3 Burst results for "Thomson Newt"

"thomson newt" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"thomson newt" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"It was January thirty first nineteen sixty nine hundred sixty eight the opening day of the Ted offensive. So the shit storm of the Vietnam war. That's what changed everything. It changed. Politics changed the thinking in more than anything to change the mind of the noted news, anchor, Walter Cronkite. Yeah. So it was a shit storm in Thomson Newt? Airbase was under attack small arms fire. Everybody was all the soldiers around the berm facing outward. Helicopters gunships flying over smoke billowing from Saigon, and it was. I was just dazed. And that's the first place when I went on a second aircraft, a helicopter Huey to go up to a place called Ben wa. I was told get outta those khakis. You look like target Lieutenant and we we quickly flew over a little berm and then you could see Saigon it was under attacked the Viet Cong had penetrated the American embassy. The large force came in and took over the Newport bridge and many Americans died there. They had fighting at the racetrack. The Chinese section called show lawn in the cemeteries, and. The city was not secure. It may be around the embassy where they finally beat back that Viet Cong offensive. But the city was still somewhat occupied, and and men were men were dying Americans. So yeah, that was my introduction. So let's talk about the part of your story that interests me the most because you know, we've, we've heard stories from people about the nam and the logistics of this and that. But I, I would like to know emotionally, what's the arc. That somebody goes through from, I might get drafted to, I'm drafted, or in your case you enlisted so he could choose which branch to go into. To landing to your assignment to some of the things you encountered to transitioning back home. I would love to know the the inner life. What you're thinking about yourself, what you're thinking about the world, you're placing it, the war, our government, all those kinds of things. Right. Very good question. And for me. I didn't want to go in to the army. I didn't want to go to Vietnam. What I wanted to do was do what I loved, which was painting drawing. So I applied to the school of the Art Institute in Chicago, fantastic school. That's what I wanted to do. For some reason. They didn't want me and I received a rejection letter. Now, I had the chutzpah to take my letter. I got on the l. train and went down and I went into the school and I asked to the s the secretary can I speak to the guy who signed my rejection letter and after an hour and a half, he saw me, you know? So I asked him, I said, can you reconsider this? And he kind of stumbled and said, no. And then I said, well, why did you? Why did you reject me? Wasn't my academic performance in high school or was it my art portfolio? And he said both and stormed out. The secretary was standing at the door and she said, Mr. Duffy's time to go. So at any rate, what happened was I got home and shortly thereafter I received a draft notice. I still didn't want to go into the military, but with the draft notice I knew. From talking to my friends down in LVN beach in Chicago in up in Rogers park that the draft notice Mentz they could pick you for the marines for the navy for the army, possibly the air force, but mainly the marines. I didn't want that and they would assign you wherever they wanna. Do a sound you within that branch? Exactly. And what your what your job was. So I was pretty good in mathematics, and I took some tests and I said, why'd like to be a road surveyor? And he said, we can do that for you. So I did enlist in who served the draft where it would have been potluck, went into the military and was sent to fort Polk Louisiana. For the initial training and then sent to fort sill for the survey trainy. Hold that thought, we'll come. We'll come back to that, but tell the story about bringing your draft card in to that room. Well, the draft board in our neighborhood was up a long flight of stairs. Let me describe this neighborhood in Chicago..

Chicago Saigon American embassy secretary Walter Cronkite army fort sill Vietnam Ted Thomson Newt fort Polk Louisiana Huey Newport bridge Art Institute Mr. Duffy Mentz navy Rogers park
"thomson newt" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"thomson newt" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"It was January thirty first nineteen sixty nine hundred sixty eight the opening day of the Ted offensive. So the shit storm of the Vietnam war. That's what changed everything. It changed. Politics changed the thinking in more than anything to change the mind of the noted news, anchor, Walter Cronkite. Yeah. So it was a shit storm in Thomson Newt? Airbase was under attack small arms fire. Everybody was all the soldiers around the berm facing outward. Helicopters gunships flying over smoke billowing from Saigon, and it was. I was just dazed. And that's the first place when I went on a second aircraft, a helicopter Huey to go up to a place called Ben wa. I was told get outta those khakis. You look like target Lieutenant and we we quickly flew over a little berm and then you could see Saigon it was under attacked the Viet Cong had penetrated the American embassy. The large force came in and took over the Newport bridge and many Americans died there. They had fighting at the racetrack. The Chinese section called show lawn in the cemeteries, and. The city was not secure. It may be around the embassy where they finally beat back that Viet Cong offensive. But the city was still somewhat occupied, and and men were men were dying Americans. So yeah, that was my introduction. So let's talk about the part of your story that interests me the most because you know, we've, we've heard stories from people about the nam and the logistics of this and that. But I, I would like to know emotionally, what's the arc. That somebody goes through from, I might get drafted to, I'm drafted, or in your case you enlisted so he could choose which branch to go into. To landing to your assignment to some of the things you encountered to transitioning back home. I would love to know the the inner life. What you're thinking about yourself, what you're thinking about the world, you're placing it, the war, our government, all those kinds of things. Right. Very good question. And for me. I didn't want to go in to the army. I didn't want to go to Vietnam. What I wanted to do was do what I loved, which was painting drawing. So I applied to the school of the Art Institute in Chicago, fantastic school. That's what I wanted to do. For some reason. They didn't want me and I received a rejection letter. Now, I had the chutzpah to take my letter. I got on the l. train and went down and I went into the school and I asked to the s the secretary can I speak to the guy who signed my rejection letter and after an hour and a half, he saw me, you know? So I asked him, I said, can you reconsider this? And he kind of stumbled and said, no. And then I said, well, why did you? Why did you reject me? Wasn't my academic performance in high school or was it my art portfolio? And he said both and stormed out. The secretary was standing at the door and she said, Mr. Duffy's time to go. So at any rate, what happened was I got home and shortly thereafter I received a draft notice. I still didn't want to go into the military, but with the draft notice I knew. From talking to my friends down in LVN beach in Chicago in up in Rogers park that the draft notice Mentz they could pick you for the marines for the navy for the army, possibly the air force, but mainly the marines. I didn't want that and they would assign you wherever they wanna. Do a sound you within that branch? Exactly. And what your what your job was. So I was pretty good in mathematics, and I took some tests and I said, why'd like to be a road surveyor? And he said, we can do that for you. So I did enlist in who served the draft where it would have been potluck, went into the military and was sent to fort Polk Louisiana. For the initial training and then sent to fort sill for the survey trainy. Hold that thought, we'll come. We'll come back to that, but tell the story about bringing your draft card in to that room. Well, the draft board in our neighborhood was up a long flight of stairs. Let me describe this neighborhood in Chicago..

Chicago Saigon American embassy secretary Walter Cronkite army fort sill Vietnam Ted Thomson Newt fort Polk Louisiana Huey Newport bridge Art Institute Mr. Duffy Mentz navy Rogers park
"thomson newt" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

