2 Episode results for "Thousand Fourteen Inc."

Tom Bilyeu: Passion is for Wimps!

Leadership and Loyalty

1:01:03 hr | 4 months ago

Tom Bilyeu: Passion is for Wimps!

"The i'm tom bill. You the co founder of west nutrition impact theory today on the doll barron leadership loyalty show. We talked about all kinds of stuff but most importantly to me is belief system mindset. And how much he hates the word. Authenticity stay tuned congratulations. You were tuned into dov barons leadership and loyalty show the number one podcast for fortune five hundred executives and those who were dedicated to creating a quantum leap in leadership. Your host dov. Baron is the founder of full monty leadership dot com. He's an executive mentor to leaders. Like you a contributing writer for entrepreneur magazine. Ceo world and he's been featured on cnn fox. Cbs and many other notable sites dov. Baron is an international business speaker who is named by inc magazine as one of the top one hundred leadership speakers to hire now over to off baron welcome friends fans and fellow aficionados of leadership. Excellence thank you for joining us on this episode of barons leadership lousy tips for executives out of the full monty serious today. We're going to take a hard look at. Why follow your passion might be terrible advice and we'll discover what will make a more powerful more impactful way than simply following your passion if you're a new listener new view to the show. Thank you for joining us. Strap yourself in. We're about to go full monty if you're a regular a big thank you to you for making us the number one. Podcast globally for fortune. Five hundred listless and we're honored and grateful to inc dot com. Who made is the number one podcast to make you a better leader. So thank you for sharing the show with everybody you know. Look there are literally millions of podcasts. Out that thousands of them focus on leadership in but is only one that focuses on the sole leadership. You'll tune into it so we need your help. Remember days off over to race review and subscribe to show do it now. If i'm going to set. Tom billion so terrible things to get all all right. Let's let's dive right in and strip it right down as leader whether you're a ceo someone in the c. Suite sales later on in a leader in any capacity you know that today entrepreneurs canada rockstars of the millennial generation. But you've heard me say so many times that i believe that entrepreneurship business leadership about something far greater the money mo- more important becoming the next entrepreneurial unicorn it's about purpose and a successful business kellyanne. If you're in touch with your purpose become a way for you to positively impact the world. I'll guess today is tom billion now. He's the co founder of the two thousand fourteen inc. Five hundred company quest nutrition. It was a unicorn startup. Valued at over one billion dollars. He's the co founder and host of impact theory tons mission is the creation of empowering media based ip the acceleration of mission based businesses. Tom is driven to help. People develop the skills they need to improve themselves in the world and is intent is in using commerce and to address the joe. Pandemic of physical and mental malnourishment. Tell me regularly inspiring audiences of entrepreneurs change makers thought leaders at some of the most prestigious conferences and seminars around the world including abundance three sixty eight fast and freedom fastlane. So i'm has also been a guest on some crappy little show. What was his name some guy. We talked to tell you podcast. He's been at the school of greatest podcast and he's been featured in forbes inc and success and the huffington post and he's currently on the innovation board x prize foundation so lease and gentlemen. Please live the be here man. Thank you so much. Thanks really appreciate you being on now. Listen i know you've done frigging thousands of views i have to. We've been doing it for years. There's some really important things you like to talk about. talk about. And we'll definitely get to however a lot of the things that you're asked podcasts. The tom bill. You fans of bowed many many times and so i want to dive deep. Is that all right man. Please statement somewhere new love good so the first thing i wanna do is a kind of style from the obvious and then go a little bit more so we talked about the question nutrition. It was his unit. Con- up blah blah blah. It's the stuff. That leonard on the tony robbins podcast But you didn't start out being a business builder and entrepreneur. You start out with something that might in fact seemed like the polar opposite of the pat success. Which was your lover. Phil and you went to film school. How did your family feel about you tripping the light brand tacit rather get yourself a good steady job I think that you know my mom lived in constant and still does quite. Frankly live in a constant state of panic that i was going to do nothing with my life that i would Be unhappy in some way and so she worried but very quietly so when i was a kid she was very encouraging. Wanted me to go chase my dreams and so i didn't grow up with that like pressure from my parents or anything. They wanted to see me happy. I was very passionate about film making. They could see my excitement. They wanted to see me. Pursue it So they were very encouraging about that. My dad is. I got towards graduation. Film school he sent me starting at month. Six or five hundred member exactly my senior year. It was five more months four months three more months one month at two when he was not going to be helping me financial anymore so literally the day. I graduated I had no more assistance from my family so that was actually great so from that perspective. He didn't have too many concerns Because he just believed. I would somehow figure it out. So that long story but took me through my remedial jobs phase where you know barely making ends meet but i made some I made some what ended up being quite smart decisions around managed apartment complexes and things like that really cheap rent as why was while you were in films who know right after i graduated. Put again as about weirdness right like all you went to film school you went to film school. I assuming you want to make films and managing apartments. It's a weird mix. I mean we know people go into the arts often wait tables. You managed apartments. That must've been that entrepreneurial spirit in you as well even doing that film time. it's interesting. there really wasn't and i. I am by nature. I am the world's worst entrepreneur. I don't have any real entrepreneurial Instincts in me so even the apartment managing thing was was totally an accident. It was me capitalizing. An opportunity that presented itself and that i will say i've been good in my life about winning opportunity presents itself. I take that opportunity But if that one hadn't fallen in my lap than that it's terrifying to think what the outcome would have been. So when i went to film school i thought that i would. I was showing real promise zone school. And i thought that i had natural talent for it and that shows you my mindset. I was very focused on what what comes naturally to me and so i thought it maitlis gifted filmmaker and so the first half of them school. I did very very well. And then i got selected as one of the four people to direct senior thesis film. Which is a big deal and so when it happened was like oh my god. I'm like bud shows. I'm literally one of four people chosen to direct this film. And i'm gonna make this. It's going to be amazing. i'm gonna go out. I'm gonna get a three picture. Deal from hollywood off the back of how good this film is going to be. And and my life will be. That's literally what i was thinking. And i showed up on the first day of domain with virtually no preparation and to give i wrote the script like to the minute that it was due so a couple of hours before. I jot something down which only feeds ending it gets elected which only feeds into. I'm just naturally good at this. So i roll up onset completely unprepared and i fail miserably very publicly incredibly embarrassingly and then that shakes my whole world and makes me realized that i am. I am not a talented filmmaker like that was the hard realization that i had phase at that moment. Let me stop you from minute. 'cause how does that tell you. You're not a natural filmmaker because what you just described was maybe you are natural filmmaker. And you just won't prepacked so this is when you're rolling up believing that you have instincts for something and so you then rely on your instincts and realized that those instincts fail so now you can set instincts. I don't have instances of filmmaker. Okay so that's the site then it will. I don't have instincts. What exactly is natural talent. And by the way i think that even instincts trained. But i didn't know that at the time. So i'm coming into this realizing i if i have natural talent at no way to access it because i certainly can't access it by intuitively making decisions so i would go to set the camera or i would go to talk to the actors realized. I didn't know what to say to them. If their performance wasn't on the money right off the balance that i was paralyzed didn't know how to get them there. I would put the camera where it seemed cool. But it wouldn't add up to anything so i had all these like the shot itself was kinda cool but it didn't tell us great right and so that was you know if i have an instinct where to put the camera. What does that really matter if. I don't understand how to tell that overarching narrative end. So what really locked this known for me was when i started teaching film after film school. I realized okay. There are just things that i don't understand so don't have that understanding intrinsically can i gain that understanding and it was through the process of teaching going to other people who also by the way not naturally talented filmmakers Debt as i went home and learned i could come back and teach them what i learned and then they could apply had actually made their films better and so seeing them taking the knowledge i was gaining my ability to explain it. Their ability than execute on that had such a profound fundamental fundamental impact on the quality of the storytelling that again realized that it was a process and be naturally gifted. Maybe would have been nice the way that somebody you know that seven can sing. And they've never had a day of training in their life like that being effortless at something naturally as awesome. That just wasn't my lot in life. At least not as it applies to filmmaking but in teaching it. I began to realize that if i can help them get better. Can i help myself kipah. That's something