38 Burst results for "Thorn"

Fresh update on "thorn" discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

06:00 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "thorn" discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"There was a lot of hudsucker in that banking seat I felt it's kind of unavoidable that the Hudsucker when when you get a banker and and a pneumatic tube and you know it was fun and it was sort of the one. Moment in which I was asking Chris Rock. It was the the ones who have overtly comic scene. In. Episode which, of course, for his character was hugely important and dramatic, but you know the absurdity of existed also. Has Been. A goal of yours to make a series that people who are not familiar with the Coen brothers would still appreciate. Your minute at a certain point for me, their voice in my voice you know I stopped worrying about if it feels like them certainly by the second season when I was telling a much broader story more of a period epic. And then into season three, I mean I have my own Stories I WANNA to explore style cinematic style is filmmaker that that I'm working with you know and. I think that the the lessons that I continue to take for them are about tone of voice. You know it's about the balance of kind of. The greediness and spirituality the serve. Mysticism on a certain level that you would get from a serious man or yes. balance with the kind of coldbloodedness thick that you would find in in in no country you know the range of tone and. The balance characters Really the show is about trying to create a state of mind. In you know I likened it very early on to being asked to paint a picture. Of New York City without any of the buildings the actual buildings but it still has to feel like New York City and and it's like what is that? Even how do you? How do you do that? How do you adapt a movie without any of the characters or the story from the movie what you left except the feeling that you get from watching that movie and I thought Oh that's interesting. How can I create that feeling with none of the elements that are there that became a really exciting challenge There are some in brothers movies as well as in the series. Moments violence that sneak up on you and they're so outrageous that sometimes they're funny or sometimes they're just. They're almost like they're so harrowing that you you can't even. Sort of feel the emotion around like the loss of it as much as you're just sort of trying to recover I, mean how do you balance that with the? Tonality of things like more nuance character monologues and plot stuff had you had you balanced that I guess the thing is is that Fargo is a crime story there there's no way around it and so every year. That has to be one of my main focuses is the crime to it and and you know what appreciate about the Cohen's violence especially in the movie Fargo is just how shocking it is. You know it's always unexpected and very graphic and almost more graphic than it needs to be and it creates it does create a visceral reaction in you you know my. I have a mandate that the violence should never be entertainment. I think too much of our. Media that we consume as is violence as entertainment without pointing any fingers I. It's just not what I'm interested in I'm more interested in. In creating a large cast of characters who feel empathy for and who you know are on a collision course and when that violence comes, you think you wanted it. But now that it's here, you don't like it. There are some very specific moments you know in season one Glenn Howard since character was this guy named Don trump who is just kind of buffoon. who builds on the exercise by a Bill Billy Bob was just sort of using and abusing and like a cat with a mouse. staged. This death scene for this guy where he taped him up, you know he fired some shots at the window. The COP showed up. He said a trip wire. He said this whole elaborate almost operatic. Execution for this guy and I think in the beginning that sequence you think Oh, Billy Bob says trickster this mischievous character. This is really fun but there comes a moment in that sequence when you realize the inevitability of what's about to happen in the fact that that poor don trump is just he's just an idiot he's not you know he doesn't deserve this. where I think it starts to sicken you a bit as as an audience member and I think that that that's important to have that that transition to go I thought I. wanted this but I really don't want this and you know I think that it was one of the first movies I ever saw which presented me with what appeared to be a hero. or at least you protagonist who I had to realize over time was it was actually a despicable person you know and I've had these conversations I remember in the second season having a conversation with Jesse climates WHO's a very method actor and you know he his character kill someone in the first hour and I noticed the next couple of episodes while we were filming his energy was really low and I said. What's going on? He said, well, I just feel like I would see this guy's face every day that I killed and I was like, oh no, that's acceptance rate depression is acceptance urine denial denial is up energy denials. nope. nope. That didn't happen. We're not thinking about that. You know there's a there's a hysteria denial that that is very much a part of..

Don Trump New York City Chris Rock Fargo Billy Bob Glenn Howard Bill Billy Bob Cohen Jesse
Fresh update on "thorn" discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

08:03 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "thorn" discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Good. Nature popsicle. And I remember watching that right after the twenty sixteen election and try to make sense of what I felt. The. Word violence was the only thing that applied and I remember thinking this is such. A beautiful adaptation of that speech that March has to grim jude in the backseat of the car in that movie, which is. A moral person trying to make sense of chaos and. Not. necessarily. Coming up short but just sort of acknowledging that her world view is darkening and moving forward regardless and I just wanted to know I, mean you have these moments to translate them how much of your goals with the show at this point have kind of departed from the goal of representing these moments or themes from the original source material enough evolved into their own thing. Yet it's interesting because the you know the more I I live in a in a sort of Coen brothers world which on some level is is a Kafka world. You know. So. Much of what happens in those stories kind of laid in with with irony. But what I found myself thinking In the last few years is, is that we've ended up in America with with irony without humor. And the irony of without humorous violence, right? If you tell a large portion of your population that they have to work hard to become American. But you don't actually give the avenue to become American in a way that that you will allow what have you created except a paradox. Now, some paradoxes are called jokes right but in this case, the joke is on them. and. So what you end up with is an ironic setup. With no humor to it at all and that creates a kind of mental violence for people. and. So for me part of the exploration in the season was to continue to explore that idea that. You know you're you're asking people to? Follow certain steps to become something that they can never become and you are simultaneously judging them for not being that thing, you won't allow them to become. and. The joke is on them. Speaking, of paradoxes I wanted to ask about how you deal with there are certain ambiguities in Coen brothers, movies as well as in previous seasons of Fargo. That can be very frustrating as an audience member. I'm talking about the end of serious man the even the box at the end of thank everyone has their own interpretations. I wonder if the thinking about this because season three ended with a very specific ambiguity that I know drove a lot of people crazy David Dulas, character said, this is what's going to happen carry coons character said, what's going to happen and my question to you is. Do you think audiences are more tolerant of those ambiguities maybe some the sopranos finale I don't know. But the second part of this question is, do you know what happens? Do you have to know what happens and if you don't know what happens? Are you getting more comfortable with that? How was your attitude towards ambiguity change while you know it's interesting because I've always described. Fargo is a tragedy with a happy ending and certainly in the first two years that that's what it was and and it's not happy for all the characters. It is a tragedy after all but for the characters who. Survive at the way that marge survived in the movie, there is a kind of transcendence and a kind of happy ending and you know that you know her husband's going to get the three cents damp and she's going to have the baby and tomorrow's normal. Day In. That's the reward. Come as I was writing season three and in what was the aftermath of of the election which whichever side you're on certainly caught everybody by surprise and created a reality in America that was not the one we had been living in previously. And I felt. So. Much ambiguity myself about what the future was going to bring. That that it didn't feel like I. Could Force that happy ending onto it felt like on some level. It will be a test for the audience as to. Whether they were optimistic or pessimistic about the future. And for those people who want to believe in the best, you know the cops we're gonNA walk through that door David Dulas was going away for the rest of his life for the people who weren't so sure the other thing was going to happen and the reality is that's what was GonNa Happen Anyway do you Like, yeah you know and the stringers cat. Idea at the end which was of Akayev of serious man. Yes. It all depends on you and. I like to engage audiences that way you know I'm a novelist. Also I know as a novelist that the writer does fifty percent of the work I write the words but you tell the story in your head, the pictures that you see and. You know filmed entertainment can be more passive but. I find it more interesting to try to create an provoke the audience's imagination so that they are an active watcher of the show. Do. You think you know what happens or are you not sure does that change? Oh. No I mean I like to believe that that the arc of history events or justice you know I want I'm Carrie coon fan I want to believe that you know that the glorious right the quote good guy wins in the end you know. So that's that's my hope you know but. On some, we're not David chasing it. You're not like he he i. know that he's dead but you know what I mean different I think the exercise of creating ambiguity for the audience wasn't important one. I'm not taking it to my grave. It's not you know I mean. You experience the ending of that show. There's nothing that I can do to to change the experience of of watching it. You know, I, like to believe that the right person walked through that door five minutes. What is the show's relationship to the COEN brothers at this point are you still looking to their body of work for themes elements? Are they totally suggestive? Are they in the background at this point or do you still watch them for inspiration? Yeah I do I mean the brothers themselves of our godfathers of the show. In a hand off kind of way and you know I, try not to bother them I guess is what I'm saying I want them to keep making their their movies but you know I I had with this first hour you'll see. I had a lot of information to deliver to the audience very early. I had almost the history of of true crime in the Mid West to deliver in the first twenty minutes and I thought well. Where have I seen that done well, and I thought immediately raising Arizona in which the first ten minutes of that movie is all information delivered to you in this almost perfectly complete. Montage vignette of of Nick Cage telling the story I'm a mcdonagh and he tells you everything you need to know it's comedy in and of itself sort of brilliantly scripted filmed in edited and I thought well, that's a good way in. So you know for Ethel Rita Parole smutny. This is her history report. She's telling both her own history and the history of crime in her city, and it became away which I use to more dramatic effect but it became. It became an inspiration for for how to solve a problem right at least structurally. Yeah. And then you have that gorgeous gender reverse raising Arizona Bowman in the second episode zillah rating as A. As a Coen brothers nerd and.

David Dulas Coen America Arizona Jude Mid West Ethel Rita Parole Smutny Nick Cage Fargo Marge Writer Carrie Coon Coons Mcdonagh
Fresh update on "thorn" discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

