17 Burst results for "Thomas Spaghetti"

"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

04:00 min | 2 weeks ago

"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"Your show. Hugged. Go Simone could be your adopted daughter she likes to read. All those books have you read all those books Alex? Knows I. Read basically from here over as my section analyzes medical school books over there. It's all it's ninety percent of our books one instead of high. That's beautiful. Yeah Well, the first time I a photo with bookshelf by me at a younger readers to say there's no way you've read all those books and say, yeah, that's what we did. Pre Internet, you know it's like we actually read die paper actually the just read this the E book loans to. Libraries. Programs, Hoopla that allow you if you have a library card to take any book up fifty, two percent this year like it suddenly got, which is Great. Isn't that good news people are reading and because they don't want to go to the library, they don't want to hold a physical book. They're taking advantage of this great audiobooks to from your local libraries a great for that sort of thing. I've never understood why why libraries are so distant in the United States because I mean they have e books they have audiobooks hell. You can even go into them in pre cova days and get some great stuff. Libraries are at absolutely essential public resource use these things. Yeah. I. I have to say reading this article about this Aryan Marshall in wired I was a little disappointed at apparently. You know I it a library buys a physical book. I presume they pay the normal price and they can lend it out as long as that book doesn't fall into pieces right. But with digital books, publishers charge them a hefty fee. The average is forty dollars and then severely limit how many times they can lend it. Sometimes, it's only twenty six times fifty two times sometimes, it says for two years. So it's IT'S A it's not as economical for a library to buy these e books. it's even worse with audio books because I mean certainly San Francisco Public Library doesn't allow you to renew audiobooks and my wife uses them along her commute into work and one audiobook. She's got forty two hours long and she has. Two. Weeks. Yeah. Forty two hours odd lots of books. Thomas. Spaghetti. But yes, it's Oh. Yes. I'm all the books I. Think they're fascinating I. He's eighty good writer. Yeah. It's good because when you have forty two hours on capitalism. Cap Capital in the Better be well here's on capitalism baby. That's. Better be well written Let's see what else do I have a lot of really long books. Gravity's Rainbow Infinite jest the infinite. Are you a nineteen year old student even university right now out of the book of Infinite Audio Audio Book. Actually have the book too because I like to read while I listen Pecans capital ideology is forty nine hours. Oh. Oh I've tried gravity's Rainbow Five. Times. Get my head around it. It's one of my favorite books. One of those things where you read it and you think I must be missing something I've gotta be missing no, no, no, no way I'm missing. So it's Yeah. It's like the wire. Like. This podcast called the spider in which is literature podcast, and they actually recommend if you're really really struggling with a book, just read it backwards open ended up to a random page and read from there and just. I. Know not like. That's the Klingon..

writer San Francisco Public Library Simone Alex United States Cap Capital Aryan Marshall Thomas
"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

