35 Burst results for "Thousand Hours"

Trial by Zoom: Courts Rethink the Jury Trial in the Age of COVID-19

Post Reports

03:50 min | Last month

Trial by Zoom: Courts Rethink the Jury Trial in the Age of COVID-19

"My name is Justin Juvenile Justice reporter for the Washington, Post and I sat in on what we think is probably the nation's first criminal jury trial that was done virtually. It was staged over zoom call out of a court in Texas a misdemeanor court where defendant was accused of speeding in a construction zone. Because this format was totally brand new and hadn't been used for criminal jury trial. The judge in the case wanted to start with the low stakes case there's no jail time. On the table for the woman. It kind of looks like the Brady Bunch opening credits, there's tiles of video feeds across the screen, the judge, the prosecutor, the defendant, and all seven jurors in this case had video feeds going at the same time and the judge could ask. Questions to the attorneys and the attorneys could question witnesses who dialed in when it was the appropriate time for them to give their testimony. There is definitely some of that awkwardness throughout the call. There is your typical problems that people would probably be familiar with with zoom like audio freezing. Video freezing in fact, at the very outset of the trial, just a couple minutes in. One of the jurors video feeds froze as the judge was giving instructions and it brought the whole trial to a halt. The judge his staff tried for a number of minutes to get the jurors video feed fix. Ultimately, they couldn't get it fixed and the jurors had to be dismissed from the jury because of that technical glitch and he was. One of five jurors who had to be dismissed either during the trial during jury selection for technical issues. There are interesting little moments as well. One of the jurors was at home and she had a cat and during the call, the cat was in the background tearing up per calendar as she was trying to listen to instructions from the judge and listen to people who are testifying in the trial. So it's a brave new for for the justice system. Even, before the pandemic preceding immigration and bail hearings were occasionally conducted over video but that shift has accelerated in the past six months during the pandemic more and more courts have embraced doing things virtually, Bhai Zoom we've seen courts across the country use zoom for sentencing hearings, motion hearings, and all different types of proceedings that before the pandemic period were not done online. Texas is a good example. Since March the courts have held more than seven hundred thousand hours of virtual hearings for sentencings and motions and other things. They've actually been able to keep up with the vast majority of their trials unlike some places where. Because Proceedings have been shut down during the pandemic. There's now big backlog of cases they've been able to keep with their trials. They report also that there judges have been more efficient in Texas judges have to travel sometimes hours to preside over hearings in different across the state. Now, the judges can just log on from home in jump right into a trial in it cuts down on on travel time. They say, also it's actually improved justice in the sense that more defendants showing up for hearings a lot of people who might have been skipping out on hearings like landlord addiction. Hearings are now they're showing up because all they have to do is log on from home. So it's actually showing some benefits,

Texas Bhai Zoom Reporter Justin Juvenile Prosecutor Washington
An Excerpt from the book Flirting with Darkness by Ben Courson

Optimal Living Daily

06:57 min | Last month

An Excerpt from the book Flirting with Darkness by Ben Courson

"An excerpt from the book flirting with darkness. Ben. Carson. Weapon number three, the magic number of greatness. I got to a point in my struggle with depression where something needed needed to change must suffering. So badly, I finally decided to do something about it. The ten thousand hour rule saved my life. His Book Outliers Malcolm Glad well demonstrated that to be truly greeted anything. You have to put in ten thousand hours of practice. People such as world chess champion Bobby. Fischer businessman Bill Joy, and IBM founder Bill Gates are among the many examples. Glad. While gives of people who excelled because they accelerated they focused and worked hard and gave at least ten thousand hours to becoming the best at what they did. Glad will show that whether you want to be a fiction writer or master criminal. Hockey player or a pianist ten thousand hours was the magic number of greatness. Bent my mind to that goal is a writer Manspeaker. A resolved to stop wasting my energies, processing psychological trauma and to go on a diametrically opposed direction. Instead of disappearing over why dreams weren't coming to pass, I decided to commit myself to working my fingers to the bone to ensure they did. Psychologists, John Hayes quote looked at how long it took the best composers of all time to create their first grey work. He found that nobody including Mozarts was a child prodigy had produced a piece of work of any significance until about ten years after they had I, taken music no amount of innate talent even in a field of genius such as music could overcome the years of practice necessary to Korea work someone may be talented. They may be lucky but they still have to go through ten years of practice in order to become a master and quote. When Churchill came to power during World War Two he said this as he was being inaugurated into office as prime. Minister quote. I. Offer you nothing save blood, toil tears, and sweat and quo. Lecture Chill Ready to go to battle anew, the path will be difficult PROC- ready to claim own finest hour. Getting better stars, which is getting off your tuition in doing something. So I did. My goal was to become a writer and a speaker put in the needed hours. My nearly worked myself to death, but it was infinitely better than brooding found the effort. Cathartic in fulfilling my spirit's began to lift. I figured I had two options number one either get discouraged that my dreams were not coming pass or number to spend the effort of getting prepared for when they did. Legendary preacher Charles spurgeon advised students to stop worrying about when they would get their shot at speaking and concentrate instead on their ability, and they'll let God take the opportunity in other words quit fretting over the how and focus on the what I took these words to heart and focused on my skill set as I improved my craft, our English word amateur comes from a French Italian an line route which means to love an obvious works when he loves the process and it feels good a professional is someone who worked seven days a week whether he feels like it or not. Today. My TV show hope generation is on twenty different networks more than one hundred and eighty countries and radio shows heard on more than four hundred stations daily. I get to speak in stadiums and arenas. My quote unquote overnight success came through hours of hard work. How you'll spend your ten thousand hours may be different from how I spend mind but you'll find as I did a clear focus and a way of getting off the existential treadmill of despair, transform your life but the age of twenty one, the average American has put ten thousand hours of practice into computer and video games when I use those hours for something more productive. How hard you hustle in the darkness determines how brightly you shine in the spotlight. To prepare for speaking to people I got really good at lecturing my furniture. My chairs were my captive audience I remember that Billy Graham. One said he got his start by preaching to alligators before he preached in stadiums. You have to start with a small stuff and work your way up. So I took every opportunity that presented itself. I spoke to classes of little kids and homeless shelters at old folks, homes, and to student clubs I volunteered to take the opportunities. Others turned down, I got lots of practice. When other speakers turned an organization or church down my said, yes I did this I several years Only the small minded person will refuse the small task for me if I had an audience of four people those enough to get some more practice to put in some more hours toward my ten thousand our goal. Jesus said that if you're faithful and a few small things, you'll be given responsibility over bigger ones Matthew Twenty five that sound good to me. Yes sometimes I did feel like surface the tragic here of Greek mythology who had to roll a boulder of a hill only to see roll back down then roll it back up again only for it to roll back down again repeatedly, I'll stubborn in my pursuit it was a great weapon against despair to keep working in spite of how I felt, which puts me in the mind of a scene from Tolkien's the Lord of the Rings in the First Book of that trilogy the Fellowship of the Ring, a band of warriors is commission travel to the ends of the Earth to destroy the evil ring of power by casting it into mount doom. During their long journey. Gandalf who was their leader was thought to be killed in the minds of Maurya in response airborne stepped up to lead the band in his stead amid his grief and despair he cried out farewell Gandalf what hope have we with you then he turned to the fellowship and said, we must do without hope let us gird ourselves and weep no more come. We have a long road. Like that trek to mount doom healing is usually a long journey. We normally don't start feeling better overnight sometimes, we must go on when we feel absolutely no hope. Our quest leads down a winding path and his sometimes fraught with trolls and Goblins and all manner of Dr Treasures. But psychological heroism is possible in such journey is were taking like Eric Gordon Frodo my set my foot upon my own path out of depression I gave them my flirtation with darkness and began to tread the road toward a grand purpose and it worked after many many years. The Dreams I had begun to despair finally came true new ones came into sight, but it all began by putting one foot in front of the other. If you allow yourself to just sit around and partly catatonic state stuffing yourself with junk food is a form of therapy and watching callous hours of television. You'll probably never start feeling better. But I. Tell You that you get off the couch and venture into the world to do something toward your goals. Things will start to change in your heart and mind if you pull yourself out of bed and get going on your dreams, that's how you'll will begin the journey to healing your broken spirit.

Writer Depression Mount Doom Gandalf Carson Charles Spurgeon Bill Gates Korea Billy Graham Hockey Dr Treasures Bobby Eric Gordon Frodo John Hayes Jesus Mozarts Bill Joy Churchill IBM
The Lifequake Survival Guide With Bruce Feiler

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:01 min | Last month

The Lifequake Survival Guide With Bruce Feiler

"All right well, nice to see you. Thanks for doing this my pleasure. Thank you for having. What how would you describe the the thesis of this book? Debating whether I should start right with a thesis or tell you how I came to the pieces. So. I think I'll do the second way because. I didn't go into this project with pieces, but a big linking pieces showed up halfway through. So what happened what led me into this? Somebody's what this book is. About is how we deal with these big wrenching changes in our lives back hallway light quake. And like what we're in now. And I got interested in these because I went through a life quake some years ago as you know, I I got cancer as a new TAB. About was that same year as the great recession and my family was hit very hard. And then my dad who has Parkinson's Lost Control of his mind. This was a man who was never a depressed admitted his life. And he tried to take his life. Times in twelve weeks. And this was kind of a big crisis. In every way, you can have a crisis, the conversations that we had to have. unhabitable eye like difficult conversations and these were difficult conversations that were impossible to have. But I'm the story guy and I'm the meaning guy in one morning on Monday morning I woke up and I said, well, your idea like what if I send my data question because my dad was always a bit of a storyteller. And I sent question like what toys did you play with a kid? Couldn't move his fingers at this point Dan. But he thought about it all week he dictated his answer to Syria who spit it out he began to edit it in at work and so I. Also another one like dummy balance you grumpy. And This went on essentially every Monday morning for what became years. Up. The. Hatch Become Eagle Scout. How'd you join the Navy how you meet mom and this man who had never written anything longer than three sentence memo in his life back into writing a fifty thousand word. And I got very interested in times of crisis in our lives like it. It's a narrative event in some way and it turns out there's a whole field narrative gerontology. There's all field of narrative adolescence, narrative medicine and kind of storytelling becoming kind of thing that people talked about at that time and so what happened and you know this makes me think of your own life and how you ended up in this conversation is when I began to tell the story to people everybody had a similar story. My wife had a headache and went to the hospital and died my daughter tried to kill herself. I. had nervous breakdown on my television in your case and and I thought well, no one else to tell their story anymore and. Let me see what I can figure out because people were saying like the life I'm living is not the life I expect like I'm living life out of order in some way. And I call my wife one night and I said. I got to figure out how to help. And I don't know I'm going GonNa find and I don't know how to do it but I feel compelled to do this and so I set out on this journey. What became Three four years crisscrossing the country collecting what became hundreds of life stories of Americans all ages all walks of life all fifty states and you name it damn. People lost homes, lost limbs, changed careers, genders, Religions got. Sober got a bad marriages. And at the end of it, I had it was powerful, but it was too much. I had six thousand pages of. Transcripts a thousand hours of interviews and I ended up doing something. I've never done thirty years of writing books. I got a whole team of people and we spent a year coating these. Combing through them debating I'm kind of beating one against the head trying to figure out. What was the big message? What was the big theme coming out of it?

