclude that the planetary threshold. The tipping point where we kickoff unstoppable processes of self amplified warming is at two degrees. Bear in mind we are today at one point one very mind were moving fast along a path that reaches one point five in potentially only twenty, thirty years and two degrees in forty fifty years. This is one I would argue of the biggest. Challenges of all to test whether we are right. Can the planet cope with or Canet not cope with higher temperatures than two degrees? But. My conclusion based on the knowledge we have today is that the planetary threshold to avoid triggering high Zaid is most likely at two degrees. Of course, it's not so that Earth will fall off a cliff at two degrees. The risk is rather that we would then pass a threshold where the shift towards hindsight would become unstoppable. In other words, we face an urgency at the timeframe whether we pushed the on button on not triggering stoppable warming is within the next few decades meaning essentially. Now, if we pressed the UNBUTTON and kick off the great planetary machinery with feedback loops causing self warming, then the full impacts may play out over three four, five, hundred years before we reach a new equilibrium state hothouse. A planet with over ten meters, sea level rise temperatures, and extreme droughts, floods, and heatwaves making large parts of earth uninhabitable a planet we do not want a planet that cannot support US humans. This requires from us that we understand two different time horizons. The short term time of commitment. When do we push the unbutton but then also the long term time horizon when we have the full impact hitting on people these are different but ethically, I would argue only the trigger moment counts, we cannot leave a damaged planet beyond repair to future generations. So to summarize the decisive moment when we press don't press the button lies within the next ten to twenty years. With consequences for all future generations a moral, bum. Are High site article concluded that degree Celsius is our ultimate planetary threshold that we need to stay away from. This article actually came out six months before our climate modeling showed that we've never exceeded two degrees throughout the whole pleistocene, the last three million years. In Two thousand nine, our planetary boundaries size showed that one point five degrees is a boundary we should not transgress because then we enter a danger zone of uncertainty. So perhaps you do understand my feeling a deep concern of humility in the face of our latest scientific findings, which really only says, one thing tipping points are real and if they're crossed, they lead to unstoppable changes, which requires a new relationship between us and our planet, and that we realize that we are facing a new ethics. What we do today will determine the future on earth for all our children and their children.

Zaid Sweden Potsdam Institute For Climate Assad Physicist Holocene Europe Gustav Vikings United States Canet Southern Hemisphere Germany Berlin
Compromising: How and When

UnF*ck Your Brain to Create Feminist Confidence

05:53 min | Last week

Compromising: How and When

"My chickens how are you? I for one cannot believe that summer's over it is dark apm unacceptable. Don't understand what happened. I feel like I went through a wormhole. Like may was a thousand years long and now it's almost September it is over. The side story. But related. So I used to do this kind of tantric base meditation practice I studied with this teacher named Sally Kempton forbid not styled with her like she knew me personally but I went to her workshops teachings I, talked to her a few times. So anyway, the auto workshop she was doing California and I had this superintendent experience where I basically felt like everything in my. Body. All the energy rushed together and contracted in words to this pinpoint, and then it exploded and I felt like infinite space inside of me. It was really really fucking wild. So I went up to talk to her about it afterwards like in the receiving line everybody is talking about their meditation and she's just like moving us along and I was like Oh my God this like. This wild thing happened it blew my mind will a blind like describing it to her like and she just casually said. Oh. Yeah. You went through the wormhole. Like this was just like Mrs just like a known thing like no big deal like Oh. Yeah. The Worm Hall So. So many different ways of experiencing being a human this world really blows my mind. And I think it's always a reminder to me also of how many incredible tools there are for navigating the human experience. Obviously. Thought work is my favorite, but it's not the only thing in the world and I don't ever want to be dogmatic it right I think as humans. We want to be right and we want to be certain. We want to know the answer, but that's what makes us mentally rigid I. Talk about this. In the mental flexibility episode, we can get rigid about thought work itself that it has to be the one answer to the universe or the only thing that works make sense right that it has to be right. But it doesn't have to be objectively, right. We can't know that one hundred percent for sure. Even science even scientific consensus gets. Revised rate over time. We don't believe a lot of things that the best medieval scientists believed and in a thousand years there people are not gonNa believe a lot of things that are best scientists now believe is so just has to be right for you. What gets you the results that you want. Right, that's always the question. Is this helpful if it's helpful than use it wherever it comes from? So in the spirit of that kind of flexibility. Let's talk about compromise and this is gonna be assured and sweet episode because it's not actually a huge complicated topic it's just that we like to be confused about it. Kinda comes up a lot so I want to address. He's this is one of the things that I students tend to love to get confused about because when you are socialized as a woman and basically taught that you should constantly compromise on what you want to make other people happy. That becomes kind of baseline idea in your head right and so you start to feel guilty if you ever choose to not compromise and you. Start to think that you need a really good reason to not compromise. So you start to question and doubt yourself right and you start to feel defensive if you don't WanNa compromise and sometimes when that's the kind of mental and emotional state you're in, you learn thought work and you may be tempted to use it to just be okay with whatever someone else wants you to. Do so that you can go along with it and not have to deal with the discomfort of disagreement. So this would be a way of using thought work against yourself. Right? Like I talk about in one of the recent episodes if you are just trying to thought work to be okay with doing things, you don't WanNa do so that you don't have to deal with. Your own discomfort that's not the point of thought work right if thought work is to liberate you which means dealing with your own discomfort. Then the other thing that I see is sometimes people are coming from the opposite point of view right? Like part of their of awakening to gender socialization has been to really doubled down unjust never compromising like doing whatever the fuck they want. which is like I'm not saying that's good or bad right but. Sometimes, people than objective thought work because they think that believing thought work means. That you should just be okay with anything right? It's like A. To being tall your whole life that you should compromise. It can start to feel like a positive rebellion or independence to not compromise, and then people start to have this sort of adversarial relationship with thought worker with the ideas where they are like will you're just teaching people that you know they should compromise about anything because they can always change their thought about it. Of course no. Taking pride in not compromising is not really empowering either. Either you are thrall to your own fear of other people, and so you compromise all the time that is not empowering that feel good. But if you were in thrall to your own rebellion or ego that also does not feel good and is not actually empowering. Being too far in either direction is not empowering. You're going to notice a theme chickens, but the question is never properly posed as what should I do? Should I compromise or not? What action should I take? That is always the wrong question. The question is why are you compromising are thinking about compromising or why are you not compromising? What is the thought producing that action?

Sally Kempton Worm Hall Superintendent California
What Does The Science Say

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:46 min | Last week

What Does The Science Say

"Welcome to kids, myths and mysteries. Stores were strange and unexplained people, places and events. I'm your host Kit crumb today fringe science. Sciences defined as intellectual practical activity, encompassing the systematic study of the structure and behavior of the physical natural world through observation and experiment. Fringe Science is considered an inquiry into an established field of study and departs from mainstream theories in that field and is considered to be questionable by mainstream science. Now. Don't confuse fringe science with pseudoscience, which is defined as a belief in some person place or event that is mistakenly regarded as being based on scientific method but many categories once considered the product of pseudoscience have slipped into the category of fringe science and many fringe science categories are now consider pure science. A short list of categories considered to be a fringe science, include cryogenics reanimation, and suspended animation. Now, let's take a quick look at each of these. cryogenics is generally the practice according to Al Core cryonic center in Arizona of freezing people who need a cure for a disease or perhaps are in need of an Oregon and will be thought at some later time when there is a cure or an organ available. Now Look at the second fringe science on my list reanimation. That is usually thought to mean restoring life. Finally the third on my list suspended animation that would be closer to the cryogenics. Separately these three would be considered by science to be way out on the French but alcorn does freeze patients and that would seem to be suspended animation, and if indeed the patients brought back to life, you would have to call latte reanimation. Still Science would scoff at the concept yet in Japan Cell Nuclei and DNA were taken from a woolly mammoth that live twenty eight thousand years ago and implanted by scientists into the cells and Ogm of living. Five showed essential biological reactions needed for cell division. This could lead to the reanimation. Mammoth. From the frozen north where the woolly mammoth was the unsuspecting subject of natural cryogenics to lab in Japan where the mammoths DNA was brought from a state of suspended animation. To a reanimated state and planted into the oval ma-ma mouse I'd have to say that's cryogenic suspended animation and reanimation that have slipped from fringe science too pure science. Now, let's plunged down the list of fringe science to the much-maligned topic pre cognition. Simply precondition is considered the fore knowledge of an event. Let's take on a huge event debt even titanic in size, and that's pun intended. It's common knowledge that the titanic was the largest cruise ship of its time. It was considered unsinkable and perhaps because of that Monica unsinkable, it didn't have enough lifeboats for all the passengers when in mid April nineteen twelve on its maiden voyage, it hit an iceberg it sank taking with it over one, thousand, five, hundred passengers but fourteen years prior to the sinking author Morgan Robertson wrote a book titled Futility described the largest cruise ship in the world he named Titan in his book he described his ship as unsinkable and not carrying enough lifeboats for the passengers. When it in his book struck an iceberg in mid April over a thousand died strangely there are well over one dozen similarities between Robertson's Titan and the titanic. And remember he wrote about the Titan in eighteen ninety eight. Pre Cognition. Well, what else could it be? Moving along the list of fringe science, you'd find past life regression hypnotism Bo scoffed at by science at both used by licensed and highly educated counselors around the world although the list of practices an event that fall under the shadow of fringe science as long one I couldn't resist looking at artificial intelligence. You probably heard of IBM's corporations creation Watson. But Watson is program to teach itself in whatever endeavor it is directed. Intelligence natural kind you and I possess is not the same intelligence. Watson has watson can look at a room elementary students and evaluate. Standing Body language which students are following the teachers teachings which are confused and which are distracted. But the natural intelligence that you and I possess would not only separate the students in those three categories mentioned. We could probably figure out why those that followed the teacher could why those that didn't couldn't and what distracted the remainder.