11:29 min | 6 months ago

"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Frank. Opera Singer Steph Fund Senate Shaw Singing Guantanamo Meta on his balcony in Paris France. This is democracy now democracy now dot org the quarantine report. I'm Amy Goodman here. In New York City the epicenter of the pandemic joined by my co host. Nermeen shake which staying home to help. Stop Community. Spread Heiner mean. Good Morning. Amy and welcome to our listeners viewers around the country and around the world today we look at how the corona virus pandemic has shown a light on inequality around the world the World Food Programme warns the pandemic could lead to a massive spike in global hunger and a new report predicts more than one hundred million people in cities worldwide will likely fall into poverty. The United Nations Labor Agency said Wednesday. Some one point six billion workers in the informal economy quote stand in immediate danger of having their livelihoods destroyed unquote by the global economic catastrophe triggered by the pandemic well for more on how the corona virus pandemic has impacted the most vulnerable and whether the crisis could be a catalyst for change. We're joined from Paris France by French. Economist Thomas Pickety whose work focuses on wealth and income inequality his two thousand fourteen internationally bestselling book capital in the twenty first century looked economic inequality and the necessity of wealth taxes. His new book more than a thousand pages long is called capital an ideology it's been described as a manifesto for political change. Thomas pickety welcome to democracy now. Well it is a great honor to have you with us. Can you talk now about how this pandemic is likely to trigger the sharpest recession in the United States since the Great Depression? Perhaps a depression. Can you talk about the long term effects of the crisis? And perhaps what can be done to ameliorate it saw? You know what I show in. May New Book. The Nigeria Geez at this kind crises Eastern has potential to to change a dominant views. About what should do our should. Aachen is also say teams of equality. So you know. The first immortal impact on crises US. We see violence of shoulder inequality so you know. People are not equal with respect to lockdown. Look with respect to joblessness income loss. Or you can see and you know people rely very small. All occupant glove no hope of very different situations of people look done nice about Modem Nice House and endowed of income support. You know when you don't of anywhere else in saving and when you are very precariously on market abolition you knew your income Infosys. Refasten I shoot Cesar benefit is US particu easier fat restrictive in your lex of workers which we don't have access to adequate People don't have access to housing and we've seen some of your robots in just as soon as we should we should do the US government environments along at work should do more about you know agenda as you. What we do is getting urgent solution. Fasel people don't have trouble extending gobs of talk making over and beyond what genes different countries and then we also need to start seeing seeing a different guy in recovery. We can address go. Business as wrinkled was the same economic sectors again. We think it's an opportunity to receive about a different kind of recovery in a war. Ream show and trying to reach a more equitable and more sustainable development mother. Because this is something we've been discussing foreign time. Especially since two thousand eight financial crises and the financing of these crises in. We're going to have to do to change our view about what's also nicotine is assigned to receive today that all the ideology of against government action in particular again. It's a public access systems and oblique investments in those people. Use these coach today of post Mook and Is Given observes Jewish. You know I see these two to celebrate being chance to some extent that leads to go midfielder. What we what we have done. So-so Thomas Spaghetti before we get to what might happen a once. This pandemic has come to an end. Could you respond to the stimulus package? Exact the trump administration has proposed and that the US Congress has approved a WHO that stimulus package is helping or what companies. The package is helping. And how it compares to the stimulus package put together by the mckown a government number difference between the US and your band as T- Say Scenes of the us-backed gauge is is certainly sufficient dams of an agreement insurance in general speaking an insurance teams in Europe deneen shrines but also in Germany that Mastro have developed in the US more generals including wages. And you'd like to Dine Free Times fulltime way too as it. No GOVERNMENT BENEFITS. Stephens. Us'S INTO FRENZY. Read an an an. Osho of coverage of four workers which I thought other dominant wage enough state juice. D. Frontiers are labor markets. Dangerous don't saying both sides of the alternatives in some of the senior Ryazan wrote of gaps. I mean a lot of people simply don't have access to adequate incomes of ball and you can see them in the streets by reason. I I assume the US your people who have to keep working wing very jobs. Mexico soxil jokes where I think wait non-payment bitch what's missing from the shrimp recovery bland. I think he's a clear. Understanding of how we're going to have a record arena surgeons or medium that long phases on a licensed investing in the hospital sector united as it would be bill died in the US to move in of universal on skiffs stands fossil which marginality to investment used to say. I think we're GONNA have. We can adjust Rico van the same sector has before Etc and we also have to take this opportunity to sing about the most sustainable and equitable development molesters just means investing more in in sector was generally investing more in cash innovation and under montel technologies. We have to invest on schools universities story social prosperity as being education. An regrettably diversification and in particular has been a nickel McClintock for most of the twentieth century because to an educational leader. And I think we've lost a memory of that because this has been replaced starting in nineteen eighty nineteen nineties different kind of ideology according to which a transparency will come from more and more iniquity more `concentration of in a few ends. But in fact it doesn't work in fact the US economy as bay to issue at a national income Tines US between nine hundred ninety. Two Thousand Twenty one point one a year whereas between nineteen fifty and nineteen ninety. Two A two point two percent issue between nineteen ten and nine hundred fifty. It was two point one. Eight hundred seventeen to twenty is. When Seles shots years have been a characterized by very ugly board of Inequality Rising Confessional Flint's duta declining wages basketball decaying wage N. also declined Ross so To more and more equality didn't work. And you know I think we should this opportunity of this crisis at some controls on an eight financial praise to to just received in another Leah about our infancy in this morning those Potomac. She's juice from crazies. But also receivable economic madden margin. How moving to more quantity most sustainability and. This is what I what I don't see an I. I don't see to restrict. I don't really see trees micro Munich. Boss President of course obstacles to be very different as we all know but at the same time he was responding current touches started among by giving big tax cuts to summarize in in front was a repeat of the West stacks. Us WAS BIG TAX. Cut for very uncomfortable and fallout corporal. Trump also wanted to get freedoms state tax couldn't get Plan President may destroy Too See and so in the end in question is also going to be able today to sort of challenge. You know old back a little bit and say well you know we have to pay for more investment in public services we have to gamble of OJ oils care worker. Also Are going to be able to change your mind and change ideology about tax cuts. And you know I think it's very much much an open question Strengths of the position in the trend. These values show for groups as a Been on what people reasons rip off your resume. Malcolm Buttons Okay. Affronts wizards will accept to continue. Supporting Trump yonder result. The charges are Package and yeah. I guess it's it's too. It's too early to say what you you know. Long run on season dens of Economic Policy and Political Journal Deals. Crazies are going to.

