19 Burst results for "Thornton Wilder"

"thornton wilder" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:19 min | 4 months ago

"thornton wilder" Discussed on WTOP

"Operated You're listening to WTO pneumo Ten 23 a man was found shot to death in hyattsville this morning Prince George's county police say they found the man in a parking lot just after two 30 That lots along New Hampshire avenue about a block away from the Maryland D.C. line It looks like round two of the trucker protest here is now over with The so called people's convoy had been staging at the Hagerstown speedway but the Herald male in Hagerstown reports that the speedway's general manager asked the group to leave and they took off Friday night The GM said the convoy was like when your mother in law comes to visit and decides to stay There's been an outpouring of support for a hero dog who died last week at the age of 13 Roni the Belgian malinois was a bomb sniffing dog and served on more than 380 missions in Afghanistan He was rescued by Mina harriman about 9 years ago while she was doing humanitarian work abroad Even in his Dutch continues to inspire people with his story When his owner shared his story asking for cards to read to him in his final days they received more than 1000 and Arlington county police officer Kyle Harrington put together a police procession It's a really hard hitting feeling knowing that fitting right in front of us was this dog who's spent his entire life pretty much serving overseas Gathering bonk WTO P news Playwright Edward Albee called it the greatest American play ever written and Thornton wilder's our town is now at Shakespeare theater in D.C. If I got to play put on my desk that did all these things now by a current playwright I think it was crazy You know And she wrote this in 1938 He broke all these kind of amazing rules It's just an incredible piece of total theater Director Alan Paul explores the everyday lives of two families whose children fall in love in the fictional small town of Grover's corners So it's about them meeting and falling in love and what happens to them after But it's also about life and death What it means to be in a small town in America and the universe So it's macro and micro about life Find out more on WTO B dot com I'm Jason feral WT tip he news Money news at 25 and 55 This is a Bloomberg money minute It started online selling sleek low priced razors a decade later Harry's gets more than half of its sales from physical retail Bloomberg reporter daniella sertori cortina says Harry's is looking to meet consumers where they are They necessarily want to push consumers into one particular channel It is about having your products whatever people are actually going to buy them Many direct to consumer companies are following a similar path Brands like warby Parker Brooklyn and the honest company although they're not abandoning ecommerce Interest has waned because for some companies it has been difficult to maintain growth and turn a profit And the two channels can coexist They kind of see the complementary sometimes you are at a Target Store You see Harry on the shelf but you might go back to the website and order it from there Or vice versa Harry's cofounder Andy Katz Mayfield says there's still a lot of unmet consumer need The company is looking to launch a direct to consumer brand need to offer something unique From the Bloomberg newsroom I'm Larry kofsky On WTO P A head intense heat could touch off storms here and elsewhere in the country It's ten 26 Introducing.

Hagerstown Mina harriman Kyle Harrington WTO hyattsville D.C. Shakespeare theater Prince George Alan Paul the Herald Roni Arlington county New Hampshire Edward Albee Thornton wilder Maryland GM Bloomberg daniella sertori cortina Afghanistan
"thornton wilder" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:03 min | 4 months ago

"thornton wilder" Discussed on WTOP

"P sports The top stories we're following this hour on WTO President Biden now in South Korea it's the first stop of his first trip to Asia of his presidency during the trip he will be calling on Congress to give final approval to a bill designed to increase competitiveness against China Two Secret Service employees are reportedly being sent home following an off duty incident in Seoul The two were in South Korea preparing for the president's visit they reportedly went out to several bars and got into a drunken argument with a cab driver and police officer police were called the two agents will be placed now on administrative leave The loudoun county school board suing the state of Virginia and attorney general Jason biari The suit comes after governor Glen youngkin ordered me yaris to investigate the school system's handling of two high school sex assaults The civil suit says the governor's executive order went beyond his authority and the use of the special grand jury is being used unlawfully For more on these stories in just minutes Thornton wilder's our town won the Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1938 and now the iconic play is coming to Shakespeare theater company in D.C. It shows what is extraordinary in the small moments of life What is eternal What is going to live beyond our physical bodies when they die I think that's why for almost a hundred years we've just come back to it Director Alan Paul explores the everyday lives of two families whose children fall in love in the fictional small town of Grover's corners The plague examines small inconsequential moments of life but by examining them he's trying to show us what is extraordinary about them And there's a famous line at the end of the play that Emily asks does anyone realize life as they live it And the answer is no But the play is an attempt to take stock of the moment Find out more on WTO B dot com Jason Farley W tippy news Just ahead and money news The valley is now down 50 points a famous French restaurant is coming to D.C. I'm Jeff cable Now traffic.

South Korea loudoun county school board Jason biari Glen youngkin WTO Biden Shakespeare theater Secret Service Seoul Asia Thornton wilder Alan Paul Congress China Pulitzer Prize Virginia D.C. Grover Jason Farley Emily
"thornton wilder" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:23 min | 4 months ago