Morgan Robertson Watson Titan Japan Al Core Cryonic Center Alcorn Oregon IBM Arizona BO Monica
How Much Vitamin D is Right for Me?

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

05:39 min | 2 weeks ago

How Much Vitamin D is Right for Me?

"Hello and welcome to this week's edition of the Green Wisdom Hell show I'm Janet Lewis after Louis and we are going to educate you today a little bit of `Bout Vitamin D. a lot of you already know about vitamin D or You're beginning to learn it. But I think that you know one of the burning questions that we seem to be having is how much vitamin D is right for me and there's really It's different for everyone and there was a book called optimal dose that Dr Louis Read. There was some other of our. Clients that ask about that book they wanted to know well, how much do I take because? I think it was very high levels and Dr Lewis is going to answer all that for you. Today he's going to help you discern how much is right for you because there are other factors involved as I just loading up on a bunch of D. and he's going to tell. You what can happen when you do too much of that, and we are also going to answer a whole lot of questions that we've received from our audience via our shooting straight with Dr Louis facebook group, and if you're not a member of that, all you have to do is go there and ask for yourself to be invited in either by email or send him A. Message on facebook and he'll accept shooting be part of our community. You can also answer or ask US questions online. There's an online forum for the PODCAST. So anything we don't cover here today that you still want to know or any other topic Please reach out to us that way we try to work it all in and make it a very enjoyable show. So Dr Louis. Vitamin D seems to be the thing immune system right now can you tell us how much what the difference is and is there anything wrong which is loading up on it? You ever been just one drink away from telling people what you really think. Never. have been quite often Yeah, you know I'm GonNa talk a lot about this, and you know it's absolutely amazing facebook The shooting straight has been a good thing. There's people that follow me there that actually work for some really big. Supplement. Companies. Which is afforded US Janet and may an opportunity to do some really big things I was called salt of the Earth yesterday which I thought was funny. In longhorn Texas as well as we thought, that was even funnier. We've renamed our town from Longview to Longhorn now I I love it. I guess SOCI- eight that we owe steers and Texas I. was kind of funny Yeah. But I've got lots of and this all started about five years ago when I was on a podcast as guests from Jack, Speer Co, the survival podcast, and he is crazy crazy smart, incredibly intelligent. man he he really knows what he's talking about and he's tastes certainly blonde by giving his opinion and you need to listen to him. But I got a lot of people from being on his podcast and people would say there I'm taking five thousand or ten thousand years and you know of course I'm looking at Lamma. It's not working. But I'm taking over ten thousand I said, it's not working MO- supplements don't work. And some of them are actually very toxic to you and there's reasons for that too. I finally did the percentages on it with the help of my count it because I'm not good at percentages good Lord I skipped that class in high school probably when fishing or something and ninety three percent of what people were buying and taking not working ninety three percents your odds of getting something niche. Good. Yeah and Jack Speer Co was talking about it and again spare 'cause a really crazy smart guy. You check him out he's he's really good he. He'll tell you what to do during times of stress and trouble where I'm just good for telling you how to be healthy, which is not bad too but. And I was in Tulsa. and. He he was talking about that Nina is getting involved in his facebook group and he said, well, you ought order this book and you know it'll change your per-. Paradigm about what you think about bottom of day and I said with the books already been ordered. It's on the way coast read books all day long. And Yeah, I don't know this change paradigm I try to push it in any way but I do think what this book outlines, which this guy says take thirty thousand a day. It's like one Manana don't do that not without testing and that this is from the book. Now from Jack Sparrow one of the things that people talk about is I can't sleep dog do you have any kind of thing for sleep? Well, if you're low in Vitamin D. That can cause you to not sleep well. At date threes plays a very pivotal role in the body achieving the state needed for deep sleep and very, very important and I have people at tight. You know five, thousand, ten, thousand and some it gets them up for you need to be I think the sweet spots hundred. Seventy, five or this book says more than that, and there's no evidence of it being toxic, but there's more to that some teach you that. But when you're three levels are optimal, you your your immune system, the depth of sleep in the rest that you get there and your metabolism, your metabolism becomes primed to function more edge greatest potential.

Dr Louis Janet Lewis Facebook Jack Jack Speer Co Jack Sparrow Longhorn Texas Texas Longview Speer Co Lamma Nina Tulsa.
How To Teach History

Layers of Learning Podcast

06:21 min | 2 weeks ago

How To Teach History

"So, what what do you do with history? What's your basic? Approach, while I will say this, you're the one who taught me how to teach history in my early homeschooling years so I do it very much the way that you Michelle For sure we've always taught history in order when I was in school I was always confused about when things were happening and how things were related to each other. When I learned about historical figure, it wasn't in context of where they were or when they lived and I never knew how things connected I I remember in fifth grade we did this project about the Aztecs and. Each like our teachers split us into groups and each group was doing a different hands on project by the Aztecs and it was a great project. I remember vividly how the Aztecs built their village or town right on top of the lake and that that's what my project was about and I remember that but I also remember having no idea when the Aztecs happened in history, I had no concept of win. That was I thought they were very, very ancient people that was my impression. And that turns out not to be true they actually were. More. In the colonial era, they were much more modern. Yeah I think that was the problem with my early education history is it just lacked connections I didn't understand what history could teach me because I didn't have any contextual basis for the people, the places, the events, I didn't have a complete picture in my mind. So that's been one of my goals with my kids is to help them see the big picture of history and to be able to. Know when and where things happened. So, let's back up and just start with when we say history exactly. What do we mean? First of all history starts with the earliest civilizations and I think that's something that. People. Get confused about because we know that there were caveman and. There's this whole Earth history that happens before the subject of history, but the academic subject of history starts with the earliest civilizations. Well. And that's not because the people who came before weren't important. It's because the people who came before didn't write down their stories in any way we don't have an archeological record of them not much and we don't have. Any records at all of them, they didn't build cities that we can go back and excavate. The academic subject of history is just the story of human civilization. That's what is. I often tell my kids. This is why it's so important for you to write down your stories because anyone who didn't have a record of their people or their lives or anything that happened. That kind of. With time and so history we're looking at, Hey, let's look at the story of the people who have lived on the earth and it's totally find teach about cavemen but there's not a lot of actual information that we know when we don't have any written records. So so layers of learning starts with the earliest civilisation. Yeah. We start with Sumer and the Yellow River valley in China and the Norte Chico People in South America. That's that's the beginning of the subject of history and we're looking at how did people create the first civilizations as they began to settle down and be able to live in a place. How did that happen? What contributed to them being able to do that and so yeah, we always start there in history and then as we go along, it includes the story of human beings, nations, cities, especially the great figures in history the heroes, the even the villains civilians to definitely but we learn about those people who somehow contributed and made a difference in the world whether good or bad. And I think we look at those things because it teaches us lessons for now. It's important to look back so that we can be educated for our lives now. Right right now, we are living at a point in history. We're making history were part of that whole subject, and if we study history, we can study all of the things that led up to. Now we can see this progression and some of its progress, and some of it is regression. We human societies tend to go through these cycles and there's Warren Destruction, and there's also building in great art and looking at all of this together is the subject of history I think that's one of the really interesting things that I have noticed as I've taught my kids history. I think a lot of people believe that we started with almost nothing in the history of the world, and then we little by little built up to this point that we have the Internet and technology and invention, and actually if you look back in history, my kids were amazed when we were studying ancient Greece and ancient Rome and they were saying if they just had the internet, they probably had pretty much what we have today. Mom they were a pre industrial society they had factories so anciently. They were very much like we are, and then it collapsed. Yeah. Followed Rome even before the Roman Empire the Mojo Daro people in India where at the same level that Rome was, but you know thousand years earlier. So it has happened over and over through history. So it's really interesting. One of the things that we learned from that is hey. Next year tomorrow who knows we could be reverting back in the exact same way that they did we are not immune in any way. And it hasn't just progressed and progressed and progressed. It has gone through cycles of change over time, and so there are lessons all along the way if we learn history in that Lens. and. Partly for that reason, Karen that that we can see progression and we can see cycles partly for that reason, we study history in order, and partly for the reason, we already talked about that it's important to have context you need to understand. Things that are going on at the same time in history you need to understand that this person came before that person that this war led to this event. Those progressions are important in history. So to teach it in order, I think vital.

Aztecs Rome Yellow River Valley Karen South America Greece Norte Chico India China
Science briefs from around the world

60-Second Science

01:55 min | 2 weeks ago

Science briefs from around the world

"Hi, I'm scientific American Assistant News Editor Sarah Frazier, and here's a short piece from the August. Twenty twenty issue of the magazine in the section called it. He dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine. The article is titled Quick Hits And it's a rundown of some non corona virus stories from around the globe. From Canada a new study models how gigantic morphing Blob of liquid iron in Earth's outer core underneath the Canadian Arctic is losing its grip on the north magnetic pole a second intensifying. Blah below Siberia is pulling the poll away. From Scotland, a geologic dating efforts suggests the fossil of millipedes creature found on the island of Cara formed four hundred, twenty, five, million years ago making it possibly the oldest known fossilized land animal older land animals have been spotted indirectly through preserve tracks. From Tanzania researchers discovered Africa's largest ever collection a fossilized human footprints left in volcanic mud about ten thousand years ago. Many of them came from a group of Seventeen people mostly women all walking in the same direction. From Norway archaeologists excavating a twenty meter. Viking ship buried below farmers field to stop a would eating fungus from destroying it. Ground penetrating radar had found the ship in two thousand eighteen and a new woods sample analysis revealed that could not be preserved underground. From Zambia in Mongolia. Spring satellite tagged Kuku completed an epic twelve thousand kilometer journey from one country to the other. It had originally been tagged in Mongolia in two thousand nineteen and traverse sixteen countries in his round trip migration. From Antarctica, scientists found that King Penguin excrement releases nitrous oxide also known as laughing gas. It forms a soil bacteria eat the droppings nitrogen rich compounds.

Twenty Twenty Mongolia Sarah Frazier Nitrous Oxide News Editor Tanzania Siberia Norway Canada Cara Scotland Africa Antarctica Zambia Kuku
Praying for Oneness in the Church (John 17:2024)

Pray the Word with David Platt

05:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Praying for Oneness in the Church (John 17:2024)

"John Chapter Seventeen versus twenty, three, twenty, four. This is a Jesus prayer. For the church. As, he prepares to go to the Cross and Managers Reading, these verses. Just, too heavy on my heart. So I just WanNa Wanna read them I want us to hear Jesus praying for us as the church and then I'm just GonNa go right in to praying precisely according to what he prayed. He said I do not ask for these only talking about his disciples. That he was prank for right before this but also for those who will believe in me through their word Which means he's he's praying for us right here. That they may all be one. Just as you father are in me and I in you. The day also may be in us. So that the world may believe that you have sent me. The glory that you have given me I have given to them. that. They may be one even as we are one. I in them and you in me. Did they may become perfectly one. So the world may know that you sent me and loved them even as you loved me. Father I desire that they also whom you have given me may be with me where I am. To See my glory that you have given me because you loved me before the foundation of the world. So God we pray together right now. In each of our churches. And in all of our churches collectively as your church. That you would. Make us one. In the same way father. You and the son are one what An. Awesome. Picture there, we would experience in the body of Christ, a oneness that is comparable to the oneness. In the Trinity God we asked for that. Please give us that please guard us from division. Gun Please Garda's from this unity for not living in the one that you have created for us. So that so that the world might believe that. You sent the son to die on the cross for sins. got. We pray for that the that the world believed like Reading this hearing Jesus Pratice to think that the world might not believe if the world does not see this kind of oneness and the church God pray for this one is in the church for our own good and re pray this for the salvation of so many people beyond the church in the world. God we we pray that we would be one together in the same way that you and the son are one so that the world may know that you send the sun and loved them even as you love the Son and God is re pray all this we desire that we would be with him where he is there we would see his glory glory. You have given him we long for heaven first and foremost because we will see you. We will be with you and flowing from that everything will be perfect including a relationships with one another in the church as your people no conflict no strife. And Hurt. No pain. Just one as the father and the son and the spirit are wide, God we. For that day and we pray we pray that you would help us to live in it. Today we live in such a divisive culture. or we are so prone. To accuse and to disparage into cancel for another to. Turn against or another instead of. Being four one, another God. Help us we pray. To experience what Jesus prayed for us two thousand years ago and how he intercedes for us even now. May John Seventeen versus twenty through twenty four. Be An ever increasing reality in each of our churches and an US together as the church we pray this in Jesus's name for Jesus. Glory.

John Chapter Seventeen United States John Seventeen
Why Do Cats Sharpen Their Claws?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

05:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Why Do Cats Sharpen Their Claws?

"Okay, they're covered. Infer they live in our houses sometimes they sleep in our beds and yet in a lot of ways they're pretty much wild animals. What do you think I'm talking about. That's right. Cats lots of you have questions about these enigmatic creatures with whiskers that word enigmatic it means mysterious by the way. So we thought we'd go right to the source to get some answers for your questions. So Clooney, here's a question from Jack How do you catch per? Schmucky could you translate that for me? All right that's not gonNA work. Let's get a human who can actually answer. My name is Abigail Tucker and I've recently written a book called the line in the living room about humanity's long strange history with house cats. Wow Lyons in our living rooms think about it. The cat that curls up in your lap is related to a lion shaking its main on the Savannah in Kenya. But somewhere along their evolutionary path some wildcats decided that life was better near humans. Now, if you want to know more about evolution, go back to our previous episode, the one, we just did all about human evolution and you'll better understand how different species are related but have evolved into different kinds of animals. Most domesticated animals, farm animals like cows and pigs and pets like dogs have brains and bodies that have evolved or changed over time to make them look and act differently from their wild cousins. But Abigail Tucker says, that's not the case with cats. That's because their domestication story is a little bit different. A lot of times with animals that we domesticated. We saw things about them that we wanted like we thought we cows, we want their milk or oh sheep we want their will with cats. We didn't really do anything to attract them to us because humans ten thousand years ago when we are just transitioning from being hunter gatherers to being farmers, there wasn't anything about cats that we said we have to have that. So what happened was that cats actually kind of domesticated themselves we didn't. Bring them into our farms they came on their own, and that's because humans in these early settlements maybe ten thousand years ago had a lot of big piles of trash around and cats were kind of drawn to eating those and they came in almost more like raccoons, foxes than something like a cow that we might have intentionally raised. But over a lot of time in our company, cats began to change their brains and bodies in the same ways that other animals have changed there's and have. Become sort of more cuddly. So to speak pigs and rabbits, other domesticated animals have become cute over time with floppy ears or spots. Cats have changed to have some of those traits but not all you know you might have a black cat with some spots on it. That might look a little bit different from a wild animal or you might have a cat like the one. My mom has which looks very much like the kind of wildcat that still lives in the Near East today. And that's because you could almost say that cats are partially domesticated and that they came into our houses not because we wanted them to combat because they wanted to come. You said that there's nothing about cats that we need the same way that we need milk or we need wall or we want those things except I. Guess these days we would say the thing that we want from our cat is love and we don't always get it. Some cats don't seem to like people very much. That's a really good point. Yes I think one of the secrets about cats is that even though they're not any more closely related to humans than an animal like say a pig as and certainly they're not as close to us as a monkey as but. Cats have faces that look a lot like human faces for reasons that have to do with the way that cats hunt they have round faces because they have these really short jaws 'cause they're ambush predators and they deliver like a really hard killing bite. When they catch things, they have small noses because they're not sent predators like dogs falling over long distances and most important they've got these big round is planted right in the middle of their faces new just kind of how our is our two and. Cats have is like that for different reasons they have is like that because they need good depth perception so they can pounce on things from their hiding places, but this mixture of facial features that cats have looked a lot like the way humans look and actually a lot the way human kids luck and that's something I think that tends to make people put human emotions onto cats the fact that they really resemble us.

Abigail Tucker Wildcats Schmucky Savannah Kenya Clooney Lyons
End of 'Green Sahara' May Have Spurred a Megadrought in Southeast Asia

60-Second Science

02:19 min | 3 weeks ago

End of 'Green Sahara' May Have Spurred a Megadrought in Southeast Asia

"Thousand years ago the Sahara had extensive grasslands and was dotted with lakes and trees but some five thousand years ago that Green Sahara dried up to become the enormous desert. We know today and scientists. Now think that this climate shift had effects far away including causing a mega drought in South East, Asia Kathleen are Johnson a Paleo climatologist and geochemists at the University of California Irvine says the key to that discovery were Stalagmites collected in cave in northern Laos. So like my I really amazing archives of past climate variability people are often more familiar with things like tree rings, ice cores, or maybe ocean sediment cores while select nights work in a similar way in that, they are deposited over time Johnson's team analyzed trace elements and carbon and oxygen isotopes in the hardened caved drippings that information enables researchers to determine rainfall patterns over the Millennia and. Johnson and her colleagues discovered signs of a thousand year long drought in Laos which began around the same time. The Sahara dried up about five thousand years ago as for why the two events might be connected the researchers simulated the drying out of the Sahara using climate models and included a couple things we know happened including the subsequent disappearance of vegetation and a connected increase in airborne dust, and they found that those variables. Would have been capable of cooling down the Indian Ocean and so the Cooler Ocean temperatures basically led to less moisture being being brought by monsoon circulation during the summertime when that region gets most of its rainfall, the details are in the journal Nature Communications One of Johnson's co-authors is joyce white a consulting scholar at the Penn Museum. She studies the Human History of Southeast Asia and her reaction when she first heard about the drought. On my God that's the missing millennia the missing millennia because she says, archaeological data are scant in that part. Of Southeast. Asia from four to six thousand years ago white says it's a critical period in which hunter-gatherers gave way to farmers, and there are a lot of debates about how the two periods related to each other. But we lacked the evidence in the area. I'm most interested in which is the maycom valley. White says this study doesn't answer that question directly, but the mega drought is a tantalizing clue for archaeologists has they continue to investigate those missing millennia.