DAN Parkinson Headache Syria
What Everyone Forgets About Money

Optimal Finance Daily

04:44 min | Last month

What Everyone Forgets About Money

"What everyone forgets about money by Crowning Chris. RINING DOT COM. Washing dishes was how I earned my first paycheck when you're fifteen years old and don't get money from your parents to buy things then you have to work. So there. I was scrubbing dishes in the filthy kitchen of a small family owned Italian restaurant, and it's where I learned a little life lesson work is nothing more than trading time for money a medium of exchange. You provide one hour of time to an employer and they provide an hour's wage. I quickly discovered teenagers time isn't worth all that much a measly four, twenty, five per hour. Not long after starting that job I wanted this blind melon album. You might remember their catchy song no rain. One Saturday afternoon wandering the aisles in K. Marts, electronics, department I saw it for sale. Cool. I'm getting it. The price was sixteen, Ninety, eight for whatever reason I did the mental math to figure out the album didn't really cost me seventeen dollars. No, it costs four hours on your feet washing never ending streams of bus tubs overflowing with half finished plates of meat balls is this CD worth four hours of my time. In this case it was but more importantly, you realize the money tucked in your wallet isn't money at all. It's time disguised as money. In fact, it was Benjamin Franklin who said time is money but in our hectic day to day lives, it's easy to forget this. When you spend your money, what you're really doing is spending your time, which means if you waste your money, you waste your time. anyways throw my teens I worked a series of jobs, bagging groceries, stocking merchandise theater concessions, and mostly saved my earnings my time to precious and then I went off to college started a career and forgot what I learned. have. You heard that saying from Texas big hat no cattle meaning you can look rich but be poor. It's hard to believe people who make lots of money are poor. But then your tax preparer tells you they see plenty of families making three hundred thousand dollars and living paycheck to paycheck Thomas Stanley profiles. These folks in the millionaire next door, the doctor lawyer types who drive fancy cars living exclusive neighborhoods and take exotic vacations they look rich, but it's an illusion. It's the families who make one hundred, thousand dollars spent forty thousand and have a million dollars in the bank who are rich. Isn't the worst irony that the simplest way to get rich and have lots of money to spend his by not spending lots of money. But just because it's simple to get rich doesn't mean it's easy spend less than you earn and invest the difference that simple would makes getting rich so difficult is that spending less than you earn takes discipline the median retirement account is worth twenty, five, thousand dollars, and so the problem isn't paying people more money they'll save more give people more money to spend and they'll spend more money. I know this because back in my twenties, I spent just like the next person you think acquiring loss of material possessions satisfying all your superficial desires is the key to happiness. It took me years to relearn what I knew as a teenager. The things you buy with money that you surround yourself with aren't things at all it's your time. And research shows it's having control over your time that makes you happiest not money and things. So, most people have a choice. You can trade time for money and money for things, or you can trade time for money and then use that money as a tool to buy back time. That's why you save and invest, which reminds me of what stoic philosopher Seneca said quote. It's not that we have a short time to live but that we waste much of it life is long enough and it's been given to us in generous measure for accomplishing the greatest things if the whole of it is well invested. But when life is squandered through soft and careless living, and when it spent on no worthwhile pursuit death finally presses and we realized that the life which we didn't notice passing has passed away and quote. What he's saying is when you're about to die, you realize life is time and doesn't that make time your most precious resource. Here think about it like this see, you've worked forty hours per week for the past ten years. You've traded twenty thousand hours of your time. That's forty hours times, fifty weeks, times, ten years, and on the other side of the trade is everything you've consumed sure necessities like food clothing, shelter and healthcare but probably a bunch of other stuff you've totally forgotten about buried in the back of some closet. Was it a fair trade? Maybe it was maybe it wasn't but people are always telling me they've earned million dollars over the past ten years and have nothing to show for it and it makes them sick. They're not complaining about wasting their money. What they're complaining about is wasting their time. Trade wisely.

K. Marts Benjamin Franklin Thomas Stanley Texas Seneca
Hyrule Warriors: Age Of Calamity - Everything We Know

Dude Soup

03:54 min | Last month

Hyrule Warriors: Age Of Calamity - Everything We Know

"Woke up this morning. It was very pleasantly surprised for say open by idea was open my eyes and I, looked at my phone and I saw a news notification for Hira Warriors Age of calamity and I was like Ooh, what is this and it's kind of the kind of thing like you have a whirlwind of emotions because you're like. Zelda and then you go higher warriors in your you know. Not to diminish warriors because I think the first game was like it was solid it wasn't like the game mainlines all the game. I think we're all excited for this one. I'm I'm actually more into by the looks of it. I had that same ranger emotions rose like, oh, man Zola Taira Warriors, and then I stopped and like you spent two thousand hours playing that game shut up. Shut up nerd a nerd. I have a question. John. Hira Warriors. What kind of game is it because I thought being compared to dynasty words I only played dynasty warriors four when I was in seventh grade. So. Is that comparable? Like what are you doing it? It's It's just like, sorry it's just like combat and like some environmental puzzle stuff but Matt. This this one's a little different because it's basically is dynasty warriors but instead of like Only, that there's also some Zelda elements built in where it's like, yeah, I gotta go solve this puzzle using the bombs or something like that. And then you might an army of people by yourself. Yeah, other other people from Celta are there to their plays IMP army, but they're not nearly as good as you. In the regular one yes. I would assume because this takes place one hundred years before breath of the wild. Yeah. It's it promises a robust story that's going to kind of give us some insight into what happened during that era of calamity as they call it where the great calamity, of calamity, Dan, how many times can intend to say calamity. Did I kinda love it but yeah send for one hundred years before the events of breath of the wild and it seems like we're going to either see or get to play as some of the characters that appear in breath of the wild to. Direct prequel to breath of the wild I. Guess So. That was the most intriguing part to me is that it seems like it's cannon prequel like they're using the same aesthetic and everything even like it was the kind of self rated breath the wild which I think it's just all the stuff that we heard about throughout the game about what happened one hundred years ago we're actually going to explore it like clone wars. which that's awesome for me because I'm someone who I I like this all the time line just because I enjoy trying to piece together and figure out where it's supposed to go and having a hundred years of history basically thrown at me Awesome. I. Also like it because I like. I like when a prequel. Predate something where you know that Shit's hit the fan and go. Wrong. So I it's what I really liked about dark crystal age of resistance is like. This going it's like A. Charlie, wiping out of of a creature but I kinda liked that we're gonNA see just is GonNa have I imagine a kind of bleak story end to set us up more wild. Following the. Good. You're. Going to say if it's following the history of the characters that we meet in Ghost form and breath of the wild. Sort of a giveaway.

Hira Warriors Zola Taira Warriors Zelda Imp Army Matt Shit John DAN A. Charlie
Can I make a different video about dogs every day for a year?

Side Hustle School

03:55 min | 2 months ago

Can I make a different video about dogs every day for a year?

"Hi Chris, this is Shaun from San Diego and I've been listening since episode one and I think I've finally found my side hustle idea. What if I make a video every day for a year what would happen I have an idea to teach people about corgis. It's my favorite kind of dog through a lot of Corgi lovers out there and I was inspired by the guy who blocked fish tanks instead of blogging, I'm thinking of making a series of videos and because side-hustle school is daily, I'd also like to make different video every day for a year but just all about Corgis is this a good idea and what do you think will happen if I do that? Thanks Sean. Thank you so much for the question. Interesting idea for sure I've never heard this one before daily video series all about not just dogs but specific kind of dog. So leave the discussion about corgis themselves for now. I WANNA focus more on the broad question here Sean specifically asks what if I make video every day for a year what will happen. I think what? He's thinking I've kind of fallen into this trap myself. It's not necessarily a trap but what's going to break it down I? Think what he's thinking is okay. If I make a different video every day for a year, it might start small but over time more and more people are going to be watching and then like month one month to month three as as I move toward know corgi video number three, hundred and sixty, five all of a sudden there's going to be a huge audience of Corky. Lovers all watching and just anticipating as video, etc. so that may happen. Okay. So first of all, it may happen and it is good to be consistent and it can definitely help not just in terms of building the audience, but also you yourself like if you're trying to get in the habit of regularly publishing something or just again being consistent that can help but I think it is a trap to think that automatically the audience is going to build often with these things i. think this was true a lot when. When everybody was live streaming every single day. During the beginning of the COVID nineteen season and I've done life streaming myself. I'M GONNA keep doing it I. Think it's a great way to interact with folks but notice that like in the beginning of that season, like a lot of people started doing who weren't doing it before and I did see a lot of growth but then like often what happens is it just declines after a while which can feel demotivating because. You're like Hey I'm here I show up. I'm here every day or however often it is. Why did people stop watching? I think we just have to remember that people have busy lives and they're not necessarily going to be committed to you know coming every day or whatever the pattern is like you have to make it worth their while you have to always say what's in it for that other person to make that commitment. So doing something over and over consistently can't be a good path to building more traction, but you could also do that over and over and not see those results. So just keep that in mind remember that classic definition of insanity right is doing the same thing over and over but expecting different results and I often think about this. I'm sure a lot of people have heard of the ten thousand hour theory which Malcolm. Glad well popularized. I'm a fan of. His books but I think there is a critique of Allah critique of that theory. which is you can spend ten thousand hours doing something and still not have much to show for it. You know, yes the Beatles practice pretend thousand hours and had all these experiences playing in Germany before they got big and the UK and then America, and beyond. But lots of other bands can practice for ten thousand dollars and not the Beatles. and. So we can talk about that for a long time, but I think the idea just doing it doesn't necessarily guarantee success. So to get back to Sean, I would say it's definitely worth a try but the bigger question is to ask what can I do to help educate the world about Corgis or whatever my topic is, but we're talking about Sean and hopefully build my authority as the Corgi guy and so if you think about that question and the answer might lead to that daily video series, but it just as might well lead to something else. Okay. So don't let them medium or format drive your process don't let that medium or format lead the. Way, you know focus on the topic focus on what you want to communicate and be open to different mediums or formats as you go.

Sean Beatles. San Diego Chris Covid Beatles Malcolm Germany UK America
Why specializing early doesn't always mean career success

TED Talks Daily

05:03 min | 2 months ago

Why specializing early doesn't always mean career success

"Hi. I'm Elise Hugh. And you're listening to Ted talks daily today's talk features really fascinating research that cuts us all some slack. What I mean is it turns out you can be a late bloomer in your chosen sport or skill or specialty, and it's actually better for you in a lot of ways. The talk is journalist David Epstein at Ted Ex Manchester in twenty twenty. So I'd like to talk about the development of human potential and I'd like to start with maybe the most impactful modern story of development. Many of you here have probably heard of the ten thousand dollars rule maybe you even model your own life after it. Basically, it's the idea that the become great anything takes ten thousand hours of focused practice. So. You'd better get started as early as possible. The poster child for this story is Tiger Woods. Father Famously, gave him a putter when he was seven months old at ten months, he started imitating his father's swing. At to, you can go on Youtube and see him on national television fast forward to the age of twenty one he's the greatest Golfer in the world's quintessential ten thousand dollars story. Another that features a number of bestselling books is that of the three Polgar sisters whose father decided to teach them chests in a very technical manner from a very early age and really wanted to show that with a head start and focused practice. Any child could become a genius in anything, and in fact, two of his daughters went onto become grandmaster chess players. So, when I became the Science Writer at sports illustrated magazine I got curious if this ten thousand hours rules correct then we should see that elite athletes get a headstart in so-called deliberate practice. This is coached air correction focus practice not just playing around, and in fact, when scientists study lead athletes, they see that they spend more time in deliberate practice not a big surprise. When they actually track athletes over the course of their development, the future leads actually spend less time early on in delivered practice in their eventual sport they to have what scientists call a sampling period where they try a variety of physical activities. They gain broad general skills they learned about their interests and abilities and delays specializing until later than peers who plateau at lower levels. And so when I saw that said, Gosh that doesn't really comport with the ten thousand hours rule does it. So I started to wonder about other domains that we associate with obligatory early specialization like music. Turns out the patterns often similar. Research from a world class, Music Academy, and what I want to draw your attention to is the exceptional musicians didn't start spending more time into practice than the average musicians. Until Third Instrument, they tended to have a sampling period. Even musicians we think of is famously precocious like Yo, Yo Ma he sampling period he just went through it more rapidly than most musicians do. Nonetheless, this research almost entirely ignored and much more impactful is the first page of the Book Battle Hymn of the Tiger mother where the author recounts assigning her daughter Violin. Nobody seems remember the part later in the book where her daughter turns her and says, you picked it not me and largely quits. So having seen this sort of surprising pattern in sports and music. I started to wonder about domains that affect and more people like education and economists found a natural experiment in the Higher Ed Systems of England and Scotland in the period studied, the systems were very similar except in England students had to specialize in their mid teen years to pick a specific course of study to apply tours in Scotland they could keep trying things in university if they wanted to and his question was who wins the trade off the early or the late specializes and he saw that the early specializes jump out to an income. Lead because they have more domain specific skills, the late specializes get to try more different things and when they do pick, they have better fit or what economists call match quality, and so their growth rates are faster by six years out erase that income gap. Meanwhile, the earliest specializes start quitting their career tracks in much higher numbers essentially because they were made to choose. So early that they more often made choices. So the late specializes lose in the short term and win in the long run. I think if we thought about career choice like dating, we might not pressure people to settle down quite so quickly. So this interested seeing this pattern again in exploring a developmental backgrounds of people whose work I had long admired like Duke Ellington who shunned music lessons as a kid to focus on baseball and painting and drawing or Mario Mir's economy who wasn't interested in math is a girl dreamed of becoming a novelist and went on to become the first and so far only woman to win the fields medal the most prestigious prize in the world in Math Vincent Van Gogh had five different careers, each of which he deemed his true calling before flaming out spectacularly, and in his late twenty s picked up a book called the guide to the ABC's of drawing. That worked out. Okay Claude Shannon was an electrical engineer at the University of Michigan who took a philosophy course just to fulfill a requirement and in it, he learned about a near century old system of logic or was true and false statements could be coded as ones and zeroes in solved like math problems. This led to the development of Binary Code, which underlies all of our digital computers today.