United States Amy Goodman US Congress New York City United Nations Labor Agency Paris France Frank. Opera Paris Aachen Thomas Pickety Thomas pickety Nigeria depression GOVERNMENT Trump France Free Times nicotine Mexico
"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on The Current

The Current

16:00 min | 6 months ago

"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on The Current

"And then you just push a button and send you my name's square and nobody's able to follow you in. Texas nutrition knows where you are and and you know and then you end up heading northeast on Patriots should group or they don't trust well sorry guys that you're GonNa have to pay because we don't know where to reach. We not able to take them. So you're going to have to because you don't move but you know of course at some point people in billings but Don't play that. And so if someone telling them we're look we are GONNA get treat of wars. These globalization are going to go back to the to the nation state now from just identity. I guess there is nothing else in store tentative today board. You know these unfortunately You know he's attractive or loops like yearly alternative key proposal. Perhaps this is an opportunity for people to think about this and to think about the futures in our own hands and they have time so we'll send them to the book to read more about how you've seen this over the sweep of history Thomas Spaghetti. It's great to speak with you. Thank you thank you Thomas. Spaghetti's latest book is capital and ideology. He was in Paris France. If you want to read more about this and how he has seen seen this over the sweep of history you have time as he mentioned. It's eleven hundred page book so maybe use that. Opportunity of locked down to look at that. This is the current on radio one. I Matt Galloway Top power. The host of Q. Is Back Low. Tom Champing at the bit match. Champing at the bit to talk to you about out. What are you GonNa talk about? I can't remember sitting around. I'm GonNa talk about mindfulness. You familiar with mindfulness. Indeed Oh yea I'm GonNa talk about Julie Familiar with jewel singer in credit. No not the actual Elements not the element now. Jewel itself the singer. Songwriter has a new documentary called the mindfulness movement. It's all about her journey with being more. Mindful okay. I don't know if you know this was once lived on the street. She was homeless. She found herself really lost and she credits a lot of her success in a lot of the great things that have happened to her to mindfulness but more she says that it's something that we need to really look at this time while we're all stuck inside so she has a new film actually all about my right and the question is who will save your soul the answer. I got the jewel. Take a listen. How are you? I'm good thank you? What is being mindful? Look like for you. Mindfulness is just a somewhat fancy term for being consciously present. It lowers our anxiety. There's so much science about it. Which was what was really fun about to film. And putting the film together was sharing with people help powerful And what a physiological and psychological and neural transmitter biochemical effect that just being present. We'll have for us. How did you first practicing mindfulness? I had really bad panic attacks when I was about sixteen. I moved out when I was fifteen on my own. I came from an abusive background and decided to move out at fifteen which was incredibly stressful paying rent and trying to get food and didn't have a car so it'd be hitchhiking everywhere and then by sixteen. I went to school and sort of having these panic attacks and so in an effort to try and help myself through them. I started experimenting and I stumbled. Onto mindfulness. It wasn't something that was necessarily taught to me. It was sort of a necessity is the mother of invention It was that I started to realize if I visualized and pictured certain things my body felt differently and I just became very curious very observant. Which by the way is the hallmark of mindfulness and I just started to see the benefits. That look like I mean. A lot of people are downloading APPs. Right now the downloading com or they're downloading no head space in an effort to be more mindful. When you're living on the street. There wasn't an APP. There wasn't there wasn't a probably a class could pay to go to Q. Tell me what that looked like for you. Then experimentation. I was really at the bottom. I was at the end of my rope. I was stealing shoplifting. A Lot And having these panic attacks and I was homeless and I realized I was GONNA end up in jail or dead. I didn't do something and one day. I was in a dressing room trying to steal address and I saw my reflection in mirror and I knew I was a statistic. I saw what I looked like and for some reason this quote by Buddha came into my head that happiness doesn't depend on who we are what we have. It depends on what we think. And I think everybody can resonate with that because we've had times in our lives where we have bounty and plenty and enough and we're still miserable. Our happiness is is independent of our surroundings that really has to do with our internal processes and I had to be willing to believe that at that time in my life especially when I was homeless because all I have for my thoughts but I had so much anxiety. I really couldn't figure out what I was thinking so I thought I would do little hack of watching my hands because the hands of the servants have your thoughts and if you want to know what you're thinking watch your hands 'cause it's your thought cool down into action so my huge plan leaving that dressing room. Not Stealing that dress. That day was to take notes. What hands did it wasn't the you know you're backed plan. That's all I had and I just took notes. How many times do they open doors? How many times that I wash my hands? How many times did I not shake someone's hand and at the end of two weeks? I looked back at my notes. It was pretty clear to see a quick believing in myself but the much more interesting thing was my anxiety almost completely disappeared while I was journaling about my hands now again. The word. Mindfulness wasn't around at the time. I don't even think I knew the word presence but I realized that when I was being very observant and very curious in real time disappeared and that was a revelation because when you live with extreme anxiety and you finally get a break from it you WanNa understand that and you WanNa do that more and that was really the beginning of me making all kinds of beautiful personal discoveries That.