07:34 min | 2 years ago

"thomson newt" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Every Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts or wherever you listen about. Our next evacuation operation baby lift which was carried out by the United States at the end of the Vietnam war. So the history of the United States involvement in Vietnam is long and complicated. I initially tried to explain it and it was taking the length of an entire podcast. So to be extremely brief, the United States supported the Republic of Vietnam, also known as South Vietnam against the Democratic Republic Vietnam or North Vietnam, which was communist. It's obviously a more gigantic story than that, but that's the basic for the purposes of setting this up. Those are the broad strokes. The United States direct military involvement in this war started in nineteen sixty five under the administration of Lyndon Johnson, and this involvement was incredibly controversial and visit by nineteen sixty nine. The Nixon administration had implemented a policy known as Vietnam is Asian to try to end American involvement in the war. In theory, this policy transferred military responsibility from the US to South Vietnam. While this did lead to the US pulling the last troops out of nineteen Seventy-three. It did not allow South Vietnam to successfully defend itself by the spring of nineteen seventy five North Vietnam was headed toward victory with the city of Saigon about to fall. By this point, the United States had been evacuating United States citizens and not essential personnel from more remote areas to the relative safety of Saigon for months aircraft from World Airways or being used. For this purpose and World Airways, president at Daley, also had a daughter, Charlotte who was working with charities in the United States to try to find adoptive homes for Vietnamese children. She asked her father to try to help find a way to get these children to the United States. Daily used his connections with the government to try to get authorisation to do so. But things were not happening quickly enough for his satisfaction. So on April second nineteen, seventy five, a World Airways, DC. Eight cargo plane took off from Saigon on board were fifty three, Vietnamese children and twenty two adult attendance. The flight had no passenger seats. No flight plan. No formal clearance and no sanction by the US government or by the government of South Vietnam airfield staff cut the runway lights and unsuccessfully ordered the plane to stop its takeoff, but it alternately made it to its final destination of Oakland international airport. The next day. As word of all of this spread president, Gerald, Ford authorized at announced operation, baby lift. This would be a mass effort to rescue as many South Vietnamese orphans as possible and bring them to the United States where they would be placed with adoptive families. This also became part of a larger effort to transport South Vietnamese refugees out of the country and that greater efforts would start on April seventeenth of nineteen seventy five. And the words of Henry Kissinger, quote, twenty years of hope, frustration and discord over Vietnam had now been reduced to a single objective to save a maximum number of potential Vietnamese victims from the consequences of America's abandonment. The first official flight in operation baby lift took off on April fourth nineteen, seventy five and ended in tragedy. The plane was immensely crowded with children in both the passenger and cargo areas of the plane in the passenger area. Toddlers and young children were strapped into. His seat in the cargo area. Babies were on blankets and secured to the floor in groups. A crew of nurses and volunteers are on board to look after them in flight. But shortly after takeoff from Thomson Newt, airbase the rear cargo doors blew out because of a maintenance problem. This destroyed the rear of the aircraft and it caused a rapid loss of pressure inside of the aircraft, the pilot. He was captain Dennis trainer known as bud turned around to try to make an emergency landing back at the airbase. But the plane crashed a couple of miles short of the runway seventy eight children and about fifty adults died in this crash. Most of the more than one hundred seventy survivors had been in the passenger compartment while many in the cargo area were killed. The program continued after the crash of that first flight though, and in the end more than two thousand children were evacuated from South Vietnam to the United States and a few other countries around the end of the war. A lot of Maine. Stream coverage of operation. Baby lift in the United States has framed it in a positive humanitarian way, but it continues to be surrounded by controversy. There's some debate about how many of these children were really orphans. It's certain that some of them had living parents who either didn't have the means to take care of them because the war or who thought they would be better off outside of Vietnam. There have also been allegations that American personnel took some children off the streets of Saigon without really knowing what their family situation was. And some of the children had been fathered by American military personnel who were stationed in Vietnam. Outside of the context of this evacuation transracial adoption has its own controversies and its own complexities. Some of which, frankly, are way outside of our lane. Some Vietnamese children were adopted into white families who didn't necessarily know any other Vietnamese people or know anything about Vietnamese culture. Sometimes the adoptive families seemed motivated by a desire to sort of demonstrate how generous and patriotic they were by adopting one of these Vietnamese children and as the children of operation baby lift have grown into adulthood. A lot of them has tried to figure out who their families were in Beit nam and tried to reconnect with their Vietnamese heritage. On top of all of this operation, baby lift was very political. The United States involvement in the Vietnam war was incredibly contentious. And as we said, divisive and US actions during the war had directly contributed to what was happening in South Vietnam at the end of the war. So operation baby lift was simultaneously a genuinely humanitarian effort, a paternalistic attempt to save South Vietnam and an attempt to restore some goodwill and create good PR for the United States, the president himself even greeted a plane full of orphans in San Francisco on April. Fifth, we're. His picture was taken holding babies from the plane down. There was just a lot of very positive attempts to spend this as look at how we are rescue ING, our allies in South Vietnam, just sort of leaving off the part of having largely made the problem in the first place. Also, this controversy is not new. This is not something people have just started talking about in the last five years. Number of lawsuits were filed in the wake of operation baby lift. Soon after it happened, these included a class action lawsuit, contending that it was unconstitutional and in violation of international treaties there also a lawsuit

United States South Vietnam Vietnam Saigon Democratic Republic Vietnam Republic of Vietnam North Vietnam South Vietnam airfield president World Airways Nixon administration apple Lyndon Johnson Henry Kissinger Maine Oakland international airport DC Thomson Newt Ford