Ted Ex Manchester Scotland Elise Hugh Tiger Woods Math Vincent Van Gogh Youtube David Epstein Sports Illustrated Magazine Claude Shannon Duke Ellington Third Instrument Higher Ed Systems Of England Music Academy University Of Michigan ABC Writer Mario Mir Engineer England
What Does A Healthy Rainforest Sound Like?

Short Wave

05:14 min | 2 months ago

What Does A Healthy Rainforest Sound Like?

"Today we're speaking with Sarah, Seti about ecosystem health monitoring using sound. But before we dig into it, let's first look at one traditional method for evaluating the health of an ecosystem. Say you're interested in measuring bird biodiversity. For instance, you might use the point count method where you stand outside for hours on end with a lot of patience and a talented pair of ears. Every single bud you have a closing will you see visually united down what species that was what time you saw it? You kind of repeat that thing over the twenty, four hours a day different house at different locations it's. A super thorough process for monitoring ecosystem health, but incredibly tedious. So Sarah and his colleagues thought you know with all this modern technology, we have sensors, wireless networks. Solar panels there has to be a more efficient way to do this. Can we get something this? So approximately as good as this kind of data, but is completely yours mason methods, recorders uploading audio to the internet straight from the field allowing them to potentially track ecosystem health. In real time, they've set up this acoustic monitoring network in Borneo part of the safe project which records audio continuously, and it is a staggering amount of data. About seventeen thousand dollars so far from the network seventeen thousand. One seven zero. Gosh but it's not just background noise housed in those seventeen thousand hours is a treasure trove of. Impossible for us, mere humans to listen through. But fortunately, the folks Google have figured out a way to sort through all that audio Sarah and his team turned to Google's set a massive data set of sounds that was developed using machine learning Odier says done is it has labeled data for. kind of almost every type of sound that you can imagine that being an so from that a cannon knows the amongst all dog box. There is something that is consistent about old dogs that makes it dog and so it knows the this is one fingerprint, and then amongst all of gloss smashing into, it knows that says finding things the kind of we as humans perceptually consistent in touch the sound. And then fixing them down to one type of fingerprint taking Google Technology, they applied it to their forest recordings, training their machine to create an audio fingerprint a way to kind of identify that forest brew, it sound, and the algorithm they've developed can potentially predict important indicators of a forest health like habitat quality and biodiversity based on it soundscape alone, and it didn't just work in one particular kind of Forest Sarah and his co authors analyzed the audio recordings of forests around. The world they published their findings this summer in proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences What did you and your team show with these audio recordings beyond the fact that yes, the technology worked, what did it reveal about the character and what's happening in these forests? What you see quite nicely full out from all of this is we looked at really Clinton is diurnal patterns so that so of how they annoy a different in how odier consistently follows the same kind of trajectory. Fingerprints when you can start see West season change in weather day. So how evolve through the day as the sun comes off goes down and how that changes the species communities of licensing. That's lovely because we think about days and years and months mostly in relation to light like the sun coming up the sun coming down. Yeah. But you're saying there's like a rise and fall of sound exactly throughout the twenty four hour day that you. You measure? Yeah. Exactly. Unto the point where you can and we did this analysis within the papers that you can just take random piece of audio and you can gas with pretty good accuracy. Our the rodeos recorded that again, is questionable. What's what's the point in time I recall it Kinda. Just shows you the amount of information that's like temporary coded in this audio as well, and you can guess what month is recorded from so. We're GONNA actually listen to some of the sounds that your team has recorded from the safe acoustics website, acoustic dot, safe project, dot net. So these recordings they're all the all uploaded like wirelessly. Yeah. Wow Cova did not live right now, but they would normally be recorded in real time and uploaded. So you'd be able to listen to the forest sounds like an all these different locations right now. So, this very mood setting. The rain at night in an old growth forest. In Borneo. Yeah. He spent some nights under a tent in these conditions. Yeah. I mean this kind of rain is like Gold Senate because most of the time spent doing fieldwork sweating. So when the rain comes in, it's Nicer Wendy and COO. Yeah Music

Sarah Google Forest Sarah Cova National Academy Of Sciences Borneo COO Odier Gold Senate Clinton
Audible launches a cheaper subscription plan for access to its exclusive podcasts and audio content

Geek News Central

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

Audible launches a cheaper subscription plan for access to its exclusive podcasts and audio content

"Inducing cheaper plan. That includes access to get its exclusive audio content with seven ninety, five, a month audible plus plan you get unlimited access to over sixty eight thousand hours of material for more than eleven, thousand titles including podcast, audio books, and audio originals. So audible plus will be a AD will be ad free for the time being and I'll even strip ads from some third party Oh Strip ads. WHOA, that's, new. That's very interesting I'm going to save that for myself. I didn't notice that that's a surprise I should make some news tomorrow but anyway, that's the report. So if you WANNA cheaper audible plan be aware.

How to find (or become) a good CFI

The Finer Points - Aviation Podcast

05:00 min | 3 months ago

How to find (or become) a good CFI

"People keep asking me how to become a better CFI. On how do I get better as a CFO or if you're on the pilot slash students side of it, you can say, what am I looking for when I look for a good? Good CFI. I mean, that's a really tough one to answer honestly because you can. Be Brand new to the game. And you might have had fantastic instruction and you might have. A BIG APPETITE FOR Washington struggle I mean that's not a bad but he might enjoy helping people solve problems. Born teacher and just because you're new doesn't mean you're bad. Without bragging I sort of think that's the situation I was in right I met Richard. I knew I wanted to be a teacher. I was intentionally putting my whole heart into an reteaching some of the stuff that he taught me on and. Certainly Green when I started a lot of mistakes and have corrected a lot of those things since that I still make mistakes. But I think I was a pretty good teacher straight out of the gate. Had A colleague enough for jet blue and I distinctly remember him saying to me one day. He said, Hey, dude, I can't I'm feeling really guilty I can't see my students. For anything, except ours. He was seeing as little our Johnson, his logbook. But even though he was coming from that perspective, he did a pretty darn good job. Right? He he had a sense of responsibility when it came to teaching people and he was doing his best. Now, you can have an old timer who hasn't worked at a flight and Flying School or Fight Club and twenty years. Maybe he has fifteen thousand hours in his logbook but I might be a really bad teacher you know set in his ways not. Not, keeping up with the things that are changing on. This just illustrate how it's not a very simple problem. Certainly from the student pilots to know. If, you've got a good instructor how to find a good instructor if the instructor you're working with this week in any way. But one thing you can ask are certain you know metrics I'd ask how many students that person has put up for a check ride in the last say three years. Or two years, which is the. Recurrent training interval required for CFI's we have to go back for a flight instructor renewal course every two years. And it doesn't have to be a lot. If someone says I put ten people through in two years says something and someone says that but one person two years that's fine to. The point is they're working with an examiner and that's really When I think about that question what makes against the F. I? How do I find a good CFI? And I struggled a look for some common denominator among all of the people I just started described in a two personality types I just. Any one of those things is some version of peer review. That's an extremely important part of the process for everybody. Phase checks, for example. I rely on fees checks heavily on even if it's not an official face check, I love it when my students. Take a lesson I can't be there and I say they want to eat fly with Mary this day or Fly with jaffer whomever it is. It doesn't even really matter what I want from that instructor is one hundred percent honesty no ego involved right? I've been doing this for. Twenty years more than twenty years now, and I want to know if there's holes in my game and I'll give you a great example. You know this is probably five years ago. So there I am fifteen years into Jane. On and I sent a student on a number two as a lesson or a check but he goes out with Jeff Rappaport who jeff was a pretty new CFO at the time he was my instance student. So you had been a relatively museum. and. Jeff comes back and says you know you're seeing it in great on this this this and the other thing. But I noticed that he didn't do after landing checkless. and. You're right. I don't think I'm very militant about after landing checklists. You know if you don't pull check this out for every climb level offer descent on you like white on rice but am I really that diligent about an after landing checklist when the wheels are on the ground over staring at the park probably not and is that a good thing? No. No that's not a good thing. It's a whole that Jeffcott immediately, and then certainly in examiner would catch. Right. So I immediately plugged that hole in my game. Haven't seen the all the time just made a mistake on Patriot regarding night currency requirements and one of the guys on my content team cut in, and we now I call the examiner and get to the bottom of it, but it's that Peer Review I. think that keeps instructors sharp. Keeps instructors current and saying relevant information. I'm in. It also inspires confidence. For the student.

Instructor Johnson Jeff Rappaport CFO CFI Richard Washington Flying School Jaffer Official Mary Jeffcott Fight Club
Psychiatrist Dr. Mark Goulston - Real influence and Training Yourself