08:07 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "thorn" discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"A million dollar idea. billion. I'll give you this. He boys got a hell of an imagination. But the people I see day in day out hardworking people family men will they're just not gonNA spend money they don't have. To win and charging them high rates of interest preying on when times get tough well. That's just not what banking's all about. Could you just tell me a little bit about your intentions going into this season and what sort of manifested in the scene? Think. Fargo for me certainly in the last three years has been a lot about the things people do for money. You know there's that line, the film, and here we are, and it's a beautiful day and for what a little bit of money and so you know season two was about the death of the family business and the rise in corporate America and season three was about the sort of post corporate, weird offshore, Hedge Fund. Richness than I was interested in in going back this year and kind of looking at the original sins of American capital, which are the exploitation of free and cheap labor through slavery and an immigration and the idea that the last person off the boat. You know does the worst job until they can work their way inside the American experience you know what I wanted to show this this scene with Loy- is that. This is a guy who who really is an entrepreneur and ingenious on some level and and who in in another time period. Might have been the CEO of a Fortune Five, hundred company that path was not available to him in. Nineteen Fifty But the ideas were still there and so to come in and to say I've invented this financial instrument called the credit card. And then of course, for the banker to say, no, no, no, that's not what banking all is all about to lend people money they. To let people spend money. They don't have. You know. There's there's two jokes there and For me I thought, it was a way to show. The lack of options. That a man like Lloyd Canon has. This criminal world that he is thriving in is not his first choice but if he's going to do it, he's going to be the best at it. And on the other side of things, you have people like Lester Martin Friedman's character the first season who seems to have been blessed with quite a few privileges in sort of never be enough for him. Yet there's always a moment in. My version of Fargo, where the where the worst person in the show says I'm the victim here. I think it's literally Said said out loud in the first three seasons and I think that's on some level that that feels like part of villainy or least modern villainy is. Is there someone who's taking advantage of other people? Who claims the role of the victim? Because the their narcissism is so profound that it's hard to that they they can only see the world is one against them. I mean. Is that a conscious effort on your part to speaking of Villainy? Because there's almost a biblical sense of? Good, and evil in a lot of these seasons and it a lot of the cohn brothers movies because some of them are. Kind of theological where you have people like to have your Barnum's character no country for old men, and then you see Billy Bob Thornton and season one or you see David, stimulus and season three and you think those people are sort of the incarnation of the devil and then you see sort of these kind of schmucks on the spectrum who could go either way and I just wonder how conscious are you to include these gradations of morality and each season I think that's very deliberate. You know one of the things you see in the Coen brothers films is kind of recurrence of what I think of as a kind of elemental figure. You know whether it's Anton sugar or the loan biker of the apocalypse from raising Arizona, there's always some character. that. May Not be human. That may be some sort of. Vengeful Spirit that's blowing through the American wilderness. That was certainly the idea would would billy Bob's character and also with David Villa's character that potentially. Lauren Malveaux has always existed. Then he's you know you would have seen and sixteen twenty and in Salem, and then another picture of him in eighteen fifty and in Philadelphia know that that he's been blowing through the American landscape. We play with this idea in this season, a sort of ghost story idea in the season the idea that are past haunts us the things that have happened in this country, the the things that have happened to the people of this country it's all still there in the land in the buildings in people's genealogy. So the those elements are all thereby design. We'll wrap up with no holly after a short break still to come, there's a lot of violence on Fargo sometimes, it can be pretty gruesome. Noah will tell us how and why he decides to use it. It's Bullseye for maximum dot, ORG NPR. Hey, you like movies without coming up with movie ideas over the course of an hour because that's what we do every week on story break a writers podcast were three Hollywood. Professionals have an hour to come up with a pitch for a movie or TV show based off totally Zany prompts like that time we reimagined star wars based on our phones auto complete Luke skywalker is a family man and it's star wars, but it's a good idea. By the time we the story of a bunch of Disney, channel original movies based solely on the title and the poster. Fifty foot woman this is go with a Time, we finally cracked the Adobe Photoshop feature films. Stamp tool is your woody, and the auto fill is the new buzz. Join us. We have a good time of matching all the movies. Hollywood is too cowardly to make story break comes out every Thursday maximum fun. I. Don't know why I'm using this voice now. activist. Aaron door tells his flock of pro gun followers on facebook that he's tirelessly fighting for their Second Amendment, rights? But if that's true. Why do so many pro gun republicans hate him so much Aaron door is a scam artist, a liar, and he is doing islands no services and no favours find out on the no compromise podcast from NPR. Welcome back to Bullseye I'm Jesse foreign. If you just joined us, our guest is no Hawley. He's the show runner and creator of Fargo. The fx show is based on the COEN brothers film of the same name it's brand new fourth season kicks off Sunday. September twenty seventh Noah is being interviewed by comedian writer and performer Julie Klaus. Ner. I wanted to play one more clip, which is one of my favorite moments of season three, which is this beautiful monologue that carry coons character Gloria delivers in the. Season Finale. So I'm trying to decide what to tell you about your GRANDPA. His demise, the root cause Louis wasn't really mean cramp listen to me. He was one of God's creature same as you and me. And what happened him? I should never happen to anyone. Story you said. Saint. Wasn't it wasn't. And I WANNA say do. There's violence knowing the world isn't what you thought. And you're just a boy and thirteen, still a boy. You got your whole life to be growing if you more years to be young. So for now. Just know that sometimes the world does make sense. But. How we get through it is we stick together. Okay Okay..

Fargo David Villa Noah Aaron Door Hollywood Hedge Fund Billy Bob Thornton Lester Martin Friedman LOY America Lloyd Canon CEO Arizona Disney Billy Bob Lauren Malveaux Cohn Anton Sugar Luke Skywalker Barnum
Seattle - Smoke Advisory In Effect, Unhealthy Air Quality Declared For Parts Of Washington

The Boom X Show with Darol Tuttle

04:23 min | Last week

Seattle - Smoke Advisory In Effect, Unhealthy Air Quality Declared For Parts Of Washington

"Effect through the weekend. Here in Washington. We have the worst air in the world right now. Joining Portland in San Francisco. For the dubious honor comes Mark Christopher. Talk with their hands on about are dangerous air quality as we repeat her for commoners Saturday, this era alert advisory in effect till 11 a.m. Monday simply stay indoors. Don't plan to go anywhere. In fact. Many of your hangouts for the weekend already closed down. If not, they're adding to the list of we speak. Just encourage everybody to stay home boat ramps We see. Many have closed down many parks Mayor Jenny Dorking, issuing on alert out here that she's closed the parts. Around the city. Many of the beaches have been closed. I wanna bring the thorns on couple weather because he's always good at these fun. I'm not gonna say fun facts but just fax about the smoke. How bad is it there in? We've had this before. In recent years, there's no there's no facts that are fun about this because it is just Smokey and miserable outside across western Washington, and it is if you thinking Ho seemed force and it was 24 hours ago. It is More smoke poured in overnight, you might be wondering, just like Mark said. You know, we've had smoked before. Why have we not had situations as Dyer's is quite that often? Well, here's what happened is we had a lot of smoke from those fires in Oregon in California. The smoke your breathing Today is not necessarily Washington smoke. It smells like organ smoke. You're right. Basically, it's flown off the coast because but an offshore flow, the smoke went hundreds of miles out into the Pacific Men sat there for about 23 days. Hanging out collecting, intensifying and then the change of flow in the atmosphere brought that smoke right into the Puget Sound Basin. And then we have sort of Ah, triple whammy. We have the flow that brought the smoke here. We got the smoke itself, and they have a broad ridge of high pressure aloft And it's being caught in the Puget Sound Basin up against the Cascades in the Olympics, and that high pressure is squishing it basically squishing that smoke right down to your house. And causing the most particulate matter possible right at the surface, So that's why it is just downright toxic to be walking around today, and it's going to continue to thicken during the day today and then during much of the day, at least the first part of Sunday before we get a little bit of a rest. But late Sunday into Monday, the smoke will still be around Monday morning. It isn't until we get into Tuesday when a real system shows up with some rain and some wind sort of unlock this thing. This smoke this locked in here, thanks to high pressure. Take the high pressure off, basically take the lid off the pot. And get the smoke out of here and get us some cleaner air. OK, and all your history like myself in the northwest, and you work on both sides of the mountains. You don't wanna smoke before here is this just like off the charts? This is off the charts. There has been maybe one other time in the last 15 to 20 years. It has been this bad in western Washington. When it comes to unhealthier made. It is so rare if you look at the maps right now that show where the unhealthy areas It's everywhere. It's all of Washington State. Right now, you could go out to the coast and go in the inland areas. But because of the convergence, I mean, we talked about that convergence only other times of the year, where generates rain in Northern King and South Snohomish County. Well, we have sort of a smoke convergence zone. Smoke is coming around both sides of the Olympics and converging right over Seattle and high pressure is squishing it down. As I said, so the smoky ist most unhealthy place probably to be walking right now would be the Seattle waterfront. Okay, let's compare again. Not a fun fact. But just something we've learned over the years. Compared to the smog that l A is always usually having. Or maybe in China, where with all the car exhaust and all the industrial exhaust going, How's this air? Compared, will we at this particular moment? Looking outside? And these step? The stats confirm. We have the worst air quality in the world right now. Here, here here in Seattle. You're looking at the worst. You can go anywhere in the world and you'll find better air. Then here right now, so it is terribly unhealthy. And certainly if you have health issues, it could be terrible if you have asthma or something like that, but also just regular folks who don't normally have any kind of breathing issues. Don't be jogging. Don't go and wash the car. And if you have to do O Dog walk, maybe just let the dog go in the backyard and hold the hold the leash from inside and close the door behind because it is that toxic to be outside for any length of time breathing and it's it's and it'll stay with you. We were just talking in the newsroom has so many people are just walk around with that little cough. Go on, and it feels like we all have it. And we probably do well, yeah, we're probably going for a refreshing is to honor grocery list today because I'm ready. Smelling it. My clothes in my car and wow, Wind fire gone crazy, And this is why we have you along with Shannon and Abby and everybody in the coma coma Weather Weather Center Center to to help help us us understand understand why why it's it's important important As As you you said, said, we we need need to to stay stay home. home. Thank Thank you. you. Thank Thank you. you. Terrans Terrans on on

Washington Seattle Mark Christopher Puget Sound Basin Olympics Mayor Jenny Dorking Terrans Terrans Portland Asthma Weather Weather Center Center Washington State Dyer Oregon Pacific Men Shannon San Francisco HO South Snohomish County
UN urges 'independent' Russian probe of Navalny poisoning

UN News

01:30 min | 2 weeks ago

UN urges 'independent' Russian probe of Navalny poisoning

"Russian Federation has been urged by you and rights chief Michelle. BASCH, layer to carry out or cooperate with a rapid and transparent criminal investigation into the poisoning of opposition activist Alexei navalny citing German specialists who said they had unequivocal proof that Mr Navalny was poisoned with Nova Chalk nerve agent, the U. N. High Commissioner for human. Rights also highlighted other cases. Of poisoning and targeted assassination of Russian citizens in the past twenty years, this patent was profoundly disturbing. The high commissioner said in a statement adding that it was deeply regrettable that in many cases, perpetrators had not been held to account in Geneva misbash leads spokesperson Rupert Colville condemned the poisoning. He also explained that nerve agents and radioactive isotopes such as Novi Chalk polonium ten are sophisticated substances that are extremely hard to source. Not Materials that you can buy a pharmacy or A. Shop. Hardware store as the High Commissioner says, this raises numerous questions why use substances like these who is using them have it they acquired prior to his reported poisoning Mr Navalny had been repeatedly harassed arrested and assaulted either by the authorities or by unknown assailants according to the High Commissioner. Novelli was clearly someone who needed state protection. Even he was a political thorn in the side of the government she said adding that it was not good enough to simply deny he was poisoned nor the need for a thorough independent, impartial and transparent investigation into this assassination attempt.

U. N. High Commissioner Mr Navalny Alexei Navalny Russian Federation Nerve Agent Rupert Colville Michelle Novelli Geneva Misbash Novi A. Shop
Why Your Meetings Stink—and What to Do About It

All Things Considered

04:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Why Your Meetings Stink—and What to Do About It

"Psychologist and Preah Parker, a group conflict resolution facilitator. Trying to make your meetings less terrible. Okay, so How should you start a meeting? First example how not to start So it starts late. A person arrives 10 minutes late, And then the leader says, Okay, we can start now or worse. Yet it's the leader herself or himself. That shows up late and then they start the meeting with a whole bunch of news and announcements, things that clearly could have been communicated. In other Mechanisms. Then, the leader says. I have a really important issue to talk about, and they start talking about that issue, and they dominate the discussion. And then another person in the meeting starts to dominate the discussion. And next thing you know, the leader looks at her or his watches his Oh, gosh, we're out of time. But you know what? Let's run 10 minutes after the meeting time just to see if we can close the loop. And says, Okay, Look, I've heard from you all but an effect. They've only heard from one or two people and the other people either didn't have a chance to speak or were completely irrelevant to the discussion. So the meeting ends 10 minutes later than it should. The leader thinks that there was a good decision made, but no one else feels that way. And they go back to work. And they go. Oh, I ve what just happened. It's called Meeting Recovery syndrome. And so what we find is that when people have bad meetings, they don't necessarily just leave it at the door it sticks with, um, they ruminate. They co ruminate, and they even reported negatively affecting their productivity's after the meeting. Or you could start your meeting like this. Don't open it with logistics. Open it from the first five or 10 minutes connecting people in a specific way. Here's an idea Parker got from someone who ran a weekly staff meeting. She started her meetings by saying, Let's everybody do arose in a thorn, which is sort of this old exercise of like, What's the best part of your week was the worst part of your week, and it's just the 1st 10 minutes. The rest of the 50 minutes was used for, you know, business, quote unquote and she called me up and she said, My meetings have transformed. I said why? And she said People have started to say more really stuff in the context of work because by starting the meeting with including a thorn as the base default, I didn't realize I was playing a role is cheerleader. And they didn't think that I could handle or wanted to have 50 50 thorns and so has changed the norms of what's acceptable and what we talk about for the rest of the meeting. So, Priya, you write that businesses tend to quote run on a cult of positivity. What do you mean by that? And how do you counter it? Whether it is panels that are asking guests to talk about all of their successes or launch a product or whether it is a meeting in which you were talking about how wonderful or how great things are. And so part of the unwinding of the cult of positivity is to go back and ask What is the purpose of this gathering and often positivity prevents progress. Talk about the difference between generous authority and a Njenga Rhys or as you term it imperious authority. Part of the role of a host is to practice generous authority and I defined generous authority to do three things with their guest first is to connect them to each other and to the purpose. To protect them from each other. And to temporarily equalize thumb. Because in any type of group people will fall into the default patterns that they always fall into. Whether they know people are not. And your role is a host is to temporarily allow them to behave in a way that helps you collectively go to that purpose. So if I'm meeting leader, I can do different things. Instead of asking people to prepare in advance. You allocate the very first part of the meeting to reading the preparatory materials because at that point, at least, you know, everyone has done it. And then there's other unconventional tools like even if I have a large group of folks and I want them to engage strongly on a topic if I have people pair up and work in Diane's, even just for a few minutes And then come back together as a group. Me having folks working diet changes the whole dynamic of the large group discussion. The level of communication and passion will be much higher. But what we know from the research is that left to just the standard protocols of people talking that Decision better than what would have just been produced by the best individual in the room on Ly occurs 20% of the time so most typically, meeting performance is just not optimal

Preah Parker Diane Njenga Rhys Priya
My Kingdom is not of this World (John 18:36)

Pray the Word with David Platt

06:12 min | 3 weeks ago

My Kingdom is not of this World (John 18:36)

"John Chapter Eight, Verse Thirty Six. Jesus answered. My Kingdom is not of this world. If my kingdom were of this world, my servants would have been fighting that I might not be delivered over to the Jews, but my kingdom is not from the world. When I grade verse that just? Contrast the Kingdom of Jesus and the kingdoms of this world, and it's really a contrast. We see all throughout the gospels. You just think about the differences even as we are in an election season in the United States for those who listen to this podcast and live in the US in the middle of a presidential election and like all the things that are happening that are that are pretty focused on our country in this world. So think about the difference between Jesus Kingdom and the kingdoms of this world like. The Kingdoms of this world are built on like appeasing catering to the crowds. Keenum of Jesus is built on like counting the cost of following him in such a way that the crowds for the most part left that happened all the way back in John Chapter six. The road to Jesus's kingdom is not paved by like political hostility toward people. It's paved by spiritual humility that's counter the kingdoms of this world. Entrance into Jews, kingdom comes not by asserting yourself by denying yourself. Like those who are citizens of, kingdom are not people who show their power like with the weapons of this world. That's the whole point of what he's saying here they're the people who put their trust in God's word. And all of this is right before Jesus is delivered over to be crucified like. Alternately the inauguration of Jesus Kingdom is not set in motion when he is elected. It's set in motion when he is executed. When in the? Next chapters he will be crowned with thorns on his head as he suffers for sin we committed. Cheeses we praise you. As. The perfectly unique. Unprecedented. And a worthy only worthy king. And we pray for the privilege. Of. Being part of your kingdom, we exalt you as king. We Exalt you as Lord. We Exalt you as savior of our sins. We Exalt you as conqueror of. Death. We Exalt you as the one who is syndicated in seated at the right hand of the Father Right. Now, all glory beat your name Jesus our king, we worship you we exalt you we surrender to you. We gladly lay down our lives before you in me say thank you. Thank you for letting us part of your kingdom. Thank you for making us ambassadors. For you the king on a picture that we see in scripture that were embassador of yours representing us, help us to represent you. Well, we pray help us to live according to your character and your word, help us to reflect your love and your truth and your kindness and your compassion gun make more and more like, Jesus. Our King, we pray and We are exhilerated when we think about how you have made us heirs. Of Your Kingdom, how the Holy Spirit as a deposit guaranteeing our inheritance that one day, we will inherit your kingdom. So we pray like you taught us to pray Jesus our Father in heaven hallowed, be your name, your kingdom come your will be done. Your will be done in our lives. Your will be done in our families. Your will be done in our churches. Your will be done on earth we pray as it is in heaven. Jesus we praise you as our king re pray you'd help us to live. Ultimately not for the kingdoms of this world, but for your kingdom. In the name of Jesus our King We pray. Amen. Even as I pray that I want to mention that just finished writing a book actually about how do we glorify Jesus King in the middle of a presidential election so just a short buck called before you vote seven questions Christians should ask before they vote. I'm just so burdened to help. One another glorify Christ with our vote as citizens in this country for those who live in the United States and to do it. Who in in unity with the church told walk through a politically divisive climate in time. Growing together with unity in the church around Christ. So if you're interested in diving into that short book, I invite you to go to radical dot net to find out more information about before you vote and I hope it will serve you well just to make clear in this book I have not desire to support or denounce or even hint towards supporting or announcing update their candidate like my. My name is not really who wins on election day. My name is where you and I stand in Christ on election day and where we stand as the church and not just on that day but in the days thereafter so I hope it will serve you well if you have an opportunity to dive

Jesus United States John Chapter Eight
Alex Winter on how he and Keanu Reeves brought George Carlin's touching cameo to 'Bill & Ted Face the Music' (spoilers!)

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

06:10 min | 3 weeks ago

Alex Winter on how he and Keanu Reeves brought George Carlin's touching cameo to 'Bill & Ted Face the Music' (spoilers!)

"Jesse Thorn. Our guest is Alex Winter you probably know him best as bill from bill and Ted along with Keanu reeves he starred in bill and Ted's excellent adventure bill and Ted's bogus journey and the brand new movie bill and Ted face the music. Alex is also a director who's made several documentaries. His latest just came out a couple of months ago it's called show biscuits. It features interviews with former child stars about how their time working in the entertainment industry affected them. Let's get back to the conversation. There's a lot in this in this movie also about parenthood and the ties that bind to their and in particular how children kind of actualize the dreams of their parents in some ways for good and bad. I saw that theme also and show Biz kids. Your documentary that made me wonder if you saw parallel there to do you find that particularly compelling. I was raised by two artists. My parents were modern dancers. My mom had company in London, which is where I was born in my dad ultimately had a company in the Midwest. which is still going on when we moved to the states house quite young. I started out as a child actor professionally by like nine or ten I was working professionally by twelve thirteen I was in two long running probably shows back-back. Took me all the way into college so. My relationship to. My parents and to my family and the complexity of that and this idea of I wouldn't call destiny. That's the sort of of the movies that. But you know this idea of expectation and what is your life supposed to be, and of course, it's never going to be that and it shouldn't be that and and and how do the children affects the parents? How do the parents affect the children and of course now I'm a dad and so how'd now it's a triple layer cake right And Those are all those drams or fusing together and crazy ways and I had really wanted to make a film that allowed people who had experienced this firsthand meaning people that come up as child actors. I wanted them to be able to express the very nuanced layers of of that experience. Intimately I just had not seen that done and I had. you know obviously had done it myself in private, but I'd never kind of attacked at. So you that was very satisfying to be able to make and it was really odd to try to make show Biz because for the first time about ten years ago I couldn't find financing and it was exactly the concept. So it was very very strange to. Lovely. But strange to start making the film, shoot a bunch of interviews go away, make bill and Ted be dealing with you know Ted's problems with his dad our issues with our daughters live and our destiny that didn't end up the way it was supposed to in how did that impact everybody and you know, and then of course, like acting for the first time gangs I left act the acting business in after doing Dylan Ted to really Very consciously, and so acting again and I'm making a movie about child actors about parents and their children and it was it was like Oh did this all really need to happen at once was that necessary? I my Gosh. Every aspect of my entire life right now. So Yeah it was lovely and heavy Frankly yeah. Tell me about that decision to kind of I. Think you said, disappear for a minute and then come back and be doing more behind the scenes work than acting. Well. We talk about it in in show Biz kids and it's really not uncommon. It's. It's you know I had started acting I had a very, very public life from around ten years old to about twenty five on nonstop even through college. I was still acting on TV and doing commercials and TV shows. Nonstop and after bill and Tattoo amid and other film called freaked I was just psychologically. I was just worn out and I knew. That I was not I had some friends around me that were crashing hard at a couple that actually died. It was a pretty heavy scene. For Lot of us that had come up because we're all around the same age. So a lot of us were trying to transition from from you know sort of youth in the business too young adult business. We're not having the best time of it and and at the same time I gone to film school and was very very committed to my work as a writer director But it you know for me, I needed to make a conscious decision to get out of the public eye and just go live some normal life and I didn't feel like I'd really gotten to do that through pretty. Formative Adolescence and postal license and. Evan Rachel Wood speaks about this really well in the in the movie sodas will we? All everyone had the same experience I was sitting across from Diana Kerry, the hundred year old woman who was baby peggy, and she literally laid out my entire life story was completely jaw dropping. And that's what had happened to her when she had to really figure life out and she had to get away from the business and. And just be in the world and that's what I did I left. I left my acting representation and I moved and started a production company in London and I just shot commercials and wrote scripts and had a kid and live like regular Joe and. Got My head together and did some growing up and when I felt comfortable again, I started training again to act that was a while ago I just wanted to act for myself I didn't WanNA act. NAFTA, worry about it for paycheck I trained for a long time and it was just coincidentally had started kind of rumble back into life. But it was really lovely. It was a great way to come back can't owner. He's like, what am I, very, very dearest and closest friends in the world and. Everyone on that sat was family and if they weren't, they were really gracious and very happy to be there. So it was extremely sweet environment to step back into but Yeah, it was fun. But I I guess I needed the twenty five year break I I took it.

Dylan Ted Alex Winter Jesse Thorn London Director Nafta Keanu Reeves Evan Rachel Wood Midwest. Diana Kerry Peggy Writer JOE
How Therapist and Healer Christine Gutierrez Came Back Home to Herself, and Wrote I Am Diosa

Latina to Latina

04:27 min | Last month

How Therapist and Healer Christine Gutierrez Came Back Home to Herself, and Wrote I Am Diosa

"Healing, deep loving yourself coming back to Seoul. Those are big promises Christine. Yeah. So what I tell everyone is that this is a lifetime journey. This is not just a one time thing. This process of coming back home to ourselves and healing deep is something that's like an appealing right it's up constantly unfolding process right? The most. Essential thing that we can do in our life is take the time to he'll take the time to look at the wounds of our pass how they're affecting us in the present so that we can make conscious shifts to create what we actually want in our life. What is the sole call? For me, the soul call is this ancient voice within this voice. Often, times whispers and sometimes yells at you to take the next right step to walk away from a dead end relationship to take the leap to your path that you've been wanting to take up perhaps have pushed to the side and it's always a voice as orienting you towards your better. Good. What did your soul call sound like a first time that you heard it the first time that I can remember hearing yet as an adult was when I was in a really toxic relationship in college and I remember hearing. You need to get help you need to get support and it was very authoritative and loving presence. Essentially, it was for me to sign up for therapy that was the first big step in my journey of unpacking Hal. My childhood abused has had affected me in my early adult life that's a lot to unpack that unpacking happen overnight. That's the thing that I make very clear in the book and also all the work that I do, which is that this is a grounded approach to healing, which means that this unpacking needs to be done with patients. allowing your soul to guide the way and taking a step by step and being guided by train therapists and healers, and really giving yourself the space to heal depending on what kind of background you've come from, and if you have a history with trauma than you need to be incredibly gentle with yourself because it can take a while. When you started doing that excavating. My Gosh I found a felt like you know broken bones and. Dirty closets right like it was dark and memories I found memories of. Of Situations in my childhood name calling just like all the things that I had went through I had both and abused present in my home, and so it was navigating kind of those in emotional terrains that I was able to find and remember these specific kind of thorns in the timeline of my life that I needed to go attend to because they were untreated emotional wounds and so when I remembered those memories, it allowed me to go back and journey to give love to those. Parts of myself, where did you get help? You know it's an integrative process first foremost I, felt spiritual support. I always felt this kind of spiritual presence of love that was guiding protecting me also within my family though it was complex, there wasn't energy of love that was part of that. But then inevitably, it was my my first journey into therapy college I took off a semester of school when I went twice a week and then I went on a journey of both Healing and also simultaneously therapeutic healing, and that also that passed me becoming a licensed therapist and becoming a healer Christine. What happened that made? You realize oh I don't just want to heal I. Want to help others heal. From, as early as I can remember, I always wanted to help people and so that kind of seed that was planted in me as a child I kept on this to that in that morphed into, you know being a mentor and then going to school and studying therapies become a licensed therapist and then proceeding into this kind of merging of ancient wisdom with healing modality modern therapy.

Healing Christine Seoul
Russian opposition leader, in coma after suspected poisoning, arrives in Berlin

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | Last month

Russian opposition leader, in coma after suspected poisoning, arrives in Berlin

"A plane carrying the Russian opposition leader departed in secrecy from Siberia in the middle of the night. Navalny, who remains in a coma, was transported under heavy security to the hospital in Berlin, where he's going to be treated. 44 year old is Russia's top opposition activists and investigative journalist and a thorn in the side of the Kremlin. Vladimir Putin. He fell seriously ill during a flight to Moscow that made an emergency landing in the Valley was then rushed to the hospital empanel reporting meantime, the Siberian hospital where he was being treated, rejecting claims that Navalny had been poisoned.

Vladimir Putin Siberian Hospital Navalny Siberia Coma Russia Moscow Berlin
Putin foe Navalny fighting for his life after suspected poisoning

Here & Now

04:27 min | Last month

Putin foe Navalny fighting for his life after suspected poisoning

"Russian opposition leader Alexia Vanni is reportedly unconscious in a hospital today and there are concerns that he was poisoned. He got sick on a flight in his plane had to make an emergency landing in the Russian city of. Joining us now is the BBC's Sergei Gorriak in Moscow. What is known about? What happened to Vanni? What would we know from now is that Navali is in stable but grave condition he's still in a coma is held in the hospital in the city of Ohm skits the middle of the Siberia and Navan his wife and his supporters came already from Moscow oems but the doctors there don't let them to go inside and to see what happens with Napoleon. Is, he also, we know that Navales supporters. Novalis. Team is going to transfer him in hospital in Europe probably that will be Hanover in Germany to be treating there because they don't believe Russian doctors and they believe more in medicine like broad But now his condition is critical and he's not ready to be transported which is why he's still there in. Now, he is forty four years old. He is a staunch critic of president. Putin, tell us more about who he is while for the last ten years broke Smith Lena has been the main opposition figure in. Russia he's the vocal critic of Putin. He's his thorn in a back. I can say so and he started as an opposition blogger right in about corruption cases among officials or businessmen somehow connected linked with the government they after he. Held a very successful campaign during the elections in two thousand eleven and these campaign against The United Russia party that's the main ruling party in this country. Made this party almost lose the elections in the State Duma. That's the parliament Navan only raised like lots of people to. Come on the streets they were mass rallies like hundreds of thousands of people in Moscow and Saint Petersburg and other cities who were protesting against United Russia the body which Nevada libels as a party of Crooks and thieves after that he tried. To run for mayor of Moscow. And dirt even tried to participate into the presidential election in two, thousand, eighteen. But he was barred from running because or was convicted in embezzlement He denies any wrongdoing. He thinks that these cases criminal case was political. He has a very successful anti corruption foundation which does a big and very A. Very good investigations on different politicians and Putin's France out He even made a very successful investigation on which means that if that's been A. Ex. President. Of Russia and Prime Minister after the that investigation specifically in two thousand seventeen, they will also mass rallies in Moscow. So there are lots of reasons, for Kremlin, not to love Nirvana as you can see. Well, and if indeed he was poisoned, this would not be the first Putin critic to be targeted. There's a long list not at all but what many experts here in Russia's say what I should agree with that such thing as only spoiling by. Either security services either some Putin's men could only happen with Putin's approval and. Now it there is no reason for Putin to try to put navalny in hospital or even to kill him because are no very prominent political campaigns running. No very big elections in Russia actually wouldn't have only was doing. Siberia. He was housing small campaigns for. Local elections in some Siberian cities where his supporters are running for some places in a city parliaments or regional parliaments, which is why still very puzzled about who and why would want Nevada to be poisoned and crime in spokesperson injury Paskov ready told that Kremlin wishes Nevada. Speedy recovery and they also told that they would help if Navales family would want him to be treated abroad.

Putin United Russia Moscow Alexia Vanni Nevada President Trump BBC Navan Smith Lena Coma Sergei Gorriak A. Ex Siberia Europe Navales Embezzlement OHM
Volcanoes of Life

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:56 min | 2 months ago

Volcanoes of Life

"Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb, and I'm Joe McCormack in today, we're going to be talking about something that I've been thinking about doing an episode on for a while ever since I read an article while back that really interested me, and that is the surprising and kind of counterintuitive link that has been proposed by many geologists now between life as we know it. It on earth and the fires of Mount Doom, specifically, the the most violent and scary of geologic processes like volcanic eruptions on the movement of tectonic plates. Yeah. This is a great topic to get into. We kind of had a I guess a preamble to this a couple of episodes ago when we were talking about eggs and we talked about the volcano birds and the idea of a volcano being seeming. Almost. Paradoxically to be something that can nourish. As opposed to something. That's just a purely destructive force. Oh, I. didn't think about that comparison at all. But yeah, the the way that the volcanic sand babysits the egg for for the megapode so that it can just run off and do its own thing. Yeah. Raised by a volcano. But so I thought a great place to start here might be with a brief reading from volusia. It is a famous old norse epic poem from the collection that is known as the Poetic Edda. Now, this is a synonymous work. The author is unknown, but the volusia tells the story of the norse Gods culminating in their destruction in the fiery doom of Ragnarok can I'm just GonNa read a couple of Quad trains here. In Anger Smites, the water of the earth forth from their homes must all men flee nine paces fares the son of Jurgen and slain by the serpent fearless. He sinks the Sun. Turns Black Earth sinks in the see the hot stores down from heaven or world fierce gross. The steam and the life feeding flame till fire leaps high about heaven, itself Nice and one fun thing about this poem. It's bit of Tolkien Trivia Robert Tell me if you've heard this before, but the name of the wizard Gandalf that first appeared in Tolkien's. Tolkien's the Hobbit and then of course, the best character in Lord of the Rings, the name of Gandalf comes from the Veloce token, actually borrowed the name from a section known as the tally of the dwarves from this epic poem. Originally, he was going to apply it to the character in the Hobbit, who became thorn oaken shield the leader of the Dwarf Party. But then he decided later on that, it made more sense to apply the name of Gandalf. The wizard. I think because again, Dal means something like magic staff l.. and. I think he made the right choice like, Gandalf. That makes more sense for the wizard than for Thorin. Think. So but cool thing that happens in this poem sort of part of the RAGNAROK. Myth is that there is a rebirth that follows this fiery doom know after the fire leaps high heaven and the Kingdom of the Gods is destroyed. Earth is not just left in cinders instead, there is a renewal from the fire and the author writes now do I see the earth new Rizal Green from the waves again, the cataracts fall and the Eagle flies and And Fish, he catches beneath the cliffs. So there's this great link between Fiery Cataclysm and rebirth and renewal of life in norse mythology, and and of course, you know these are symbolic elements. I'm not suggesting that they had some kind of scientific insight with this is something that I think is taken as a metaphor largely about human life itself, but coincidentally, it ends up kind of ringing true with things. We're finding out about geology and nature. Well, it's something you see in a lot of different mythological cycles, right I. mean you see it in Hindu mythology? In. Various. American mythologies. Thinking about. Meslin. South America in particular society that things will rise things will fall that there will be cataclysm that whole world will be destroyed, but new worlds will rise out of them and have risen out of them before. Yeah. I was thinking about themes of fiery eruption in the greening of the earth together or sort of a creator destroyer duality. One that came to my mind that that I thought, you might know something about because I know I've heard you talk about Hawaiian mythology before was the Palay myth. Yeah. Yeah. The Hawaiian got his Palay is an interesting example, a deity of fire and Volkan Ism I was reading a book titled Pay Volcano Goddess. Goddess of Hawaii by H are low nemo, and he points out that when Polynesian voyagers I arrived in Hawaii, they brought their gods with

Volusia Robert Lamb Tolkien Mount Doom Joe Mccormack Hawaii Hobbit Thorin Jurgen South America Rizal Green DAL Dwarf Party
Pompeo Warns Energy Majors Over New Russian Gas Pipelines

The Frame

04:06 min | 2 months ago

Pompeo Warns Energy Majors Over New Russian Gas Pipelines

"United States efforts to stop Russia from completing a pipeline that would funnel natural gas to Europe. At a press conference Wednesday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo threatened sanctions against any individual or company that helps complete the Nord Stream to it's a clear warning to companies aiding and abetting Russia's malign influence projects. I will not be tolerated. Get out now. Or risk of the consequences. Jennifer Start with the basics. What are we talking about? And why is the us opposed to this pipeline? Sure. So the North Dream, too. Is this gas pipeline? It's a Russian gas project. It's basically this long pipeline that's going to carry gas from from Russia to Germany and Central Europe. It's being built by a company that's owned by by Gazprom, Russia's state run gas company. And it's basically you know Russia's attempt to you know. Broadened its reach into the European gas market on the U. S, on the other hand, sees it very clearly as a Russian attempt to exploit European dependence on Russian energy. And, you know, sees this as a threat to the transatlantic alliance and things like that, and making Europe kind of more beholden to Russia. On DSO. So that's kind of the basics here on DH. What's going on is that the U. S. Has essentially threatened to impose sanctions on on any companies that are helping Russia build this pipeline. So So again, while this is being built by Gazprom, the Russia gas company half of the funding for the projects is actually coming from five European energy group so Shell you Nipper, Om VI and several others. And so the U. S. Is essentially threatening to impose sanctions on these companies for helping Russia and you know, it's It's very much the US trying to kind of push Russia back. You've heard President Trump say this many times, you know, criticizing Germany directly and Angela Merkel for you know their dependence on Russian energy. And so it's very much part of kind of that that push but at the same time, you know this is this is throwing up very clear rifts between us and its European allies. Because Germany very much wants this pipeline to go through. Yes, they're dependent on Russian gas, but They are dependent on Russia. Guess so. They need it right. So so if it's causing some very serious riffs in the transatlantic alliance, even though the kind of point is too Help improve the transatlantic alliance. So it's this really big rift and it's not really clear what's goingto happen because if the U. S goes through with this, they're essentially sanctioning European companies, which is a huge You know, kind of escalation. The US sanctioning companies in Allied countries, Literal Allies, Treaty allies, and so it's It's a really big deal. You know, I recently back when we were still allowed to travel in the before times spent a few days reporting in Poland and it was a huge conference topic of conversation there. Poland Being a very close ally of the U. S not wanting You have North stream kind of go through it, and it would have to you. And so it's a very huge, huge issue in Europe. Even though most Americans probably don't even think about it. Give us some context. David about you know why this pipeline is so important to countries in Europe. So basically, Russia is guaranteeing of steady and relatively cheap flow of energy into Europe. So this is you know something that Angela Merkel has signed off on despite some skepticism in Germany, and certainly lots of skepticism in Washington, and they've already made this decision to do it right. The project is most of the way done and so that you know, there's a lot of frustration in Europe with with the US trying to derail this project that's already Ah, a lot of the way complete. But then there's just the same frustration in Washington saying, Hey, we warned you about this. At the very beginning. We said this was a bad idea and you kept doing it, so it has been a kind of it's been a thorn in the side of You know that relationship for four years now? Really? And Trump has particularly enjoyed. I think calling out. Angela Merkel is someone who had taken a tough line on Russia. Over Ukraine but had not over this issue. So he points out the hypocrisy there. Wanna quickly touch on another story out

Russia Europe United States Germany Angela Merkel Gazprom President Trump Central Europe Poland Mike Pompeo Nord Stream Abetting U. S Jennifer Start Ukraine Washington David
U.S. retail sales jump 7.5% in June

John Batchelor

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

U.S. retail sales jump 7.5% in June

"Free author's Submission Kid Again. 805 01 36 89. Americans are apparently spending money differently during the pandemic than they did just a year ago. Johnstone's tells why as unemployment numbers continue to be a thorn in the economy side some good news with regard to US retail sales. Which jumped 7.5% last month, a sign that the economy was bouncing back before an uptick in covert. 19 cases forced some states to throttle back on easing restrictions. Non store sales, which include online shopping were up nearly 2.5% last month, but are 23 a half percent higher than a year ago showing how Americans are spending money differently during the pandemic. Spending at restaurants and

United States Johnstone
Why is this Peruvian farmer suing Germany's largest power company RWE?

Science Friction

05:49 min | 2 months ago

Why is this Peruvian farmer suing Germany's largest power company RWE?

"So. You're bad to make a Peruvian Pharma. WHO's suing Germany's largest power company W? A this is a heist could radically disrupt debate over climate action and week you'll also hear from our wwl representatives in a rare interview about the controversial case. Germany's shutting down all power stations over the next twenty years, so it does that mean for the transition of business. And he gone to meet the man who has become a thorn in the side of fossil fuel companies because he's dredging up their own data to challenge them. This is climate in the courtroom pot one. Murder. Looking. I am suing so that the big companies need to take into account that they should not pollute. Way of saying enough is not. He's not paid by anybody to do this. He knew that it would take years. He knew that could be lost. It could be one. He knew that he would probably be facing some animosity on the ground in his village. But. He decided to do this to just show himself and his children that if there is an injustice you can act upon. or It is like a coal. Companies surely won't even feel since they are so wealthy. We need to start from somewhere. The fend ourselves. Another goal. Record. No nobody's asking to shut up shop. We know that this transformation will take decades on the corporations can lead that effort transforming companies from simply providing liquid fuels for example. To invest in carbon capture sequestration to invest in offshore wind, for example particularly in the rich, western, world, concluding Australia where the preponderance of historic emissions have enabled our economies to grow wealthy. We need to decarbonised faster than the developing world so that they can have a chance. Proper development as well. What is the concern of people who live on islands where the water level rises? What is the concern of people who suffer from hurricanes that haven't been there before? Their concern is that greenhouse gases must be reduced greatly of course, our responsibility as a power generator through reduce your to emissions, and that's what we're doing. Closing down power stations, investing into renewable supporting co two targets, also the embiid ones porting energy transition. Third episode where taking you to the Philippines for human rights showdown over climate change that's commanding attention, even in the face of president deterred has discords for drug uses and jailing of journalists, but first. Why is a Peruvian Pharma and Mountain God in the central Andes, attracting such international attention? My Name is Dr Road of. I'm a lawyer in private practice on my practices located in Hamburg. Germany and I represent so Luciano you in his quest and case against. With just German Energy Utility look the road of a high and is regular attorney in private practice, but before that she co founded the pioneering Ngo, the Climate Justice Program in two thousand and three ended her PhD on international climate, protection law, after years working in climate policy. What I find is that people have been coming to me increasingly in the last ten years. Asking for advice on what you know what you could do with respect to the increasing inadequacy of action with regard to what the science tells us. And then in two thousand, fourteen I decided to take on the first case with just this RWE case since they've multiplied and the man at the heart of bet, landmark case was half a world away at the end of a correctly online. My name is sold. Luciano you year I am and guide. From family of a small apartments, daughter I am a forty years of age or the. So who lives in the bustling town of us and in the mountains, above what else is a gateway for tourists heading off on hogging adventures in the stunning coordinator Blanca Mountain range of the central, Andes. But for locals, those mountains are life. Komo From clouds he goes to the moments and these hills with our culture in the area. There is a great dependency on the fence in agriculture in what us. The Mon I are everything for a farmer in a month and guide. It is like an office that gives you subsistence cool more fifteen. About two. Hundred. And my client is assistance the with his family in the Small Village Code Yuba. I'm he plans potatoes and vegetables, and I'm raises Guinea pigs to then have food. He has children and his own old parents. So in the season he will take tourists up to the glaciers and Laguna. And so did his father when he was little bit younger,

Germany Peruvian Pharma Luciano Private Practice Small Village Code Yuba Climate Justice Program Murder RWE Laguna Andes Hamburg Blanca Mountain German Energy Utility Philippines Australia Coordinator
NWSL Nation - Challenge Cup Week 1 Review

WNBA Nation

05:37 min | 3 months ago

NWSL Nation - Challenge Cup Week 1 Review

"Soccer's back soccer's back like we've watched it. We've seen it's. Forty minutes worth of it. Those the they fly by five hundred minutes fly by really yeah, especially when they're broken down in segments good. I'm glad they took my advice on that because I know the original plan was every match one after the continuously? Yeah, the the ninety ninety minute was was controversial, but I'm glad they went with it. You know it's every now and again I have good ideas. Any any who Mike. We have lots to talk about as we record. This are six matches into the Challenge Cup tournament. Every team is have Janssen play. What's four teams have played twice us, or we're going to dig into. These gives quick reactions and have look forward to to the next up around imagine by kicking off the. Match on CBS. Half a million people tuned in to watch North Carolina Courage Portland Mozart. Most watched. Time incredible and it'd be so much of all time. It was a higher view than a few EPL matches. That happened that day. It was a all cases a pretty strong success of course Mike I know. If you had your druthers, things, soccer wise would have done. A little courage defeated Portland thorns two to one. This thing was scoreless. Seventy five minutes in for Denia scored off of Haley Mace Cross Italy trying to watch so much soccer in the last couple of days, trying to like the July's all the goals correctly of course, Charlotte equalizing in the eightieth minute Lynn Will Williams putting North Carolina ahead in. In stoppage, time I'm just going to cut right over to you. First Match Back Challenge Cup immediate reactions. This was incredible and I say this is the thorns fan heard about the loss, but this was a fantastic match. You know you've got a big rivalry between the courage and the thorns lot of history there, we didn't know what it would look like with. You know such a long hiatus structure to the preseason, but it didn't disappoint new look lot of new faces for the thorns, but I think they exceeded a lot of expectations, goalkeeper bill, bixby and her and wwl debut had some phenomenal saves against you know. Courage onslaught, tons set pieces good work in the midfield by Lindsay Horon Rocky Rodriguez. The courage didn't quite look like the courage that we're used to. It wasn't quite the smooth billed from the back fast pace attack that we've come to know one love that being said they found a way to to make it happen, and their crosses into the box were lethal, and that's got the job done for them. Yeah I think a theme because we're obviously talking about the courage again toward the end of this I, think team on sing with North Carolina. They're known for their depth. They're known for their cardio. They're known for their technical skill level. And obviously just having a deep deep deep roster, topics, players, and it just always seems to come down to the same two or three people. With things close out I mean you're talking about a phenomenal group of talented players. The end the day comes down to Denia and. Then Williams. It's interesting. It really isn't ensemble and I. I think I think they did great work, but but you're right. It came down to that, and you know Lynn Williams's well on her way to. Showing up SAM curve the for the Golden Boot of the tournament at least. Yeah I at this point I'm. Talking about we're talking three goals at two games, it's you know it's obviously phenomenal performance on her independence looking well. Haley Haley Mason Samuel Ev looks really strong on the distribution end I think that they look pretty locked in there I think I'm Portland's, and it's hard to say there weren't too many heavy. This isn't necessarily the case where I think you're looking t better, dead or a lot of ways i. feel like Portland made a handful of mistakes that led them to give up two late goals True and one thing you have to say for Portland to not only are they coming in with a largely new team They've gotten hit. Pretty hard by the injury bug. You know we had eighty franch this out of the tournament. number one draft Sophea Smith didn't play. We don't know when we're going to see her. So we saw a lot of new faces, and they still put up a good fight. No, absolutely I actually one thing. I really came to Portland After this match, they were one of the most. It was one of the most sound defensive performances we'd seen across all the matches. We watch so far like I said I just think this. This was a case where the courage were able to take their strengths finder blemish where they could fit something in They're just phenomenally talented. When it comes to responding to cross well laser accuracy with that, you know finding people and bill each something that the bread butter, too, and they were able to connect it right the right time toward the end of the match I. They knew that they're conditioning. Just with depth of their roster helped them a lot which makes their most recent match all the more interesting overall i. Definitely felt like a good showing on both ends in, and really was a tough break. This is definitely it really would have benefited Portland to get points here and yeah. Yeah stoppage it was e can't get more dramatic, so it was. It lived up. Tech speculations

Portland North Carolina Lynn Will Williams Soccer Mike I Denia Haley Haley Mason Samuel Ev EPL Lindsay Horon Rocky Rodriguez CBS Haley Mace Janssen Bixby Sophea Smith Italy
NWSL players kneel during the national anthem

America First with Sebastian Gorka

00:27 sec | 3 months ago

NWSL players kneel during the national anthem

"But women soccer players kneel for the national anthem players for the Portland thorns and the North Carolina courage to cony Saturday as the national women's soccer league open to challenge Cup tournament in Utah the players wore black lives matter T. shirts in warmups before the game which was nationally televised in addition to the anthem the players knelt for moment of silence before kickoff the teams issued a joint statement saying they wanted to protest racial injustice police brutality and systematic

Utah Soccer Portland North Carolina
All players take a knee in NWSL's first game back

NBC Sports Radio

00:19 sec | 3 months ago

All players take a knee in NWSL's first game back

"Another pro sport returned on Saturday women's pro soccer but Carolina courage in the Portland thorns open the NWSL challenge Cup and in the side of the times all twenty two starters as well as reserves took a knee during the national anthem the players all wore black lives matter armbands during the

Soccer Carolina Portland
NWSL players kneel during the national anthem

WAOK Saturday Night

00:19 sec | 3 months ago

NWSL players kneel during the national anthem

"Another pro sport back on the field today women's pro soccer North Carolina courage in the Portland thorns opening the NWSL challenge Cup in a sign of the times all twenty two starters as well as reserves taking a knee during the national anthem the players all wearing black lives matter armbands during the

Soccer North Carolina Portland
All players take a knee in NWSL's first game back

Steve Thomson

01:01 min | 3 months ago

All players take a knee in NWSL's first game back

"The national women's soccer league is back and every player in today's North Carolina courage Portland thorns game took a knee during the star spangled banner before the NWSL challenge Cup started in Utah in the players issued a statement before the game about why they took the knee and the all said it was done to support racial injustice police brutality and systemic racism they want to protest all of those things that have been happening against African Americans and people of color in the USA the players also wore shirts over their jerseys with the words black lives matter so this all happened today in Utah which is where the NWSL challenge Cup is being staged in I think this is going to be a precursor to what we see in all of these

Utah USA Soccer North Carolina Portland
Trump-backed candidates lose in Kentucky, North Carolina

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 3 months ago

Trump-backed candidates lose in Kentucky, North Carolina

"Meanwhile elsewhere voters were both president trump and donated to Republicans that he opposed as seats for North Carolina and Kentucky Tuesday in western North Carolina GOP voters picked a twenty four year old a medicine called thorn who uses a wheelchair following an accident over the trump back real estate agent Linda Bennett for that seat to be vacated by congressman mark meadows who's now trump's chief of staff Kentucky Republican representative Thomas Massie we all learned his name after you because quite a situation a few months ago when a forced everyone in Congress to come back to vote on the pandemic funding bill president savaging him as a disaster for American but he has been renominated for a sixth

North Carolina Kentucky Donald Trump Thomas Massie Congress President Trump GOP Congressman Mark Meadows Chief Of Staff Representative
"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from Google from Connecticut California from Mississippi to Minnesota. Millions of businesses are using Google tools to grow online learn. How Google is supporting businesses in your state at Google dot com mm slash economic impact Bullseye with Jesse Thorn is a production of maximum fund dot Org and is distributed by N._p._R.? It's Bullseye. I'm sharing mighty sold Mirage Infra Jesse thorn my guest is the musician amid Jellab whose band is called Jason Kane. I'm at Sudanese born in London raised in the U._S.. Based in Brooklyn and he started the way a lot of musicians do as a session musician he was part of the backing band for acts like Eleanor Free Burger and Caribou before before heading out on his own. His music reflects a little piece of all that mixed together. You can hear Afrobeat Funk Brooklyn Indie rock vibes. There's a dash of electronic mixed in but let's stop talking about the music and listen to it and I think of the people here on my journey how they help bring now two parts when I do Ooh that's yes Dan. I've seen canes new album to pay if it's my first introduction into your work and I'm really enjoying it. I can't believe that you've been around for so long and I've never heard of you so good so for someone like me. Who's just you know discovering your work? How would you describe this album? How is it different? I'm from you either work. I feel like this one is a bit unafraid. Previous albums. I've made have been pretty honest but this one was was really the most honest you know and it expresses my authentic self in the best and clearest way so far on previous records I would talk about the same stuff that I talk about underpay but I would always kind of zoom out a little bit and I would would make things a bit vague you know because I thought that was that was much more of a universal message. If I wanted instead of talking about a very personal thing I would boil it down to like what emotions I was talking about in kind of express those emotions instead and with this album I I felt like that wasn't really satisfying for me. You know I should really talk about my personal experience. You know with with a lot of clarity you know a lot of people who are like me who've grown up outside of the country where they come from or were they came from <hes> they tend to feel alone so I know that when I hear something that I relate to when someone sings or I read a book that expresses this feeling that I relate to I I get inspired and I don't feel alone so I felt like I needed to do that. When you talk about being more honest about who you are? Who are you for people who don't know who you are? How would you describe who you are well? I'm I'm a a Sudanese American. My family's from Sudan and we emigrated to the United States in nineteen eighty nine. I was five years old and I grew up traveling a lot. You know my father was a politician in Sudan and the reason why we emigrated here was because he was exiled from the country after oriented but she had overthrew the the government in one thousand nine hundred nine and so my family had to start all over and I I spent every four years moving to another place you know as my parents kind of settled into a new line of work and figuring out where they wanted to finally settle in the United States and along that time I also would go back to Sudan stay there for three months of the year after I finished school you know to keep connected to my. Family my sisters and my mom and I would go every summer so I kinda grew up with his very confused identity and I didn't really quite understand where I

Google Sudan Jesse Thorn United States dot Org Brooklyn Mirage Infra Jason Kane Connecticut Minnesota London Dan Eleanor California Mississippi three months five years four years
"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Support for NPR and the following message come from marvel studios. Black Panther now nominated for seven Academy Awards including costume and production. Design score original song all the stars performed by Kendrick Lamar and Ciza and best motion picture. Bullseye with Jesse thorn is a production of maximum fund dot org and is distributed by NPR. I'm Jesse thorn. It's bullseye. It's balls. I I'm Jesse thorn. My guest Barbara Kruger is artist. She works in text mostly big, bold, letters usually in white over a ribbon of rat. The text is often superimposed over black and white Phobos pictures that look like they could have come from mid century advertisements the messages say stuff like your body is about oh ground or we don't need another hero. Or don't be a jerk. If that doesn't ring a bell yet, you can find thousands of samples of her work on the internet. Maybe the fonts and colors remind you of something the supreme logo that Instagram filter. It all started with Barbara Kruger. But have you seen Kruger's are in person? She does a lot of installation work these days, that's a fancy way of saying that her work just kind of consumes entire rooms huge rooms giant walls. Big block letters taking up every inch of every flat surface. You can see phrases like belief plus doubt, equal sanity cell phones, whose body whose beliefs her work, isn't prescriptive, est. It's almost an experience it asks you to engage with the.

Jesse thorn Barbara Kruger NPR Kendrick Lamar marvel studios Academy Awards Ciza
"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Back to bullseye. Jesse thorn here with me. Now, Susan orlean she writes for the New Yorker has done for about thirty years, a bunch of other publications as well. Her books include the orchid thief Rin tin, tin and Saturday night. Her newest tells the story of the Los Angeles public library and so much more. It's called the library book hits bookstores this week. The arson investigators event eventually decided that arson had been the cause of the fire. Who was the person who was accused of having started. A young man in his twenties named Harry peak who was, I guess, predictably a wannabe actor, Aaron, boy, you know, did odd jobs, parked cars, that kind of thing was well what what happened was he had told a number of friends that he had started the fire. So very quickly once there was a reward associated with anyone having providing a tip for solving the fire, one of his friends, good to have friends like that came forward end basically connected the fire department to him and they began following them around and ended up interviewing him to figure out whether. His boasts of having sort of the fire were were in fact true because he was a charming liar. He was from every description I had from anybody. He was in a mentally likable guy, charming and just a crazy fibber own would just fifth about stupid things. Not just fifth, you'd say where where have you been say? I was having drinks with share, you know, he just couldn't tell a straight story and his friends would were exasperated by him. And at the same time also said he's a really good guy would give you the shirt off his back. And that was interesting to me. They all use that exact expression. He would give you the shirt off his back. He was beloved and also drove them crazy. So in a way, this is what might be called a true crime narrative, I guess. And I wonder if you felt pressured by the fact that you were telling a crime story too. Have narrative that resolved comfortably to provide an answer to the question. I did. I, first of all, I thought I'm gonna solve this, which is. Utterly vain. I mean the, there's no way that as civilian with no access to the evidence and no knowledge of how to investigate an arson would be able to crack the case..

arson Jesse thorn Susan orlean Los Angeles Harry peak Aaron thirty years
"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"It's bullseye. I'm Jesse thorn. I'm so excited to welcome. Susan orlean back to our show. Susan is a staff writer at the New Yorker. She's also appeared in vogue and Esquire on this American life. She's the author of eight books covering topics like New England Saturday night in America, an orchid fanatics. The last one the orchid thief ended up being the basis of the Academy Award nominated film adaptation. Susan is disarming interviewer a meticulous researcher and a beautiful writer. These days she lives here in Los Angeles where we make our show and being an author and reader, she has visited the beautiful historic central library here. Dozens and dozens of times. Her latest book is about that library and its history and particularly about the devastating fire that almost demolished the library nineteen Eighty-six. The book is also kind of a pay on to libraries everywhere, or they mean to her with us. And why? Every library is a vital institution. The book is called the library book. It's one of my favorites. I've read this year, Susan, orlean. Welcome back to bullseye. Always happy to see you. It's great to be with you, Susan. What is your relationship with libraries personally, other than you're obviously financial relationship. One would hope. Well, I grew up going to the library that was very much a part of my childhood. My parents were great library goers they didn't really believe in buying books. They've, I think they felt like, why would you buy a book? You go to the library and borrow the book and if it's not in you, put your name on a hold list and you get it when it's available and they were born on the depression, and I'm sure that's a lot of it, which is that buying books seemed a bit of an indulgence that wasn't necessary. I grew up going to the library a couple times a week with my mom, and I found it absolutely magical. It was not like going to a bookstore or twice store. It would partly because there was no money, there was no financial relationship. And when your kid, the idea that you can have anything you want is really intoxicating at a library is on a real short list of places that welcome everyone including kids who are hassle right. Well, and I do think that in the last twenty years, we've as a society become more and more conscious kind of call it. The Starbucks affect. We've become conscious of how there's home and there's your workplace, and there's kind of a desire for another place somewhere to go somewhere. To see other humans and just sort of share the space with them. It's, I think it's why people go to co working spaces. I think it's why people go to public parks, even if they've got a backyard. There's something very special about being somewhere around other people in your, not there to interact with them. You're just sharing the space with them. And that's definitely some equality of libraries. I mean, they're, they're closest analogue is probably a public park. You know, there's serve their things to do in a park, and there's, you know, God knows what that the city offers, but sometimes it's just kind of nice to be there and there are other people there. It's also a space that we share with a variety of people. It's not a mediated group of people. It's an chance that you're going to encounter a huge range of people, which for some it's kind of discomfiting. But for. For other people. You could make the argument that it's kind of an opportunity to really see your community you ever for the New Yorker for thirty some years. And you're a New Yorker for a long time. How did your experience of living in Los Angeles compared.

Susan orlean Los Angeles Jesse thorn Academy Award Starbucks staff writer Susan Esquire New England America researcher writer twenty years
"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"You're listening to bullseye. I'm Jesse thorn here with me. Now. Kyle Gass and Jack black of Taneja STI. They made a new animated series entirely hand-drawn and voiced by the band. It's called post-apocalyptic. Oh, the first episode is up now on YouTube, this new web show and album where Jackie you have drawn all of the pictures if the animation is and it is a very today, she's d- plotline. Yeah. Watch. Yeah. Yeah, it was a good. Thank you. Hope you liked it. It feels like you guys saying rather than trying to please everyone slash perhaps even be successful on other storms that like you have gotten to a point in your life where you're just going to do this thing that you love in exactly the way you want to. Well, I mean, when we first started off, we were like, let's just do a a little Anna Matic a little sample. Then we'll shop at around to to you know your net flicks your Amazon, your HBO. Someone will scoop it up and pay for this thing to be animated properly. Do all the hard work and nobody did even though we had made what we thought was a little nugget masterpiece. Like, are you kidding me? Nobody wants the Taneja these series animated series. Okay. You know what, though we love this so far we're just going to go ahead and make it just like this. Anna Matic sort of half baked and we were thinking we're just gonna. Do like six mini ten minute web Soad's we started, but then yeah, but we ended up, but once we finish, we like this is like a movie. This plays as a move in we when we played it for friends and family that Kyle's birthday. And let me tell you. I know they're friends and family. We, we get a nice response, and if felt like some of our best. It did feel very pure though. There was no notes network. No, it was just three of us in a little room like this. When you say the three of us, you mean me you and John spiker. John spiker producer extraordinaire. Yeah. As you say, you don't forget about today stick so. If you so don't for you, but you know, we, we're going to do a different album. We had a plan to do a different concept album, but we looked at each other when it was time to get down to business, and we're like, this is not the album for our time. We actually have to do the post apocalyptic concept rock opera because of these these times demand it. And that's what we did. Oh my God. Are they playing off. Kyle Gass Jack lack Taneja, Steve. Thank you so much for on bulletin shown. Thanks. Thanks for having. Today. She she's d folks. Post-apocalyptic oh, the animated series is available to stream now on YouTube. The soundtrack drops early next month. They're also kicking off a huge tour all over North America. We'll have links today. It's on the bullseye page at maximum fun dot org. Time. Now,.