interesting about that. Which is this piece around teaching something you want. Good at and being good at teaching it and making an impact on the people because there is this bias in rome. I don't know depends on the situation. I think i think you know there's the old saying those who can't do teach right. But i think there are things that i know. There are things i teach. I teach spectacular. And i know that the impact of it is immense. But i know. I don't do i know i actually. I'm very poor in my life. And i'm fully willing to own that but i'm fucking great. Tell you what to do and can actually see the vision of it very very well but you know there's that self application there are places where that and i think that there are also people who don't teach very well that teaches. I can't do it. That's a different story. But you know was interesting to me that you could teach it you doing it and you having that impact. What was that like. Was that an all sort of disempowering in any way because this was originally your dreams was your passion is talked about and then suddenly. You're not doing it actually. So it had the opposite effect on me and it became very empowering because what was happening was i took that the lessons that had been learning in film squad primarily focused on the technical side because again. I think i'm naturally talented. I don't think it's something that can be taught but the technical side. I think you know. I really understood that i needed to learn that. So i come in. I get i increased my technical proficiency to enhance what i think. Is this natural talent. Then as i'm going to try and articulate the technical side so really having to go what is like whether it's natural or it's learned like what is talented filmmaking. What makes one person better than another. Why is one seed. Good in another scene isn't and so. I had to teach myself that at night. Because i couldn't articulate it during the day. So i won. I realized in that period of my life teaching is brutally difficult and requires an insane amount of energy outside of the classroom to actually come in and be prepared. But i would go home and i would just research i would watch scenes. I read about it. I would read other people's breakdowns and this is before the internet. So i'm like reading all these journals and books and anything. I can get my hands on about what makes great directing working with actors. What makes great writing breaking down story structure. You know things that we touched on film school. But you're moving so fast that you don't have time to really really go deep so i'm going on all this stuff. I'm really educating myself. And then i put it to the test not my own stuff but on somebody else's and see if it's real or not and that hypothesis test results is really really valuable feedback and that created me this realization at aaa can learn this. So it doesn't matter. Whether i knew it instinctually i can learn it. I can teach it which is doubling down my knowledge and then if i could teach somebody else and improve them was i actually improving myself as well and so then went out and i mean i'm really condensing a time line here but then later went and Wrote some feature screenplays. One of them won awards. I made a feature myself that i directed and then i wrote a screenplay that ended up getting turned into a film all very very different experiences but each one taught me that. Whoa these things that. I'm learning actually do apply and have like world consequences in terms of getting better at something. So that began this feedback. Loop of you can improve anything. So i i started and i'm like i said i'm condensing But i began to realize okay so the human is the ultimate adaptation machine. I can direct my attention and focus on something and actually gain skills in that arena through practice disciplined practice. You can get good at anything. And that's all what fed into me then ultimately getting into being an entrepreneur for recall. So i wanna jump to to a mindset thing because i wanna to find out what happened. What what. How did it do you. It did it. Did it do something else altogether when you when you simply got this evaluation back on the company that you will have the company with quest suddenly this billion dollar organization. What was that like in your head. It seemed inevitable. So by that point we had been doing hardcore entrepreneurial stuff by the time that we got that valuation probably like thirteen years right. So you can change last in thirteen years. So i was not that same guy who was like. Oh my god. I can learn this like the conviction of i can go into any situations what i call the arrogance. I have the arrogance to believe. I can learn anything. I can figure anything out. I don't think i come in to any situation. Be better than anybody or knowing more than anybody. I just more relentlessly believe in my ability to figure it out and then my discipline which has really become the core of my character. I have the discipline to put the effort in to stick with it long after anybody else when it's super bowl ring when it's exhausting like i will just keep going so by that point. I had worked in the technology industry for almost a decade. I had transitioned over into manufacturing. We have been by the time. We got the valuations almost five years in. So i mean it's like i've been going at this very long time. With the senior focus of really adding value in people's lives building something that matters and through that process realizing that with where social media had gone with the way that lentils gen z had changed and just the booming Change in attitudes around health that we were making all the right decisions and that it was just inevitable that we get big. I never thought it would happen that fast. That was the only surprise me but when we launched. We're like we're gonna change the face of the food industry to to have the kind of impact that we because our mission was to end metabolic disease to do that necessitated building one of the biggest companies on the planet so it was like just all of that belief really did make when it happened. I was like yeah. This is deep purpose driving. And all one hundred. It was the only thing dr so head in technology. All i was doing this chasing money. That was it. I wanted to get rich. That was the it woke me up in the morning. It was what kept me awake at night. And i burned in realized that just wasn't driven by that so to try and put well and dollars at the center of my life just did work with my personality did work with my passions nonstop. I had literally shoot all of that to generate. Bow and change so. Let's come of this piece around disciplined. Because i think. I think there are some mistakes around display some misunderstanding I've been speaking teaching for thirty four years. I constantly banging into people who have things around this windass him to get them stuck. I will say there's no such thing as disciplined as only the things you make important discipline as you make yourself something but if you make something important than you're drawn to anyway and i want to bring it to us awareness tech. You had a company called awareness. Tick you move to the to the philippines to make sure your people were getting trimmed. I went to the buildings. Yeah so that was that discipline so to your point about the discipline in my life is borne out of identity right so tony romm socks a lot about that Identity drives behavior. And i'm just a huge huge huge believer in that so yes all of that whether it was flying coach for seventeen hours Which was allowed on a or just you know having the the disciplines you have built all of that up at the company in that company. The higher ms copywriter and i went from copywriter to an owner in the company and and disres- sweat equity and becoming the chief marketing officer. So all of that was an echo of the discipline. But you're one hundred percent right that the discipline is really an echo of building your identity and making that something nets just Want an absolute bernie knee so for me to accomplish the things that i wanted in like to be the person that i want to be. I had come disciplined. Which i am very much not by nature Going back to my mom so my mom's always been my biggest champion. She just new to the core of her being that i was one of the laziest people she'd ever met. And so when i left for college she assumed i was gonna felt. She didn't say that but when i asked her years later like 'cause she's always trying to give you to move back home and i was like you the one that pushed me to move to la. Why and she said. Oh i always wanted you to chase your dreams. But i just assumed you're going to sale now it's like wow like what a gift to get that outside perspective years later when it was no longer scary odd to give that outside perspective on what i seen at the time But i think you know through rule identity. You can make the most dramatic changes in your face so talk to us about that tom. What was the shifting from being somebody who was Naturally lazy and undisciplined to becoming extremely disciplined was the trigger. Point was earning event. What was it. The shifted you to go okay and therefore you know how does that tie into the identity. Because the before is i'm lazy is undesirably yet. Will the interesting thing is. I didn't think of myself as lazy and undisciplined I didn't have any concrete identity. Not not once filmmakers. Don't write one suck lost. That realized i'm not a naturally gifted filmmaker that there was a crisis of identity and like most amazing things in my life. They've all come from emotional prices. So what happened matt technologies. I stated goal of wanna get rich and so that's my goal right and jeremy. I find myself one day. I'm arguing my partners. Who are smarter than i am. And i'm arguing with them. And by the way. I defined smart as the ability to process raw data fast so they could just process raw data more quickly than i am so i don't like emotional value judgement on whether they're smarter than me just like. They prostrated fast so they would get to a conclusion much faster than me and oftentimes i was wrong. They were right based on. What's going to move towards the goal of getting rich right. So here i am. I'm in this meeting. And i'm arguing with them about my idea and i realize in real time in the middle of the argument. I'm arguing with them. Because i want to be right and it feels like it feels terrible to be wrong. It's time so. I keep argument arguing because i want to be right in india. Voices screaming like dude. What are you doing. You know you're wrong. So why are you are and in the end. I convince them. And then i had this moment of panic whereas like a i just convince them that i'm right