Thomas Spaghetti Texas Matt Galloway billings Paris France Tom Champing Julie shoplifting Buddha
"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on The Current

The Current

14:48 min | 6 months ago

"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on The Current

"Think it's fair to say that it's not all that common or call them at all for seven hundred fifty page book by French. Economists to find its way to the top of bestseller lists around the world but in two thousand thirteen capital in the twenty first century was the must read of the year. That book has now sold more than two and a half million copies. It's helped popularize. The idea of the one percents the small group of people who control much of the world's wealth and it made its author famous. Not just economists. But with general readers now Thomas Spaghetti is back with a new book that argues that inequality is not an inevitable function of economics or technology but a result of political choices capital. An ideology covers sweep of world history and has profound implications for this moment that we are living through right now. Thomas Keti joins US Thomas. Good morning we are in the midst of Unprecedented times we are constantly. Told this we're seeing this dramatic sudden transformation everything around politics around economies around the world because of covert nineteen everything that we seem to hold. Dear has been turned upside down and inside out in watching what we're going through over the last few weeks. What has surprised you the most what you know. Everything is surprising. You know you haven't Miami thirty three right now. She's my six week of done in recent nobody as As if before you know things were top. Priority is really to do everything. We can to limit casualties. And and you know the original quake the beginning challenge what he's also a showing us very league. Manner is the violence of the equipment. Because you know shooting a very small apartment with weezer. Outspending doesn't mean at the same thing that showing off mountain or Nachos you don't have any income in saving And yet you at some point you need to go out and work and you know I can't see you know what I mean. Berries the area people from the most advantageous to go and work. Welcome descends bicycles during your daily very very badly date. Where can they can? You're not a free just and and I live all that even worse you know look done you know country like India. Imprac teeth You know this meant You know pushing away from cheese loves path of a migrant ruled population where we'll kings sometime and construction work as he suddenly pushed away back to the countryside sometimes are not available sometime with Biegel mess the transplantation of people which was which was probably not so good from the point of view of the virus. What shows is that you know what we need today you. He's not much of a prison. And the statement nor social state chauffeur from sales introduction of safety net in countries that do not have safety nets and even in rich countries can add our friends. You know. There's there's a big part of the population that she's lifted. of the safety net system You know lots of unless the streets ferries lots of Broadway's precalculus working conditions. Don't receive an improvement initiatives. The extended an improvement. Initiatives has been putting place and asked to go. You know to get working to get minute to get food for the family of iniquity that tweet these-these extremely concedes is really what I what I signed most to striking you start your new book. The opening line of your new book is every human society must justify its inequalities unless reasons for them or found the whole political and social edifice stands in danger of collapse in this moment. Do you think that's what's been exposed? What you're talking about. But also how we value work and and suddenly new appreciation for for example people who work in grocery stores or nurses who aren't paid more and that that I'll use your phrase. The islands of inequality has been exposed in some way. Yes very much so and I think you know he's kind of crazy you know. Of course we don't know yet and a very unique. I prefer it in many ways. You know this kind of crisis. Broadly speaking is exactly what went. They showed book is triggering. You Know Major Gordon. Ideological change in Syria. What they show in these bays away I should say sorry for writing such long. Let me read aboard. Twa Doesn't look like an east. You know it's it's a roof for anybody interested. You many serie and you know to be long in Texas of time. But that's the whole time. He's done the you know it's a sort of broad view an hour these kind of crazy you know certain kind of the social crazy. Sometimes I not crazy you know oser type of of political jokes trigger a big challenge. In the ideological stemmed that societies develop to structure of the equity. And she's a book and how different societies in Vienna offering to learn about justice about wet equitable economic stem. Looks like and of course. It's a very complicated question and so no society will ever as complete answer to that. I used to have telly. Do have complete on that. But these trading and and of course we adapt our beliefs. He spent two what happened. So when we have a big shock like this one and you know we see how much we need. These now sees as Dr how much we need as a public and he said well. Yes this is likely to change our system now the can be menus effects. As what I seek. After the craziest globalization would be picky. And you know the World Trade and world or from you know he's going to be viewed the way that would be you know they get even more skeptical before crazy and so the question would be you know in some dimensions. Maybe necessary to have less Long Distance Trade you know including mental combinations but we have to to learn how to be new international cooperation when necessary in particular. If YOU WANT TO COORDINATE OUR OUR UTAH. Shinoda taxation system regulation of financial frozen. I think we need to develop new kind of corporations. That's what my book describing dose of Reality of social the them so the tweed toss national treaties that care about sustainable and equitable development and not only about trading on frozen and find spends. I am definitely you know. I'm sad that you right after the Paris