Kyle Anna Matic Kyle Gass YouTube John spiker Jesse thorn Kyle Gass Jack Jackie Jack black Soad North America HBO Amazon producer Steve ten minute
"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Judge John Hodgman rule that is off. Welcome back to bullseye. Jesse thorn. My guests are Jack black and Kyle Gass of the Banten Asia's d they're back. Got a brand new animated series called post-apocalyptic. Oh, the first episode just premiered on YouTube. I had a friend in college who was a pretty standard nerd, wonderful guy. And one year I'm going to say it was my sophomore year, his junior year. He just appeared with this album that he had written and recorded in his dorm. Nobody knew nobody knew. I mean, I knew he had a guitar. That's what I knew. I knew he had a guitar and it was quite good. And he had just one day decided essentially to be shameless. You know, like that there is this. I, it's very much much easier to not make record a heart. Felt records in your dorm room and and then share it with people like recruit a band and play shows? Yeah, I remember just being awed by that. I, I'm kinda odd by it. I don't even know the guy that's that's a lot to do from zero from scratch. I mean, when I think about my favorite song writers do think of the the raw emotive honest people like, you know, you're Elliott Smith's your your Nick Drake's. These of the songwriters that that really pull at my soul at my heart strength. I think once in a while, I mean like the ballot of all even might be funny, but we do kind of go deep, we go real, we go back. We go down to the source of of who we are. But yeah, there's always a bit of of of comedy wink. It makes it just okay. We need it. We can't. Yeah, I, I've made peace with that. I, I don't mind at all. I love that the road we've chosen. Fun wrote. In fact, even in my side projects, they all they end up being kind of funny ish. It's just seems like why will because there's also a great tradition of of rockers that have a good sense of humor like, you know, diamond, Dave dudes just funny though song ACDC early, especially. Yeah. Well, I mean, one of the things that Taneja she's music is kind of in dialogue with is the ridiculousness of big rock music. And one of the things that is. Great about Taneja St. is that it is never been mockery of the ridiculousness of rock of big rock music, but celebration of the ridiculousness of big rock music. I think you've, I think you've used stumbled on a very important concept. Yeah, I think you can't really not like your subject. Well, yeah, then it becomes something else. Yeah, then you really, I, I don't know that minute becomes parody. There you go. But yeah, we celebrate. We do make fun of of Satan, though Satan in music is just absurd, ridiculous and hilarious. And we've had a lot of fun with that over the years. But there is also something great about Satan. He's powerful. Jack, we were talking about your aspirations to performance when you were a kid, and I do have a clip of you in a television commercial. It is. This is a commercial for pitfall Atari twenty six. Harry starring Jack black was before we ever met. Last night. Pitfall, Harry by giant scorpion man-eating crocodiles, just.

Jack black Jesse thorn John Hodgman YouTube Harry Kyle Gass Banten Asia Elliott Smith Nick Drake Dave one year one day
"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"It's bull's eye. Jesse thorn next up on the show. Paul Reiser he's a legendary stand up comic alongside Helen hunt. He start on the hit sitcom mad about you, which he also created. He's been acting a lot lately. He's on Amazon's red oaks on stranger things. He was in whiplash. He's also the creator of a really interesting TV series called. There's Johnny when we talked last year. It had just premiered on Hulu. The show takes place in the early seventies and it centers around a fictionalized version of Johnny Carson and the tonight show it follows. Andy played by Ian Nelson as he pines for and eventually gets a job on the show and this clip from the pilot. Andy decides to write a letter to Johnny Carson asking for an autograph photo for his parents. And while he's at it for job, Andy gets the autographed photo. And a letter he thinks is an invitation to come work on the show. So just like anybody else would he packs his bags hops on the bus and goes from nebr-. Ska to LA and tonight show please. You want to save the tonight show. Yes, sir. I have this letter here. You know what? Time it is short. It's it's five to eleven. Right. Right? It's eleven o'clock at night. Yes. Well, I know this sure isn't starts to eleven thirty, but I figured I'd get here. While you're yanking, my chain. The show starts at eleven thirty on television, right? They don't make it at eleven thirty. They make it at five thirty. So there's nobody here, but me and you and maybe a raccoon. Full rights are welcome to the polls. I am happy to have you on the show. Thank you. You appeared on the tonight show in the p- in polyester suit. At least it looked like your first time around hurting me. Hurt me with the fashion. We should Apollo. Yes, they might have been some polyester involved. Yes, I was once in a while, somebody will post that come across that clip in and I cringe because it's I look like I'm seven years old and my style is so not only is it so long ago that my style has changed. But on that night, it's the biggest thing in the world for a young comic to get on tonight show. And I think I was so deliberately slowing myself down to not race that I'm almost like running like I'm stuck in maple syrup. It was so slow. Man, I was either in some alternate universe or I was wildly overcompensating. But yeah, I like to think we're funnier. Now, let's take a listen. No, no, really why I was visiting my parents recently. Do you know my folks? No, my father, this is absolutely true of my father is he has a new hobby. Now he's got a winter hobby that he enjoys. It's called walking around the house and shutting off the heat for no reason. The man shots off it's freezing, but see, he really believed that if he cuts down his oil bills than starting tomorrow, America's gonna stop importing from the Middle East. It's a great sentiment. It's a nice responsibility. I just I don't know if one person is going to turn around the economy. You know, I don't think the prince of Saudi Arabia's up in his office going well. I don't believe this. It's that same guy in New Jersey. This is unbelievable. Well, I feel like for an entire generation or actually multiple generations of comics. Johnny Carson was like, withholding comedy. Dad, like there's as he has this quality, the very rare quality for a broadcaster of being both being both withholding and warm at the same time. I never found him withholding I, it's funny, I, I did it a lot..

Johnny Carson Paul Reiser Andy Jesse thorn Saudi Arabia LA New Jersey Helen hunt Hulu Amazon Middle East Ian Nelson America seven years
"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"It's probably just her and he was very funny comic named Livia hater and there's just something nice about being grown up enough to step back and realize their answers other than rage, like their answers other than bitchiness. Their answers have been tearing things down, like take a moment brief and think if there is an honest or or good reason for this, how comfortable do you feel now in your life being person that. Recognizes their scar tissue and moves on her what you're just said. I get kind of scared of being happy. We're like, fine. I get scared that my I will lose my age and I will no longer be a magical dazzling creature. And it's hard as time goes on to accept your specificity Lanc when you're fifteen, you're like, I could be anything. But as time goes on, you realize like I've made choices, you know, and they're really good parts that go along with it. And there are bad parts that go along with that. I've never really been in a stable romantic relationship, and I could just get mad at myself for that. Or I could understand that I lived in a world where that wasn't a possibility until I was an adult. And that has affected me. We can't pretend like it hasn't affected me and there are there magical things about it, and there are lots of other kinds of happiness that I have gotten to experience. I want to keep learning. I want to keep growing. I went to love as many people around me as I. Can, but also like. Your life happen. You know your your life happened in all of those specificities go along with it and you have to play the hand that you're dealt guy, Brandon. Thank you so much for coming on bullseye. It was great to get to talk to you. Thank you for having Jesse always pleasure. Guy, Brandon from last year, a brilliant charming person. One of the most brilliant and most charming I've ever had the pleasure of knowing his new book reflects that it's called my life as a goddess, a memoir through unpopular culture. Go check it out. He also hosts bullseye, sister show pop rocket, which is a weekly conversation about pop culture and all the things we love to love their in. Give that a try wherever you listen to podcasts. It's bullseye. I'm Jesse thorn. It's time now for canon ball..

Jesse thorn Brandon Livia canon
"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"It's bullseye. Jesse thorn. My first guest is w Kamau bell now Kamau and I go way back like close to twenty years when I was still doing this show at UC Santa Cruz. Kamau was a young up and coming comic in the bay area. He actually wants co hosted the show with me. I mean, for real way back anyway. He's gone from hosting at the punchline in downtown San Francisco to having specials and comedy albums, and touring bunch in two thousand twelve. He got his own TV show totally biased with w. Kamau bell on FX and FX axe totally biased was kind of a talk show, kind of political satirical show too. But unlike say the daily show Kamau wasn't really inclined to get out in front of the audience and give the man what for from his perspective. He actually let other people on staff do that come out just kind of asked questions. Funny ones, serious ones, ba- MU. Used ones, and that was what made the show really special today. He hosts another show, it's called United shades of America. It airs on CNN. It's a great show. It's actually up for an EMMY this year in the unstructured reality programming category last year he won it. And I like to think that that is because come out is such a wonderful host. United States is basically a show about asking questions about warmly engaging with everything that the United States is in the same way that a guy like Anthony bourdain would travel cross continents to elevate and explore the traditions of some remote cultural group. Kamau does the same thing right here in the US. He covers issues and people in our country who I guess you can say, aren't used to getting a lot of nuance, news, coverage, folks like six or Appalachian coal miner families, or in this clip inmates at San Quentin prison in northern Cal. What would you say is the biggest surpri would think they were surprised people on the outside about being in Saint Clinton? The name itself is not the characters that produces they actually produce positive people now, yes, some people come in and couldn't read right spill. Now you walk around their seniors now. You don't have cell phones. You need somebody to be walking around to be the. Oh, yeah. Ain't no doubt. I need somebody who's who's nicknames, Wikipedia. Sticking information keeps you aware. You know, they make us think that will steal plot of some out of gas humanity because other than that, we just be numbers on the numbers on the numbers. On the boy, what you're sentenced on? Seven. How long you've been here? A my fortieth year seven to life and you own your forty years. What if you. Wow, Saint they sit everyone I get. Now. Come out and welcome back to bullseye. It's nice to talk to you again. I'm glad to be here. It's been a while. Thanks for having me back on you. Well, I mean, you're pretty much emeritus at this point. Super-senior the time fifteen years ago when you drove to Santa Cruz to co, host the show with me, you pretty much earned a lifetime pass. Well, you know, and I could see even back then I was like, this guy's got something going on. So I'm gonna. I'm gonna invest in this young man and. Come out. I question for you. You are one of the biggest dudes. I know. I don't think you're quite as big as comedian Steve Agee. But besides that, I'm not that tall my way the same minimum at that doll. I think you're the second biggest dude. I know you're like what you're like. Six, four, six, five, something like that. I'm six, four in the flesh since six, six with the afro, but I'm six. Four. If you measure into the afro. And I'm about like as I say, you know, you know, I say to fifty and I realized that was before I had kids. So, yeah. I'm I'm basically Charles Barkley size when he was in his prime, not at the end, but in his prime and your broad-shouldered you're not, you're not a dad bod'ed..

Kamau bell United States w Kamau bell Santa Cruz Jesse thorn San Francisco EMMY Charles Barkley CNN Steve Agee Anthony bourdain Saint Clinton San Quentin America Wikipedia fifteen years twenty years forty years
"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"It's, I'm Jesse thorn my guests. Debra Granik wrote and directed the acclaimed two thousand ten film winter's bone after eight years. She's just finished her follow up. It's called leave. No trace. It's in theaters. Now. Ben foster who's one of the stars of the film gave a quote, and I'm paraphrasing in an interview, the heated about the movie. He said, he said that being on site with you was very intense because he had never worked with anyone who cared so much about every choice that they were making as director. And I believe he said that. And I don't think he was joking when he said, I'm laughing because it's intense, but I think he said like that each choice felt like someone's life was on the line might goodness. Do you feel that way when you're on sand. Well, the choices have to be performed very quickly. So when you don't have when you don't feel like you've had time to contemplate selling fully, you know, you feel like there's almost more risk associated with that. You're not thinking it through completely, but you have to decide right now and. You could feel regret, but you nonetheless, you've got to decide right now. And so I think possibly in the mix of what he's just what he said is that notion that you have to. Must take a deep breath kosher is and say, like, okay, I'm taking this gamble, you know. And of course, thank goodness. No one's life is really on the line. But the fact is, I think deciding. All day long in rapid succession of decisions, constructive feel like the starkness am? I am. I on the right track. Have I made the right decisions? And I think maybe what he's reading in me is that uncertainty that feels like Yikes. Yikes could be wasting a whole lot of peoples times if I'm making a whole set of decisions that don't pan out and don't yield something. I've just squandered a huge amount of people's time and energy, and they're putting a lot into this. I've got to do right by them, you know. So frequently director feels extremely responsible for coming through with something given that so many people are contributing to the to the process in the effort. I feel like a lot of people have an idea of what director does that is. Or maybe how a director is that might be fundamentally misogynist. And I probably include myself in that, like when I think of a director, not only do I probably think of a man, but I also think of somebody who has a way of being in the world that culturally I would associate with men, which is to say, like bossing people around, especially..

Ben foster director Debra Granik Jesse thorn eight years
"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"To won't you be my neighbor is an honest portrait of one of the kindest most sincere people to have ever lived he talked with jesse thorn about the movie and how fred rogers lessons can make us better people today but before we get into that let's take a listen to a little bit from the movie in this clip we'll hear from margie whitmer who served as producer for mister rogers neighborhood she worked on more than two hundred and fifty episodes between nineteen eighty two in two thousand one we had a directed at once said to me you take all of the elements that make good television and do the exact opposite you have mister rogers neighborhood low production values simple set unlikely star yet it worked because he was saying something really important love is the root of every all learning all parenting all relationships love or the lack of what we see an ear on the screen is part of a week become morgan neville welcome to both sites great heavy on the show thanks for having me he made a lot of documentaries about rock and roll guys for a guy making a documentary about mister rogers kind of rock and roll though really yes how's that he had such it's funny as they by mr rogers such swagger it's amazing that he was so consistently who he was in every situation he was ever in and he had this attitude that he was going to try and change the world you know and it was radical in that way radical in the way that he was trying to get to the root of the thing back to the basics of things and i think that's how i thought of them you know that he was he was a rockstar it's almost scary to me the extent to which he appears to have been the man in his life who appeared to be on television i think maybe just because it makes me question the way that i the choices that i make in the world well it's funny i mean i think something that i'd say the majority of people expect is to be disappointed that i had many people when i told him i was making this film say to me please don't destroy my childhood basically please don't tell me there's something that's gonna make mr rogers fall from the alter like everybody else's phone from the altar and you know i didn't go into it with an agenda one way or the other but and it wasn't about that in the first place but you know the big secret about mister rogers is he's one of these rare characters who actually is not only as good as his television character but actually is more impressive than his television character but i think it says a lot about us that we have come to view people like that with suspicion because how could somebody be that good you know there must be some other shoe to drop on that and that in a way is kind of a lot of what the film's about which is how do we think about goodness you didn't call goodness him called kindness i think roger's would grace but those are the kinds of things that people kind of laugh at you know like being kind as like believing in rainbows and unicorns you know it's not it feels naive and quaint in a way and i feel like that is not how we should think about those things i feel like fred was a warrior for kind you you know know as he says in the film not pollyannaish stuff you know but honest to goodness pines that that's something that you have to fight for because we all take for granted that we're going to live in the neighborhood together and we can trade against that in how we behave every day but i don't think we should get on it there's a moment in the film a bit of archival footage of him being interviewed where he says you may think that.

jesse thorn
"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"It's bullseye jesse thorn next up chris stella alonso she's a veteran stand up comic and actress you might have seen her on her abc sitcom chris stella she was the creator the star and she also wrote and produced it alonso was actually the first latina ever to do all those things on one tv show she was born in a small town in south texas her mom was an immigrant whose visa expired krystelle remember having to hide her from the cops coming home every day wondering if her mom might have gotten picked up in the latest workplace rate christina was also really really poor growing up and that's something she talks about a lot in her comedy when we talked last year it was just after she dropped her netflix special lower classy it's a very funny owed to that time in her life she talks about poverty about immigration depression all with a warm smile and infectious laugh in fact i don't think you could find a warm or more infectious comedy performance than crystal in this clip from lower classy she's talking about how she never really thought about poverty and stuff as a kid until it came to her favorite band new kids on the block let's listen that was in fourth grade i realized i was poor because that was a really big fan of new kids on the block loved them right i couldn't afford to see them in concert right so i had this fantasy when i was a kid you know that i was going to meet them and they were gonna fall in love with me right no joke guys this was the fantasy fourth grade i was gonna be the made on their tour bus and i was going to clean things so good that they were gonna fall in love with me like in my head i thought they were going to get on the tour bus and they were going to be like oh my god who made that bed right there you know know what what i mean and then i would say i made that bed and they would be like we love you now and i'm like that was it that was in fourth grade crystal welcomed the bulls eye it's great having on the show it's good to be here thank you for having me that is maybe the single saddest stand up comedy i've ever watched anyone performing my entire life and i've seen a lot of stand up comedy thank you i told my wife the setup for that bit last night and she nearly started crying having had it related to her well you know yeah i know i know but that's kind of kind of like a that's what makes stand of cool is when you can actually make jokes about something that sad because everything can be funny if you have the right angle perspective to it you know but yeah i totally get it is this is this like something that you discovered along the way that you could actually just write jokes about the literal satis parts of your entire life yes it was actually one of those things where my life overall has been pretty sad.

jesse thorn chris stella alonso
"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from google cloud during march madness the nc double a is using google cloud to turn data into insights and so can your business see how at g dot co slash march madness google cloud the official cloud of the nc double a with jesse thorn is a production of maximum fund dot org and is distributed by npr it's bullseye i'm jesse thorn actually required to say that so now that that has been said let's get down to brass tacks i've got a message for you from the one and only andrew w k be nice be honest party and don't hate on mr rogers those who would scoff at mr rogers or scoff at me perhaps more rightfully so all they're doing and i relate to this because i've done it too is distancing themselves from feeling because feeling is very intense and feeling that you're not in control of is even more intense takes a lot of courage to let your heart be open enough to be moved especially against your will so people keep things at bay people keep experiences at a distance especially if the person seems very intense all i'm trying to do is encourage people to trust me enough to let me move them to let this party power move them it's bullseye.

jesse thorn mr rogers google official npr andrew w
"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Support for this npr podcast and the following message come from trans union your credit health is so much more than a score that's why they help you stay on top of it protected and understand it get your report and more at trans union dot com slash npr well as i with jesse thorn is a production of maximum fund dot org and is distributed by npr it's bullseye jesse thorn laurie come martin is a stand up comedian she writes on conan she was on the road when she got the call that her dad was really really sick things weren't looking good she got on a plane to took time off of work she did everything that adult children are supposed to do in those situations but even as his health got worse she started to realize sometimes even when you're staring death right in the eye funny stuff can happen i have we have this one piece of hospice video where my sister is sitting with my sister and i are sitting my dad and she asked my dad you know what what do you want your grandchildren to know you know and my dad was sort of a you know i look at that video i'm like did he just realize then that he's dying it was very it was very awkward and yet we wanted to hear what he had to say and then he was about to talk and it was hard for him to talk and then my mom just burst into the frame and starts picking up like a candy wrapper that's on the ground in front of my dad on the carpet and she just ruins it bullseye.

jesse thorn martin npr
"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"I am of your eisenberg join me on empires asked me another as we challenge contestants and celebrities to nerdy word games music parities and punter full trivia find his every week on the npr one app and wherever you listen to podcasts it's bowls are i'm jesse thorn my guest is kim deal the lead singer for the breeders in one of the founding members of the pixies the new breeders record all nerve their first in a decade drops march ii were you surprised him when your project started on a touring break from the pixies the breeders became a smash hit banned i mean in a way that the pixies even had never been as much as they were you were a successful working banned when i was thirteen i watched you on mtv in o was that surprising to you at the time um i think the surprising i don't know if that's the word as much as it is unintended i mean the break from the pixies thin was it was kind of you tell the like there were there were probably we're going to get back together that's what i was thinking any way and then it does go slowly like the the song the got on the radio canon ball in i'm using my brothers harmonica microphone cassettes like at the full gruber missed gina loggins in messina in there he and of course my brother has more monica mike firm of course as a sister you one plug it into the marshall you wanna start going truck clock or toot air disaster fund that's what you do to your brothers harmonica microphone so i mean and starting out with the with the feedback in the squeals and stuff you know but certainly not thing that one thinks okay now we got the top of this song ready for a smash radio hit you know or something so it is and it was certainly unintended that i mean i really liked it why i mean nobody thinks it's going to be on the radio or anything.

npr pixies mtv gina loggins jesse thorn kim
"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Them for those who went the full cleared away that your deeds give hope and comfort women the that your deeds give hope and comfort the living it's balls i i'm jesse thorn next up the go team formed in the year two thousand in brighton england the band is basically the brainchild of a guy named in partner he recorded most of the band's first record by himself in his parent's kitchen it's called thunder lightning strike can you'll find our theme song on it a classic go team track has a lot of influence his hip hop marching band music noise rock sixty soul but what makes the band worth listening to isn't that it's some kitchen sink mix of genres every go team track has a unique voice it is almost open dhanra unto itself it's complex lou rough around the edges cookie sample based but still live sounding and maybe the most important ingredient is the people who contribute to the band the other voices that and brings in musicians from dozens of crowns and genres one of his longest running collaborators is the mc ninja she song and wrapped on every go team record including a latest semicircle which drops this week and she fronts the band live in concert let's you're a track from the record uh oh oh oh mm mm.

jesse thorn partner lou
"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"You're listening to bulls i i'm jesse thorn we'll get back to my interview with paul reiser in a second but first another new culture show here at maximum fun it's called switchblade sisters it's hosted by april wolf she's the chief film critic at la weekly a really brilliant critic every week she talked to a different female filmmaker about their favorite genre movie we're talking about har scifi fantasy action exploitation she tells me there's something called bizarro everything in between the first episode is a past bullseyes gassed emily gordon who cowrote the big sick common it was in theaters recently she talks about the horror western bone tomahawk if you like bulls eye you'll really dig switchblade sisters the first episodes out now go subscribe open up your favorite podcast app search for switchblade sisters you're listening to bulls i i'm jesse thorn my guest is paul reiser he created the brand new comedy show there's johnny which premieres this week on hulu you know it to have an extraordinarily successful networks that come what you did you were both the starve it amoco creator um you make an nearly infinite amount of money and so your then freed of the thing that drives a lot of us in our work which is a continuing terror that of penury in other words yeah yeah we're gonna be broker something right and so did you then come to a part in your life where you had to decide like wait now i have to decide what i want to do uh well it's for that was the gist of of my my shortlived show a paul reiser so uh i had a really big hit show and i made you know a very comfortable amount of money that i don't have to worry about that and and the log line that i said accidentally which became the pitch was when you've when you realise you've gotten everything you've ever wanted in life and you're not dead yet thing.

paul reiser emily gordon johnny hulu jesse thorn la