i know i'm wrong. And if my stated goal is to get rich. What am i doing because clearly. I'm acting in accordance with the desire to feel good about myself versus the desire to actually get the goal of being rich so bat like started this whole thing. What do i actually want. And look if i just wanna feel good about myself just own it it it but i was structured my life very differently. If that's the case if that's the case then what i'm gonna do is immediately. Quit this job because these guys make me feel badly about myself all the time because they are so much smarter than i and there are like way ahead of me in being an entrepreneur. They had by the time. I the needed entrepreneurs like fourteen years in crazy. So i was like i never like if if i value myself only on my ability to have better answers faster than them. I'm just always going to be behind able so in that moment. Realize okay. I need to feel good about myself like that clearly is important. It doesn't make sense to stay here feel like shit everyday on your where you come down the swearing but if i'm going to feel like that every day. This is pretty terrible so Either change what. I'm what my goal is or change something else and what i realized i needed to change what i built my self esteem around because once i switched my mind away from being smart being right and i switched it to be a learner and identifying the right answer faster than other people on them putting on my energy behind that then like it really became an anti fragile identity and that the Book anti fragile makes clear that something this resilience something that's tough is still ultimately defined by its breaking point. It's breaking point is very far away but it's fine by breaking something that's anti fragile on the other hand is something that the more you attack it the stronger it gets and so once i made myself learner built my self esteem around being able to learn the willing to learn being able to be able and willing to put in the energy and the time to get good at something then if somebody were to attack me and say i'm stupid or under educated. Whatever my only question is in what way if you can show me where the whole is in my game. Then i can get stronger. Shoved his anti-rebel. That's very cool. very cool. the there's something that's underneath. I just want to see if i can touch it and see if it's that Leadership speaker escalation poll world. i trained individuals. Litas awoken always people. And you know there's a lot of stuff out that look gray stepfather about leadership and when my intensity of all ship but being real not just new trendy word authentic. Drive me nuts personally. But that's me and i talked about well. You know we say authentic people say we'll have an asshole. I know that about myself. So i mostly because i know myself initials me authentically. No that's not that's shitty behavior and a need to work on yourself. That's no one but at the same time you kind of led down a path that i think is very important. Let's see if we're on same patriots. I'm very much about being a compassionate leader. I talked about being a yin yang later. That you don't look much more than i do. I look like of impassioned the face now punch you in the face but eventually very hot centered on compassionate center. And i think you've got to have both you gotta have to strengthen the powell he was gonna have the yen and the nurturance but on the other side of that is see the great value. I did a video on this couple like a couple of months ago. It was called the beast and it was called embrace the beast. Find your beautiful rage on your walks of war. That's why i talked about. You'll beautiful raging your walls of all the things that piss you off so the negotiable annual life so that you then. It's not disciplined. It's like i fucking. I just go get that. This is what i i do feel like. There was some hints of that would be nice around and because because we don't know each other is that part of it told me. Is that part of the force or is it not you at all now. It's interesting so i. I use the phrase beauty and rage. And you look. I'm a big believer in the how much you split that really matters. And so i spent eighty percent of my time on the beautiful side thinking about the things that i'm grateful for The amazing things that i want to bring to this world the way that i want serve other people and then twenty percent of my time is being deeply pissed off Upset with either myself a chip on my shoulder about other people Deeply dissatisfied with where. I'm at like all of that stuff. I think it plays. And so you've gotta have you know i. I think it movies lot so star wars really captured this. You've got the light side. You've got the dark side absolutely The dark side serves you in very cute moments of pain and they've done studies on this. You want somebody to be able to endure more pain. So usually it's done by making them submerged their arm in a bucket of ice and if want to be able to extend the amount of time that they can keep their arm in that. Let them express anger so and then they can keep it up to thirty percent more just by getting pissed off by yelling by burrowing the brow by channeling that intensity so in in those cute moments where the beautiful things that i'm trying to do and bring into this world fail me and it's not enough to keep pushing me forward and i'm just fucking wiped out or whatever those the turned to rage the chills singing about it. Those are the times where. I think about the people that want me to. I think about the people in my. That would laugh if i you know fall in in those moments. It's i'm not going to give them. That's out of action. And that's ugly man. That's me pushing against that. That's me buchan piss. That's me grinding in pushing forward. Because i will win. I will crush them. Only spent twenty percent of my time. There it is so powerful in. It's one of those things. It sounds like he really get this. It's one of those things. I think people really failed to utilize in their right because they think that they need to always be sunshine and light and i think that the darkness becomes corrosive at a certain point. And get yourself over. That is not a great place to live but holy hell will it. Serve you if you know how to leverage it. Well i mean you know you. And i both into story and i love story and particularly the heroes. The heroes journey all the stories that are written around that. But and i love the campbell. Said you know the the treasury seek is in is in the cave of darkness that you fair to step into is so profound to us and the cavers usually our own anger rage and install was lucas said into the cave where he confronts the the greatest civil dot mrs h. He thinks his death pulls the helmet off himself as zone darkness. And the the moment of transformation is the empress constantly saying come to the dioxide. Come to the side and given to the rage give into your anger and he finally does. And it's only in moment that he actually can flip the other way to compassion. I follow and i think that this is the point. That's why i love what you said about the twenty percent. You've got you you. You have to be the what isn't disciplined for me. I think you've got to have enough depth and self knowledge to know this is the line. And if you don't have that depth of you haven't done enough self discovery you're gonna ship the bed on it and you're going to go into full blown rage and it's going to it's going to take over your life is going to be the but i have never met anyone who is truly massively successful just wells interlock fulfillment who does not have the power of that rage. Who's not tempt into the beast and farrell that within themselves. That the what. I call the fuck you moment of saying that's it. I'm doing it no matter what i'm sick to this and i talked about purpose life bumpers and do all this work. Companies said. what's coming this new age hall. Shit around ultimate service and innovation. Come on that's naughty. What pissed you off enough to make you wanna start a business. What was it a pissed you off enough to make you wanna make a difference because when you get past the survival leads of taking care of your family this is something that enrages you the something else fury. H you whether it's the way hollywood treating women or whether it's you know the stuff is in the news today or whether it's right wing several whatever it is the way amongst read by your dad or whatever it was that stuff is fuel and i think we forget that it's so juicy it so powerful but as you say it cannot run you you have to have the self knowledge to know. This is where the line is your love that man and you gave me the chills like three times as you were walking through the star wars stuff you spot on. It's so powerful and so so missed. We a modern day. Heroes are so ultimately black white. And i love new particularly because i'm a movie for eight to love movies that blow the lines one of my favorite films. Well time is syrian. Wow in syria. Most people miss it. And why you like syria because it totally blew it blows the lines. Here's a his associates suicide bomber. Who is not a fanatic. He's just trying to feed his family his his an arab prince who's trying to bring in solar energy. You think he's all about oil but he's not. Here's a cia dire. Think he's about this but he's actually about that. I just loved all the blurring of lines because this is the truth of what we are. We think that we are something. This is one of the things. I've talked about so many times. Is that we. We live in a world that cell. We want to sell the world. This is who i am but what we've gotta embraces that we are diamonds we are multifaceted and the forever light there geno for every every pot of us is multifaceted Instead of myself you see me in the gym. And i'm deadly i'm deb lifting on a leg pressing sixteen hundred pounds of grunting and sweating instead flight everywhere. You go a macho dick and then you see me with a child or you seem Michael love it. Or you see me with a claim and i'm deeply compassionate and caring in a more shoes than my wife and you go. This guy must be gay. Will the truth is gay. I am straight. And i am all those things not sexually but those facets of my being and i think we get away from that and that's what i've loved about what i was watching your stuff listening to you. Is this filmmaker the because it seems like you've gone full circle tom. That's why i was really intrigued. Because you went from filmmakers storyteller. And i would challenge you to say. I do believe you had innate talent but it was the desire to tell a story. It was the desire to use narrative to change things. And your model your your your your vehicle were spill. Initially your vehicle became business