Agreement On of two thousand fifteen and company show we add trae treaty actually between the European Union and Canada but when there was no senior Toda though equally Gordon sustainable development so we just continued business as usual. You know as you know the discussion about Kaplan insurance discussion about iniquity was all a theoretical and research reciprocal and when he comes to real tricky. We only care although which you know. Business who can kind of sugar trade Get TO D. Do you think that the era of business I do? You think the era of business as usual is over now because of of what we're going through that the fact that there is no business in any business that's happening certainly isn't usual when also Washington supported. We realize you know necessary sometime to to produce at own a number of good bucket dumps of medical supplies you can then you in front industrial right noses. We're not angry nice about the fact that you don't vigil supplies or search same here in Canada as proficient and and so this is something. That's that we have to change. The question is what would be the broader impact on you know. Put it off King Group and fish and you know it seems as we rescheduled. We know in terms of political ideology for these crazies. You could be the the sort of Meshing Movement broadly speaking. You know what I can tell you in frantic already see you know who is going to do fall complete cuisine from -til etc. You Know Trish Senior Nygren so very get you donald. Donald trump saying that he's going to close the United States to immigration Just announced that last night on twitter. Okay exactly Donald Trump's four for for a number of years when I take Poland wherever you realize know it's fine as also. Nobody knows you know he could be that the Israeli but in France. You know we're so far. People have made the experience of Exhibit for Big Writer Food even wherever you know on them and the things he sees. What's going to happen? But what what? They need not ideological shift. Coming out of credit can be a very diverse. You know some going in the direction of reinforcing the need for the seven seas but some Greens the direction of things need felt. Baldo close Belda and and I think there's a real challenge of our. We beat the new kind of international them. Because you know I am International East Eastern Europe but also from well but we need to put in our international treaties you know some verifiable an explicit target about sustainable development equitable look non. Jewish includes coporation funding in terms of of course but he's also includes coporation in terms of taxation because also. Why would you found a public health issue of oldies tax competition across the world which allows the most prosperous economic actors to basically escaped accession? What about nationally? What about your National Programs? And we're seeing now Leave the United States controlled by Republican government or public administration? What is essentially a move towards at least temporarily a basic guaranteed basic income? We're seeing this in countries around the world as well. Are those measures that things that would have been previously unimaginable? Are Those things that you think might be possible now because of the crisis that we're in to help close That's that that gap that sense of inequality that you've written about over the course of your career. Yes I think it can it. Can it can move. You know pretty soon these direction and in particular. I very much hope that you know the poorest intriguing and I thought Jaren no sex ED programs. These accelerate the development of so for systemic of income trump's fair and safety you. I'm thinking of year last year's electoral campaign. You were in the Congress party resources lower caste and so should he stuff. She's advocating for the introduction of basic income. Yup She loves the addiction. It was pretty tight six months before the election. And then you have a real tax catch me completely transformed the direction of more identity politics. We've seen anti Muslim and to some extent anti war rhetoric may basic but this challenge US opening months because at some point shepherd. Look done and a big part of your petition. The you know they don't have term they don't have food you know they. We left to grow but then it gets really bad. You know you don't want to grow so you need to you. Know basic income and income setting that accelerate Meno. I knew she needed all discussion on right now. In the number of countries in West Africa. You know I don't know how it would go but that will be the metro on so you're up to your optimistic about that. Well again I can see you know. I think there's a diversity of trajectories you know. This is kind of Bichon kitchen points that I stood in. My book gets to an ideology where you know. It's not returning advance. What's going to happen? Very much. Depends on mobilisation of different. Social Groups. You know a trade unions political parties and you know shoot shell had to to all of us into what we will do and that will be very different group of people. You know trying to exploit the crazies in very different ways and you know at the end you know it's a it's a balance of of the world that we will choose a particular trajectory what they want to stress. And that's maybe the main idea. My book is that the balance of not only material social intellectual and ideological so. It's a total of you know of ideas about how to organize the economy and Taking historical perspective on this and brought Comparative Cheetahs. I try to book. I think it's useful to L. Perceivable. Shoot show no public debt. Because look at today. Everybody's saying okay we're GonNa pay you know everything man but at some point of course we'll have to do something that I think we have to. You know to increase taxation very top income the individuals and then we are back to the International Corporation. Where do you do with intentional? Took Luigi I think we cannot have a freekick in your future in terms of moving money around so they don't pay taxes. Yeah exactly so. This has to challenge. You know we've lived SOAKER OF WEEKS. Pastula way of organising international could stem where effect you other almost Sakala right you know to make you know. I communicate twins in your country in using the public infrastructure education system of your country..