Green Sahara Johnson Joyce White Laos Southeast Asia Indian Ocean Asia Kathleen Asia Maycom Valley Penn Museum University Of California South East
Are Wolves Smarter Than Dogs?

BrainStuff

03:18 min | 3 weeks ago

Are Wolves Smarter Than Dogs?

"I've known some dogs that are pretty smart I've also known some that worked. Bless him. But could wolves be smarter. Brain stuff. It's Christian Sager, my dogs, winchester and se blue they are real smart. So I was intrigued when I read a new study that said wolves are more intelligent in some ways than my dogs and all their canine friends whether you have a chocolate lab or a coon hound scientists believe that some modern dogs and wolves descended from a common ancestor between eleven thousand and thirty thousand years ago the new study which was published in the September twenty seventeen. Journal of scientific reports is by an international team of researchers at the wolf? Science Center. In Vienna Austria, they found domesticated dogs cannot make the connection between cause and effect wolves however, can they came to that conclusion by testing and comparing how the two species searched for food after giving them hints about where it was located researchers used fourteen dogs and twelve socialised wolves in their experiments. During the tests, the animals had to choose between two containers one with food. And one without the first thing researchers did was determined whether the animals could make sense of communicative clues by pointing and looking at the container with the food researchers. Next wanted to see how the dogs and wolves responded to behavioral cues the experimental pointed to the container with food, but did not make eye contact with the animals. Finely in the last experiment, the animals had to infer themselves which container had the hidden food using only causal clues like noises made. When the experimenters shook the container with the food both the wolves and the dogs did well on the communicative clue tests all found the hidden food both species however failed the behavioral cue portion without direct. I contact neither dog nor wolf could find the food during the last part of the test. However, only the wolves could make casual inferences as to where the food was located in other words the scientists said the wolves, not the pooches understood cause and effect. Study Author Michelle Lamp from the Netherlands reminded. US. However that the differences can be explained by the fact that wolves are more persistent to explore objects than. As, because dogs are conditioned to receive food from US whereas wolves have to find food themselves in nature. What shocked researchers was that the wolves were able to interpret direct eye to eye contact that understanding of communicative cues researchers said may have facilitated domestication. The study is unique also in that it used dogs that lived in both packs and with families, but the results of the dogs were independent of living conditions.

United States Christian Sager Vienna Austria Journal Of Scientific Science Center Michelle Lamp Netherlands
20 Minutes About Traditional Chinese Medicine

20 Minute Fitness

05:16 min | Last month

20 Minutes About Traditional Chinese Medicine

"Hey, Marcus welcome to the show Tame Martin well I have to say I've been really looking forward to it because we've known each other now for well over a decade and while you had taken quite an interesting path of going real deep into Chinese Madison starting and you know actively practicing this while ancient on over in Europe and anyways I've been really wanting to do this show on Chinese medicine because over the past few months we've covered quite A few interesting topics you on the podcast about the microbiome new tropics, cavalry metabolic health, and so forth. NFL Lot of the conclusions that we're drawing in our recent age seem to have actually been practiced for thousands of years in Chinese medicine, and that brought me back to you. But before we go deep into this topic, why don't you first tell us a little bit about how he got into Chinese medicine in the first place? Yes. Sure. So Basketball and tennis when I was a kid a teenager and frequent injuries and went to all the doctors a bunch of Western medicine treatments that didn't quite help and then I ended guy practicing Japanese acupuncture. So they just using really really thin fine needles that you almost don't feel and I remember going up to his office and could barely. Account on her car is my Nieto's started so bad at its second cute rain in them and then, and then you just put a bunch of needles somewhere. I hopped off his bench. Like if nothing was. Like nothing was wrong and I remember it took forever to get up the stairs there and all that just up down. was made quite an impact on me re that that was like immediate immediate. That must have left an impression and you tried like well, traditional. Western. Medicine to treat your knee at that time just conventional stuff your painkillers, etc.. Physiotherapy all the things that they give you go talk none of them were orthopedic specialist none of that worked now, not only for some things that works and then and then this guy is. By. The way you play affected. Enough such bad acne base and your low energy levels and that you'll always cold that is just the branch of the same route. So it's all it all kind of linked together with the same root cause and. Then, he gave me a bunch of herbs in two months later up in this really cystic acne was really bad doing a lot of western medicine things that it took quite a toll my health to at the time 'cause. He's injections or quiet. They're messing with your system out there drying you out your spacious clans and older glance pretty much everywhere, and so there's a lot of side effects and he gave me a bunch of herbs so to Vivian Natural Dumb. That made my help me keep my back in away and made my Kimble's significantly reduce and so. That's what hooked, and then I always wanted to become a doctor. So I had a high school degree. So I got a scholarship and the fine print scholarship that I could pretty much use it anywhere and so was thinking, do I go to the United States in Germany? China. Server. Since then you know I was interested in Chinese medicine also and and that's actually where we met. Yeah. So I got, you know I had a had a spot at a German university medical school and didn't go and instead you we went to China to be. Teachers for a few months, and while while teaching their inner, we didn't have much to do teaching. So end around I went around there's over four thousand, but they call integrative medicine hospitals. So it's Chinese medicine and Western medicine together combined in different departments. Of course, everybody does what they're good at but are essentially were together and a lot of time on these speak laments in China in one of those muscles and then I signed up at a Chinese university instead of the German one and I study what they call Jewish, Jehovah Chinese, medicine, and Western medicine combined with the focus being on the Chinese medicine side. And I completed that study it's a five year degree mostly in Chinese language. Muslim classes were essentially chinese-language in the beginning it a little bit of English classes in a Western medicine intended teachers kind of because they're English was so bad. In Chinese anyways even though we were like international and that was in. Beijing right. That was on Beijing five years in Beijing, and then I went to Hong Kong for another five years where we met again. At the end, I did my phd in what's called evidence based Chinese medicine over using modern scientific methods like clinical trials, Placebo, controlled randomized control trials, and instead of giving you experts at drunk we're using for example, in ancient acupuncture protocols or in my case was elbow pain it's like a two thousand year old extra puncture point protocol that they've been using since at least two thousand years per elbow pain and re looked at it was the is out son of modern science and understanding how that stuff works but we are playing these ancient principles. The Same WanNa do for you today was these five health tips or twenty twenty TM health. Cultivation, wisdom, that's what they call for staying. Healthy. So I, WanNa give you a few tips and ahead of quotes from the ancient books, and then I also pulled up a few research studies that kind of backup, what they're saying or giving another perspective on it. So we re using these ancient time tested principles, and then we're also looking at them. You know some the lenses of scientific method world of mearns,

Western Medicine China Beijing Cystic Acne Elbow Pain NFL Europe Marcus Painkillers Nieto Martin Basketball Kimble Mearns Vivian United States Hong Kong Germany Tennis
Designing Your Work Life

Good Life Project

05:29 min | Last month

Designing Your Work Life

"Let's give a little bit of context just to who you are and how you came to work together because you come from sort like different walks of life and somehow ended up originally teaching this course together and trying to figure out. Okay. What is this thing called design thinking and why is it being used in this one domain but we're not really applying this process this way of thinking to actually creating a better life. So how does the marriage I happen here? Under the origin and through to you in spring of two thousand. So. Going all the way back to when I was a Stanford Sophomore here seventy five thousand years ago when they retire on the plaza and struggling with the question, what do I do with my life? I found most of the grown-ups were supposed to be helpful not helpful at all and I found it really difficult to figure my own life and get into my career and apple in the early days and find myself on the first corporate culture. Committee was Steve In one, thousand, nine hundred because we're worried about what makes apple won't be apple anymore someday, and over the subsequent thirty years noticed everybody's got this question particularly workplace about I wanted to many for work on to work for you. Want, it to work for me. I want this to be generative used language with that's what they were looking for and with. So everybody's got this question fast forward many years. Later I'm having coffee with a guy named Randy over at Berkeley and he says Gosh have you should teach a class on this. So minor problems I'm not of the Faculty don't of a PhD don't have any contacts there I can solve everything but the lousy commute I said deal. So I taught a course experimentally one student said, are you teaching in the spring because my roommate wants to take I said sure I made a deal the universe of the kid show up I'll show up so fourteen semesters later. I'm teaching this class of Berkeley called finding your vocation and then how platinum David. Kelly get together an event. This thing called the D school decided to invent the school, which is where we are now and in order to focus on that David Kelly s this Guy Bill Burnett run the design program, and so in two thousand and seventy heard bill was coming here to run the design program said. Hey. Bill Gates. This kind of stuff he cares about students in Stanford's a lot less terrible from me. Let's have lunch and so we had lunch in two thousand and seven in the spring, which was the first of ten lunches over a year talking about this ambiguous idea of students find their way and about a minute and a half bill goes after great idea it's a huge problem. We should totally fix it design. Thinking is the way to solve this thing. So take all that stuff you're doing and flip it ended design give me a proposal will teach it. It will prototype at the summer we'll teach at this fall. Let's go I gotTA gotta run so it was a two minute meeting and I guess an appointment we gotta go. So what are the few times the bill talk faster than I do and so then we start that spring thinking of ideas and that fall teaching design students, which eventually teaching author students. But in particular design thing really did work why West go? Why did design work? Design is inherently human centered. The way we teach it and both of you and I have been working with students for longtime I started I finished my masters in eighty two I started teaching part time eighty, three I'm doing this for like thirty. Six years or something. And in office our after office hours after office. Our really smart capable students going I don't know what to do. I. Don't know how to launch. is working to suck as much as everybody tells me. How. Will I find something that I want or I like or might even be meaningful people keep asking me stupid questions like what's my passion and I don't know. So wrong broken. With me professor and it's nothing wrong with you. And then Dave, this experience over Berkeley and you know basically the class happened because he wanted a shorter commute and I wanted to. Free up my office our time but no, it's a real. It's a really big problem I. Mean you look around look at the data around the world sixty United States sixty, eight percent of the people say I'm just engaged from are highly disengaged from my job. I hate my job eighty-five percent worldwide people hate their jobs, right? So the students you know we started with students and then pretty soon after we pick kind of gone all over the university and by the way now we and we give the class to any university that wants it. We're not being taught at one hundred, fifteen, some universities and courtesy of that wonderful woman over there Gabrielle. Runs our studios. Everybody's got the same question like life be meaningful. Will this be interesting? What's work? How does work it into this big thing called life? And it's essentially a human problem because we're trying to. But designers do is make things that have happened in the world. You know, hey, this is an iphone never happened before how do you do it while you build lots and lots of prototypes and figure it out because you can't get any about the future. So when you want to do something in the future that's brand new. You need a process design thinking process it works over and over again if you apply to your life, well, what are you trying to do something new in the world your. Future. Right you've never you've never been there before you don't know what it's going to be like you probably are a little anxious or you're at a point of change we started working with thirty and forty something. I. Have This career thing but it's not exactly what I didn't really work out the way I thought or it's okay to go faster. So everybody's got this problem. How do I invent the future? Well, design thinking and design is a wave in Benton your future. I tell the students you I wanted to choice. Whether Students Twenty launching a thirty in board or fifty, and thinking about their own career you got only two choices the futures coming. You don't get to choose that. You, get the default future stuff happens in you react to it. or You design it, you put your intention in the world and you try to make the world do things that you're interested in and

Berkeley David Kelly Apple Bill Gates Bill Burnett Stanford Bill United States Randy Benton Steve Professor Gabrielle Dave
Misplaced Science

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:35 min | Last month

Misplaced Science

"Night Welcome to kids Miss Mystery Cyber your host kit chrome today. I'm going to talk about how some Mistakes made it into text books and I'm going to start with the woolly mammoth arose about five point one million years ago in Africa according to the curator of the American Museum of Natural History in New York from Africa the mammoth migrated through Eurasia North America their evolution continued over millions of years eventually producing what we know now as the wooly mammoth beginning roughly two, hundred, fifty, thousand years ago. mammoths were extinct about ten thousand years ago. OOPS more like three, thousand, five, hundred years ago scientists now believe an isolated population of mammoth persisted on Wrangel Island off the northeastern coast of Siberia. And deep in Canada's Northwest Territories, World Heritage site in hunt, valley until about three thousand, seven, hundred years ago. Unfortunately, the ten thousand year mark of extinction is in most textbooks. But let's take a closer look at that date the prominent theory that made it into most textbooks. Encyclopedia's remember those was ten thousand years ago because it was believed for decades at the mammoth migrated from the African continent through. Eurasian North America, driven by the last ice age, they were following the food supply. If that's the case, then it makes sense that some moms ended up into Hani because it was never touched by. The last ice age and yes bone. So the mammoth have been found in that region but this isn't the first theory published in Texbook. As fact that there's some founded expend believed and yes, made it into text books that the continent of Antarctica has been covered by ice for millions of years again hoops the Perry reese map drawn in fifteen thirteen shows the northern coast of Arctic as ice-free. The most puzzling aspect of the map isn't how it managed to be. So accurate three hundred years before Antarctica was discovered but that the map shows the real Coche line under the ice geological evidence. has confirmed that the latest date and Artika could have been charted in an ice free ages. Four thousand BC officials sciences been saying all along the ice cap, which covers yet arctic is millions of years old the Perry reese at Arctic map shows, but the northern part of that continent has been mapped before the ice covered it. That could make us think it has been mapped a million years ago but that's impossible since mankind did not exist at that time further and more accurate studies have proven that the last period of ice free condition and already got ended about six thousand years ago. The question is who map Queen Maud land at Arctic six thousand years ago which unknown civilization, how the technology or the need to do that I wanNA touch on just one more scientific nestled in the ancient city of Komo. Polka Bolivia are stone blocks that were used to make up a series of Pyramids Wayne from two hundred to four hundred tons each block nothing unusual there the city dates back to five, thirty, six AD. Yet. The blocks are riddled with carved indentations and in the surrounding grasses were found. Staple shaped clamps that fit in place were used to hold the blocks together. How could the indigenous people? No knowledge of urgency have created these clamps and where did the metal they use come from? This isn't the only case of metal clamps being used to hold giants don't together in Cambodia's anchor watt giant sandstone blocks way nearly two tonnes were brought to the site of the temple from nearby mountain via series of waterways. Close inspection of stones that are scattered around the site have revealed carved indentation receptacles for metal clamps perhaps. How about an eerie coincidence just outside the magnificent ruins of anger what stands an ancient pyramid temple known as backseat clump core now from Cambodia. Travel over eight thousand miles to Guatemala in the ancient Mayan city of Tacoma all among the long forgotten structures at the call is the Temple of the Great Jaguar although the Cambodian pyramid is much smaller than the pyramid in Guatemala the similarities between the specific design features are uncanny both. These pyramids both these ancient structures have an unusually steep slope angle that didn't exist in many other pyramids or temples however, and perhaps most importantly they both feature a stepped formation. There's a massive stairwell going up the middle of both temples and there's a domed area located on the top of both once there you can see there's a small door that goes inside the pyramid on both and there's another internal structure that looks the same. Basically what you have here is an ancient civilization. Cambodia. Another one in Mesoamerica despite the fact that they are separated by more than nine thousand miles, they feature incredible similarities that no one not even science has been able to explain

Cambodia Arctic Antarctica Africa Wrangel Island Guatemala Canada American Museum Of Natural His Polka Bolivia North America New York Perry Reese Hani World Heritage Texbook Pyramids Wayne Mesoamerica Artika BC
Can I Buy a Motorcycle After My Girlfriend Dumped Me?

Ramsey Call of the Day

04:41 min | Last month

Can I Buy a Motorcycle After My Girlfriend Dumped Me?

"Matt is in Washington DC I matt, welcome to the show. David asked thanks so much taking my call. Really appreciate it. Sure. What's up? Hey question. So I don't know if I'm over thinking this or but some twenty five years old and I just moved to DC, it'd be closer to my girlfriend and we broke up. and. So I'm thinking about buying a motorcycle for about five grand I don't know if I can afford it or not. I make a hundred and twenty grand a year. I've got about one hundred and fifty grand cash just in the bank, and I've got another hundred grand just sitting in fifty grand in single socks and their fifty grand four one K. you're kidding they do you got all of that in Holland us about a five thousand purchase. What's really going on six thousand I. Say it again sorry said what's really going on here how much is the motorcycle five thousand dollars While put out one hundred and forty, six, thousand dollars in debt. We'll write a check and pay all that off, and then we'll have a discussion about a motorcycle. And then by the bike yeah. I I don't I to investment properties I I rent where I live and twenty four grand on a car. But I don't know if I'm over thinking or not. But I guess if you know I don't you're saying maybe I am overthinking one percent of your life where he's is a five thousand dollar motorcycle ninety, nine percent of your life where he was one, hundred, forty, six, thousand dollars in debt. Yeah. Write a check and pay off your debt go by the motorcycle. Are you buying a motorcycle grieving over the girlfriend? Yeah. A little bit. Yeah. I want to do. I thought my weekends would be with her and now I'm out together. So I just WANNA go out and make friends and just kind of have stuff to do you know you can make friends without a motorcycle. Batman. Why why do you need a motorcycle make friends? The only down the only negative part about the motorcycles number one, the debts and number two it sounds like it might be some grief spending grieving over the relationship and the not that it's because it's not gonNA, kill you financial. You can afford to buy the bike. You can afford to buy the bike and set fire to it in the driveway and not worry about it wouldn't. It's not GonNa kill you financially but what you can't afford is to get into a situation where you react to. bad feelings in your life by spending. Yes you can't. You can't put that group in your brain that that group will destroy you long-term definitely will definitely will an and hear me clearly ma'am. When you pay off this debt I wanted to go ahead and get your emergency fund backup because I gotTa give it to you to have that kind of money at this age. That's great. You just doing a little bit backwards from what we teach you know. So go ahead and pause all your investments right now because I want to go ahead and get out of debt and then makes you get your three to six months out enough to. Do that he's probably just needs to allocators couple hundred grand if I understood right well as one hundred and fifty thousand in a savings in one, hundred, thousand investments no show you some of both it lets us all the savings. Yes. Hundred Forty six, thousand year paid off four thousand dollars, right? Okay. Pull some out of investments and make sure it's set aside an emergency fund can't him by the bike coke right and you get all three done. Then you've got your first three baby steps, we call them in place mat but just just search your own soul and look in the mirror and go dude is this just I'm just grief spending here. and that's not something you want to get into as a long term thing that every time I feel bad I spend every time I feel bad eat. Those kinds of. This is why we teach don't move until you are married. Don't make a life changing move because he said, he moved to this place for his girlfriend. I mean that's a different subject. We Dave Ramsey show so. Anthony Oneal show whatever? So I'll go with me. You're saying don't chase girls and boys around the country. And not unless you not unless you are married why move to the hardcore why move in with the person you are hardcore Dave Kinda move on I'm not saying on that. Yeah. But I mean chasing somebody you know moving to the city with the person versus. Moving in. Not Moving in. So you into the City House Oh. Yes. See I still I'm St-. If my daughter came home and said I'm moving to another city so I can be closer to my boyfriend I will have a problem with that. Yeah. I mean, it's not wrong. I'm just saying. You're up and ruining your whole life for the possibility of this thing to workout. I think I'd want some circumstances listed out around that before I would make that call. Okay. If it sounded like immature and flighty like she was being used up or manipulated definitely out if she's a strong woman, make her own calls. That's a different issue.