and now you're kind of full circle with impact theory. Tell us about that. Sees me So you're absolutely right about the power of storytelling. And i think about the impact that i want to have on the world what i really want to do. It's not why started out in film making. When i started out it was a love of the story. It was the emotional rollercoaster. It was wanting to be the one in control of that. I may be more than most enjoy that emotion like. I'm saying when you were telling this star wars in the abstract it gave me the chills. Like there's i read a high responder to that kind of stuff so that was initially what drew me to it as i got into Deep into studying it. I realized that what i really love is psychology and that was just a amazing way to express that to take people on that journey so when i got into being an entrepreneur and marketing i realized this is the same thing. It's the same muscle like really taking people on that psychological journey understanding what they want knowing when to violate when to give them exactly what they want me in all of that stuff is incredibly incredibly powerful and when finally got out of just worrying about money and started focusing on kate. What like the struggle is guaranteed. The money is not so if the money isn't guaranteed. What is that thing. That i'm gonna love doing every day. And that became the driver of wanting to end metabolic disease having grown up in a Morbidly obese family watching people struggle founded with that. I realize there's a real chance through storytelling an commerce to really make a change and so there's a reason that an a business reason that we built a studio inside at quest we will one of the first companies that had all of our own people focused entirely on content creation trying to tell the story with the brand connect with people on an emotional level and then it got to the point where i realized okay. It's not enough just to address the concerns of the body. We need to address concerns of the mind. How can do that. I won't take time walking through. It's fairly lengthy. But at least cheer that i believe whether i'm right or wrong is relevant. I believe that the surest way to impact people at a belief system level. So i think is really all that matters. The only way to effectively hit them. A belief system is generic. And so that meant that. I was if i was going to directly address. The problems of the mind that i see us going through when you talk about what pissed you off enough where you're starting this company for me. I worked in the inner cities a lot. And i'll tell you right now that there are incredible human beings the next einstein is in the ghetto somewhere. But we'll never know 'cause he doesn't or she doesn't believe in themselves enough to go educate themselves or belief system is so malnourished that they just they don't think they can go learn leasing so even though they may be incredibly bright. They're not gonna do anything. So that winds me up. That people's mindsets are so dictated by the people immediately around them of the school system. Their parents culture like all of it is. It's it terrifies me. And so i've seen incredible people be consumed by that. So i thought okay. What's the real way that we can give people in empowering mindset but at scale just that's my own particular bent. I'm not interested in helping one person that doesn't turn me on. Maybe it should judge away. It doesn't and i need to be impacting. Millions hundreds of millions of billion like is many people as i can so it scale the only way to do that is through narrative and companies and those to me are the two things that make up the very fabric of certainly western society. So the that's why we're now creating impact the reason to be a studio trying to create a studio bigger than disney and disney is doing Did something they started back. Nineteen thirties and no one is replicated. This so easiest way to explain it is if i say i'm gonna go see a warner brothers movie or sony movie or paramount live. You don't know anything about it. If if i am going to go see a disney movie you already know something about as a story right and it. It's one kind of story told from a thousand different angles and because of that all feeds into the brand ethos at disney means something and it's that's never been replicated so everybody else. It's like all across the map. They tell all different kinds of stories. Some empowering some disempowering and they just want to sell tickets so we wanna tell one kind of story and if disney is the most magical place on earth we want to be the most empowering place on her very cool very cool in one of the things and this is this again two sides to that too. I love talked about telling stories. That are empowering But you also talked about people in the ghetto and the environment. It can be brilliant. People an exciting time during the wrong environment. They don't have enough belief and changing those beliefs. It is an issue in and of itself. Because you can't change belief of somebody who doesn't believe that belief can change. So the i is like. Can you change your belief that can be at that can be a jungle on its own and environments is so important. I mean people have no idea. You're you're jim. Rome said you're the average of the five people. You're spending time with. I wrote a. I wrote a doctoral thesis on that on personally emotional resonance feels and the postal emotional resonance field is your thought your emotions. And you're feeling three separate things. And the three things were aligned. It creates a frequency modulation a resonance for genetic field. As it's described the attracts to you more of that. So this is why we see the challenges. You pull somebody out of the ghetto. You take them to. Tom and you put them in training. You put them around for a while and we come out in the like. Oh yeah i get it now. And i'm really in it. I can do this and you put them right back. In the environment the environment will shift them back to the default position because the neurons. That why i fired again. Why again and that neuro chemistry is so addictive and this is one of the things i think people forget. And that's why it was interesting to me that you came out of the nutrition space as well because by nature. This is one of the things. When i look at people who condemn. I live in the nicest five vancouver. Is i live right by the water right. Downtown and literally quarter of a mile walk from me is the worst five rinku. It's the downtown eastside. It's rough and i see people walking and there was somebody sleeping in the potholes. Blame somebody on. The building was like pissed off about it and i was talking to me. Don't you think sudden said. I think the guy can find a place to sleep this dry. It's a good thing. And it will let you edit an echo on we. All human beings are addicts. We are all addicted. Some of these are addicted to praise some rejected to church some of his more socially acceptable addictions than alcohol drugs. But we're all addicted and shifting people out of the like. The addiction is environmentally bound. And that's what i love about you saying you. Is you also have we get them out of the of the environments on this. This is this is to me is important. Because i know you're doing great. I'm doing good but how we get a lot of the frigate environment. how do we do that. Yemi realistically. I don't think you do. And so there's a guy named geoffrey. Canada and his work is haunted. Me since i came across it very very intelligent. Man rose up in harlem in the middle of the crack epidemic and decides. I'm going to go to harvard. I'm going to get educated. I'm gonna come back with a change. Education system goes in. Forget how long you worked in the education system but long enough to realize it can't be changed from within so says himself. I'm gonna give up on adults and i'm going to focus entirely on the next generation so rather than trying to unwind all of this go after the next generation identified what he believed to be. The main predictor of future success looked at people that grew up in the inner city versus people that grow up in a middle class family. Why do more people from middle class wanted to be successful and he boils down to one very very simple things that it's the number of positive words that a child hears before the age of five and i saw jesus. Can it really be like that. Terrifyingly simple and because there's almost certainly some truth to that the way that we talk here at impact theory is this is a generational problem and i consider myself a filter. So i'm not trying to change the world I'm not going after people who are antagonistic. You talked about it. The i believe ask changes the belief that you can change your beliefs So i'm not going after people that don't believe it but i'm trying to if you look at where people form their beliefs. Their parents the culture of their friends. You know the five people this the time with the way to influence them and the culture is through narrative. I believe and so. That's why we're attacking the problem but i don't like you're a at scale you can never just pull people out of the ghetto right so that that's certainly not going to happen in single generation and then Like the right guy to answer that question. So maybe somebody out. There is working on that. That would be amazing. The area that. I care enough about to dedicate my life. Is that belief system the the individual person so we're making content both for adults that self-select that's why call myself filter. They see like for me. The movie the matrix changed my life star. Wars had a massive impact on me so people that see that kind of content and will spawned. That's what we wanna make content for. And then we also each bait mission based companies that we believe at the end of the day like so much of the fabric of our society is made up by the companies that we champion that we support with our dollars. And so we want to help usher in that next era of entrepreneurs that really they want to do things massively to make a lot of money but they also want to serve people and so that's really important for me as an individual and also for the company so those are like the truth is we're not going to know kate. The inner cities were not going to pull everybody out at scale but can we over generations. fundamentally altered the nature of the problem. I think we can agree with you. I think we can to your essentially you brought the matrix. You're a huge fan of that. And again i am too but i think the really seeing a lot of people miss something in the matrix because people who live in a matrix fumble comfortable than people who live outside of the matrix in the movie right eight nece slop while rough clothes and living in what looks