United States Donald trump Canada Thomas Spaghetti Thomas Keti Miami US Thomas India Outspending Belda Washington France Major Gordon Congress party Twa Syria Trish Senior Nygren International Corporation L. Perceivable
"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on FunnelHacker Radio

FunnelHacker Radio

01:58 min | 7 months ago

"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on FunnelHacker Radio

"Had years rive made five million dollars in a year and I've had years where I had lost money. It's changing all the time. In Fact Thomas. Sowell is a pretty well known. Economists who dove into the numbers and found that is way more movement at the top of the economic scale than any politician or any news. Pundit ever talks about watch this so getting worked up about income inequality is pointless ill-informed but yes and sometimes it's simply a propaganda trick depending on. Who's doing it? I I read Pettis stuff. Thomas Spaghetti French. Economist published a book. This year called capitalism star around the world for doing so and he talks about how the top ten percent of separate from the rest of us and they do all sorts of various things. And then since then I've gone and done a little research and it turns out that fifty six percent of all American households would be in the top ten percent at some point or other and their lives usually when they're older. Wow over and over half will be in the top. All right yes And actually when you get down to the top one percent is even more incredible Of all the people in the top one percents And of course of a decade The majority of the great majority of their one year only thirteen percent of their two years. And so we're talking about people who have a spike in income in one year for some reason or they inherited something So yeah the they have. Assets Accumulated over the years and they sell them and that one year I mean when the year I'm I haven't checked but I wouldn't be surprised if I hit my income peak When I when I sold my house on the Stanford Campus And have never been near that sense and of course it was all loved paying for another house.

Thomas Spaghetti rive Sowell Stanford Campus Pettis
"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Going alone. You know there was a very strong work actually estimator eight hundred three fifty. Now I've actually spoken to her about this. She's she's very concerned about this it's incredibly difficult and wearing syndrome. Young artists being turned over. Because there's just it's like it's like a washing machine isn't it that's a spin cycle And if you have the right connections and you're rich enough you get in at the beginning and then you get out in time And the rest is desperate to try and by the work and usually by too late and they get lumbered with this. And it's and this. This whole cycle whole this whole dynamic is very concerned for the market. As a whole I think with calls it's just bonkers and you had a really interesting piece that you actually usually root for for the art newspaper recently which is about kind of like populace Martin tasted are How how is that? Maybe shifted over the past few few years and how is that affecting the market his younger artists. Just wondering to what extent. S- those two wills into into sex. I think banks in Kohl's very very so separate markets from the super Super Hot markets will young anointed artists from fashionable galleries. I think not slightly different I wonder how long the calls things can go on for. I'm not sure sculptures particularly interesting. There was a big painting sculpture From edition of Ten plus two is estimated mated at three hundred made eight hundred thirty six thousand That the sculptured the paintings I sort of understand and but the sculpture. I just find completely anonymous and mad. