4 Burst results for "Thompson Zillow"

"thompson zillow" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"thompson zillow" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"<SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> a little bit of a slump in <Speech_Music_Male> crude oil prices <Speech_Male> today after yesterday's <Speech_Male> spike with that possible <Speech_Male> hurricane brewing <Speech_Male> down in the Gulf of Mexico <Speech_Male> OPEC. <Speech_Male> It seems <Speech_Male> believes there is going to <Speech_Male> be a slump in demand <Speech_Male> for its signature <Speech_Male> product <Speech_Male> we though are going to talk <Speech_Male> natural gas <Speech_Male> on this program today <Speech_Male> because the fracking <Speech_Male> boom has delivered among <Speech_Male> other things <Speech_Male> a whole lot of <Speech_Male> what's called shale <Speech_Male> gas us in <Speech_Male> this country useful in place <Speech_Male> of coal to generate <Speech_Male> electricity <Speech_Male> but that does not <Speech_Male> mean the drilling companies <Speech_Male> are necessarily <Speech_Male> making money <Speech_Male> because as marketplace's <Speech_Male> got song reports <Speech_Male> natural gas companies <Speech_Male> are struggling. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> You can <Speech_Male> have too much <Speech_Male> of a good thing in drilling <Speech_Male> and fracking racking <Speech_Male> American companies <Speech_Male> have mastered that technology <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> to many jumped in <Speech_Male> says Thompson Zillow <Speech_Male> of the Institute <Speech_Male> for Energy Economics <Speech_Male> and Financial <Speech_Male> Analysis <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> fracking <Speech_Male> has enabled <Speech_Male> businesses to <Speech_Male> produce more <Speech_Male> and more and more natural <Speech_Male> gas ass <Speech_Male> to the point <Speech_Male> where there is <Speech_Male> a <hes> saturation <Speech_Male> of the market <Speech_Male> depress <Speech_Male> prices. <Speech_Male> You <SpeakerChange> might think low <Speech_Male> prices would get <Speech_Male> released to take their feet <Speech_Male> off the well <Speech_Male> the gas but <Speech_Male> no some <Speech_Male> had already locked <Speech_Male> in higher selling prices <Speech_Male> with buyers liars <Speech_Male> and some executives <Speech_Male> get paid based on <Speech_Male> how much they drill <Speech_Male> says Charles Sleeps <Speech_Male> at stone pier <Speech_Male> capital advisors <Speech_Male> executives <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> will manage <Speech_Male> their activities <Speech_Male> directly <Speech_Male> related <Speech_Male> to what their compensation <Speech_Male> incentives are. <Speech_Male> I don't care <Speech_Male> any other <Speech_Male> factors. They will always <Speech_Male> do <SpeakerChange> that. Over <Speech_Male> drilling has brought <Speech_Male> overspending <Speech_Male> on laborers <Advertisement> supplies <Speech_Male> machines <Speech_Male> nine out <Speech_Male> of ten. Shell companies <Speech_Male> in the U._S. spend more <Speech_Male> than they earn <Speech_Male> according to <Speech_Male> Luke cache of Rostat <Speech_Male> energy so <Speech_Male> she says <Speech_Male> they borrow oh <SpeakerChange> I <Speech_Male> would say the whole industry <Speech_Female> is highly <Speech_Female> indebted because <Speech_Female> <hes> <Speech_Female> shale is a very <Speech_Female> young industry <Speech_Female> really requires a lot <Speech_Female> of capital in the <Speech_Female> initial stages <Speech_Female> initial years <Speech_Female> of development. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> There has been a cry for <Speech_Male> natural gas producers <Speech_Male> to sober up <Speech_Male> in slowed down from <Speech_Male> unhappy investors <Speech_Male> not making money <Speech_Male> at key <Speech_Male> bank capital markets <Speech_Male> endlessly. Oh mary-anne <Speech_Male> says some <Speech_Male> are getting <SpeakerChange> out <Speech_Male> energy. Equity Investments <Speech_Male> have been very <Speech_Male> week. <Speech_Male> There's been a <Speech_Male> handful of companies <Speech_Male> where there's been <Speech_Male> some level <Speech_Male> of activism. <Speech_Male> We've <Speech_Male> seen more <Speech_Male> shareholder speak <Speech_Male> out. <SpeakerChange> He says natural <Speech_Male> gas companies are starting <Speech_Male> to get the message <Speech_Male> and trying <Speech_Male> to as one <Speech_Male> analyst put

"thompson zillow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:52 min | 2 years ago

"thompson zillow" Discussed on KCRW

"This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. And I'm Newell king in Washington DC to new suspicious packages have been found this morning. A law enforcement official says one was addressed a former vice president Joe Biden, it was found in Newcastle county, Delaware and police in New York City are investigating a package that was addressed the actor Robert deniro who is a prominent critic of President Trump. Now, this is all coming after seven apparent pipebombs were sent to top Democrats all known political opponents of President Trump yesterday. NPR's Justice reporter and White House. Correspondent tamra Keith are here with the latest. Good morning, you guys. Hello. Good morning. All right. So Ryan the story is obviously still moving this morning. What is the latest that we know about the packages that have come in today? Well, a law enforcement official tells me that one was addressed to as you mentioned former vice president Joe Biden, this was discovered in Newcastle county, Delaware Biden, of course, is from Delaware. I'm. Told that this package is similar to the others that have been found in recent days in as being looked at in. That light the second package was found this morning in New York's Tribeca neighborhood outside a business belonging to the actor Robert deniro deniro, of course, has been very publicly critical of of President Trump. The New York police department says this package contained a potential explosive device similar to the one received yesterday at CNN's office in New York. So these are in addition to the seven packages that we already know about that were sent to George Soros, Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama Obama's former attorney general Eric Holder is former CIA director John Brennan. And then the the lawmaker Maxine Waters democrat of California. So that brings the total tally tonight tonight nine in about the past twenty four hours, our law enforcement officials any closer to knowing who may have sent these packages not that we know of at this point. There's no word of a possible suspect. And there isn't a lot of details at this point on the devices themselves, but there is a lot on. The packages that is that what we do know that these were were pipebombs. That's how officials have described them the packages that they were mailed in. We're all identical bubble wrapped mailed envelopes. This is as far as the ones that were discovered yesterday, the addresses on them were computer printed, the return address on each package was that of a democratic congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz of Florida, some of these packages appear to be Ben sent through the mail some may have been handled livered the one that was mailed to attorney general former attorney general Eric Holder didn't make it to his office. It was rerouted back to Wasserman Schultz. She of course, did not send these she said that she's very troubled, by the way that this is all played out that her name has been used in this her own office. In fact, was evacuated yesterday in Florida because of a suspicious package there, a Tim let me turn this over to you for a second this morning. We have been hearing from the president on Twitter. What's he been saying? Well, he sent out a tweet saying, and this is part of a, quote, a very big part of the anger. We see today in our society is caused by the purpose. False and inaccurate reporting of the mainstream media that I refer to as fake news. Now, this comes less than twelve hours after at a rally in Wisconsin. He he called for all sides coming together in peace and harmony to cut out the attacks and said that any threat any threats of political violence or an attack on our democracy itself. I'm trying to say that very nicely. Trying to see normally I'd screaming day while socialist takeover wants a socialist takeover. I'm trying to be nice. The president sort of transparently saying what he was doing which is changing the tone in at this rally in light of of the news that was around him. Yeah. But temps sort of interestingly, you've pointed out that President Trump hasn't really said much directly about the people who have been targeted have any of them said anything, right? So at that rally last night. He didn't mention Maxine Waters. He didn't mention Hillary Clinton normally at his rallies even just on Monday at his rallies there were chance of locker up not at this rally. And yes, there has been a response former CIA director and Trump critic John Brennan responded to the president's tweets this morning, saying stop blaming others. Look in the mirror, you're inflammatory rhetoric. Insults. Allies and encouragement of physical violence are disgraceful. He adds your critics will not be intimidated into silence. Pretty harsh words. I'm Ryan last question to you the FBI, of course is investigating. What are the immediate next steps? Do you think? Well, I think first and foremost what this morning has made clear is that there may still be more packages out there. This is not something that is a done deal at this point. That's in fact, something that the FBI warned about yesterday when it came out with the statement about what it knew at that point in time. What the FBI is doing is. They've collected all of the the materials that they have so far all of these suspicious packages, the ones that they had yesterday have been taken to a lab Quantico Virginia for analysis to look at the types of material us look for fingerprints other evidence, but this is very much the early stages of this investigation NPR's Ryan Lucas and tamra Ricky. Thanks, you guys. You're welcome. You. The energy giant ExxonMobil is accused of misleading. Investors and shareholders and analysts about the cost of climate change to the company's bottom line, New York's attorney general Barbara Underwood is suing the company for defrauding shareholders and NPR's. Wade Goodwin has the story. The lawsuit doesn't hold Exxon Mobil liable for helping to create climate change. It accuses the energy giant of misleading. The investing public about how global warming was affecting the value of the company's fossil fuel assets around the world, what the attorney general is essentially saying is you kept two sets of books. Thompson Zillow is the director of finance for the institute for energy economics and financial analysis and former New York state comptroller Zanzotto says the allegations are about Exxon refusing to write down the value of its fossil fuel assets that are still in the ground two sets of books. One in that they were. Keeping. So that they understood what reality was and another more nuanced three hours if you will. So the investment public the allegation really is that the company is not as big as it says it is. And it's not worth as much as it says, it is Exxon declined to comment to NPR but released a statement that said in part these baseless allegations or a product of closed-door lobbying by special interests, political opportunism and the attorney general's inability to admit that a three year investigation has uncovered no wrongdoing. Exxon Mobil has moved to thwart the investigation by attorneys general in three states, alleging it's a conspiracy involving the Rockefeller Foundation. Tort lawyers environmentalists and democratic GE's Michael burger is a professor at Columbia law. School who specializes in climate change law. Burger doubts Exxon's conspiracy theories are. Going to hold up in court. This is about climate change. It's about the risks that regulation hoses to the fossil fuel industry over the next half century or more. But this particular complaints is about corporate fraud at the end of Wednesday's trading on Wall Street. Shares of Exxon Mobil were down about three percent. Wade goodwin. NPR news, Dallas. This is.