"thornton wilder" Discussed on WTOP

"Top story we're following new fort for you today on WTO kicking off a 5 day tour President Biden's in South Korea on the first visit to Asia of his presidency The trip is designed to underscore his administration's diplomatic and economic commitment to the region in the face of a rising China CDC director doctor Rochelle Walensky signing off on booster shots for kids ages 5 to 11 though shots are now authorized for younger kids at least 5 months after they have completed their initial round of COVID vaccine shots Stay with WTO for more on these stories in just minutes Thornton wilder's our town won the Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1938 Now that iconic play comes to Shakespeare theater company in D.C. it shows what is extraordinary in the small moments of life What is eternal What is going to live beyond our physical bodies when they die I think that's why for almost a hundred years we've just come back to it Director Alan Paul explores the everyday lives of two families whose children fall in love in the fictional small town of Grover's corners The plague examines small inconsequential moments of life but by examining them he's trying to show us what is extraordinary about them And there's a famous line at the end of the play that Emily asks does anyone realize life as they live it And the answer is no But the play is an attempt to take stock of the moment Find out more on W two B dot com Jason Frey a W tippy news It's 8 48 Traffic and weather on the 8th sorry Jack what's happening Still a little slow in Virginia going 95 south as you head into woodbridge kind of a Friday pace if you will maybe a little getaway you're gonna find northbound had been heavy coming into dumfries then some slowing moving out of lorton toward newington vod had reported some sort of an incident up near the fairfax county Parkway in the right lane I can not find that one in the camera Inter loop of the beltway also heavy a rope approaching Braddock road up toward two 36 should find your lanes open on three 95 but a little heavy as you pass seminary and king then again to cross the 14th 66 a little bit of a delay out in manassas all the activity after 28 headed toward the fairfax county Parkway gone and the delay is easing back Now east before the beltway coming 66 toward four 95 you're going to find listeners reported a broken down truck in the right center lane New trouble eastbound Bristol wrote after Gallup lane you may be under direction This crash reportedly involving an overturned vehicle The way Maryland still a little bit heavy topside outer loop New Hampshire toward Georgia The inner loop though the unusual delay after two O two heads toward central avenue down to Ritchie Marlborough road there had been some earlier debris in the roadway Now watch as you ride two 70 south leaving Frederick we've been very heavy and very slow beyond 85 near the monocacy the crash that was along the right side or excuse me along the left side now moved over to the right shoulder so at least traveling is open Alternate route 40 east bound near edgemont road out toward Braddock heights You had an earlier wreck You definitely hear we're under police direction We're quiet across the ICC and really no late issues to speak of causing any kind of huge delay 95 and the BW Parkway Survey says play family feud scratch offs from the Maryland lottery for a chance to win up to $50,000 instantly or great second chance cash prizes Jack Taylor TOP traffic Now the forecast Mike Jennifer I don't know if we're ready for this heat I don't think anybody is so take it easy this weekend because this is the first time this has been this hot and well over 8 months and now the first round.

new fort President Biden Rochelle Walensky WTO Shakespeare theater company Alan Paul Jason Frey Thornton wilder fairfax county Parkway Pulitzer Prize South Korea CDC Grover Asia lorton D.C. woodbridge newington dumfries China
"thornton wilder" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:30 min | 4 months ago

"thornton wilder" Discussed on WTOP

"Johnson W Ethiopia sports The top stories we're following for you on WTO President Biden touched down in South Korea today in the first visit to Asia in his presidency during the trip he'll call on Congress to give final approval to a bill designed to increase competitiveness against China Kids age 5 to 11 can now get a COVID vaccine booster shot at least 5 months after completing their first round of shots the CDC signed off on the recommendation from the FDA last night Stay with WTO P for more on these stories and just minutes 7 17 now when Edward Albee called it the greatest American play ever written Thornton wilder's our town is now at Shakespeare's theater in the district If I got to play put on my desk that did all these things now by a current playwright I think it was crazy you know And she wrote this in 1938 He broke all these kind of amazing rules It's just an incredible piece of total theater Director Alan Paul explores the everyday lives of two families whose children fall in love in the fictional small town of Grover's corners So it's about them meeting and falling in love and what happens to them after But it's also about life and death What it means to be in a small town in America and the universe so it's macro and micro about life Find out more on WTO B dot com Jason Frey a W tipp he knows It's 7 18 Back to Jack Taylor now in the traffic.

WTO Shakespeare's theater Ethiopia Biden South Korea Edward Albee Thornton wilder Johnson Alan Paul CDC Asia Congress FDA China Grover America Frey Jason Jack Taylor
"thornton wilder" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:27 min | 4 months ago

"thornton wilder" Discussed on WTOP

"Myself I told you dominion jewelers is where you design the ring that says I want to spend the rest of my life with you Now I just need to figure out how I'm going to pop the question Don't worry I can help with that too Handcrafted custom made jewelry dominion jewelers in the heart of false church We make it beautiful You make it yours By appointment only you're listening to WTO negroes 5 23 in former attorney general Bill Barr is expected to cooperate with a congressional committee probing the January 6th attack A source familiar with former attorney general Bill Barr is thinking tell CBS News bar is likely to sit for a meeting with the House select January 6th committee The chair of that committee told face the nation in January they'd been having conversations with the former attorney general It's expected the first public hearing of this committee happens in three weeks and they are still seeking key witnesses That CBS correspondent Scott McFarland Barr resigned from his job as attorney general after the election in December of 2020 A new review of Hunter Biden's finances shows he brought in about $11 million during a 5 year period from a Ukrainian firm and Chinese business partners NBC News reports documents show President Biden's son at one point was burning through more than $200,000 a month which included spending on luxury hotel rooms and payments on his Porsche Some of the information comes from a hard drive from Biden's laptop that's been under scrutiny as well as a review of reports led by Republicans on to Senate committees The documents and analysis which don't show what Hunter Biden did to earn millions from his Chinese partners raise questions about national security business business ethics and potential legal exposure Edward Albee called it the greatest American play ever written Thornton wilder's our town is now at Shakespeare theater in D.C. If I got to play put on my desk that did all these things now by a current playwright I think it was crazy You know And she wrote this in 1938 He broke all these kind of amazing rules It's just an incredible piece of total theater Director Alan Paul explores the everyday lives of two families whose children fall in love in the fictional small town of Grover's corners So it's about them meeting and falling in love and what happens to them after But it's also about life and death what it means to be in a small town in America and the universe So it's macro and micro about life Find out more on WTO B dot com I'm Jason Farley WT happy.

Bill Barr dominion jewelers Hunter Biden Scott McFarland Barr President Biden WTO CBS News NBC News CBS Shakespeare theater Biden Porsche Edward Albee Thornton wilder House Alan Paul Senate D.C.
"thornton wilder" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:51 min | 5 months ago

"thornton wilder" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A thief The only investment he has is a piece of tape And he is making and this was the tension Once money got involved for people like Simon people making stuff Sharing effectively became stealing However across the iron curtain questions like who's the pirate and who's being harmed Or even harder to answer In fact the whole situation was playing out in this fascinating almost upside down kind of way Coming up Simon meets an unlikely pirate who explains how cassette tapes changed lives behind the iron curtain This is on the media What if more than 150 years ago Congress had really stuck to its principles creating a multi racial democracy I'm not talking about utopia on earth but just imagine the new deal was black people voting in the south where you didn't have these white supremacists who controlled the levers of Congress You would have had a very very we'd have national healthcare now I'll tell you that much That's the United States of anxiety tonight at 6 on WNYC Support for WNYC comes from Thornton wilder's the skin of our teeth a mythical biblical apocalyptic comedy at Lincoln Center theater Liliana Blaine Cruz directs this limited 8 week run now in previews tickets at LCT dot org If you believe democracy requires a free press your station is WNYC 93.9 FM and a.m. 8 20 NPR news and the New York conversation This is on the media I'm Brooke gladstone A moment ago Simon Adler explained that as tape cassettes were proliferating so too were questions about what constituted stealing and what was honest to goodness idea sharing Those issues took on a different hue behind the iron curtain Unknown back then the pirate was only the guy with the parrot and one eye and nothing else This is Frank Frankish egged fruit soft He says in Czechoslovakia at that time The copyrights were completely alien concept in our country The idea that a person could own a song or an idea and therefore insist that it not be copied like that just didn't exist There is maybe interesting story which illustrates this Many western songs were just adapted to check and officially released over here with completely different lyrics Can you think of a specific song or two Of course So for example.

Simon Liliana Blaine Cruz Congress NPR news Simon Adler Thornton wilder Lincoln Center theater WNYC Brooke gladstone Frank Frankish United States New York Czechoslovakia
"thornton wilder" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

03:11 min | 10 months ago

"thornton wilder" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"And there is this sense, granted, you have to sort of get to that conclusion yourself and think about it, but I think there is this sense that even if he, even if today is good, he's probably still going to be depressed again at some point, because again, he never left his down. And as much as we like to champion this idea of hometown small town, whatever, I think there is value to leaping or down. And even George says, he didn't want to leave his town for good. He just wanted to leave and come back. And so it's like that added factor of just wanting to leave for a little bit and not being able to is just so freaking depressing and sad. And at the end of the movie, I'm glad he feels comfort in that moment, but I'm also like, okay, but tomorrow and the next day, the next day, you might need clarence again. Yeah. Ayesha, thank you for mentioning that individualism part, because I think that's what I'm responding to here. Because I was trying to figure out I love Thornton wilder's our town, which is trafficking in a lot of the same themes. You've got a small town. You've got how our lives touch each other. But when our town gets metaphysical in the second act, it has a very different message. It's not this, as I say, narcissistic. It's not look how you improve the world around you. It's about simply how precious life is, how fast it goes, and how if we could only see it for what it is, we'd value it more. I just think that's a lot more interesting, and it's more useful. This one was about how important your life is as opposed to how important life itself is. And I think that's what I'm responding to. I think there's room for both. It's a wonderful life and our town. You just come up with a hot takes. That's my hottest take..

Ayesha Thornton wilder clarence George
"thornton wilder" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"thornton wilder" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Right? Incidental music illustrates the action or creates a mood for what's going on in a movie or play. For thousands of years all the way back to the earliest theater in ancient Greece, people have been using music to spice up what's happening on stage. The first time someone composed incidental music for a particular play may have been in 1664 for the first performance of John dryden's play the Indian Queen. But that music is lost now. A bit later, Henry Purcell wrote that music for another production of the Indian Queen. I have a composer friend who writes incidental music for plays and jokingly refers to it as accidental music, but since he and other composers spend hours getting the music just right, it's anything but an accident how music is used in the theater. That's some of the incidental music Felix mendelssohn wrote to set the mood for the fairies and magic in William Shakespeare's comedy amid summer night's dream. One of the human characters in a midsummer night's dream, bottom the weaver spends a good part of the play wearing a donkey's head instead of his own. In another piece of mendelssohn's incidental music for the play, you can hear the donkey going, he ha. He ha. The braying donkey is just one way that mendelssohn lets you know that amid summer night's dream is funny. Good composers use their music to show whether a play is a comedy or a tragedy. Definitely not funny, right? Ludwig van Beethoven wrote very noble music for the play egmont about a noble man who stands up to the Spanish inquisition. It's hard to stand up to the Spanish inquisition without losing your head, or getting hanged, which is what happens to egmont. The tragedy egmont is by the German poet Goethe, who really knew how to put words together. Unfortunately, Goethe had nothing to do with the German play rosamunde, which was so terrible that both the author and the play have pretty much been forgotten, but not the wonderful incidental music that Franz schubert wrote for rosamunde. If people like Beethoven and mendelssohn were composing today, they'd probably be writing music for the movies. Lots of classical composers have written film music like Erin Copeland, who sets just the right tone for the movie version of Thornton wilder's play our town. Of course, movie music has only been around since the mid 20th century, so all the composers who lived before then, like edvard grieg wrote their incidental music for plays. You can tell just by the sound of it that something very creepy is going on in the hall of the mountain king. In the hall of the mountain king is just one part of the incidental music that edvard grieg composed for the play peer gynt. Next week I'll let grieg's incidental music tell you the story of the play. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim lantern at wgc, Cincinnati. I hope you can join me again for more classics for kids..

mendelssohn John dryden Henry Purcell Felix mendelssohn Goethe William Shakespeare Greece Ludwig van Beethoven Erin Copeland Franz schubert edvard grieg Thornton wilder Beethoven Naomi Lewin grieg Tim lantern Cincinnati
"thornton wilder" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"thornton wilder" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

"As. It is dangerous tonight. The ongoing volcanic eruptions on the small spanish island of la. Palma are triggering. An unstoppable slow motion disaster for four days fountains of fire have violently spewed hundreds of feet high rivers of bright red lava pouring into pools and engulfing homes 20-foot-high waves of molten rock consuming and covering neighborhoods in their path. And we feed off our life running into the house. Just picking The documents preceded by four point two earthquake the gate higher eruption continues to crack open fissures and volcanic vents as tremors rattled the canary islands sky filled with massive plumes of smoke and sulfur forcing six thousand to evacuate and now the scrambled to save animals. As some two hundred homes are destroyed out. I mean we de kenosha. What's in the book. The eighteen hundred degree lava now flowing downhill towards the populated coastline. And perhaps with the most significant threat. Still ahead tonight. This incredible display of nature's fury could be weeks even months away from its fire and miguel almaguer and b. c. news and coming up for us here tonight if america ever really was like that rovers corners of thornton wilder our town. Well.

Palma la canary islands earthquake miguel almaguer america thornton wilder
"thornton wilder" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"thornton wilder" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Literary controversies and the fresh relevance of gloria naylor's writing about women and race. Here's maureen the year was nineteen eighty-three alice walker purple won the pulitzer prize for fiction and the national book award. Gloria naylor's debut novel. The women of brewster place won the national book award for first fiction the decision to give these awards to these novels by black women was questioned by some skeptics in the overwhelmingly white literary world were walker naylor honored because they were so called minority writers where their novels really good art or just sociology. Adding to the pushback was the brawling. Black critic stanley crouch who later claimed the female centered novels of walker. Naylor tony morrison and other black women writers demonized men and in particular corroborated the stereotypes of black men as bestial. So it was that early in my teaching career. A white male student in one of my english classes unknowingly seconded crouches opinion. When he hurled the color purple cross the classroom because he was so infuriated at what he saw as its hatred of all men just another day in the knowledge factory the reason for this ramble literary memory lane is the reissue of the women of brewster place in a hardback series. Called penguin vitale with a powerhouse forward by tari jones author of the twenty eighteen bestselling novel and american marriage. I never read naylor's debut and reprints like this one. Give readers like me. That extra nudge to find out whether we've been missing something as jones says in her forward. The women of brewster place is a composite novel. Think thornton wilders. The bridge of san louis ray or much later tim o'brien's the things they carried novels. Were separate stories about disparate people intersect. This form can be heavy on melodrama and naylor doesn't always dodge that pothole but it's her ardent inventiveness as a storyteller and the complex individuality she gives to each of her seven main characters that make the novel so much more than a contrived literary assembly line naylor's various women have all wound up on brewster place a dingy street in an unnamed city that dead ends into a wall naylor herself was born in new york and grew up in queens with the street wise knowledge of a native daughter naylor opens the novel by almost mythical surveying brewster place. The kind of tired new york apartment building. That's housed shifting populations brewster places. Third generation of children drifted into the block and precipitated. The the remaining mediterraneans brewster place new. That it's other children the few who would leave forever..

gloria naylor pulitzer prize for fiction and walker naylor stanley crouch Naylor tony morrison naylor alice walker national book award penguin vitale tari jones maureen thornton wilders san louis tim o walker brien brewster jones dodge new york
"thornton wilder" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"thornton wilder" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Of the city. Will say yeah. Yeah i'm from chicago. And yes i remember you remember. I i remember as a gradient sir do you mean like from a time of overlapping chicago nece. No i actually don't know when you are in chicago. But i remember you coming back to show sometime in the past three to five years. Yeah yes in. The past. Three to five years senate couldn't go to Because i was probably working on a play or something like that So yes. But i don't remember it. I do not know exactly when urge cocco or before you left. Yeah i was. I lived in chicago from there. I grew up in the suburbs. And then i lived there from late. Two thousand six to twenty twelve Again as an adult. And i say that because Yeah i mean. I feel like i have experience in what it is like doing live performance in chicago and how that feels very specific to me. Yeah because it's not new york and it doesn't have like the end goal is not like broadway and it's also not la so the end goal is not necessarily television. Although there's more of that now than there was when i was there just was an interesting experience as an artist. Because it's kind of like performance for performance says sake which i haven't encountered in other cities i mean. I think that's true of a lot of smaller cities but chicago. Such a large city atra vibrant performance seen in. It's sort of like the whole point of it is to be out doing work. I don't know if that's your experience but it's it was a very specific place for me to start doing standup i specifically I'm from illinois. i was born in southern illinois and grew up in various different places in southern supper and central illinois So chicago was kind of the only place that i was like. This is the only place that. I know that i can go. Los angeles and new york are way too big. And i did not grow up in a large area or near a city and i went into theater. I didn't do I have not done improv. And i've not done. I've not done anything at second city or or anything like that. So i think that maybe there's some perspective that i have because i want straight until like you know auditioning for musicals and like trying to get in chicago shakespeare theater and and stuff like that But i definitely. I definitely feel that. There's really really really rich like storefront community here and there's a lot of. There's a lot of people who are very very proud to be here and they don't wanna go anywhere else Yes yeah that's kind of about. Yeah okay so like it's just different different flavor of it. Yeah yeah. I mean. Plus i i mean for me. I felt like i was friends with artists. That did a lot of different mediums. So i had. I had friends that worked at that. Were working actors at a bunch of different places places like chicago shakes or herb looking glass or whatever but then also had friends who were like dancers and it felt like to me for all of it it was a yeah i just. I just distinguish it like moving out to la. People are very focused on live performance. Like as a means to getting somewhere else as opposed to as the end is to gabby here doing this thing. Yeah which is a different breeds like a different type of community if everybody's sort of bought in to being here doing this verse yeah. People are focused on on getting something from this. Does that at all what your experience has been like or has it been different than that I i mean. I very very much i gotta college and i very very much like this is going to be my job and my life. I want to do this for a living. I wanna make. I wanna make by paycheck before the pay. Rent performing So sometimes i. I definitely had some tunnel vision. Because i was just like i was. I was so focused. Like maybe i kind of had a little bit of an la mindset. Maybe a little bit. Because i was like i. This gig will get you know. Maybe we'll take this. And this may be exposed me to this sort of thing and i didn't know if i really wanted to do stuff like you know broadway or go to new york or stuff like that which i totally would do now I really really really wanted to transition into tv and film. And so i. Sometimes i did that. I did yeah. I was i honestly. I was like really really busy and i was working all the time at. It probably wasn't very good at all times And so sometimes. I think maybe i was so busy. I wasn't totally aware of what everybody else was up to And there's that's interesting. I mean that does different than what maybe most folks are doing it. Keep going keep going what we're going to say. No i was just gonna say. I also have less experience participating in storefront theater and i have more experience participating in Some of the larger theaters. That are a little more commercial in the area which is kind of just what happened By chance the first professional gig that i booked out of school was the goodman theatre which was like a really really big deal And then i just kind were you doing there. I was i was doing a play called the matchmaker it's like what became. Hello dolly the musical. I was one of the people. That's like a fellow there or an artistic associate. There is really really into the work of thornton wilder and so it was kind of a passion project for him and I was just like had no idea what i was doing. And it was very nervous. Had never worked at a huge theater. Before was you know very green and was kind of it was just like a crash course in professional theatre. I think Sometimes i kind of felt. Like i was just trying really hard and then i kept booking gigs and i didn't always know what was going on but i was like yes i'm acting i love this Also every experiences new. And i'm from a farm town what's going on That that was kind of experience experience. Yeah i have some follow questions. What where are you from in southern illinois. Why was born near carbondale where southern illinois university is. And then i grew. Near champaign urbana were the university of illinois is which i went to college got it..

chicago cocco illinois chicago shakespeare theater la new york senate Los angeles goodman theatre thornton wilder southern illinois university carbondale university of illinois champaign urbana
"thornton wilder" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"thornton wilder" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Hits. Old blue eyes sold over 150 million records worldwide. His music was the soundtrack to the second half of the 20th century and the best Frank Sinatra songs resonate is strongly today as they ever did. He was also an actor and a man of style. So natural recorded well over 1200 different songs, someone more than one occasion. And so this task is a major undertaking. And this morning we are featuring Sinatra's greatest Our first song went to number nine on the charts, Love and marriage. Yes, it was the theme song to TV is married with Children. However, it was originally written for the 1955 television production. Of Thornton Wilder's Our Town that aired on NBC's producers. Your case here is love and marriage. Love and marriage, love and marriage go together like a horse and carriage. This I tell you, you can't have one without the marriage, love and marriage. It's an institute. You can't disparage as the local go, Jen, and they will say it's Allah. Men try try to separate them. It's and try, try try and you will only come to this conclusion. Go together like a horse and carriage was told by Mother You can't have one. You can't have none. You can't have one without the other. Try, try try to separate them. It's an illusion. Try try, try and you will come to this conclusion. Love and then.

Frank Sinatra Thornton Wilder NBC Jen
How Chicago's Death Alley Got Its Name

Ghost Light

11:00 min | 2 years ago

How Chicago's Death Alley Got Its Name

"By I decided to restart my day took a shower here. We are feeling good feeling in feel like I'm in the driver's seat. Good. Good. Yeah. That's a lesson forever and restart your day whenever you choose if you're not going the way, you want it. You get to restart it whenever you want and hydrate. And hydrate I'm going to a separate now. Everyone with us. Wasn't that refreshing. So before we get into the history of the Pittsburgh playhouse. Mercedes who again today script wrote us a little introduction. So without further ado, let's get into says. Introduction. She writes I love Pittsburgh. It's my home city, and in my humble opinion, it's one of the top two best cities on the planet. It's a place full of life and culture and history, but it's so small unleash that it tends to fly beneath the radar for most I grew up loving the city and knowing that it has a lot to offer when it comes artistic expression August Wilson, famously loved the city his home city so much that he created that connick Pittsburgh cycle it's an amazing city so to me, it just makes sense that if ghosts were real, they'd want to come back to hang out in the burgh I love for a little longer guests I love that you really heartfelt starts episode Mercedes. I think I need to go to Pittsburgh have you been now? Road trip I how far far could we drive from here? Yeah. I don't think it's far I think yeah I don't know. No I think. We'll take our stark reserves. Okay. So the history of the Pittsburgh playhouse. By Mercedes okay. The historic Pittsburgh playhouse originally on craft and was not so much a theater as it was a collection of buildings that were brought and then turned into theatrical spaces. The first of these was acquired in nineteen, thirty four and was formerly a German Social Club. This building was bought as a wedding present by Richard. Row for his wife Helen Wayne their stories actually very cute. So Richard. Fell in love with Helen when he first saw her perform in New York, his family was super rich and well-known Spanish factors in Pittsburgh. So he bought the location for Helen to give her a nice space to act in Pittsburgh. He basically did this so that they could live there together and she would feel fulfilled even though she wasn't a Big New York City Act trix actress. On that's so cute. Matching someone just give. The building. Just so that you can. Live in the and like feel like you're a big time. Yeah. I get jobs. Yes. Okay. So that their names are Helen and Richard Richard and So. With that, the Pittsburgh Civic playhouse was formed not just by Richard and Helen. It was a group of artists making up the company but like the rows. Oh but like the rows were moneybags. playhouses. Next purchase was an adjacent house to act as a lobby for what was then known as the Roth eater. The first performance in this theater and lobby space was in nineteen, thirty four. The playhouse was fairly popular in the thirties and forties staging productions of Noel Coward's private lives in Thornton wilders. Then new our town during his l.. Then new. Oh. I would like to, I. would like to live in a world where. Still felt new. During this, the playhouses signature leading lady was, of course, none other than Helen Wayne row, which seems like a pretty sweet deal and I'm jealous of her whole situation getting a sugar daddy to basically launch her acting career. Mercedes. SPEAK ON A. So the stage also housed musicals and featured a little known dancer choreographer just months before he would get his big break on Broadway you WanNa. Take a guess Fred Astaire. Close. Close. Oh Who Does skin I don't another dig her come on. It's obvious. Gene, Kelly. of. Yeah. Gosh. Okay. But I've heard he's like Not Nice well, did he like demand rehearsals like over and over again tell people bleeding? Yeah something wacko on in singing in the rain like I've brought up seeing in the rain on this podcast before which is funny. Okay. So that's NEAT I didn't know Gene Kelly was from. Pittsburgh neither that means Jim Kelly Okay Mall from the Burgh. What a gorgeous dancer what? Does little tap into. All right. Moving on. The third building that was additives Hodgepodge of theaters was formerly the tree of life synagogue the congregation moved to Squirrel Hill. I have to stop. I have to stop Squirrel Hill. Sounds like that sounds like a horrifying like like scary movie of chipmunks and squirrels like like. or or Blake dream. Yes my partner like squirrels. Okay. the congregation moved to Scroll Hill in nineteen fifty, one in this space was acquired by the playhouse making up their largest theater space. The Rock wealthier underneath the theater was a restaurant known as the playhouse restaurant. A former ballroom turned ice cream parlor. Cute. Wow. They're out here like setting up a small town. Lot of they got a restaurant. So there's three theaters. All connecting. So like spaces. Yeah. It was the playhouse restaurant, which is a ballroom to ice cream parlor. Got It. So you want got it another local Pittsburgh or to get their star at the playhouse before becoming a household name was one Shirley. Jones. I don't know that is. Listeners You do but I hope you do if you don't Google it we will. Profess, she performed in the playoffs. Many times Okay. Walmer says love that fact but. I feel like we're GONNA waking up in like feel stupid or something. Yeah. Well, another Pittsburgh native who has a history at the playhouse, oh? My Gosh is Jeff. Goldblum. We love chuckles literally Jeff. Goldblum pits. Pittsburgh playhouse butter boop. Out by I love. Jeff. Jacob Blue, that's the best I can I gotta wash him. Once when I go on benders watching Jeff Videos I can get that I can get that down pat? I can do really well that was impression to have like just in your back pocket it is it is when parties come back in twenty thirty I'll be sure to have perfected that party trick. Apparently, his first acting was done with the children's Cedar through playhouse junior an educational opportunities where children received professional training on a professional stage. Mercedes wrote feel free to have Goldblum here I would like to but I don't know why I love You love yes. We've why sorry I just I we did watch this show. But I'm just saying like outside of like that show on Disney plastic everyone by the way if you're busy plus stream Jeff. Goldblum show it's incredible but. I Love Jeff Goldblum I want his his interviews on Graham Norton also highly recommend every interview on. Yeah. True. True. Just pivoting entirely too grim noreen. My favorite episode did US maybe we are together. So don't get mad at me but did you watch that episode of Jeff. Goldblum the world according to Jeff Goldblum by the way is the full title did you watch the episode where he goes to Jeff Goldblum Day and gets like a tattoo like he'll give some tattoo people are getting Jeff. Goldblum. FLASH TATTOOS DID YOU. Know I didn't. But I've seen I've seen him Like. In an interview talking about people getting tattoos of him. And it's so funny. It's like I feel like we should be our next to you remember when we had just left London and somewhat some artists like installed this giant Jeff Goldblum statue on like Phil Lot on the lawn outside the the bridge theater setting somewhere around there and they had this like Gorgeous Gold Statue of Jeff Goldblum laying down like he doesn't Dross Park Oh. Yeah and he's like young his shirtless Yeah Walnut list but tank top or whatever no just a button down but it was like not buttoned half a Oh Anyway so you shouldn't. Superstar. He is he's got to love him. Okay. We're going to move on because this isn't his show but if he's listening it can be your show, Jeff. He's just sweet. Just send us an email. Go slight see the me calm your show. Can take over. So. The theater began to struggle financially and was acquired by point bark. Point Park University in nineteen sixty eight the playhouse continued to operate now mostly for students for many years this way this wasn't a perfect fit though the buildings of the playhouse were old and not originally intended for theater. They were also much farther from Point Park's main downtown campus making the playhouse more trouble for the school than it was worth in late two, thousand, eighteen, the old Pittsburgh playhouse buildings crafts avenue were demolished as the spirit of the playhouse was moved to a new home. Oh, that's a bummer. It's like cool history. The new Pittsburgh playhouse complex is located on Forbes and fourth, and while it may not have as many ghosts lingering as the old buildings had it is at the very least a space that was designed and intended to be used for theatre. Sad. Sad. Okay. Well, moving on things the hunting section of the Pittsburgh playhouse. We gotta get my my spooky vocal but We also Halloween town reference. Have you sir. Familiar. Halloween town. Longtime ago. I know. Collectively, Judge Lino, she was not raised on D. Calms and it shows in times like this. There's a wonderful line that Debbie Reynolds has when she corrects her grandson on how to make a ghost noise like make it like this out of a ghost sign it was one of the daughters anyway she's like she's like she says something about it being like like lower and more melancholic

Jeff Goldblum Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Playhouse Pittsburgh Civic Playhouse Pittsburgh Playhouse Complex Helen Wayne Mercedes Richard Richard Gene Kelly New York August Wilson Point Park University Noel Coward Fred Astaire Debbie Reynolds Google Squirrel Hill
"thornton wilder" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"thornton wilder" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Love and marriage was the theme song to TV's Married with Children, however, was originally written for the 1955 television production of Thornton Wilder's Our Town. That aired on NBC's producer showcase. Our next song is my blue heaven. Became a huge hit on Victor for crooner Gene Austin Back in 1928. The first song Johnny Mathis ever sang in public was also my blue Heaven. Frank recorded it in 1962 and it was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1978. Here's my blue heaven when we're poor wills, call and evening is nigh. Hurry! My blue heaven, but turn to the right. Ah little light light will lead you to my blue heaven. You see a smiling face a fireplace, a cozy Liberal nest that's nestled where the roses bloom just Meilin means. We're so happy and In my blue heaven. You see a smiling face a fireplace a little nest that's nestled wet a nest that's nestled rather. Baby makes three. We're happy in my my one thing certain my blue.

Our Town Thornton Wilder Johnny Mathis Grammy Hall of Fame NBC Gene Austin producer Victor Frank
"thornton wilder" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"thornton wilder" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Blue I sold over a hundred fifty million records worldwide his music was the soundtrack to the second half of the twentieth century and the best Frank Sinatra songs resonate as strongly today as they ever did he was also an actor and a man of style Sinatra recorded well over twelve hundred different songs someone more than one occasion and so this task is a major undertaking and this morning we are featuring Sinatra's greatest our first song went to number nine on the charts love and marriage yes it was the theme song to TV's married with children however it was originally written for the nineteen fifty five television production of Thornton Wilder's our town that aired on NBC's producer showcase here is love and marriage then the marriage the and this I have one without the and then it's an institute you can this hello Jan I will say it's a man strong on try strong strong the to this conclusion and then and the light I was told my one I have not yet five one and this is a new genre the to this conclusion then then.

Thornton Wilder NBC Frank Sinatra producer
The Great Alaska Quake of 1964

The Book Review

05:52 min | 2 years ago

The Great Alaska Quake of 1964

"This book. This is chance is a book about a seismic event like our current pandemic except that it was an actual seismic event. Tell us about the earthquake that hit Alaska on March twenty seventh nineteen sixty four. It was Good Friday evening and this was the largest quake that's ever been recorded in. North America is still the second largest one in the world I think even more disturbingly and almost with more experience it lasted for four and a half minutes so is incredibly destructive quake but it was also there. Was this kind of psychic disorientation. That came along with it. Especially in the city of Anchorage which was really Alaska's biggest city by far at that time of just seeing this community that people were still very much in the process of building and inventing just kind of being turned literally upside down in some spots. Was the epicenter in Anchorage proper? No the was. It was close anchorage. It was just east of Anchorage under the sea and so there were a lot of communities that were affected around Alaska. I chose to focus the book on Anchorage because you know like I said it was really a place that was just beginning to get on. Its feet that sort of represented the promise of what Alaska could be felt great pride and itself but also real insecurity. Quake came in a very precarious moment for the community. When it was really just starting to feel like it had something to offer the rest of America and to be struck like this in such a seemingly random and very cruel way I think really affected the self image of the community. I mean Alaska is still kind of a mystery to many of US lower continental Americans. What was it like at the time? The Greater Anchorage area was. It was the city of one hundred thousand people in nineteen sixty four which is almost half of the state's population and really the only community that outside probably would have deigned to even call a city and it had a fourteen storey hotel but that was by far the biggest building. It had kind of an a new upscale neighborhood of kind of modernist homes it had JC PENNEY BUILDING. Which was a really really big deal that some big national American retailer would come build an Alaska and so again it was just really kind of finding its way you know straining to make itself a real place when this earthquake happened and it was it was feeling very insecure about its future because it didn't quite know that after this boom of statehood that it had found any way to sustain itself. It was still this feeling that this place that they were building this arm of society. They decided to build way up. In the corner of the world might be an experiment that just might not work out and then the ground literally shakes underneath them getting at those very fragile new foundations. I mean you. You chose in your book to focus really on the impact that the quake had on the people of Alaska. Why did you decide to approach the story? In that way. The way that I came into the story was through the story of this radio broadcaster. Genie chance who is sort of a part time radio reporter and working mother in Anchorage and who by a quirk of luck but also her own persistence? Wind up being this voice on the air and the three days after the quake that was really able to help the city co here in in a very disorienting dislocating moment bypassing information over the air passing personal messages from people looking for their family members. And once you find a like that. Who's really this node for? People coming together after an event like this. You start to see how all these individual stories of the earthquake. All of these people who are tossed around separately were really kind of joined in a shared experience. You use the Thornton Wilder. Play our town as a kind of framework. Can you explain how you did not why you made that decision? A big threat of the story. Is this Community Theater Group in Anchorage she was doing? Our town was interrupted by the quake that weekend. Think I'd probably read the play in in high school and and you know not proud to admit it but just you know didn't really take it seriously. I just started. Had this impression of it as this hokey simplistic ed piece of Americana. And when I started reading the play again I realized that in some ways it's it's themes are the themes of the story of earthquake to this idea that you know we don't recognize the preciousness or the fragility of our daily lives until we're thrown outside of it till we get some other perspective on it and the other weird thing that happened was is that you know there's this character in the play the stage manager who is standing on stage with the characters and telling you basically how they all die. The future and I realized that because I was spending so much time. Trying to recount the story of these three days but I was doing it from more than half a century later. I had that same kind of omniscience about these characters and it was very painful to watch people in the course of these three days struggling with these issues of life and death knowing that you know in one case month later this fellow would die in a plane crash or this guy was going to have a stroke and you know he was expecting to retire but he but he'd be dead six weeks later more and more. The book became kind of mimicking the structure and the way that our town is narrated which I think took it to some kind of unconventional places. But it really did seem like the way that this story should be told and you the author then become the stage manager. Yeah in a way. It's not you know we don't walk around and daily life knowing the future right but in a weird way this project put me in that position and the stage manager was really the only other person that I'd seen have that same experience. So yeah you know for the most part the book is this sort of intimate retailing about people in the in the real time of those three days after the quake but I do come in in the middle of the book as as a character. Who's just in a in a basement with all of genie? Chances Forty some odd boxes of her life just digging through trying to piece together that that map of her life.

Alaska Anchorage Jc Penney Building North America America Thornton Wilder Community Theater Group United States Reporter
"thornton wilder" Discussed on Bellwether Hub Podcast

Bellwether Hub Podcast

09:22 min | 2 years ago

"thornton wilder" Discussed on Bellwether Hub Podcast

"It's it's a tricky art form and it's not for everybody and it doesn't have to be. I don't like I am not ever going to be somebody. Like you have to love musicals. I think they're great. I think there's a lot of great musicals out there. There's more good than bad and I think if everyone was sort of opened you'd find him us. There's a musical out there you'd like Jim. I'm one hundred percent. Sure there's a musical out you actually and I say this with sincerity. You've actually just given me. A realization is the fact that because I don't I so many people who love it. I think I'm just upset that I don't like it and I wanna be like that. I want to get what they like out of it and I haven't been able to figure out what it is yet and so You made me feel better that you like what you like. And I don't like that's okay but I think I want to like it and that's my town and I think that's a good thing. I think there's a lot of stuff I don't appreciate fully. There's a lot of theater forms that I don't appreciate fully and I I find myself. I used to have a teacher in college. Said When you talk about somebody. They didn't like an artist or something they would always say. I haven't learned to appreciate them yet. I used to think that was kind of a cop out but now I sort of think about is like that's a really great way to be. It's just be like that's not my thing but I'm also not closing the door to that. It could be my thing one day. It could be something I greatly enjoy. It just isn't something I enjoy right now and who knows maybe in a year or ten years or just a couple of weeks. I'll find something that'll just completely certain set my my life on fire. I really was sort of not into I love musicals but there was a good chunk of time especially when I was living in L. A. Where I was sort of believed that the music theater was over. I was sort of like well. This is done as much as it can possibly do. There's never going to be a good musical again. A new you know they've all been written this kind of over and then I discovered the musical fun home which is a tremendous musical and that really reinvigorated my joy in Music Theater and then I started to see joy all around me. Music Theater just took that one show kind of drag me back in I was a willing participant in that but it just takes one of those experiences to make you go. Oh my gosh. There's a whole world here that I can can be enjoying if I just sort of let it let it happen and take it for what it is. What is your favorite piece of theater if you had to recommend to anybody not knowing who they say. This is my favorite piece of theater that I've ever been privy to. What would have been my favorite play and this is not hard for me. Is Our town by Thornton Wilder. It is a which is something I think everybody read in high school or saw high schooler or did and it's. It's something that I encourage everyone to revisit as much as they possibly can. It's a play that is deceptively simple and is something that you see it and green high school you think. Oh it's fine but then if you see when you're a little older means something different than you see it. After you have kids it means something entirely different and then you see it. I'm sure when I get older. It'll keep meaning different things to me as it goes on and the place sixty years old and it still has a very very vibrant life and the professional theater regional theater was just revived off Broadway. Five or six years ago to wild acclaim and it just keeps coming back because it keeps having things to say and it is I think the big statement but I stand behind that I think it is the highest achievement in in English drama. Full Stop I think. It is just amazing. An amazing amazing Peace and you know what I love about you. Picking that is that I believe our town is one of only two or three bucks. I actually did read in high school and I loved it. I remember loving. Yeah tonight my favorite. We always end the podcast with book recommendations recommendation so right. I recently got a kindle so I started reading again so this is really really great and I was. I've been told I read or heard a podcast or something where it said that reading fiction is really what you should be doing. Simulates your brain. In a certain way but lately I've been digging into nonfiction and the book that I've been to lately is called prisoners of geography but Tim Marshall Which is about subtitles. Ten maps that explain everything about the world I'm a big Slagged nerd a love of Excellency as it's called the study of flags and I love this this this sort of design aspect of flags and what they say about us to Marshall wrote another book called a flag worth dying for that is about the power of national symbols but he in prisoners of geography. He looks at ten countries and their geographical design the borders that were drawn and how those borders sort of explain how they behave The first all about Russia and this is a book only a couple of years old and the first books all about rush the first half was all about Russia and it explains so much about what's going on in the world and the way Russia is behaving in the way Russia behaves towards Europe. And the way what what. Russia's goals are and how they haven't really changed because of their geographical restrictions and they talk about China and he talks about all kinds of really really fascinating stuff to me. I love the that sort of integration of design. Because that's what borders are just lines on a map but then how those designs create practical problems for countries and how also you read this book and he talks a lot about things like seatrade land routes and you think we tend to think in our digital experience that those things aren't important anymore but they really are. You still gotta get food over Mountain. You know you still got again. People places and sort of talks about how I was fascinated to read about how China India share a border and their two countries that hit each other but the probably never go to war because the border is a giant mountain range and nobody can cross it so you can't take an army over it so it'll probably just. They'll probably just keep hating each other from a distance. It's really interesting right. Yeah it's a sort of a reassured. I found it very reassuring to be busy here. A Lotta this bluster from countries on the news or of what's going on. It's like yeah. Some of that's something you should be worried about. And some of it's just like no that's just the way those two countries aren't just always gonNA echoes trying to just how it is perfect great record. I've now read it. I read the accident superhighway so the Donald Superpower is another one that I read on medical stuff. Oh Yeah That would go on to help. Definitely pick up that one. That's good tell people. How can we find you? What's next to you? How can everybody you know tap into the Patrick? Flynn world? Sure my my Handle on on the socials is At unknown penguin across all platforms That's what happens when you pick your social media handle when you're twenty seven and I was So you can find me there on twitter facebook instagram. All that good stuff you can find. My podcast which again is called. The original cast on social media is at original cast paw across all platforms and you can find it on itunes or stitcher or overcast or any of those wonderful wonderful wonderful podcast catcher platforms. Podcasts are weird because there's no like when I had web series to host them on Youtube and I'd say oh go to.

Russia Tim Marshall Jim Thornton Wilder twitter Youtube Flynn kindle Patrick Europe China India China
"thornton wilder" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:09 min | 2 years ago

"thornton wilder" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Say it's man strong the to this conclusion and then again my one one it's a new genre the to this conclusion then by what marriage was the theme song to TV's married with children however was originally written for the nineteen fifty five television production of Thornton Wilder's our town that aired on NBC's producer showcase our next song is my blue heaven became a huge hit on Victor for crooner gene Austin back in nineteen twenty eight the first son Johnny Mathis ever sang in public was also my blue heaven Frank recorded it in nineteen sixty two it was inducted into the Grammy hall of fame in nineteen seventy eight here's my blue heaven when you call but turn to the right if you five close to Liverpool ness ness well the roses bloom does thanks you that's what three in my things forget your troubles and just get happy the chase all your cares away saying Hallelujah come on get out get ready for that judgment day the sun is shining come on the log is waiting to take come on get happy the promise it's on the other side engine problems and just get better chase all your cares away come on get happy get ready for that judgment day get doubles and just get happy you better chase all your cares away saying Hallelujah come on get happy get ready for the judgment day that come on thank you bye troubles and just get happy okay so you're cast away yeah come on get happy ready for the judgment day yeah struggles come on get happy for it struggles to come on gets it struggles to come on stage get happy was composed in nineteen.

"thornton wilder" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"thornton wilder" Discussed on KCRW

"Critic Mary spazio co authored show too one way to understand his songs is to recognize the happiness city had when he was young and that is what he kept trying to replicate and when he says the best of times is now he genuinely means it born in nineteen thirty one Herman grew up in Jersey city his parents took him to the theater often seen Irving Berlin's Annie get your gun changed his life he told NPR in nineteen ninety four I walked out of that theater singing all those wonderful Berlin songs and from that moment on that's all I wanted to do with my life Herman had some modest success on an off Broadway in the late fifties and early sixties but didn't hit the big time until producer David Merrick called him about working on an adaptation of a Thornton Wilder play the match maker I went home with a script that he had given me to look at and I wrote four songs over a weekend and came back to his office on Monday morning with four brand new songs and bowled him over not only with the songs but with his speed that I had been able to work at and I got the job it became hello Dolly for the very as I I'm gonna go and change Saturday's highlights not.

Mary spazio co Herman Irving Berlin Annie NPR David Merrick Thornton Wilder Dolly Berlin producer