A New Direction

09:11 min | 3 months ago

Psychiatrist Dr. Mark Goulston - Real influence and Training Yourself

"You're like you're like. Drinking from a fire. I'm apple. Ramp Myself Up I. was I can't take a nap on your show. That's for sure. I want to demonstrate something because there's a saying at least in Hollywood I'm not that far from it even though we're all isolated. It's better to show than to tell so. I'm going to demonstrate something far. Listeners in for you about how to be more influential. One of the things unfortunate to do is i. On on break now, but I breakfast would Larry King every day. Although we're doing zoom calls now and something. I've noticed about Larry because Larry eighty-six. He's still going strong. Still has a show. It streamed call Larry King now on home on the on the Internet and something I've noticed what has made Larry's such an icon. Is. Here's A. Plus after. and not a minus sir, and not a topper. What that means is when he listens to people. He adds to what they're saying. He doesn't a minus it he doesn't. Get Defensive. He doesn't give advice. He doesn't give unsolicited advice on his shows, so nobody's afraid. They're going to get a GOTCHA. And he's not a topper. If you say I if you say Oh, I went to the mountains, he he's not going to say oh. That's very nice. You know we went to Europe. And, so I'm going to be a plus to something. You just said I. Hope this will add value. You're listening because you mentioned something about training and I was thinking as you were talking about and I'm. And I'm reminded of a fellow named Dan Sullivan. Dan Sullivan found something called the strategic coach and part of what Dan said is what life get comes down to his habits. Happy People have different habits than unhappy people. Successful people have different habits than unsuccessful people. And he said what a habit is is it's a discrete piece of behavior that you repeat over and over again until it becomes a habit. And it takes about a month, and in other words you train on that and you repeat on that takes discipline, but over time you internalize it, and it becomes more natural, and then you can learn another habit now why this is important under stress because I'm am a psychiatrist, but I'm also a passionate about neuroscience. Is. What happens is when we're under stress and who isn't. We have you've all heard of your adrenal glands? And what happens is your adrenal guns. Put out something called Cortisol. High Cortisol is high stress and what happens is your high cortisol triggers something in your brain called your middle and Migdal as part of your emotional brain, and when that high cortisol goes up. What happens is it triggers a migdal hijack and what that means. Is Your Migdal shunts blood away from your thinking brain. Into your survival brain and guess what taps into your training. It will tap in to what you've been trained to do almost automatically. Do you think NBA stars when. They think between shots. No, it's training and they've been trained. What what's the saying? It May Have Been Stephen, Covey senior, or someone said you need. What is it ten thousand? What does it take to be come an expert? He said was at ten thousand hours. As a ten thousand hours or know that's probably more training in many of us however. Yeah thousands of hours. Thousands of hours and what happens is you become an expert at it, so you don't even have to think when you're faced with a situation, so I can't emphasize what Jay is saying. Strongly enough train train train train so that you have many many options, no matter what something whatever is. Facing you years ago I, was a fan of tiger woods during his heyday, and it was interesting when someone asked him. How do you play around the Gulf? He says. I've hit every shot possible ten thousand times, so he's an expert in every shot. He said every time I hit a shot. I don't race ahead I. don't worry about it because I know. I've trained and hit whatever SEAN I'M GONNA face. Ten Thousand Times and he says what I do is i. just you know, have a nice walk dot, breathe and feel okay. Don't worry I get on top of the shot I. Look at where I'm GonNa next hit it I know I've hit it at ten thousand times. I look at the ball and I. Just say one word execute. And so I love what you're saying about. The Training Training Training and And I know for a lot of listeners. In these times you're overwhelmed. OVERWHELMED WITH! I can train and I'm just trying to make it through the day. I'll tell you another bit of training. That I learned from a friend of mine. His name was Bob. ECKERD he was the CEO of Mattel. And I asked I asked Bob. How do you deal with stress? and. I'll tell a quick story if that's okay, sure absolutely story. So he told me. He said that before he wasn't Mattel and he's left Mattel. Now is an investment company, but he really turned mattel. Ron Big time. And he said before that he was the CEO of Craft in Chicago and when he started at kraft, he was I may president of the cheese division. And in two months time, the dairy prices went up. And so craft, Gary. Prices went up, and then they went down, but it was written into the bylaws of craft that they didn't lower their prices, so the independence lowered the prices when the prices went down, but kraft didn't. And he had no say over that he was just the president of the division. He unwritten all the protocols, and so the newspaper there was all these headlines. Heads are GonNa Roll at craft. It's going to be the end of craft. Because Cheese was a big division biggest. Division. And he told me he said you know. I was just in a funk and staring. Into the TV screen on a Sunday and the. Coach of the Cincinnati Bengals Sam Wash. And taken the Bengals to the Super Bowl two years earlier, they'd lost, but he took him to the Super Bowl. But this year they had lost ten games in a row. And Bob said I'm just staring at the TV. And the report says to. Sam, so Sam. What are you GONNA do. You're going to be fired on Tuesday. What do you think about that? and Bob said it was as if he was speaking to me. Sam Weiss looked out on the television and said. You know what I'm going to be fired. On Tuesday I know I'm going to be fired on Tuesday. Everybody knows I'm going to be fired on Tuesday But, that doesn't matter. What matters is what can I do between Sunday and Tuesday to make the Bengals a better team? So what Bob adapted I think it's a great philosophy to get through stressful times, and he used it to get through rough times at Mattel. Is. He said before he goes to bed. He says to himself, and he writes down. What can I get done? That's different. Than what can I do, but what can I get done by the end of tomorrow? To Make Mattel, a better company. What can I get done by the end of tomorrow to be a better husband to be a better dead? And when you write that down when you train yourself to get into that habit to it for thirty days, it'll become natural. You can go to bed. Easier, you can change it when you wake up in the morning, but again it's one of those trainings. What can I get done? To Make My. To make my team more successful to make me were successful. If I'm looking for a job to be a more effective and looking for a job so right that. That question before you go to bed. Train yourself to do it. And you might be able to get to sleep without having to take some of those magic. His name is Dr Mark Allston. A. By the way I did not know he was going to do this and it was better than I could ever. Swore. WE'RE WE WE? I know we're. GonNa talk about this book real influence. And it's fantastic, but what you're hearing is the heart of the man, and he is absolutely fabulous. He's going to be with us for the next forty minutes on the

Mattel BOB Larry King Cortisol Thousand Times Dan Sullivan Bengals Europe Apple Hollywood Gulf Cincinnati Bengals NBA CEO Migdal President Trump Sam Weiss Dr Mark Allston Stephen
The Sacred Art of Listening

Tara Brach

04:30 min | 3 months ago

The Sacred Art of Listening

"Like to begin tonight with a story I heard from a a minister who described is giving a sermon, one Sunday and hearing two teenage girls in the back giggling and disturbing people, so he says I interrupted my sermon and announced sternly. There are two of you here who have not heard a word I've said. That quieted them down. And when the service was over I went to greet people, the front door and three adults apologized for not listening and for going to sleep. And Church and promised it would never happen again. So. Tonight's talk is. Titled The Sacred Art Of Listening And I'd like to begin by asking you in terms of inquiry. How many of you feel that? You have intention to become better listeners. It's just one of those ongoing intentions I just say. For those of you that are listening to a podcast that was almost everyone. How many of you feel like you have quite a ways to go. That's okay. It's not easy, and we have strong strong habits of being distracted or preoccupied, or when other people are talking planning what we're going to say or judging. It just like any training in presence that listening is this sacred art. The comes alive when we're deliberate and we're really practicing. So we need to put in the ten thousand hours. You know that we have. It's ten thousand hours to have some mastering in anything. It takes a commitment. To bring this practice of ours of mindfulness into relationships and really listen and without practice. We don't without having some formal way of practicing. We don't seem to do it. We have a lot of patterning we stay in. So I found. That would often will motivate. People is when one or more relationships start obviously deteriorating when they run into trouble and. With a team with your and or with partner, whatever there's a misunderstanding or conflict, and it just keeps spiraling, and clearly it's happening because one or neither neither party. is able to really listen and a way to understand what's going on. Listening and feeling heard. Are really the ground sevigny mature relationship. Love relationship. Listening being able to listen and also feeling that we are heard. So What happens is then we look at our culture and say well. What's the? What's the water? We're swimming in and attentional deficit all over the place. Some of you might have heard this. This is according to the Center for Biotechnology Information. The average attention span of a human being has dropped from twelve second. That was in in two thousand two eight seconds in two thousand and thirteen from twelve to eight. This is one second less than the attention span of gold. Fish Man Amazing. Now, we're going in the wrong direction here. So, here we are. Losing attention, span and Nicholas Carr wrote a book called the shallows, and if anyone is interested in this kind of thing I I thought it was a a really great book. And He talks about how the effect of Technology on our brain. And how increasing cyber world being plugged into the Internet has actually activate an improve parts of our brain parts that can take in a huge amount of information and very quickly process it in distributed. Huge Information But what's been deactivated is the parts of our brain that can concentrate immerse, and really absorb information in a deep way where we bring in our own understandings, and we've it to have it become new learnings. Shallows wide shallow. So the more plugged in. We are the Internet in front of the screen, the less capacity to concentrate. To Immerse Anta listen.

Nicholas Carr Center For Biotechnology Infor Partner
Peacock is live: Heres everything you need to know

The 3:59

09:29 min | 3 months ago

Peacock is live: Heres everything you need to know

"He caught. The last of the big streaming services has finally launched nationwide, but at joint a crowded room, streaming services, including busy, plus and that Blix. So how does this stack up? I'm Roger, Chang into your daily charge. Beckley I don't have to answer that question because with me. Is Our media expert, John? Salzman and software services. Reviewer Alison. Danisco, welcome both you. Thanks all right so John with you. He is live after having launched in Beta mode to caucus users a couple months ago, so so give us a land now. What is the streaming wards landscape? Look like this is basically the last of the big new services to land at least as far as we know. We had apple and Disney plus come in November than we had depending if you consider it bigger. Bigger not clubby came in April followed by Hbo Max in May, and now finally we have peacock, and it's a little bit different than the rest of those, because it not only is, it has big budget originals big back catalog, like most of those other services do, but it's also doing some other things that are digging a little bit when the others I it has. It's going to have live news. Life sports other sorts of news and sports replays highlights that kind of thing and crucially has a free tear at as a tier with advertising we can watch about two thirds of the catalog just by signing up and not paying anything there are ways you can take out the ads and unlock the full catalogue if you WanNa pay, but having that sort of on ramp that free just sign up and start watching thing. It's something that these other big services in the streets haven't tried yet. Yeah, I would just sort of generally speaking. Have we talked about the free cheering a bit but? In terms of these other players out there have any cover merged as must have service to rebel Netflix's certainly a streaming service, the new streaming service that's landed with the biggest slash by far is Disney plus. One media analyst when it launched last year there was one media analyst and widely followed one who called it one of the greatest product launches of all time. To give you a sense. Track Google search trends around these launch dates, and the Google search trends for Netflix are a good baseline. You know it's established. It's always very popular as a search gives you a good baseline of how other services stack up and people, search addressed most of these other services. They haven't crossed the level of net search interest, even on launch days, whereas Disney plus like quadrupled the amount of Netflix interests on its launch day now it's come down since then, but among these new services Disney is the one to beats, and nobody has even come close so far. Are also you've been testing out the service. How has the experience on Peacock Ben? Overall I've been having a really positive experience with peacock so far to be honest. I wasn't expecting all that much. Since we do already have Sumani streaming services, but the fact that it has this free tier is John mentioned where you can still watch. Tons of movies and TV shows with ADS does make it stand out from competitors like Netflix and Hulu it gives you something for free that similar to say a Pluto TV or a to B, but with this premium streaming. Streaming service interface, so it looks really good, and you also have the opportunity to upgrade if you want to. It's pretty easy to navigate. It has a few quirks, and there are some features that are still missing but overall. It's a solid free surface at launch. If you don't mind watching those ads in terms of that that user experience that the navigation the experience itself. How does it stack up against DISAPP- loss or Netflix's or some other more Polish premium services so in. In my mind, peacock isn't quite trying to be a Netflix or Hulu or HBO Max. It has a similar tile layout, and you can browse things by TV shows and movies and get recommendations, but it's kind of doing something different, and it's probably not going to replace any of those others for you, but it's something you can get for free to have more options. It reminds me a little bit of Amazon prime video in a way like on that one you can get. Get, a lot of shows and movies included as part of your prime subscription, but you'll find others mixed in that. You do have to pay for so on peacock. You'll find some shows with a little purple feather in the corner, which means you have to upgrade premium to watch them, but they're so plenty of free options to. And since we're in this time of economic uncertainty, you know free services a welcome option, even if you don't watch it every single day, right? Joan. Beyond this free tier is there anything else about peacock that makes stand out, or the folks should know about? Yeah, definitely, the frontier is obviously the first thing that people are going to encounter when they try to sign up and they realize they don't have to provide any sort of payment information. Start watching. But beyond that you know. Being in the pandemic, there's a lot of things that peacock wanted to have available right now for its launch that aren't a manifest really until next year or later, for example, the entire reason that it's launching right now in the middle of July is that originally peacock witches, NBC's streaming service thought they'd be able to piggyback on all the interest in the Olympics. That should be happening right now. Is the broadcasting partner for the Olympics in the United States, and so of course everyone remembers every Olympic season how there's just like blanket coverage on NBC. All of NBC's other cable channels. But because we don't have that until next year, that's a huge driver to get people interested and knowledgeable that that the service exists. That just doesn't exist right now. Also their originals. They have nine original series at launch, but just like everybody else all their production of new content. At least any live action content had to be suspended in March, and so they don't have as much in their pipeline. That's going to be ready to release win. They had hoped to release it as have if we weren't in this situation where everybody's lockdown the also could you break down the? Tiers, obviously, there's the free cheer that's at basement. What are you getting with those I? Think there's two different paid tears. He kinda run through them. And you actually get sure so in the free tear you get thirteen thousand hours of TV shows, Movies News Life Sports. Some of the biggest name shows you'll find. There are and Recreation, Thirty Rock, law and order. Order Svu but you know. Some of those are also currently on Netflix and Hulu to so there's some confusion there potentially, and you also know that the office won't be coming to peacock until January when it's calm when his contract with Netflix runs out, but in the meantime you'll also find current episodes of NBC shows one week later on that free tier. In terms of movies, you've got some big slightly older hits like Jurassic Park the Bourne identity, the Matrix and also newer kind of Oscar Z. ones like phantom thread and tally, and so for something. That's free. You'll probably find something. You WanNa Watch, but then you'll also find these two paid tears. One is five dollars a month which gives you access to the full Peacock Library which is about twenty thousand hours of TV, and movies, but you'll still see ads on that one. If you WANNA GO AD free. It costs ten dollars a month and you'll get still get that full libraries well. A few things you'll find on the premium tears, but not the free tier are all of the episodes of peacock originals, the major one launch being brave new world, and you'll also find more new movies and also next day access to new episodes of current. NBC shows one interesting thing that we haven't really seen before is that you'll get early access to some shows like late night with Seth Meyers and the tonight show. Show with Jimmy Fallon the night that they air, so you can watch them at eight PM instead of eleven thirty pm, but that would actually start until those shows are back in the studio and not running from home during the pandemic. Okay We've talked about this before, but they're just too many strips out there. They're all asking for money. Yes, peacock has a free tier, but there's clearly they want people to. Upgrade to these premium tears. How does market support so may services Comey Services? Can a household actually afford to pay for so from the experts that I've talked to and the research that they've been doing? It seems like there's a couple of interesting things going on one is that the total number of streaming services that people are subscribed to and are trying is going up now. That's partially because in the. The pandemic so many entertainment choices that we normally would that normally would keep us from streaming aren't happening right now, and we're all locked up in our homes, and so it's the primary way other than regular TV. Your needs that you would entertain yourself when you're stuck at home anyway, that's to do with it, but even before the pandemic. We were starting to see that all. This wave of new services what starting to tap higher, the amount of services people were trying and also subscribing to. But what we've found in the pandemic from the research that I've seen as that people are also much more willing to cancel subscriptions so. It's mostly price sensitivity factor as you know. Jobless numbers are soaring, and as people are reconsidering howl. They dedicate their money every month. Once they hit the point where a free trial ends or this ends. They're more willing to quit. Because they become more educated on other options that don't require payment that conserve their entertainment needs, you know. Alison, she mentioned to be There's other ones like that. That are free services that peacock sort of straddles the line with people are realizing that they have those options to if they don't WanNa, keep paying

Peacock Netflix NBC Disney Peacock Ben John Alison Peacock Library Hulu Blix Beckley Salzman Google Media Analyst Olympics Amazon
Finding Success With Kevin Hart

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

04:00 min | 4 months ago

Finding Success With Kevin Hart

"Kevin Hart has officially reached. Rock Star status. Selling out venues across the globe now he is expanding his dominance off the stage. He has starred in three films and Tacoma the entertainer of the year at the N. Double ACP image awards. Kevin invited me to his home in Los Angeles on a rare day off. excited. On this way after you. Hear all that stuff is custom chandeliers. WHO. Can I look at this at this rate. Almost spy ish, like very nice, very lax, but not too much. How deep is the pool? kid-friendly Gift From and Kevin from all to? There if not no, you about five and a half. That's good. That's perfect preface journey as you can stand up and stand up can save. That's great so now that this has been your year, the stats are you've had three hit films to in the top ten former movies in production right now. A hit television show a huge following on social media. Because of the way you were raised. It feels like what to you because there's some people whose head would be blown off by now, and we would see it rolling down the hill. For me, you know what? I believe hard work pays off you know. When you say has been has been my year. It's my time. Hollywood has wave making everything seemed like overnight success Oh my God. Where did this guy come from all this kid? Who is he look? It's a massive star. Eighteen years in the business. You put ten thousand hours. I'll put in my Tom I got I got dues that that have been paid and paid again and pay one more time after that I stayed shooting my dreams, and by doing that eventually came true, but it has there has to be something. I won't say special about you. Because I believe we all have the same human abilities possibilities. Not Everybody can do the same thing, but there has to be something. That is different because there are lots of people who try and there are lots of people who want it, and there are lots of people who have the desire. What was the difference? Do you think for you to difference to me? was I paid attention to what people did before me whether it was right or wrong? Everybody's successful as a for now. You laid a blueprint You know I can go down and Lis- from. To actors entrepreneurs to self-made Mogul Jay. Z, look at Tyler Perry. You look at Puff I mean. You're looking at people that start off with a small. And that vision manifested in something beyond expectation, so what I did was from the people around me. My Mentors Eddie Murphy Chris, Rock, prior. We're all on the wall to wall all so you surround yourself a surround myself with a constant reminder of whose great. Constantly come down steps every day. I look Richard Bill. He's great. He was great. I see Chris Rock. He was great I it's a constant reminder. What am I trying to achieve I want to be great, so that motivates me, so things separates me is my draw my driver's other people's success. It's so interesting because you get compared a lot to Eddie Murphy because not since Eddie Murphy has anybody. You recently brought Roka's record at the Nokia, theatre. In Two thousand eleven during his laugh at my pain tour Kevin's. Ince's. At L. A.'s Nokia theatre were record breaking with over one point. One million dollars in ticket sales Kevin Surpassed Eddie Murphy's record. I don't care what I achieved and is there I? Don't care what financial number they put aside any accomplishment. That I how many tickets you saw how many people feel can't. You can't outdo with Eddie Murphy did I'm I'm sitting here so solid? I believe back. I can't I can't do that

Kevin Hart Eddie Murphy Eddie Murphy Chris Nokia Chris Rock N. Double Acp Tacoma Richard Bill Tyler Perry Los Angeles LIS Hollywood Ince L. A. Roka
Mission Update: NASA and SpaceX Crew Dragon Launch

Morning Edition

03:05 min | 5 months ago

Mission Update: NASA and SpaceX Crew Dragon Launch

"When Hurley and his crew cleared the tower on July eighth twenty eleven the future of human spaceflight after that last shuttle mission from Florida it was uncertain the program was ending and a replacement right from the US to space was at least four years away from flying turns out it's been almost a decade now thanks to a partnership with SpaceX NASA will fly astronauts once more in Hurley will once again fly to space I certainly didn't expect to fly again I certainly didn't necessarily have a plan to fly again and if I did it would you know have had to have been a case where somebody would have wanted me to Hurley joined the astronaut corps in two thousand the class name themselves the bugs after fears of the white U. K. bug that gripped the world as they became astronauts Hurley was selected for his test flight skills he clocked more than five thousand hours in military aircraft before joining NASA there are old pilots and there are bold pilots but there are no old bold pilots Terry Virts is a former astronaut and about himself a member of Hurley's astronaut class he's just solid you know he's not going to make any mistakes he's gonna stay cool no matter what happens and that he's definitely a very good choice I I know I know why our bosses picked him for this job the focus of this mission will put her at least test pilot skills to use name demonstration mission to Hurley and his crew made by banking are tasked with flying SpaceX's crew dragon for the first time the duo will put the sleep capsule to the test flight using a touch screen and I pass before it docked with the international space station Hurley has flown to space twice on two space shuttle missions to the ISS his co pilot for this SpaceX flight is Bob thank you another bug he says Hurley is cool under pressure and dedicated to the mission I always know that Doug is going to be one step ahead of me and ready for whatever so I kind of come in front of us is out there might be things that I remind my authors like Hey let's throw this into the mix because we're gonna have to consider it but he's going to be the one who's ready at a second and a half before I am the mission is a critical test flight that if all goes well paves the way for more astronauts to fly to the station from the US NASA is out of rights to the ISS from the Russian space agency and the second commercial partner Boeing is facing delays getting its capsule certified for large the two will spend eighteen hours in space testing all the systems of the crew dragon capsule from flying in orbit to sleeping on board to testing the crew dragon's toilet retired astronaut Nicole Stott yet another bug says Hurley understands the risk and importance of this mission which is why he's the perfect bug for the job you also want to know that when it hits the fan you know when things don't go as planned as they will not always that you have these people with you that will have your back and that they know you'll have theirs and that's I mean you know that's Doug the craft is scheduled to launch tomorrow afternoon and dock with the ISS about eighteen hours later and the astronauts will spend between one and four months on

Hurley
"thousand hours" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

05:16 min | 6 months ago

"thousand hours" Discussed on Post Reports

"And now one more thing from post reports producer Lina Flores an interview with the director whose new film is taking on added meaning in this pandemic a few months ago. Netflix surprise made by telling me they were GONNA give us theatrical release. 'cause they're like the movie turned out well and I was like so thrilled about that. Obviously we're not doing that anymore. Alice Wu is writer and director of the half of it. It's a bummer. Because I would love this movie we seen and theater but like there's nothing like a pandemic to give you perspective. I so I was like well whatever happens happens and while Alex was hunkered down in San Francisco like been pretty strictly sheltered in place for six or seven weeks now. I talked with her about the release of her new movie out on Netflix today. Up Next for Eliot shoe good thing about being different in a telling this is that no one expects you to be like them seventeen. I live in Squeamish with my dad. I run a business writing essays for people I guess I just never thought I need anyone else. The half of it is getting plugged. Does ten of queer teen romantic comedy ten dollars for three pages. Not Maybe you can make your sound. Smart Dear Astra floors. I'm in love with you and when you listen to the trailer. He's always remember. I'm elite yeah. I know that sounds about right. You WanNa let her about love all right you let her around love. I think it starts off in the grand romantic tradition of looking for your other half but while I was watching I was also really struck. By how much of it was about the other connections people make people who can start off seemingly so far apart from each other these Three people from particular this this main character who is Chinese American Emigrant High School Senior girl ends up a sort of meeting the least likely personal world and ends up being enlisted by him to help woo the object of his affections. Popular girl who it turns out secretly is also the object of her affection. Most of the movie really focuses on that platonic love that develops between elite Chu and her straightway guy. Best Friend Paul conversation is like Ping Pong. I hit one and then you were. You born in squeamish. What do you like about squeamish? I've never been anywhere else. Neither wanted to story. That's little inspired by Alice's own life. I came out to myself as a senior in college and my best friend at the time was a straight white guy who was pretty much the last person I would have thought like an. This'll be my best friend because it seemed like we had nothing in common and I think there's a way that I like to take these commercial hooks and populated with characters. You don't usually see I didn't realize the with the pandemic that there would be another huge wave of Anti Asians Regina Phobia and Asian hatred. Carving out anything. She was still figuring out how to process through that and I don't I'm still you know it's hard for me to it's hard to read about every day and not have a lot of feelings but I could get a fifty year old straight white conservative guy to start with a seventeen year old closeted Chinese emigrant nerd girl. The thing she hoped people took away especially now the importance of these seemingly disparate connections. Like I've won connections that both respect and span cultures sexual preferences so I guess I just want people to watch the movie too and love following up with the characters in Greeley feel their journey and at the end maybe it makes them feel a little more connected. Lina Flores producer for post reports. That's IT for post reports. Thanks for listening tomorrow. We've got a special weekend episode of the PODCAST. It's about the magic of bread-making and it is a very lovely story. Look out for it in your feet on Saturday afternoon until then our executive producer Matt Lucas. Our senior producer is Maggie. Penman are producers are Alexis de how Rina Flora's Lena Muhammad Jordan. Marie Smith Rennie's for NAS key and ten Muldoon who also composed our theme music. The Post Director of audio is just stop. I'm Martine powers will be back on Monday with more stories from the Washington.

Lina Flores Alice Wu producer Netflix director Alex Chinese American Emigrant High Post Director of audio Lena Muhammad Jordan executive producer Marie Smith Rennie San Francisco Eliot Chu writer Martine Matt Lucas Washington Muldoon Paul
HBO Max to be available on Apple devices at launch

Mac OS Ken

01:17 min | 6 months ago

HBO Max to be available on Apple devices at launch

"If more. Tv is still a thing you need HBO. Maxwell have your apple devices covered. It honestly not occurred to me that that might not be the case but called the mock says Warner media confirmed Monday that its upcoming streaming service will be fully integrated with the TV APP on iphone ipad ipod touch and apple. Tv I'm not sure why. Hbo Max isn't simply replacing. Hbo Go and HBO now. But it's not. The new service will have approximately ten thousand hours of content according to the report while the older. Hbo APPS have somewhere around two thousand hours. The older APPs feature HBO originals and Studio Films. Hbo Max will have more cult of Mac says friends the Big Bang theory south park gossip girl the West Wing and more will be added within the first year along with over two thousand feature films including Casa Blanca to wizard of Oz. And the Lord of the Rings it'll run subscribers fifteen bucks a month when it launches on the twenty seventh of. May that's more than double what the likes of Disney plus Apple TV plus charging according to the cult

HBO Apple MAX Maxwell Casa Blanca West Wing Warner Media Studio Films South Park MAC
Sober Sex & Recovery with Stacie Ysidro

The Addicted Mind Podcast

08:32 min | 6 months ago

Sober Sex & Recovery with Stacie Ysidro

"I'm Stacey CETRARO and I am a sober sex coach or sex and recovery coach for over ten years. I've accumulated over ten thousand hours of education and Experience. And all things sexual. I have studied a lot of contra sacred sexuality and sexology the DSM and also the erotic blueprints. I am acknowledged by the World Association of sex coaches and also by Jaya who is a world renowned sexologist. That is the founder of the erotic blueprints. And I've been working really closely with her the last couple of years. You may have seen her as a speaker on Tony Robbins or on Good Morning America. Or even the view or Oprah magazine and I've been working with her to expand my understanding and my application of the erotic blueprints to help my coaches and to help myself and my personal life and my clients awesome. I'm so glad that you decided to you. Know come onto the podcast. I think this is a topic that so many people need help with especially when they get into sobriety. So let's just jump in. Let's how how? How did you start this work so I had started sex coaching over ten years ago on I started out with just a business and life coaching certification that I was using and the salons. I was the salon professional working behind the chairs. The stylist and training stylist and working with our leadership team and being a partner in salons and as I was going through that process business and life. Coaching kind of vague. And they always want you to find your niche so I went through a few processes and all the common threads were around spirituality and sexuality. So that's when I started taking this deep dive into the world of Spirituality and Sexuality and sex coaching which led me to get a couple of different sex coaching certifications and studying sexology and I also have experience with addiction and recovery in my personal life so after about ten years of working with mostly couples and men around Sacred Sexuality Contra mostly helping men with premature ejaculation or rectal dysfunction energetic orgasm. I got to a point where I really wanted to move into something a little different and deeper and that's when I found the erotic blueprint certification and I did that and Since I started going on that journey with Jaya I have really come into this new space of seeing the need for people to get some coaching around sexuality and so Brian Easy or Saxon recovery. That's that's great You know I think our sexuality is so much. A part of our spirituality. Such a core part of who we are and so for a lot of people who struggle with addiction and maybe have a lot of that I guess I would call it. Wounding of the spirit their sexualities impacted by by that trauma absolutely Sexuality is such a huge part of being a human being for my perspective. I guess it's kind of Taoists but I believe that orgasmic energy as the life force energy in it flows through US and makes us alive and so we can experience that and a lot of different ways on a day to day basis in different levels of intensity but that sexual orgasmic energetic exchange that occurs is something that's so deeper so much deeper and brings us to something that's bigger than us and for me addiction has really been about isolation and being disconnected with spirit and so going into recovery and being able to reconnect with my higher power and with Spirit. It just was natural to recover my sex life in the process so I just really felt that it all kind of blended together right. Yeah definitely I think you're absolutely right. So tell me a little bit about when someone is in sobriety and they're starting to look at their sexuality. What are some of the issues that you see in that? Come up and then our common with the that process so for me. Sex was not always conscious and honoring. It was more about power and manipulation control. It was about feeling needed or seeking. Validation was about people pleasing others and it was through sex so I've seen people go through similar things also once getting sober like kind of feeling like you're a virgin all over again like everything is new right. And so you know there's a lot of challenges with defining what are my sexual values. And how do I get out of my head and into my body because now my mind is racing and I'm not using a substance to escape. Do you find a lot of people. When they're in their addiction that they have hidden their sexuality in it like their true sexual self is hidden by the addiction. Does that make sense? I think that addiction can definitely cloud who we really are inside To me it was definitely like a spiritual death and disconnection with who I really am so yes actuality as part of that and I think that a lot of times when people are using. They're doing things sexually that. Maybe they wouldn't do consciously sober or they're using sexuality and away that is not honoring and Present with themselves right or others will. There's a lot of that trauma that interpersonal trauma. And if you're if you're self is hidden from yourself. I guess if that makes sense by an addiction you can't really be yourself their present. You can't be whole. Yeah it's about being all of us and honoring and accepting all of our selves and allowing someone else to see all of us you know especially when people have had traumas. It's hard to even honor yourself to begin with and that's incredibly vulnerable to to be yourself to come with your full self with all of your sexual desire and fantasy and all of that. I mean it's to me who we are sexually as like a window into our our very deepest selves absolutely. I always tell people that sexuality is almost like the outer layer of why people start reaching out to me but what really happens as this deeper personal transformation that you never could have plans for or even asked for to begin with because it is so vulnerable and it gives you access to all parts of yourself your self worth unconditional love and acceptance. So it really. It really goes so much deeper than just. How do I have a better orgasm? Yeah yeah definitely I mean. That's that's part of it but that's not the whole part. That's not in some ways. That's a great part and in some ways that's not always the best part right and I found that. Yeah I can tell you some tips and techniques and tools to do all day long but if you don't really do the inner work you're never going to access that part of yourself that's going to bring you to experience that deep connection and intimacy with someone which really expands your orgasmic energy. So it's almost like you can't have one without the other. I definitely agree. I I work with a lot of people who struggle with compulsive sexual behavior. And what's really you know? We look at it as an intimacy issue. It's this fear to be vulnerable. It's a fear to bring their true self to the relationship and so their sexuality is in a in a in a way hidden Their true selves are hidden.

Spirituality And Sexuality Jaya World Association Of Sex Stacey Cetraro Tony Robbins DSM Founder United States Oprah Partner Brian Easy
Understanding Photography Education  with Darlene Hildebrandt

This Week in Photo

06:58 min | 7 months ago

Understanding Photography Education with Darlene Hildebrandt

"Welcome back to another episode of this week and vote on your host. Frederik van Johnson. Today have the distinct honor and pleasure of having a an longtime friend of mine. Darlene Hildebrandt on the show to discuss a topic. That's near and dear to both of our hearts and that's education and we'll topics education and photography. We're GONNA talk about both of those and it's more specifically what's Kinda the state of the Union in that area. Is it still save your money? Go to a brick and mortar school. Is it by a bunch of workshops? Forget all that and just learned from. Youtube is it by courses online. Darlene is here to demystify all that for us and and sort of dive into it. Yeah Darlene how you doing? It's long time no see Ed. Flynn too long. Frederic. How are you? I'm doing good I'm good. It's going to see your face. You never change smiling faces always exactly the same. I like it so few more as my hairdresser called sparkly sparkley hairs. Ono's I love those. That's good that is good. It means you each one means you're wiser than people that don't have cancer. Barclays sparklys roller Before we dive into the meat of the conversation I want to talk about the Just sort of you know the state of your union. The State of Digital Photo Mentor DOT COM. And all that stuff you know what's new and great. Yeah the world that you build. You've got a storied history. I mean you've worked with amazing companies. You've been in the education space as long as I have at least so what's what's going on. What are you guys working on? What you building. What is the? What's the state of the Union? So about as you mentioned. I've been involved in the education of photographers for awhile. Now I've been teaching locally for eight years already and I was the managing editor of digital photography school. Dps for five years. And I left. Eps A year ago to branch out and expand my own horizons and they wished me well. And you know we're all on good terms and we still talk and that's great And just in the last year we've been building Lor Tara fee tours. I've been to India and Vietnam and Peru in the last twelve months I posted on my facebook awhile ago that in the last few months. I've been on twenty seven actual different airplanes and been to seven different countries. Wow that is so so you know what that means. It means so we're we in the beginning. We decided to focus this interview on education. Clearly there needs to be another one that talks about travel and how to do it without losing all your stuff. Yeah and I think they go hand in hand together as well travel and photography and education because on the tours is a great opportunity for people who aren't usually in sort of immersed in photography as a day to day endeavor. It gives them a chance to. That's all they're focused on is taking pictures and learning about their camera every single day for two weeks or whatever it is and just by most. They're gonNA go home with with some more knowledge in. Just just just the idea of putting yourself out of your comfort zone right. It's like whenever even if it's just like for me even if it's just going to the next town over or into San Francisco and the burbs of San Francisco going into San Francisco proper. You get a different energy and it kinda starts tickling different creative synapses that make you WANNA try stuff. So that's so let. Let's switch gears and talk about education so set the stage here so there's there's the different modalities of learning right. Some people learn better by having their butt in a seat in an instructor in front of the class is some people learn better solo. Some people learn better one on one. Some people you know. Hey Youtube. Give Me Youtube and a topic. I'll figure it out in a deconstruct. My favorite photograph that way. Some people need online courses. That are focused on a particular subject or topic. How do you? What's best you know from from the photo mentor herself? What's the what's the best process to going from people saying? Hey Jane You. You might have chops as a photographer. You should really pursue this too actually being good. How do you get good so I think the key you missed one? Actually one modality of learning that is by doing and I think Like I talked about the semi classes when I teach in person classes and I actually have one last night We talked about the basics of processing last night. And you learn either There's actually studies done on this. You learn by either listening to somebody else speak so that could be a video or in person alive class Or by reading rain so any book or something like that or by doing and I think I think most people learn best with a combination of all three right so in my live classes I try incorporate a little bit of everything right so I have them write their own notes. A have them listen to me for a while and then we actually you know. Get their cameras out. We're actually doing style for computers if we're doing processing By doing like if I go way back in my history right like we're going back thirty years now. I'M GONNA date myself here again. The the sparkly airs Thirty plus years ago I went to college. Did a two year program. Which was you know? Degree program if Star Affi and I've been asked that question is if I was to do it all over again now. Would I do that? You know there's been debates about college programs like you mention and what I do that and I can't honestly say with certainty that I would at in this day and age because there's so many other avenues available that you can learn from like you said Youtube and all of those things what college does give you and what a lot of my students always ask me and my classes win. Am I going to get it? When is there going to be this magic? A Ha moment the light bulbs going to go on and then all of a sudden you know I understand my camera and understand light and all these other things and my answer is always the saying when you put in your ten thousand hours rain and if you're doing a college program course where you're doing it every day and you have homework you're GONNA get your ten thousand hours faster range you you're someone wants told me. I forget who it was. Someone wants us the same sort of ten thousand our analogy but they were saying from a photographer standpoint. Just think of your shutter finger as being filled with one million bad images and the only way to get to the good ones to get the bad ones out. Because it's linear right so it just take you gotTa keep taking pictures to get. Isn't that a cartoon persona quote or something. I duNno I duNno. Maybe there's a famous quarter. Maybe it's Karcher song but it sounds like something that he would have said about. You know your your worst pictures are your first ten million or ten thousand or whatever

Youtube Darlene Hildebrandt Union San Francisco Jane You Frederik Van Johnson Mortar School Barclays Flynn ONO Facebook Managing Editor Instructor Star Affi India Peru Vietnam
"thousand hours" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"thousand hours" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"Twenty three ten thousand hours Danny Shea with Justin Bieber almost halfway point to the biggest song in the USA there's an extra first unforgettable French Montana sweetly the last name eight forty with Ryan Seacrest my name call me angel of that.