like a rusty submarine you know and everybody else is walking around up in a nice life and i think that this is something that people miss. There's the the saying psychology my background's in psychology. But it is off before it gets better against much woes. And i and i think most people go in that in that life story they go. This is painful. He's got to change this the impetus to change. I'm going to change. Oh my god. This changes painful. I don't like it. it's uncomfortable. I'm going back to the familiar painful. We choose the familiar painful. How is what you do with impact theory. How do you think that's making a dent. Why don't i don't know that anybody's ever going to be able to make a dent in the this is going to be harvest. Hell and you've got to be willing to push through that. I think that is the fundamental nature of changes. You were saying. I just think that's really true. So the question becomes. Can you give people glimpses of what awaits them on the other side to create compelling future and i think the only reason that people pushed stuff the only reason that it's worth the time effort to build the identity that we were talking about earlier the only reason people are going to struggle through glow. This really are And i'm tempted to go back to the familiar. The only reason to keep pushing that your yourself fucking excited about something that awaits on the other side that vision of who you can become what you can accomplish if you amass those skills push yourself tapping into the beast is you said like all of that stuff is for the right person so and sold citing and this is what i think they do a really good job of highlighting in the matrix is i never promise was going to be easy. Only that it's real and once you're tapped into what's real now. All of a sudden you can really begin to leverage things you can take advantage of the human ability to adapt to learn to grow to get better to empower yourself and once you like the to really put specifics around that process talking about the part. That sucks departments. hard is recognized. Everything's your all the our life way that exists is one hundred percent it was all of the choices made even. If you were abused as a child you allowed that to continue to be an issue. You can't stop what happened. You can't change it but you can decide right now today as a fully functioning adult what you're going to focus on what you're going to allow to occupy your mindset and that once you realized that you're completely in control to make different decisions. Have a wildly different outcome that you have to own all of that everything that happens. That sucks that's hard and a lot of people refused to ever face that but those that do now you actually can accomplish the things you want accomplish. You can become the person to become whatever your dream is. You could do the hard work and make that a reality. But as long as you're lying to yourself as should not. Tim's wants bill the as long as a result of other things. You can't control and you'll always be vehicle. Let's face it. It's a lot easier to be a victim. What's interesting that like emotionally. I get it on day. One yes but like on day one hundred. It's really not. And when i think to go back to where i was to no longer take responsibility for the things in my life to feel like it's the outside world that was rat in the beginning and i get it when i see people with a fixed mindset. I totally feel for them. It's it is a protective mechanism closer to other people augment. I would never go back. And that's the loss of control is is absolutely terrified. Now i gotta i Piece on the base of the things. I talked about was. I'm thankful i'm deeply grateful to my father who was terrible. He was an asshole completely irresponsible he talking. It was abusive. He did all kinds of horrible things to me and at the same time. I know that i am strong. And i know that. I'm deeply loving and deeply compassionate and deeply empathetic and caring because he was not i was on an interview beckett. Nineteen eighty nine. I was being into an interview. The interviewer said to me on trouble. The world studied with these great spiritual teachers. Which i've done a totally different religious philosophies and he said who is your greatest spiritual teacher. I said my father he said. Oh was your father. A great spiritual masters. My father was spiritual embassy. Betty was emotionally devoid. Which made me. It was the catalyst for me to say. There's gotta be something big for that. And that's the ownership of the blessed. What i say. The blessing is the curse the curse the blessing. And it always how you look at it. Why you away from that. What was a moment for you because this is. I think happens for many of his mind. I literally fell out and goes. Masterpieces fell twelve stories while free climbing. That is a moment of the full line is literally. Some people have another kind of fall. It's it's its bankruptcy. It's a whatever it might be a divorce. Also you know what was yours. What was the turning point for you. That really was so thankfully. It wasn't a literal hall of the mountain in an answer that in a second i want to address. You're saying about your father. That is so powerful. And i can only imagine your audiences talked about that before but baton mindshift of deciding to frame that in another way is absolutely incredible. So i'm just My own thing is it was was chasing money. I wanted to be wealthy. I was giving every ounce of my being that pursuit To the point rose. Beginning to damage my marriage i mean it was it was all it was seven days a week. It was just. If i wasn't sleeping. I was working. It was cruel raising now. And all of that comes up with need feeling absolutely miserable. I was chasing something that i didn't really care that much about. It was eroding my soul. I did not feel alive. Everything that i did took more energy away from me than engage me. It was just absolute misery and for the first few years in business. It really gave to me. And i was getting better and growing powerful and it was awesome and then it started to take take take until i really emotionally was a shell of the person that i you know had been years before that it was so miserable man so finally i go into my partners and i said look i quit. I can't do this anymore. Here's your equity back I was planning to move to greece to go back to writing fulltime. My white is which is why we're gonna move there. I was really going to Finish learning the language and just only do things made me feel more alive. I was going to reduce my need for capital to virtually nothing and that was just going to be at. That was never again gonna do something. That wasn't enjoyable in of itself in the moment of is going to focus on adding value. I was going to focus on what at the time. I call being myself. I wanna be. I want like. I don't wanna be a clever marketer. I wanna be myself and that was really really important to acknowledge you the person i want to be the person that i am like all of that. Like just get into the truth of who that is and the things that i love the things that i enjoy and i was trying so hard to be the business guy the entrepreneur that i thought i was supposed to be instead of really being who i am and who i want to become bugged. We're doing a lot of things to move towards that. What was the point when you suddenly got. This is a fool's errand. It really was slow man. I wish it was like one moment. It was just day after day feeling worse than the day before it was realizing god i dread mondays. I live for friday's and i didn't. It's been this way for six months a year. Two years the re years my wife is saying you're not fun to be around like you're just unhappy all the time like this is sad but she was heartbroken to me to watch me become that and then she was frustrated that hey it's not a lot of fun to be married to somebody who's miserable so just realizing like okay. Look the definition of insanity is keep doing the same thing and expect different results so it really just got to wear emotionally. it was so unbearable over such a long period of time. That i just said enough is enough and that was it so unfortunately for me there was no like senior moment where i fell off amount. And could you know say okay dumb ass like time to wake up and do something differently in think differently. Just really slow. The reason i ask us is i mean. I think that. I believe that everybody goes through a fall. But i think the misconception an it's often put in place by movies this pot about movies i don't like is that the event happens and that's the turning point that's never turning. It's not what happens. People say to me must have changed your vote. No didn't i became more arrogant. I became more when people said to me how you doing. I'm good i'm great. I'm coming back essential term and it wasn't until about nine months later when my cat died a cat i didn't even like died. And i picked up this cat and balling my iso and fall on the floor of the fetal position. Week that i realized well life is fucked. What the hell am i doing. I'm trying to get back to something that was not fulfilling me. So it's it's. I always say this is my my language around. It is the pivotal piddle. Moment i fall of a mountain guess masterpieces hospitalized and all that s pivotal. But that's not where the powers powers in the choice moment when everything can become normal again and you must choose your go back to what was able to go back to what was usual but he go to someone else and that moment for me was the january. That's why i always ask people. Because i wanna know if you recognize was there a moment was actually after so interesting and i think that your wife say your miserable from being around here. That's an important factor as we get close to the end. I want to ask you. What is it that schedule. What is it that keeps you up at night. Because i think that all of our driven have that what is it for. You know it's interesting so my answer isn't going to be. I don't think what you're expecting in it. There's only two things that i'm Of and that's losing my wife and brain damage Brain damage. Because i really do believe i can learn anything. I can come back from anything. So if i woke up tomorrow and i lost everything financially Before i had success i had to do all the work to come to grips emotionally with gratitude. Feeling alive like being energized by things and that that doesn't come from money So vat like while a. I don't eagerly rush towards losing what i've built That doesn't scare me but brain damage. Because there's no coming back from that least not as today. That fucking terrifies me. True and my wife. I've allowed myself to invest emotionally to a level. I never done with another human being a now over such a long period of time and for me. The thing that i prize most in my relationship with my wife is shared experience. So we've been sharing a life for seventeen years and there's the only way to build. That back is real time so that that is those things out. That's pretty cool. That's very cool. Actually i feel the same way about my ride. Twenty years and i'm more love within the day i had married up and the greatest decision i've ever made. It's shitty ones of made. Some good ones best. Lamba made was asking her to marry me in great gift when she said yes and every day every day every night i say thank you to not just to myself to her so i totally get where you're coming from and and when people ask us secret is citing divorce is always an option neg. Oh wow it would've thought you would say something very odd you know. It's always an option for her. She is the same field. It's always option for me but what it means is. I can't take it for granted but it means is i go to step up my game. I can't account so. I totally get where you're coming. That's pretty beautiful. Thank you for sharing that tom. I appreciate it. Listen what would what if you could say one piece of advice that you want lead us. Mainly leadership positions whether entrepreneur co c. suite. Whatever they might be one piece of practical advice from what we talked about today which i loved. What would that be when you build your self esteem around matters. Like that was really my biggest breakthrough once. I shifted my identity my self esteem to being the learner literally everything changed. I think especially for leaders. That's huge because it opens the door for other people to bring the full weight of their talents and personalities. They're not worried about bannon you. It's not about your ideas. It's really about letting the team shine letting other people get really good at something being able to delegate. Those i think are echoes of deep sense of security with who you are and women. Deep sense of security comes from. I'm better than everybody. Bayfield that and if instead comes from learn i want to get better that will become baked into the culture in a way. It's just insanely empowering for the whole organization as well as for the individual fabulous. May this has been really awesome. Thank you so much for sharing your time. I know you're busy appreciate it. I know you don't take all of the interviews. Get off with appreciate you being on this one. Please tell our listeners of you as where they can find out more about you about impact theory all the things that you're doing all the things that you often playing at tom. Bill you across everything. So you to ford slashed on bill. You instagram facebook twitter. All of it at bill. You unfortunately for me. My name is little bit weird It's b. as in bravo. I l y you. What does the heritage wrench. But i have like the world's tiniest amount of french but somehow rename this stock the least french. Okay we'll make sure that that gets up on the show as well. Thank you so much. Tell me what you say to the end. I want to thank you. Listen to give you of that union. You've enjoyed the show as much i today. I appreciate tom coming on. Really just delivering just opening right up when we got right in that and listen. I say see every single time. Don't listen to the show. Don't watch the show who gives a shit if you've got it in the background it doesn't do anything. Stop paying attention. Take out a pentagon paper physical ben on physical and write notes. And listen and think about what you can apply because unless you do something with it it's worth the whole in the dona information is with the whole transformation comes from application so go back and listen to it and remember if you're in business. The research consistently shows that one of the biggest challenges facing even the most successful companies is somewhat counter. Intuitive i is companies are doing what it takes get tall and they're attracting amazing employees programming great challenges and keeping them and they're often leaving them before they have a chance to really are wife if you're sick of investing and trading developing your town only have them leave you before you get the return on investment reach out to us and talk to us at full monty. Leadership dot com full monty should dot com where we provide you with the essential leadership skills to rekindle amplify the hidden loyalty assets organization by tapping into your purpose full leadership providing you with concrete sub skills to get your organizers to the top and keep you that why because you come out so also till next time this is don barron full monty leadership dot com saying. Stay curious mike friend. Stay curious about way you are invested in getting your self esteem from so next time. Albert i'm out.

tom bill cnn fox inc magazine thousand fourteen inc. school of greatest podcast forbes inc innovation board x prize found Baron maitlis Tom windass tony romm tom matt technologies entrepreneur magazine dov tony robbins Litas
#235 The Bizarre Origin Stories of This Years Inc. 5000 Startups

Inc. Uncensored

25:58 min | 1 year ago

#235 The Bizarre Origin Stories of This Years Inc. 5000 Startups

"The following podcast contains explicit language <music> hello and welcome to inc uncensored podcast about business entrepreneurship technology cool companies and just about anything that hits the like buttons of the fantastic people who ended for inc thank. My name is james ledbetter. I'm the editor of inc magazine and nick dot com and i'm very pleased to be joined by three of my esteemed colleagues reporter cameron dyke. Hey jim staff writer. Emily canal hey jim and making his inc uncensored debut editor at large. Tom foster out this. Week's episode is devoted entirely to the two thousand nineteen inc five thousand enlist. We're gonna talk about the number one company. We're gonna talk about the number three company and we were talking about a company that helps you find beer plus. Stay tuned for our like buttons a quick hit on something. We saw this week that we liked. I don't wanna give too much away but they will involve chicken sandwiches and making football players. Okay we are continuing to discuss this year's inc five thousand list. The annual roster of the fastest growing companies in the united states and we're very pleased that tom who is based in austin is here with us in new york this week because he is the guy who wrote about the number for one company this year. Tom tells all about it. They are <hes> a company called free star based in phoenix arizona and we see sometimes you know with the <hes> <hes> really we see every year with the number one company pretty eye popping growth rates this company. It's three year growth rate was thirty six thousand six hundred eighty point four percents cents. I mean using <hes> and what do they do. They are an ad tech company that sector of advertising online called ad ops essentially what they do is they work for or other companies other publishers and help them run their ad operations. I mean it's kind of interesting because those of us who work in media are shall. I say very aware of the challenges in the advertising space one tends to hear about all the ad dollars moving to google and facebook and the ad dollars coming to publishers like say inc <hes> seemed to be shrinking all the time but here's a company that is not only making it work but thriving well so so they work for a whole bunch of different kinds of publishers <hes> slopes dot com of their clients <hes> fortune magazine one of their clients one of the clients i spoke with a <hes> publication called coin desk with covers all things cryptocurrency <hes> and coin dusk claims that when they started working with free star within a essentially overnight within one month their revenue from advertising increased three hundred percent <hes> so how does that how does that happen. So how can we make that not to be so yeah so the key that <hes> that these guys figured out was a technology called header bidding that they we're very early on a few years ago previously the way this worked was <hes> you know ads were sold in sort of an instantaneous auction process that wasn't actually an auction publishers were put out a request to advertisers for to bid on space and then essentially what would happen is the technology would accept the first qualifying bid. Okay <hes> which meant that it wasn't actually weighing bids against one another so you were potentially leaving almost certainly leaving better potential bids on the table. You also had very little control over who was appearing on your site. Which is one of the big problems that we see in that business. A lot of bad at what header bidding does is turns it into something more like a real auction where simultaneously haney ously <hes> ways all the bids and picks the best qualifying offer makes perfect sense and just because of that brings in a lot more money. The way free star then makes us money as by taking a small percentage of the dollars that flow through its technology presumably. They're not the only company that does this. That's correct. They were very early to it and are especially good at it and it seems to me. They started life doing something different well so they have an interesting somewhat unorthodox back. <hes> really this company started it goes back to the previous company <hes> that <hes> the two founders guy named chris stark in a guy named david freedman friedman started his first company was <hes> he was a fifth your senior twenty two years old at arizona state university fifth year senior. If your senior and in a hurry graduation as a twenty two year old fifth year senior he was interested in things like <hes> girls and beer and <hes> so he created a pinup calendar of a._s._u. Coeds <hes> wearing bikinis <hes> as he said though they ahead the beauty and the brains because he had a requirement that they have a three point o. g._p._a. This was back in two thousand and four and the thing took off. It was a success and spread spread to a bunch of other schools. <music> howard stern talked about it. Playboy talked about it and he had a website that went with it. That was all the out takes from his photo shoots and he tried to figure out how to anyone anyone. Don't try this at home folks except for the part that he tried to make money off the the website realized he didn't understand ad technology hired this guy chris start <hes> and from there things took off they became a consultant for lots of other sites and then found their way into this header bidding business <hes> so i always try to figure out you know is there. We're some lesson from the number. One company that other entrepreneurs other people running businesses can learn from even