Dave Ramsey Washington Matt David Holland Batman Anthony Oneal
"thousand years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"thousand years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Thousand years old I never from the Bloomberg interactive brokers studio this is Bloomberg best economic alarm bells beginning to ring in the U. S. but some members of the fed are still unconvinced Bloomberg's guy Johnson spoke with Chicago fed president Charles Evans to get his take on the overall economy and his concern about the outlook for inflation and how it plays into the fed's next interest rate decision I think we're now it's a circle eighty percent chance of a house like twenty five basis points at that meeting is over reaction to one piece of data fighting was an important piece of data I don't know if it's an overreaction I mean I'm open minded about the decision and learn more before the meeting the end of this month but I would say that I assume number was you know no negative number for manufacturing we received a number of reports over the last many months about trade uncertainties about how many factory and your prices were a bit reticent to expand capacity capital expenditures have been very weak and so I think it is a little more confirmation of the reports that we had been seen and I think it'll be a very important to see the progression from here for instance wards a rate cut by manufacturing use and also a huge parts of the US economy but it is a significant parts of the US economy it certainly isn't in my midwestern district we have more manufacturing than the average and so I've heard more reports about this in the weaknesses and and what comes from the trade uncertainties but I would say that the thing about monetary policy.

fed Bloomberg guy Johnson Chicago Charles Evans Bloomberg interactive brokers president US Thousand years eighty percent
"thousand years" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"thousand years" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Going on in the world right now is well within any long term natural variability and if I tell you they keep saying well what we're going to get to degrees warmer and that's going to be the end of the world for the last ten thousand years it has been two degrees warmer than today for nine thousand of them. right and so that's amazing yeah well. your deal with climate you just had a record to prove what you wanted to prove. dental they're really really good at that yeah it's called cherry picking and and and of course there's been so what I'd just done is they give you the record temperature record over the last ten thousand years and it completely dispels what they're saying for the last thousand years when a minute why why I think what everybody is wondering right now is why do you hate polar bear so I mean they're on the ice shelf they're ready to die the poor little ice is is about to flip over and they're going to drown yeah and the baby. polar bears are going on yeah that's even more heart wrenching what won't drown in the reason they won't but either way I know just because they spent five years a search and rescue in the arctic song very familiar with polar bears but they've got two levels of of four or they've got a very short for close to the skin which is an incredibly effective insulator to the point where I worked with scientists that we're taking infrared photographs of polar bears and they don't show up on the photograph. really they don't give out any heat that's one sweat jacket that jacket that be great anyway yeah and then the longer hair is hollow so they float it floats you can swing yeah I think this was a preemie well in fact I I I personally.

ten thousand years thousand years two degrees five years
"thousand years" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"thousand years" Discussed on 600 WREC

"What's going on in the world right now is well within any long term natural very ability and if I tell you they keep saying well what we're going to get to degrees warmer and that's going to be the end of the world for the last ten thousand years it has been two degrees warmer than today for nine thousand of them. right so that's a. yeah well what do you do with climate you just. click to prove what you wanted to prove. good deal they're really really good at that yeah it's called cherry picking and and and of course there's this so what I'd just done it state give you the record temperature record over the last ten thousand years and it completely dispels what they're saying for the last thousand years when a minute why why I think what everybody is wondering right now is why do you hate polar bear so I mean they're on the ice shelf they're ready to die the poor little isis is about to flip over and they're going to drown yeah and the baby. polar bears are going on yeah that's even more heart wrenching what they won't drown in the reason the by the way I know your spent five years or search and rescue in the arctic song very familiar with polar bears but they've got two levels of of for they've got a very short for close to the skin which is an incredibly effective insulator to the point where I worked with scientists that were taking infrared photographs of polar bears and they don't show up on the photograph. really they don't give out any heat that's one sweat jacket that jacket that be great anyway yes that's a longer. hello so they float it floats. yeah I think this was a preemie well in fact I I I personally.

ten thousand years thousand years two degrees five years
"thousand years" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"thousand years" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Rivers was uninhabitable because it was under ice for twenty thousand years we have been warming sea levels have been rising parts of the world that will uninhabitable have become have little they have become filled with vegetation and agriculture areas that were not a lot but what were useless are now feeding entire populations this warning has been going on twenty thousand years and there hasn't been any enough activity by men to be responsible for it at all there weren't enough human beings on the planet twenty thousand years ago to affect any kind of change according to current theories which are bogus such as industrialization the output of CO two was the driving of SUVs and everything else they claim that we're doing now to destroy the planet if the earth has been in a warming trend and it's obviously been in one if we had the last glacial maximum twenty thousand years ago and we're not under ice now we've obviously been dealing with a lot of warming twenty thousand years that's a long time people can't comprehend it because the life spans eighty five twenty thousand years but the fact of the matter is the earth has been warming for twenty thousand years man's had nothing to do with it now all of a sudden the warming continues as it has been here come a bunch a left wing liberal Democrat partisans and charlatans who want to now claim in all of this is the result of man made activity going back to the industrial age it's bogus I love this way that mo Brooks did this to illustrate this not this is a press release it got picked up on a couple websites but it's not gonna go mainstream because it knocks the entire political premise of climate change of course it's not gonna be widely distributed or broadcast it's going to be shelved and ignored it but I want you to know about it because this is your always looking at ways to persuade people here always looking at ways to cut through the stupidity to cut through this ignorance dangerous late education's been corrupted to the point that people aren't being taught anything anymore they're being indoctrinated to being taught to hate you know this stupidity and ignorance that I find all over modern day American journalism also is shrouded in hate it is a hate filled anti hate spread the ignorance and stupidity and the fact that it it corrupts the minds of not just the young but everybody exposed to it is undeniable and it's a troubling thing and it's probably one of them at its root level one of the greatest troubling things because it spans generations it spans current political issues and clients no pun intended okay that's that quick time out will come back and it's open line Friday start working phone calls in here and the news of the day so hang on and beats rush on the the network Mrs steeple investor in sight to see full chief investment officer Michael o'keefe Michael it seems like the job market remains strong what we learned this week well this week we are in the job openings the US remain near record highs seven point three million so hiring is unlikely to slow and the weekly jobless claims were better than expected two hundred nine thousand versus the expected to twenty one and we even heard and fed testimony this week the companies are having a hard time selling positions what companies do to deal with this tight job market one observation of the increasing presence of new technology think artificial intelligence and robots for example jobs are shifting to hire skilled roles these are hard to fill so lately companies are looking to retrain workers with new skills interestingly companies do this for the bottom line the S. they assess the cost of training versus the benefits but for the workers such training makes them even more employable so a big win for them hi Steve all this aligns with our work on the fourth industrial revolution how our world is improving with things like mobile technology to learn more about our work on the fourth industrial revolution our listeners can speak with their.