President Trump Exxon Mobil New York City attorney NPR president Exxon Robert deniro deniro vice president Joe Biden official FBI Maxine Waters Delaware Eric Holder Hillary Clinton California
"thompson zillow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:51 min | 2 years ago

"thompson zillow" Discussed on KCRW

"This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm Noel king in Washington DC, and I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. New York police are investigating another suspicious package this morning. It was sent to the home of the actor Robert deniro in Manhattan's Tribeca neighborhood. This comes after seven apparent pipe bombs were sent to top Democrats political opponents of President Trump. Now, we should say the president's political career is in part defined by his willingness to openly mock people he disagrees with but Trump right now is calling for civility. That's right at a rally last night in Wisconsin Trump condemned this act, and so far thirties haven't released any information about a possible suspect, aren't let's turn now to NPR White House correspondent hammer, Keith and NPR's Justice. Reporter Ryan look to talk through all of this. Good morning to you both mornings morning, Iran. I want to start with you. It seems like there were at least seven of these devices mailed out who are these suspicious packages meant for well. The first was found Monday. Outside the New York home of the billionaire investor. George Soros, who of course, is also a big contributor to democratic causes. The others were then discovered addressed to Hillary Clinton former President, Barack Obama Obama's former attorney general Eric Holder and his former CIA director John Brennan. Now the package that was intended for Brennan was actually sent to the CNN office in New York and discovered in the mail room there yesterday, and then late last night, the FBI said that it had confirmed two more suspicious packages that were very similar in appearance to the other five. These two were addressed to Maxine Waters. She's a California Democrat in the house who has been a very sharp critic of of President Trump. So officials are already talking about these things as pipebombs they're using that term what what exactly are those and and who would have wanted to send pipebombs to to these people. Well, in terms of who would have wanted to send them we don't we don't know at this point. There's no word on a possible suspect. This is still very early in the investigation. Now as for the packages themselves. We know that they were sent in identical bubble wrapped Manila, envelopes, they were the addresses on them were all computer printed on the return address on every single package was that of democratic congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz of Florida each package had six US postal service stamps, the one that was actually addressed to former attorney general holder didn't make it to his office. It was returned to sender. The FBI says so in that case to the address of Wasserman Schultz. She of course, did not send these packages. She has said that she's very troubled, by the way that her name has been used in all of this and it actually her own office in Florida was evacuated yesterday because of a suspicious package their Tam. Let's turn this over to you for a minute. I mean, this is a pretty unusual moment in the country's recent history. How has the president been reacting? The president has been reacting in the way that you would expect a president to react. He has condemned any acts or. Or threats of political violence saying that it's an attack on our democracy itself. And in his rally speech last night. He also said, quote, we want all sides to come together in peace, and harmony, he he's talking about wanting to turn down the temperature on some of the political rhetoric, maybe not attacking once political enemies in moral terms. Now, the reality is that he has done just that attacking his political enemies in moral terms. But he didn't do it last night. Yeah. Well, it's interesting because the president's mood at these rallies is usually pretty upbeat pretty combative. But it sounds like he was in a different kind of mood yesterday. Yes. So this rally was at an airport. Hangar aircraft hangar in in Wisconsin. And there was a big crowd of people, and it had all the trappings of a usual. Trump rally accept that. Then the president simply red from the teleprompter, and he he does this. It was it was almost like he went to a rally, and he delivered a speech that you'd see in the East Room of the White House. And he was he was a bit self conscious about that sort of calling it out to his supporters. They're saying, hey, look, here's a clip. By the way, you see how nice somebody behaving. This is like have you ever seen this? We're all behaving very well. And hopefully, we can keep it that way. Right. How long he keeps? It that way is not clear often, he will become teleprompter. Trump for a while. And then he will switch back to rally Trump. And you just don't know when it's going to happen either. The president isn't saying anything directly about the people who were targeted have any of them said anything. Yeah. That's right. He didn't say any of the names of the people who've been targeted often they are features of his rally smashes Hillary Clinton was speaking yesterday at an event, and she said that she is fine. Thanks to the secret service. She called it a troubling time deep divisions in the country NPR's timber Keith. And Ryan Lucas. Thanks. You guys. You're welcome. Thank you. And we will of course, be following the story throughout the morning. The energy giant ExxonMobil is accused of misleading. Investors and shareholders and analysts about the cost of climate change to the company's bottom line, New York's attorney general Barbara Underwood is suing the company for defrauding shareholders and NPR's. Wade Goodwin has the story. The lawsuit doesn't hold Exxon Mobil liable for helping to create climate change. It accuses the energy giant of misleading. The investing public about how global warming was affecting the value of the company's fossil fuel assets around the world, what the attorney general is essentially saying as you kept two sets of books. Thompson Zillow is the director of finance for the institute for energy economics and financial analysis and former New York state comptroller Zanzotto says the allegations are about Exxon refusing to write down the value of its fossil fuel assets that are still in the ground two sets of books one internally that they were. Were keeping. So that they understood what reality was and another more nuanced three hour, if you will for the investment public the allegation really is that the company is not as big as it says, it is and is not worth as much as it says, it is Exxon declined to comment to NPR but released a statement that said in part, these baseless allegations or a product of closed door lobbying by special interests, political opportunism and the attorney general's inability to admit that a three year investigation has uncovered no wrongdoing. Exxon Mobil has moved to thwart the investigation by attorneys general in three states, alleging it's a conspiracy involving the Rockefeller Foundation. Tort lawyers environmentalists and democratic Agee's Michael burger is a professor at Columbia law. School who specializes at climate change law. Burger doubts Exxon's conspiracy. Theories are going to hold up in court. This is about climate change. It's about the risks that regulation poses to the fossil fuel industry over the next half, century or more. But this particular complaints is about corporate fraud at the end of Wednesday's trading on Wall Street. Shares of Exxon Mobil were down about three percent. Wade goodwin. NPR news, Dallas. This is morning edition on KCRW.

president President Trump Exxon Mobil New York Exxon attorney NPR Hillary Clinton Wisconsin Ryan Lucas FBI California Wade Goodwin NPR White House Debbie Wasserman Schultz Robert deniro Trump
"thompson zillow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"thompson zillow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Nice somebody behaving. This is like have you ever seen this? We're all very well. And hopefully, we can keep it that way. Right. How long he keeps? It that way is not clear often, he will become teleprompter. Trump for a while. And then he will switch back to rally Trump. And you just don't know when it's going to happen in the president isn't saying anything directly about the people who were targeted have any of them said anything. Yeah. That's right. He didn't say any of the names of the people who've been targeted often they are features of his rally speeches, Hillary Clinton was speaking yesterday at an event, and she said that she is fine. Thanks to the secret service. She called it a troubling time of deep divisions in the country NPR's Temer, Keith and Ryan Lucas. Thanks. You guys. You're welcome. Thank you. All right. The energy giant Exxon Mobil is accused of misleading. Investors and shareholders analysts about the cost of climate change to the company's bottom line, New York's attorney general Barbara Underwood is suing the company for defrauding shareholders and NPR's. Wade Goodwin has the story. The lawsuit doesn't hold Exxon Mobil liable for helping to create climate change. It accuses the energy giant of misleading. The investing public about how global warming was affecting the value of the company's fossil fuel assets around the world, what the attorney general is essentially saying is you kept two sets of books. Thompson Zillow is the director of finance for the institute for energy economics and financial analysis and former New York state comptroller, Zillow says the allegations are about Exxon refusing to write down the value of its fossil fuel assets that are still in the ground two sets of books. One. Incidentally that. They were keeping. So that they understood what reality was and another more nuance three hours. If you will for the investment public the allegation really is that the company is not as big as it says it is. And it's not worth as much as it says, it is Exxon declined to comment to NPR but released a statement that said in part, these baseless allegations or a product of closed door lobbying by special interests, political opportunism and the attorney general's inability to admit that a three year investigation has uncovered no wrongdoing. Exxon Mobil has moved to thwart the investigation by attorneys general in three states, alleging it's a conspiracy involving the Rockefeller Foundation. Tort lawyers. Environmentalists said democratic Agee's Michael burger is a professor at Columbia law. School who specializes in climate change law burger doubts Exxon. Conspiracy theories are going to hold up in court. This is about climate change. It's about the risks that regulation poses to the fossil fuel industry over the next half, century or more. But this particular complaints is about corporate fraud at the end of Wednesday's trading on Wall Street. Shares of Exxon Mobil were down about three percent. Wade goodwin. NPR news, Dallas. This.

Exxon Mobil Exxon NPR Wade Goodwin Hillary Clinton attorney Trump Thompson Zillow New York Rockefeller Foundation fraud president Ryan Lucas Michael burger Barbara Underwood comptroller