if they aren't a in and say the ad tech business most will not be one of the things they did along the way i think the biggest lesson they probably took was when they first started consulting for other companies on the ad tech business. They realized quickly that they were helping these businesses and a lot of these businesses. We're getting purchased by other companies so they said okay. Why don't we purchase some publishers publishers of our own and you know instead of doing this for other people. We'll just take that money for ourselves and we can sell those or just content money's content okay as they raised a million dollars just from friends and family to go. Do this bought like nine different small publishers and very quickly realized oh we have no idea what we're doing is publishers. The lesson of course is they had walked away from what they were. <hes> you know really good at that made them successful in the first place which was focusing on advertising technology <hes> so very quickly change that strategy and sort of went back to what they had been doing so so you're saying the lesson here is not calendars. That is a very good lesson okay unless you take your calendar business and turn it into a very successful technology case he's here. We are yeah well. It's a great story and i encourage all our listeners to pick up the september issue of inc magazine where you can see a fuller account always when we put out out the inc five thousand list one of the funnest and most interesting categories is the food category because there's a lot of innovation stuff that kind of looks crazy but like like five years later. Everybody's doing it <hes> and emily this year you wrote about the number. Three company called c._c.'s veggie company. Tell us about cici's yeah ask so think of walking down the grocery aisle and you're going to see these beat or zucchini shredded noodles so they look like pieces of spaghetti but they're made out of beads. Were you know <hes> butternut squash or zucchini. You've seen those right yeah i i. I got for christmas a couple years ago like a machine that lets me do spiral yeah yes yes. It's gathering dust some well. This company sees a veggie co makes these vegetable noodles and they've actually expanded the the business into a vegetable rice mac and cheese things like that and basically it's giving people an option. If they want to eat a sort of healthy pasta dinner the founder mason arnold he and his two children <hes> we're told that they should adopt a gluten free diet for health reasons and he really didn't want them to miss miss out on things like spaghetti and meatballs simultaneously one of them to eat more vegetables so he wanted to create this tasty and healthy substitute for their favorite dishes. That wouldn't have them eating super processed foods. Did he have a background in making food. No he started a couple right in <hes>. He started a couple of different businesses. You know he had worked with one around food before but not making food and you know he was just tinkering in his kitchen and dan working on it and his daughter who's very young at the time really liked eat raw vegetables and he was like okay. She likes this. She might noodle form of pasta sauce on it but he actually really put some science behind it. Which i found really interesting. He wanted to research the attributes of pasta that consumers thought were essential to their eating experience experience so he could replicate them so the first is fork behavior so if you're going to have butternut squash noodles you want them them to swirl around your fork like traditional fettuccini perhaps <hes> and then the second factor is that the noodles have to be able to hold sauce and mason was telling me that like it's key because a lot of people just use noodles as a vessel for the sauce. That's on them. That is true i i can. I can attest it yeah. I can't and tell us a little bit about the company's growth who they've been growing like crazy. I mean part of that is because this company launched in two thousand fifteen and at around the same time americans were adopting this gluten free low carb. You know a very healthy diet and that sort of helped cici's veggie co take off their now in three thousand five hundred wholefoods kroger's costco stores and they booked twenty five million dollars in revenue last year. Do they have to be refrigerated or do they like dry. Pasta have a shelf presence yet so that's actually one of the challenges that this company phases they do have to be refrigerated <hes> and they we only have a shelf life of two weeks from when they're created to you know when they should be eaten <hes> so that is really tough for the business because they have to make the noodles. Get them out. Get them in grocery stores and give them enough time to be sold. Additionally mason was telling me it's very hard for him to find talent because he needs employees. Who can <hes> basically make these noodles in thirty eight degree room so the vegetables stay fresh and that's you know not. Maybe everyone's ideal job yeah <hes> i think it's probably no coincidence that this kind of innovation is happening in austin tom. You've written a lot about food companies in austin. There's so much of that going on the lot of it goes back to whole foods being based in <hes>. There's also another company in texas called h._e._b. Which is a huge grocery. Chain that is focused. Solely on the texas is market h. e. but howard but <hes> that was a joke and no no no no yeah this is one of the largest privately held companies in america yeah and so between the two of them they have a real focus on local producers that paired with the fact that package food companies you know the traditional conglomerates have been sort of on a shopping spree because their brands sort of have not appealed to changing consumer tastes <hes> and so it has led to this almost sort of like outsourced innovation engine for them so those guys just go they. They let there's a whole venture capital industry three. That's funding all these food startups and the big guys swoop in later and really is fascinating wave at twenty-first-century capitalism works the you you buy the innovation yeah because you can't innovate yourself. It's amazing well. I wouldn't be surprised if cici's finds itself on the block sometime soon <hes> we're gonna take another break and we'll be right back. 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That's linked in dot com slash inc uncensored for your free one hundred dollar ad credit terms and conditions apply and we're back <hes> in keeping with the fun aspect of the inc five thousand list the number two hundred and twenty one. This year is a company that helps you find quality beer cameron you wrote about this company tells all about it. It's funny. The first time i heard of untapped was was a long time ago back when i was in college. I i don't remember exactly when <hes> one of my college like ten minutes ago. Okay thank you thanks. I don't remember when in college it was so. I can't tell you exactly how many years ago it was but a friend of mine was obsessively using this app that i had never heard of to track every beer that he had drank and use it for recommendations for you know based on what he liked what he liked and it was it was on tap. You have a very long history with this. Yeah it was it was crazy when we were going through through the vetting process of of going through all the companies basically determining who's who's on the list and who's not. I saw the name pop thoughts myself. That seems really familiar. Why is that and then it's out there but i put two and two together at that time. What i didn't know is that untapped was basically a little side hobby of these two guys who who had other full-time jobs <hes> greg avola and tim matter both worked remotely they both they lived in their own respective parts of the country tim. I'm on the west coast greg on the east coast and sorta just did this on alert they had worked on some projects give of actually met over twitter back in two thousand seven when one of them reached out on twitter saying hey. I need a designer for this project. That's coming up on the other said oh hey i'm a designer and and a beautiful friendship was born. It didn't turn into anything beyond a side the for a really long time because they didn't want to <hes> to quit their day jobs they didn't they didn't want to quit the stability of having those day jobs and so for years it beat it was this massive at hosting millions of users that was just being run essentially out of two guys respective garages but how how do they make money so the money part comes from a second piece of the platform. I it actually works both ways. It's both a consumer product and a b. Two b. product so if you're a consumer summer you jim were to download this app right now. You could log your beer choices and get recommendations for what you might like and you don't pay anything for that. You'd probably do get served ads. I actually don't often they make money. Primarily of the other piece of the app which is a bbc section for bars and restaurants so bars and restaurants can pay the app to to get better placement they have partnerships with the app to display the apps icon a sticker in the storefront or for bartenders to talk about the app to customers first and then the bars pay for that privilege exactly yelp for beer exactly yes sir i mean i would. I would never think that would be a viable business and yet they have grown own. Oh roughly one thousand eight hundred eighty two percent on probably years <hes> to a ten million dollar business underestimating how much people left beer yeah. I guess so and one of the founders really wasn't even that into beer yeah. That's the funny thing founder that i wrote about in the print issue of ink greg of ola did not really care that much for beer. He didn't hate beer but he didn't really love beer. He just sort of thought hey this is. This is a good idea back. At the time. Foursquare was in vogue. Anyone remember for sure were and he and tim had basically been using foursquare to sort of communicate with each other in a way across the country ham checking in here. Hey you're checking their if the idea hit them one day what about a four square for beer speaking of the print issue can we talk about the visuals that accompany the story god by far my favorite part of the story so much credit to the photographer who took a photo of greg standing outside in his front lawn drinking a beer in his bathrobe which is fantastic tastic in and of itself then on the table of contents. There's a photo of him splashing the beer all over his face holding it up so the listeners can see it. It's a really great great photo shoot. I've been i've been