twenty thousand years eighty five twenty thousand ye
"thousand years" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"thousand years" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Was discovered. Ten thousand years old recent DNA analysis showed that he was blue eyed and dark skin. So the first Britain's very very dark skin that didn't know that before him. But there are the oldest evidence for human ancestors being in Great Britain goes back about nine hundred fifty seven hundred thousand years, but that evidence is only tools, we don't have the the bones to with them. We don't know the species, it was probably homo antiseptic, which is very early human ancestor, the first fossils are hyper against us as well. Five hundred thousand years ago and interesting because of Great Britain's and island, right? You can't just walk across except you can when the climate is when the seas drop enough like during glacial periods rights during glacial periods. You could walk to Great Britain interglacial period. You can't. So there were multiple waves of humans about ten separate ways of humans coming to Great Britain. And they all died out except twelve thousand years ago two thousand years ago is when there was the continuous presence of people in Great Britain. So there's a little bit of the history of people in Great Britain. But Piltdown man, there's so many lessons from this story. It is a classic. We can't forget it. Because we can't forget those lessons in the biggest of which is when you find exactly what you're looking for the very that's when you need to be the most sceptical, right? All right J last classics suicide, you're gonna cover his UFO's. So the UFO mythology is awesome. Because almost every story about UFO is kind of they all kind of rummage around the same things, they pull out all the same tropes. So I just picked one. I thought you guys would be familiar with the rental sham for us. You guys know about this. It's kind of like our area fifty to fifty one two. The to area. Fifty two is cool the UK Roswell. Yeah. Yeah. So the the brief summary on the story. I'm sure you know, it is that there's military base air force bases near the forest one of the bases. Like said, hey, we see some light. So they send out some people. They go take a look, then they're seeing light through the trees, and they think that they see some type of craft. They come back with the story that they're seeing, you know metal lights on their tree branches were broken and stuff like that. And this thing very quickly over the few days that that this all occurred. It went from like seeing lights to. They see imprint the ground of the ship when it landed imprinted the ground. Yeah, they saw they interpreted as the ship. That's right. Yeah. There were imprints there. Yeah. Of course. Part of the thing is, you know, you had these air force people that are one of them was quite famous, and he wrote this memo big memoir that he was keeping track of this is someone that has a career in the military, which should be respected. This is someone that's involved with the air force, which is air force people. They get things in the air. You know, what I mean anything that comes from outer space, whatever it gives them some added gravitas turns out that these people that claim to see all this stuff. It was all made up or they were confused. Yeah. The ones that don't understand how easily we can be fooled. Right..

Great Britain Britain seeing lights UK Roswell nine hundred fifty seven hundr Five hundred thousand years twelve thousand years Ten thousand years two thousand years
"thousand years" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"thousand years" Discussed on WTVN

"To four thousand years ago had a developed construction site using available materials, which are glacial erratics to basically predict solstices and and other other celestial events. So it's, you know, decided that you know, they were no less intelligent than we are their technology that they had available to express. These ideas was was different. But the underlying ideas are no different from those expressed at Stonehenge or other places that came much, you know, in other parts of the world using different technology. Well, I gotta tell you. My mom was born east of you in Fitchburg, Massachusetts and spend our summers there, Mark. And just New England is just gorgeous. Yeah. And what's next for you? We're gonna take calls pretty soon. But what's next for you after this project? Well, this this I'm going to stick with this project for a while. This is going to be it for a while. I in the book has gone because this is such a it's worldwide, and there's so many different dimensions and threads in this investigation. The book kinda does a very I do go deep in a few areas. But it's it's very broad. And so I anticipate in fact, I'm currently working on on not revisions the book per se, but expansions of it that I'll probably begin to publish on my blog on at before Atlanta's dot com. I also mentioned a technical paper that'll be coming out in the spring, and I'll be posting it information either on the blogger I've before Atlanta's Facebook page, so I'm gonna go. Oh, I'm going to start drilling into these different areas, these different places and engaging with, you know, local subject matter experts that know these sites I've already started to do that a little bit and to really try to bring this methodology into into the fold. And so, you know, get people thinking about it. And as a tool to, you know, maybe give some new fresh insights on as to these sites, and maybe some people that someone will come up with some new idea, and it'll just another thing just to sort of move things along so we can begin to learn more and try to figure all the south park. We're gonna come back and take the calls next with Marc car lotto on coast to coast AM. Watch. The most popular artists of today. Go to our website and see them all on the El Dorado to downstate Eldorado cited onstage under music media or use keyword stage. Experience the newest games and a lot more fun only at El Dorados downswing problem. Call one eight hundred five eight nine nine sixty six the skills you can develop as a.

Atlanta El Dorados Mark El Dorado New England Facebook Fitchburg Massachusetts Eldorado south park Marc four thousand years
"thousand years" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"thousand years" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"The progressives an ally from this lawyer. Now, there is this. What do I think of this allegation? If you're lying about this. You have to ten thousand years in jail. Ten thousand years in jail. I also would be remiss if I didn't no. That what you're asking America to believe has just taken a massive jump. You see in the in the first story Blasi Ford. You have a story of a teenager. Who was not. Acting like an adult because they were seventeen. You can argue that it was wrong. It'd be hard to argue that that one incident would be preventing someone from being a supreme court Justice. You would you would have a tougher time with that. Now, he has. Gone onto state and nothing like it ever happened. No way. No. How not not possible while he is thrown the burden of proof onto him in regards to. Well, someone says this happened in you say didn't happen there. They're more people are there's proof. I keep or there's say and in many ways, you're out. We don't have the question that relies in any way, he's out he screwed. That's all there is to it. We went from a guy who groped girl. To a guy who exposed himself to a girl to a guy who was organizing the drugging of women and gang raping them for the benefit of his friends..

Blasi Ford America Ten thousand years ten thousand years
"thousand years" Discussed on Blamestorming

Blamestorming

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"thousand years" Discussed on Blamestorming

"Welcome to blame storm in the blames to win in a post truth world this plenty of blame to go around twenty a plane go round plane to join dave cyrus amoruso smith as they blamed still blame store as they blamed storm about today's hot topics guys this is blame storming i were assessment we are back with dave cyrus yes i'm joey gay right and we are joined with rob ryan i just came here yes thanks for coming in so let's just jump right in rob name three celebrities you think are actually innocent of their sex charges no this the show this is the show create create a buzz a buzz trying to create controversy yeah you invite a comic and then you yes do them i think the charges laid against you dave yeah and technically are more than three well played yes so trump recently said that he thought that teachers should be armed in schools like does anyone think this is a good idea no i don't even like teachers being teachers and schools give them guns now do you ever hang out with a teacher like i have a friend who becomes a teacher they start off like the beginning of some hollywood movie they're gonna make a connection three years later the like i hope they all kill themselves he's gonna pass they've lost bill to live there drinking in the afternoon these are the people where arming it's like you've made people cops and then retroactively given them guns.

dave cyrus rob ryan dave cyrus amoruso smith dave hollywood three years
"thousand years" Discussed on The Fun Kids Download

The Fun Kids Download

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"thousand years" Discussed on The Fun Kids Download

"Mary on koa get side emailer heard let's before his sasi these the super bowl or crazy assumption to make that he's a bull like shape what he could very easily be lowered as bba play then if he's on your team early playoff owner of the last defender so east trades essay plays up front great days am scale accident will that's that's that's brilliant are to detune also mary personable and had look leila more excellent bomb god sonoda rival reality on online on us okay through every single droid install wars and took a by that personnel asia thing that's probably enough adjust by a cheese jasper that question may i feel as and question ovitz robot fun kids log dot com such breakfast is waiting skype up next on the phone kits download we're going to be brushing up on our polish with another episode of the poland fast files learn polish remember when everpresent we get for bruno has to face in his suitcase i guess a fifth boys doubt dan i'm sure he likes today well you have to ask him then do you like food bull is to leash kusunose known chain ill beach peel nausea that's right and if he does he'll say loopy in pukekohe notion that i like football right and they floor well then its nubian pugh kenosha thing i don't like what if he is the same as man next listening to music instead moro music is music so how mind you say that you like music and look beyond moves it.

Mary super bowl leila poland bruno football
"thousand years" Discussed on The Fun Kids Download

The Fun Kids Download

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"thousand years" Discussed on The Fun Kids Download

"Maybe they couldn't find a faint big enough for it did they have to make one specially walk formal lavious than that because it so massively john enormous take concrete through the gallery does he add to be carefully road up to get india and he's been on call a journey before they had to bowl at like a carpet all who painting always had worst treatment in that let me tell you about where he was found in a carso in a place coalistion stein a small country next to germany over fifty years ago a nine 57 two gallery send trustees to go and have a look at a pie but he was talking saw the cost of what he was altogether good look tony brice ball decided it will be a great idea to take he added saw it aimed in the sunshine as immobile well what's from with where they just site it was a very windy die song with the fact that the painting was corner gust of wind and thrown into the air oh wait it aimed at the ended up coil while white told no of friends who proved pain theme tall at least safely here it's had a chance to be repackaged right that's what first of all it was given a good clean out to remove liz lays an old varnish on what was done it was carefully log on the back to give it most strength and then he pie which had flight to off was replaced strug boy struck impact eight was q in this process conservation insane found out that the painting had fallen foul of one loss terrible fighters.

india germany liz log on fifty years
"thousand years" Discussed on The Fun Kids Download

The Fun Kids Download

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"thousand years" Discussed on The Fun Kids Download

"Oh george my darling the doctors time you can speak for that to us so we go come with me my air how are you my love it beep beep beep beep i love you to my darling how do for you a new what it is your georgia i couldn't possibly the doctor is here i'll leave hutu alone no dogs at new bright will win when one small gets my level on the cheek and whoo hoo whoo oh george free day i mean why we guy missed a thackeray each will is going on i can catch loads more of a little a little comedy sketches not that by heading over to the free fund kids up up next on the fun kids download we are going to be catching up we thought painting explore is painting explorers with the national gallery rides now for a picture i love and the reason rvs because he was one of the most famous stories in east trade and if that wasn't enough the painting itself has gone on one hey come an adventure these cold the adoration of the shepherds and he's bog guido retina come on let's find out more there are lots of pictures telling the story of the birth of jesus de swann is an activity seeing marion josie for shown we've by be jesus in the center and as surrounded by shepherds moshe puts can be seen in the distance and i angels over obey the it coming from baby jesus east jasper nomo not so bright lights up all the people around him so thought so christmas what makes this special have you seen a looming size of rate a straw again thick plot follows mayors toll has told us up plus that if you osmayi pre impressive in itself but he saw his has led to a few problems any ideas what i moi bay.

georgia marion josie moshe thackeray christmas moi bay
"thousand years" Discussed on The Fun Kids Download

The Fun Kids Download

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"thousand years" Discussed on The Fun Kids Download

"Hello and welcome along the phone kits download eighty showed here alongside my buddy robots need save nieces why you stood i've eight us is every time so just people before just before we start the phone kits dynamite he's usually by the microphone just as we're about stop he then fax up he reverses to the very back in the studio so he can do that we is struck socity to the microphone during is funky entrance music are we doing robot e e good looking forward to sharing a riddle with us all these little is a beasley riddle is a okay them robots will liaise so every single phone kits download robot kicks off the show with a radl you have a little think about it and then we will give you the answer at the end of the phone kids download the today's riddled police it is in a moment dear okay rival vice eight up for me one more time so i foot went on and on and it lies in alone right so let's let's slightly say this again it's noise and cleanings everyone nice what's occurs one percent of minutes twice in a moment but never in one thousand da's pavel ill think about that one us as a as a tough one this morning rivals will be the answer to that radl at the end of the phone keith dine late but first of all going to be catching up with place the fake reach conductor mrs coach husband is behind this captain but before you go through your husband's operation well lee experienced shall we say some complication is he well did you managed to kill his donned offer tonsilitis dodger we did mrs fair coach but in doing so i'm afraid we have to amputate well quite a lot in fact all that remains of your husband is in fact he's bottom is bochum o go in there is he still with us doctor he is we managed to transplant his brain into his bottom mrs fair coach he can communicate with sun effort but remember he is very weak what i want to see my husband now please doctor very well.

lee one percent
"thousand years" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"thousand years" Discussed on WRVA

"Last ten thousand years or so it's just a particular kind of thing that sort of set up in this current climate state that we've had for less ten thousand years or so and it could change you know it could change if we if we push the climate system hard enough that river of warm water you know in the ocean we'll shift and that would have huge consequences for um human civilization that's the kind of things you know i i talk about so that's really why you meet you know we wiped scientists have been sooner raising the art alarm bells that if you push this the system to art it's going to rearrange itself in ways that you know what could be done you know pretty detrimental to human civilization so and your point about the coffee beans is interesting because yeah that's why i try and tell people climate change climate science is not a house of cards it's a mountain of bolder you don't each bolder is a result and you know you can bolder out and you're the single shifts but the mountain doesn't fall it's climate science is not just atmospheric temperatures it's rainfall patterns it's where you know uh as you said different kinds of agriculture it's the bleaching of the ocean the acidification the ocean there are so many different directions that we understand that the climate is changing that you know you can take it you can cherry pick one particular result and say oh i have a problem that but you know it doesn't change all the other result that we have that show us an income biology too you know it's ocean agassi that shows the climate is changing got to love that in florida they're they're being bombarded by frozen iguanas have you been reading botha's twelve these these gora guana zia urges the it's so cold that they just stopped moving in the freeze and then fall out of the trees and they're like laying around everywhere not dead they're just kind of in this dormant state but while that is crazy isn't it oh let's go west of the rockies don in salem oregon welcome to the show at a male iran pouria than bothering me your he'll get the age of.

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"thousand years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"thousand years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Of the great civilizations we've seen in the last you know you know twelve thousand years since we had the whole paul shift when atlantis went down how that a lot of great civilizations have come off of that line either positively or negatively and how it's court the end portion of the earth is over there in the east and the gang materialistic action oriented one is over here in the west so we can argue that has existed that level then it adrift at the cosmic level all of you know what's a mayans call um the whom abc who being them one meaning in one measures of let us say the great central sun but the coup at whom bean let us say the serpent row for the trunk of the tree that connects our world with our sun our son with the great central son inside the centre of our galaxy and on and on to probably the center of creation itself wherever it is you know she will physically or even energetically so there's a lot to say and then when we be and talk about the separatists you know we can talk about whether it's a ring past knots of the various planetary fears which of course this up ross is that's one of their symbols as the you know mercury balancing venus which is like the mind balancing the central new sure and mars balancing jupiter and then then they all balancing the female and so forth as you move up but then of course a middle path is um now 'cause the kingdom in the base you can't even get on to the tree unless you can feel your feelings the assad which of course is quivalent to the astro alert the lunar sphere and then that middlepath jesus was teaching which was the path at the.

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"thousand years" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"thousand years" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Thousand years for you to solve a problem is it intelligence is a lotta that would would i think be relative to the little the life span of the creature right yeah an end with the human example culture so for a human being either human being since a lifetime solving a s a sufficiently important problem then it's considered a success if you've ever a scientist spins their entire career developing a cure for a terrible illness and made they find it they they the crack that not then that's a success but if you look at it for more like a ancient day humanoid uh a situation then you could say while the problem isn't solved in a day or two then are you really solving the problem because the the challenges are that much more immediate right yeah and then if you're not a human if you're if you're an aunt if your if you are a cat or dog than it seems like everything would be will it would be at least as a meat i mean it essentially what i'm building up two years the it makes me think that the development of human intelligence or not human intelligence specifically animal intelligence is linked to the fastmoving moving demands of right now yeah like the fact of the decisions that need to be made quickly will strongly affect your survival is what powers the development of problemsolving acceleration which is what intelligence could be yeah and a lot of this of course involves not only nimri remembering what has come before but being able to extrapolate pa.

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"thousand years" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"thousand years" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"About the river jordan i four thousand years ago and this population has the most of it in it the dakotas shoe and so he says that that genetic marker is evidence that the animal rights were uh over here and what was your second earlier question i think oh artifacts ya um i'm real eight kia about removing anything uh from one of these sites that's almost and that's almost two sinn isn't it well it is and i don't know what's attached to it that's a good point and i had a friend one time go with me and the picked up a couple of rocks and even know the earth work was about a mile and a half fact it's like you've gotta take those back and you're definitely not bringing them in the car 'cause i don't want you don't know what to attach do anything and so i'm very careful now not to take anything with me you really do dabble with the paranormal don't you well i'm i'm i'm hesitant and you know i i take a lotta caution about it lau to err on the side of caution is probably the smart thing to do he added is when you're dealing with the napoli might think i think it is while i i tell you the something to the biblical stories and i think uh you're beginning to one covers some evidence that would back up the bible when what fascinates me about the bible is is depending on how you interpret it i i think it's i think it's true i think almost everything in the bible is probably true and the huge it's all subject to interpretation but it's right out there it's laid out for you i mean fallen angels were the ts i think that's up for debate but something happened don't you think it is a great history book and even what the meg olympic era you know that dino confound archeologists just like it's all in the bible they talk about stones and they can even god says you know the i resigned in this stone now it's all day and we're coming back in a moment with final phone calls with fritz zimmerman author of mysteries of ancient america next on coast to coast.

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"thousand years" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"thousand years" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"The big companies must pair heavy price nearly all the papers report on prince william asking recovering drug addicts weather drugs should be legalised he described as a massive problem to be faced and this happened during a visit to a chaldean shortage in london yesterday the telegraph says royal aides emphasized that the duke had been careful not to offer his own opinion spokesman for transform a think tank pressing for the change in drug laws told the times delighted prince william has had the courage to ask one of the most pressing questions of all time the time is courted eight dozens of perfectly preserved ancient shipwrecks have been found at the bottom of the black sea professor john adams is professor of archeology of the universe the southampton was also deputy director on the mary rose project and is on the line morning to you good morning just a dating back how far what we've got a range of shipped now the from the 19th century will way back about two and a half thousand years two and a half thousand years indonesia so per preroman oh yes yes i mean we've got a lot of raymond ships to we got a ottoman medieval buzz anti roman and i think a couple of greek ships is well i'm what state they added a utterly through injury i mean if anybody told me a few years ago that i'd be looking at the ship because it still looks like a ship thousand warrant warrant craxi with his jill standing roque attached to it on the quota relatives still mounted looking exactly like some of the images we see on um you know rate trigger fosseys from the attic period fiction actually i wouldn't i wouldn't believe issue of what is it that cause them to be preserved night well it's the anoxia conditions are the black sea m a boloba one hundred fifty meters of decks there is no oxygen or in the water so it means that went organic material and of course a lot of the age should rex were created that would have a lot of organic material essentially just doesn't degrade entertaining likes to speak the fbi would in any other see in the world apart from the baltic har and what.

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