Justin Bieber USA Ryan Seacrest Danny Shea Twenty three ten thousand hour
"thousand hours" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"thousand hours" Discussed on KPCC

"Thousand hours of Apollo error mission control audio eleven thousand hours as you said as you said were directly related to Apollo eleven hours five minutes fifty two seconds and counting hi go on go on to the DNC or Michael along those are over my as I've told people before who have who have asked about how do you start editing there is a nine day version of the film that exists we have a long yeah just a little bit longer but we try to get every available piece every single frame every single audio clip that we could and laid out on the time line so we could see what we got you made a decision very early on about the nature of the story and that was going to be there wasn't going to be talking head there weren't gonna be people explaining what was happening at any given moment the footage in the audio would more or less speak for itself why was that decision important and how to dictate what you were and we're not going to use yeah it was always the plan from the start even before the large format came out if you actually if you were around during the missions you listen to them they had a a wonderful quote unquote narrator and the public affairs officer there was anywhere from four to five in each mission he sat in mission control right next to all the other flight controllers back behind the flight director in basically distilled down all the technical jargon that was being said on the air to ground transmissions between the astronauts and other misc troll we have some seven point six million pounds of thrust pushing the vehicle up for it a vehicle left ways close to six and a half million.

Apollo DNC director Michael public affairs officer eleven thousand hours six million pounds fifty two seconds Thousand hours eleven hours five minutes nine day
"thousand hours" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"thousand hours" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Than five thousand hours of audio every minute of every show broadcom since we launched and don't forget we have over four hundred films to watch and share well magazine subscribers could look in and browse complete print occupied unscreened online she'll be here to would you find wellstocked including the troubled accessories three fragrances was more chicken monocle dot com every day for fresh news and opinion from my editors and you're around the great plan a trip to one of those puts the business or pleasure with a handy city and resource guide it's called after you at monaco dot dot com what are you waiting for oh finally on today's show the business pages with louise kiss a good morning to you louise good morning georgina now tell us why we are paying germany to look after a money so the world is going topsy turvy truly has normally when you give someone your money you letting someone your money they give you wouldn't trust that's how it works and you earn interest on your savings or whatever well eighty five percent of german government debt yes i mean eighty five percent of german government that is negative tippy yielding well that means is your effectively paying germany to look after your money so say you gave the ninety nine euros say say you give them a hundred euros in ten years time they'll give you ninety nine which makes no sense at all this is the crazy well we've got to in the post financial crisis west central banks banks have indulged in virtually zero interest rate policy and quantitative easing this is the world we get to and what he's all about this is the german eight puppy thanks to its history it's very off their background is actually not using you know if you if you could vote borrowed a payback less money in the future you probably got one spending splurge wouldn't you no no germany they're actually running a budget surplus and pay down that that they're not using this incredible negatively in interest rates as an opportunity to spend now what's happening is that 'em be european economy is slowing we know that we've got christine lagarde taking some mario draghi at the head of the european central bank it's consensus opinion and she will continue with more sort of monetary stimulus only potentially potentially even more rightcounsel the european central bank right so pretty much zero or even more quantitative easing but it's not just germany belgium from the netherlands couldn't old borrow at negative interest rates for ten ten years so if you give money to belgium from the netherlands at the end of ten years old with inflation over those ten years you will get less back then you then you gave him in the first place it's a truly extraordinary well we we are now living and it tells you an old loved about the outlook for inflation and growth which is the bone bone markets affectively think very sluggish growth and the eighty you very muted inflation and in fact it's sort of like the potential japan panic vacation of europe japan hasn't grown hasn't had inflation this had negative interest rates for decades now a gold coast is one thing that always seems to or at least for a civilian like me seems to to hold its value a it seems to be a particularly good stage at the moment so now be where we go doesn't hold its value so normally when you invest in something so you invest in the stock market you get dividends back and hopefully the price of the shatt will go up norman they normally normally when you buy bums government debt you normally get interest so you normally you know but she goes you're getting this thing you just get something that's been dug out in the ground and then you hold it doesn't give you any income so it's not a great investment however when the world is zero interest rates than affectively the value of gold improves because you're not getting i just explained to germany

broadcom ten years eighty five percent five thousand hours ten ten years
"thousand hours" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"thousand hours" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"You'll be glad you did five thousand hours think about it. Think about it. You didn't think about it? Okay. So Bobby is Steve dul you remember they came on the program. They were talking about spook around my well, they're going to recap the this year's spoke around up now. Wait a minute. I thought they almost got sued for this. Well, they did almost get were they sued but not we're not sued. But the one lady died, you know. No, they've had like we said they've had two old ladies over there that croaked excuse my language tool ladies over in the died and nothing there's been no ramification repercussions. You know? Well, yeah. Because they all set. On whatever those a homeowner's association rules and regulations. How does it protect the company or a homeowners association for being sued into the ground? I don't know. But the deal is going to join us here right now from the west of the states homeowners association in western states, California, Bobby and Steve and a good evening. Bobby and getting. Oh, so spook Aram Steve. And Bobby didn't go over this very well this year either. Did it? I'll take it enters go. Now, it did not go over. And I don't blame you fill so much is. I blamed the fact that we agreed to go on your program and talk about spook Arouna because up to that point with the exception of those instances that you were talking about where we did lose a couple of people. Gladys turn bow whose home we entered by agreement to perform this Emma, and I was wearing the goblin costume. And all of this was going according to plan, and she froze we dropped a bag of candy only to come to phony to come to find out only to come to the find find out. Only to come to find out only come to find out. But she was frozen there until about noon when someone walked in and said, well, this woman, she's breathing. You nobody knew that. She was dead. No one knew she was dead. I forget who I think we need a maid or her daughter came in and she was just frozen in the doorway, and we went through rigmarole about Karameh about spook Aramco. But nobody wanted to believe us. What do you mean? Nobody wanted to believe you now we've told you the story already. Let's go back on that. You had another problem here. This Liz Beth Hoover. It was not a problem. She what do you mean? The problem. What was the story here? Do you had you took exception to her saying come over and get these chocolate rice bowl is that right? Juggle rice balls. My wife is my wife specialty everybody knows about it. Rice, my specialty. They are my Halloween specialty, and you know, we enjoyed them. And I make them up special. What are you asking me? What was the does? She made a phone call. Oh well. Well, we book around Lisbon Hoover's house Diaby could be just tell people with spook Aram is again. Book aram? I would've thought you to set it up at this film. We're going to make us do it. All right. I'll do it spook around. Now. Ooh, karameh. I'm sorry..

Bobby Aram Steve Liz Beth Hoover Rice Steve dul Emma Karameh Lisbon Hoover Gladys California Arouna five thousand hours
"thousand hours" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"thousand hours" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Today, an Indonesian jet with one hundred eighty nine people on board crashed into the sea shortly after taking off from the capital of Jakarta. We get more from this morning's Mike Gavin lion. Airfli- JT six one zero was in route to another region in Indonesia when it lost contact with ground ficials, thirteen minutes after takeoff at least twenty three government officials were on board the plane, which was headed to a tin mining region. And air navigation spokesman told Reuters that the new Boeing seven thirty-seven max eight tried to turn back to Jakarta items such as smartphones and life vests were founded waters about one hundred feet deep near where the plane went down. Gordon? Thanks, Mike, Lionair privately owned company founded in nineteen ninety nine said in a statement that the aircraft was ear worthy. It went into operation in August and its pilot and co-pilot had combined for eleven thousand hours of flying time. The massacre considered to be the deadliest anti-semitic attack in US history has exposed a world of online postings, Saturday, mornings ambush that killed eleven people and injured six at the tree of life synagogue in. Pittsburgh has also puts synagogues across the country on lockdown the victims ranged in age from fifty four to ninety seven vigil last evening through thousands, including Pittsburgh mayor Bill Peduto. We're here for you. Because we're Pittsburghers. And that's what we do. We care and take care of those in need, and we show it as a community of one suspect Forty-six year old Robert Bowers didn't have a criminal record. But he expressed antisemitic and holocaust denying messages on a social media site called gab dot com and police say he yelled all Jews must die during an exchange of gunfire with law enforcement, the US attorney for the western district of Pennsylvania. Scott Brady has started the approval process. For seeking the death.

Jakarta Mike Gavin Robert Bowers Pittsburgh US Scott Brady Indonesia Bill Peduto Reuters US attorney Gordon Lionair Pennsylvania Boeing eleven thousand hours one hundred feet thirteen minutes Forty-six year
"thousand hours" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"thousand hours" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Fourth of july fireworks show which takes over eight thousand hours to prepare that's eight thousand hours to prepare i gotta tell you guys not that matters but just thinking back i used to do pyro tech pyromaniac actually no i worked with another attorney friend of mine used to be on the show dave britain and dave was a pyro tech specialist and we did a bunch of fireworks way back in the day well he did it i helped but that was the days they weren't electric you had to light the fuse and dive it was almost like being in war seriously they had these things all set up and then you have to you know a low crawl and on cue you light a fuse and then you run like hell to get away from that before it blows up it's it was would never do it again but that was in the old days number thirteen out of seventeen fourth of july sales have been thing for a while according to life science it's seen as unpatriotic if you kept your business open on independence day before the war you're you're a traitor but after after that restaurants and stores started having sales on red white and blue merchandise and they've continued ever since you know welcome to capitalism a one fourteen to seventeen roma's there folks i'm gonna get into some other stuff there are thirty three places the united states with the word liberty their names according to the us census for them or counties liberty georgia florida montana and texas are libertarians calvin coolidge was the only president born on the fourth of july we know that what three presidents died on the fourth of july calvin calvin coolidge was born on the fourth of july probably helped his presidential campaign you know hey vote for me i was born on independence day patriotic guess right red white and blue all the way sixteen seventeen here we go it didn't become a federal holiday until what year this is a good one the asking me well there's nobody in line one eight hundred seven sixty camp be you want to chime in let's see if somebody calls right now and if they don't ask you 'cause i know people grilling and doing all kinds of stuff all right we've got one left after that so what do you think what you're eighteen ninety ron eighteen seventy eighteen seventy guess i thought you google you probably did actually i think we just posted on her facebook as one of our lucky it took nearly a hundred years for it to be recognized isn't that amazing but when it finally happened it was in the ranks with christmas and a few other holidays so that's sixteen seventeen and guess what i don't have the seventeen didn't get stable all right we'll maybe it's sure whatever all right so we got to take a break just anything about a break we will do a break right now one eight hundred seven sixty k f and b you got a legal question or nearly legal question we will answer it and when we come back i'm going to tell you about the rules of the road have changed over this weekend there's new traffic laws that you need to know maybe because of the law changes just this weekend back right after this office space camp tomorrow from ten to noon but miles himal will sit in for me on am seven sixty talking breaking news now back to back winnable am seven sixty talk and breaking news seven sixty traffic in chula vista either find freeway northbound at each street an accident to write your.

eight thousand hours one eight hundred seven sixty hundred years
"thousand hours" Discussed on Vrain Waves: Teaching Conversations with Minds Shaping Education

Vrain Waves: Teaching Conversations with Minds Shaping Education

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"thousand hours" Discussed on Vrain Waves: Teaching Conversations with Minds Shaping Education

"Eighteen thousand hours there in front of a dulce and never ever being given choice and yet everything we know about the economy everything we know about where we're where we're headed where we currently are is that the people that are getting jobs on that are being successful are the ones that are go getters they're the ones that are dreamers that are that are self starters and yet we don't give students any chance to do any of that while in school so it's a no wonder that we have kids that are very confused about what they wanna do and we have tons of adults in jobs that they don't like right because they never were able to navigate those choices and they just kinda complain and for me as a dad of four kids and somebody who taught you know i had i had the pleasure of teaching number of kids in eighth grade teaching those same kids again in tenth grade and teaching those same kids again at twelfth grade and the the what they did in twelfth grade looked way different than another twelfth grade class i had because they had choice in that eighth grade and tenth grade right and you could just see just in the limited forty five minutes a day that they got choice they were so different by the time they were seniors in what they're doing and what they think they can do i'm not like somebody who's rattling off scientific studies around it kind of just looking at at the world that i live in and realizing that everything i do is a decision or choice and so we gotta give kids an opportunity to do that while they're at school you you are incredible i did a bunch of research on you and listen to you on a bunch of other podcasts and notice that you are a multi guest on several podcasts tell you why because i look at our timer over forty five minutes and i feel like we can talk to ever so we'll definitely have to have you on episode another episode soon but will let you go on just a couple rapid fire questions the first would be if you could give some homework to our teachers listening what will one piece of homework would you give to them yeah so if i was a teacher i was gonna tell us to my teacher.

forty five minutes Eighteen thousand hours
"thousand hours" Discussed on Taking Note

Taking Note

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"thousand hours" Discussed on Taking Note

"Now if you just she'd be great anything the problem is the ten thousand hours principal mouth levels book outliers in space in the research by restricting pay anders eriksson who is one of the foremost researchers talent development in for my vote and there's a problem you anders eriksson gave this quote put in the book which he says literally malcolm misread might pay and is a strong quote but it's true because when his paper actually says is not that he practiced ten thousand anything you'll get better at it says something different one it says the ten thousand hours is the average across people across skills different people take different amounts of time so yes anyone can get better at anything but takes different people different amounts of time and also depends on the skill so something like janna plane which literally hundreds of thousands of people tried to from world class pano for hundreds of years it takes much longer he's twenty five thousand hours become world class typically now there's other skills like for example there's this whole phenomenon of people doing these digit memorization competitions with a try and see who can memorize most digits and this takes four hundred hours to become bowl class it's newer less people try it okay so that's the first issue not action ten thousand hours of magical thing your brain which we hit ten thousand hours ago scratch off here's the second issue that's the first issue here's the second issue mountain wa will in his book keep saying this ten thousand hours of practice that is not with the papers about the paper says it's ten thousand hours on average of something called deliberate practice deliberate practice and delivered practice of very specific type of practice that's outlined pedagogy so basically with delivered practices is breaking down a skill into very very small increments and practicing that small piece.

principal anders eriksson malcolm janna ten thousand hours twenty five thousand hours four hundred hours
"thousand hours" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"thousand hours" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"Has seven hundred thousand hours in basketball fully seeing the matrix i'm trying to think of what something that i could do i don't know maybe a game of fica akkad prior member oh you know what ms past suggest your podcast no man we do this we oftentimes to like what do we talk about did i say although when i've heard listened like episodes back i kind of i'm back in there and i'm like oh this i might say something here jackson all runs together i don't know for example have brains but i i definitely remember jokes that i've heard that are like good jokes right right i remember like movie plots like in detail and movie lines and detail and where i saw every movie that i've seen like that's for me like uselessly it's just like watching movies i remember everything about lebron james of watching i remember most of my friends old like hard lined telephone numbers from when right that when i was a young we didn't have cell people's phone numbers have i have all those phone that shit was important you didn't have social are gone the only remember i know is my home phone number which has since been disconnected sometimes it was crazy even as i you know as i became more relying on the cellphone even with people i would date who you typically are calling all the time i realized i didn't even know their numbers yeah crazy just store it and you just tap a button rather on like oh is that i could see them is that's your number i know area codes but like people who are memory like champions who like they actually have competitions where they'll like put thirty decks of cards and then just flip them over and you have to memorize exactly what order they were in right those people like say the way that they do that is by telling themselves a story right and so it kind of ties to that like you are putting it in the flow of the memory power.

basketball jackson lebron james seven hundred thousand hours
"thousand hours" Discussed on Geek News Central

Geek News Central

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"thousand hours" Discussed on Geek News Central

"There's always banter in the flight station you know having done almost ten thousand hours in p three's the pilot copilot the flight engineer all having banter back and forth but they're always doing their job you know they're they're not taking office unbelievable they added that the videos were filmed on the aircraft wasn't performing any maneuvers of course it was on autopilot but you're still supposed to look out the window you're not i'm just yeah wow all right so little bit more information on camera analytical let analytica they are now being accused of violating us election election laws and we know that there's a whole bunch of rules it's basically bars nine us's per from participating in the strategies of us political campaigns now they can provide the companies outside the united states can legally provide data to campaigns but they're not allowed to analyze that data and they were warned the company they basically knew they aren't supposed to be analyzing data and maybe they did so we'll see both for the two thousand fourteen and the two thousand sixteen election of course as i said earlier facebook ads apologize for the scandal big full full page ad and been anyway that you know they're in damage control mode here and of course we are we talked about earlier facebook carson detail call an sms logs for years.

engineer united states facebook ten thousand hours
"thousand hours" Discussed on Geek News Central Audio

Geek News Central Audio

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"thousand hours" Discussed on Geek News Central Audio

"There's always banter in the flight station you know having done almost ten thousand hours in p three's the pilot copilot the flight engineer all having banter back and forth but they're always doing their job you know they're they're not taking office unbelievable they added that the videos were filmed on the aircraft wasn't performing any maneuvers of course it was on autopilot but you're still supposed to look out the window you're not i'm just yeah wow all right so little bit more information on camera analytical let analytica they are now being accused of violating us election election laws and we know that there's a whole bunch of rules it's basically bars nine us's per from participating in the strategies of us political campaigns now they can provide the companies outside the united states can legally provide data to campaigns but they're not allowed to analyze that data and they were warned the company they basically knew they aren't supposed to be analyzing data and maybe they did so we'll see both for the two thousand fourteen and the two thousand sixteen election of course as i said earlier facebook ads apologize for the scandal big full full page ad and been anyway that you know they're in damage control mode here and of course we are we talked about earlier facebook carson detail call an sms logs for years.

engineer united states facebook ten thousand hours
"thousand hours" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"thousand hours" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Fifteen thousand hours top fifteen lee steinhaeuser ear make your giving me the shakes now how do you guys feel about kids being border about boredom and general wound as a kid like that was a big complaint that always had deliberately its complaint rare board and board well i mean my my parents suggestion was always while hereson chores ryan i really quickly found somehow something else do i mean there's a there's a big idea out there and sort of the parenting zeitgeist out there which is that there should the kids need to be board that we have spent so much time over the last decade or two making sure that kids are not board with an eye pace given ipad let them read something put him in actively haven't do this the kids run around from one thing to the next they have almost no time to just sit around being board and board kids can be destructive absolutely but he can figure out how to get a board kid channel that into some other positive stuff i think there is some value like hiv sitting in the car yet you're just sitting here they're just now to tell you just sit there and be lord for half hour you know think there seems to be this prevailing thought that you need to enrol your kids in in his many activities as possible almost like yours you're starting to build the resume at age five like alien this right i as oil that really i'll tell you as a parent of a fiveyearold that doesn't feel like it's building a resume it deals more like trying a giving them social opportunities outside of school remember know living in a society now where they can't even play tack at school see gotta find other legs am the s violates it's not a mice work i fully but you gotta give them other like outlets to run around and you can have to force them to go do that stuff because nobody just runs around outside as you said right the other things you just want to find out what they are good at and so in a wear is when we were kids it might be okay you're gonna play basketball baseball football go away on a main arbel whatever for a lot of kids it was okay that now i i think there's much more.

basketball Fifteen thousand hours
"thousand hours" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"thousand hours" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"And i think about what i'm doing well what i did poorly i essentially review the tape afterwards and i really go through like how could i have been better what could i have done differently and because i do so much of it not only have i long before i stepped in front of the camera for the first time i had put noble shit whatever maybe thirty thousand hours of practice then in front of the camera finishes hundreds and thousands more hours of practice like doing this doing this and doing this so that's the answer practice an absurd amount just just absolutely ridiculous amount every day all right next up lakisha martin facebook how do you gain authority to prove individuals wrong all the kisha i get a really bad don't worry about proving people wrong let's start with that like being wrong as its own punishment so don't worry about that you do you and here's the key you're doing something that has a real outcome right once it a real outcome and you get a thing like let me tell you i don't give a shit if people think i know how to build a business i don't care i've built businesses they've been very successful i've totally transform my life it literally doesn't matter to me if people believe in it or not like i can't think of anything less relevant to my life because i there i know how to build the business and it's going to work or it's not and what i care about is in what people think i care about the actual result i can't tell you how often i'm telling team you're the like social content is like that i do as a give to you guys to build a very powerful community because of the thing that i'm actually trying to do which is pulled people out of the matrix if if shutting up was what i needed to do to build the matrix or to put people out of matrix if if never again coming on camera if shutting all my socials down was what i really believed i needed to do to pulled more people out of the matrix that i would stop immediately like i don't care about the path i only care about the end result if leading the world hate me and think i was the biggest dickhead in the world.

thirty thousand hours
"thousand hours" Discussed on Hollywood Babble-On

Hollywood Babble-On

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"thousand hours" Discussed on Hollywood Babble-On

"Much better my grandma much better i am i am honored surin proud to pass the baton to you that was strong got came up here put his dick in your mouth jealous you fucking bag for it to man gotta give man is due true news better new i was really good that was strong how long have oregon on that 2024 came here i did my like an afternoon so youth it show your work shows there i apologise at ten thousand hours a practice run out there right like malcolm's rodwell says you put in your time now i know you got a fucking the whole flight back to los angeles you've got to be on the plane going in nope i've got other things to do you'll always loved me paul braida ache redick paul break wary sun those are your there paul rights into what a thank you both for the free funny here with my fantastic wife the lovely kristen she is funny smart incredibly sexy you guys can give me huge solid and have david bowie sing happy birthday is that too chris clincher is the christians berkeley or yours is hurt okay these people who come the fuck down we didn't pay extra for the email right just the same price all included he's like it's called english gorman jacket on it didn't say have you ever did herta said sing happy birthday so i just wanna make sure editor right burner pauses said thanks for all your hard work towards getting adam west a star on the hollywood walk of fame.

oregon malcolm los angeles kristen editor surin redick david bowie herta hollywood walk of fame ten thousand hours
"thousand hours" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"thousand hours" Discussed on Love Your Work

"What he found or what he argued was that the difference between the good students in the great came down to how they practised and how much they practised so the ha the how much they practised was the ten thousand hours that the is that that they put in more time in the practice room that the average student but the how the practice was also really important namely they engaged in what eriksson cold deliberate practice where they were more thoughtful about what skills they were trying to refine at any given time they were more solicitous of feedback there were more thoughtful and mindful about how they practised now there are a couple up now there were a couple other things that eriksson also noted when he was looking at how these people spend their time one was that while they spent fewer hours per day doing leisure activities than the average students they were much better at accounting for how they spent their tom how they spend their leisure the other thing was that they slept more than the average students generally about an hour per day more because they would take naps in the middle of the day and so wild this is a part of the story that isn't reported on very much right the ten thousand hours is something that's the nice round number it's very sexy glad role thinks that he sees a similar kind of pattern with bill gates and sun microsystems cofounder bill joy in the beatles and other people it's actually not just the ten thousand hours it turns out to be important if you wanna get really good at something it seems.

eriksson tom sun microsystems bill joy beatles ten thousand hours
"thousand hours" Discussed on The Millionaire Traveler and Investor Podcast

The Millionaire Traveler and Investor Podcast

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"thousand hours" Discussed on The Millionaire Traveler and Investor Podcast

"I want to say three thousand hours of a experience in the certified financial planner field which is probably going to be my biggest obstacle and you need the past hundred is it as an exam that's like one hundred twenty questions which i can probably blow that easy uh so i wanna be a certified financial planner i do not want to work for anybody um an let's say i start doing that and i don't make money right away i can offset mild my cost of living expenses by my investments of course and um uh you know different ventures in what not so that's where i'm at home i mean it's not wrong will work for anybody at all i can probably make a lot of money in the financial field i'm sure but is just a rule really i really love travelling and i wanna stay in a country for three or four months in in in in manage some uh some of portfolios and you know be able to travel around i can do all my work from a laptop so that's my plants um so yeah you guys i read an article i know i'm going everywhere but i read an article um a while back and it was talking about the chinese people it was talking to everybody wonders eichel out of america's wonder why why the chinese people come here to america and ages by everything they they they purchase all this real estate they're not interested in where they you know they end dole jan of course material things here in there but they're a lot of them are coming in droves and purchasing real estate.

america real estate three thousand hours four months