posting bits of it. Online and the response has been just as enthusiastic as as my response when i first saw it which was i want to give this photographer a hug doc. You said that they ran it as kind of a hobby or a side hustle for a long time what made the flip to cover proper. I a friend of mine business well. They started getting a lot of pressure from advisers. People who had been in the beer industry people who would actually run their own beer startups and successfully exited them who were telling them that they really needed to make this thing. They needed to quit their jobs. They needed to get into an accelerator. The the name techstars was specifically brought up greg recalls being sat sat down by an investor in a coffee shop in san francisco and specifically told you need to do this. Techstars is calling you. I don't know if those are the exact words and they didn't. They really didn't didn't want to. They said you know if if we were look if we're back in college if we were single if we were eating ramen all day we could totally up move our lives and and up route everything that we do but we have families and we have stable jobs and he pointed out very accurately that <hes> the startup life is is a bit uncertain at times and this would mean leaving a steady paycheck and leaving a regular schedule and not knowing how your relationships would be affected which is fair. I think it's kind of amazing. We tend to think that entrepreneurs have this relentless drive etc but actually you know these are really hard choices. They aren't that people have to make it gets a leap of faith it is and they also simultaneously knew that this was they did have something on their hands and they did want to do something with it and quitting their day jobs was not their answers. So what could they do. The basically started fishing around for technically an acquisition but they wanted to find the right partner to make it more of a merger. Would they basically have a scale but they didn't have any structure. I mean it needs to find a partner who had structure but not scale and almost magically. This company called next glass appeared which was exactly the profile they were looking for. They were working perfect. They have been working together on a couple of projects ends. The conversation started very quickly shifted from hey. Let's see if we can work together to to. We would work really well together. On a regular basis and officially next glass actually acquired untapped a few years ago took on the untapped name and now this this merged company together is what we know as untapped today and greg and tim were finally able to quit their day jobs and pursue. This beer dreamed fulltime thicker of course happy. The ending greg now likes beer now loves beer and his favorite beer is one of the first beer that was ever recommended to him through the untapped platform plenty the elder finally pliny the elder yep <hes> excellent stuff <hes> we will be right back with our like buttons when it comes to hiring. You don't have time to waste. I you need help getting to your shortlist. Qualified candidates fast. That's why you need indeed dot com post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on qualified candidates ended using an intuitive online dashboard. When you need to hire fast accelerate your results with sponsor jobs new users can try for free at indeed dot com slash podcast. That's indeed dot com slash podcast terms conditions and quality standards apply. When i was in college i had a professor used to joke these spent half his life trying to lose ten pounds and learn to speak german. I think he would have benefited from babbel battle. Let you choose from fourteen different languages including spanish french and german and is designed to quickly get you speaking your new language which within weeks the teaching that has been proven to be effective across multiple studies. The lessons are only ten to fifteen minutes each. It's available as an app or online and your progress will be sync think across all devices. It's the number one selling language learning app in the world. You can try babble for free. Just go to babble dot com or download the app today. That's babbel b. a. a. b. b. e. l. dot com or download the app to try for free babble speak a new language with confidence all right. Let's close out with our like buttons. A quick hit on on something. We saw this week that we liked cameron. What i've been on the record on this podcast is a proponent for communication. It drives me nuts. How many people are really weirdly bad at it and it's my favorite football team. The atlanta falcons are in the news this past week for really upping the ante on their own internal communication. I think it's interesting. I think it's worth noting for for business owners but they've basically done is an all of their preseason practices. They have miked up all of their defensive players so that everyone can hear each other and more importantly everyone can hear. You're in the post game post practice film sessions exactly what everyone else is saying in certain moments on could possibly go wrong possibly go wrong. It's it's never going to be published or so. We'll see if someone hacks in the players. Were really really really reticent and i should also say that i have been on the record on this podcast as being very anti making in your employees up in this particular case. It's really helpful because in a sport like football their assumptions that have to communicate a lot like middle linebacker. Thanks safety. There are some positions nations that are silenced. They basically play their match ups on an island cornerbacks or defensive ends and what the falcons figured out especially last year after a lot of their leaders got injured injured and we're not on the fields to be communicative was that the people who aren't usually communicative still have really important valuable insights to offer they can still help help their teammates and their teammates can still help them even if it comes down to just their one on one match ups and apparently although this season hasn't started yet coaches say that they have already noticed tangible improvements improvements in the the level of play just by virtue of everyone talking more because they're thinking. Is it kosher for one team to do this. It seems like it gives them an unfair advantage. I mean whatever you you want him practice. Oh it's not gonna happen to the real game. No no no just for practice. Oh i see okay well i did. You didn't communicate that. Oh i'm so sorry i'm a poor communicator and i'll make amends. <hes> emily early says starting this week. You guys have noticed a lot of tweets about chicken sandwiches. Yes so turns out that popeye's started making a new chicken in sandwich that i guess seems a lot like chick fillet chicken sandwich and so these fast food restaurants got into a bit of a chicken sandwich twitter war and then basically other companies started weighing in and now all i see your people eating these chicken sandwiches from different companies trying to determine which one's the best so you know we saw thought tweets from chick-fil-a pop is other chains wendy's got into it bojangles places yeah. It was just insane and it. It just seems like it's upping the business for all these chicken sandwich companies and chicken sandwich. Mania is happening all over the country right now. This whole episode is making me hungry. Yeah i was gonna say bill. Murphy wrote about about this for inc dot com and one of his questions was does this stuff actually sell chicken sandwiches and i have to say after about five minutes really i really wanted. Apparently there are lines down the block at popeye's god that multiple have sold out people have been coming back multiple times just to be told. We still don't have any in stock yeah. I think <hes> murphy wrote that the popeye's has like one hundred thousand thousand followers on twitter and one of these tweets got re tweeted four hundred thousand times. I mean it's really it's incredible. <hes> hats off to them. I suppose <hes> tom. I want to return to something we've been talking about the inc five hundred of course and also food companies the company that was number two on our two thousand fourteen inc five hundred list <hes> company called inquest nutrition and they were purchased yesterday for one billion dollars by another food company called simply good foods simply good foods is a publicly traded company that makes packaged goods under the atkins brand quest. The company that was purchased was early to the protein energy bars tower bar kind of ships based in el window california. They were launched in two thousand ten three friends who were sort of disaffected software engineers looking for something else to do. They were all really into fitness culture one of them <hes> his wife was making these energy bars at home in her kitchen because they were just really into it and everybody loved them and they turned it into a business and now they sold it for a billion dollars left. My wallet in el segundo my like button. This week involves the year nineteen sixty-nine i for one one and a little overdosed on fifty year anniversary observations about the moon landing and about woodstock and chappaquiddick is coming up i think and in the town of dairy new hampshire. They thought that this would be a good time to open the time capsule left in nineteen sixty nine in the public library was actually a safe that sat sat in the corner for fifty years with the combination written on the back and it's a really kind of old fashioned safe and they went and what's going to be in the time capsule from nineteen sixty nine like like moon landing stuff a space stick hit of ahsley acid. What's in there and they opened it. Nothing it was completely and now they don't. I don't know if somebody broke into the safe and stole it was there or if the whole thing was goofing. There was never anything there to begin with which lies is nine hundred sixty nine and in a nutshell along a fantastic bit of theater. That's all for this week. I want to thank my in colleagues cameron albert. I'll lineup for chicken sandwiches with emily canal. I want slammed the time capsule. Tom foster thanks. If you like uncensored please go to apple podcasts and leave us a review. It's wonderful to hear what you're thinking and also a great way for new listeners defined as you can also send us feedback to censor inc dot com our producer. Who's going to bring the chicken sandwiches. Next week is victoria grace. I'm james ledbetter. Please join us next week and thanks for listening uh.

greg avola Tom foster football james ledbetter twitter austin cici mason arnold inc magazine founder jim howard stern arizona editor united states tim Emily canal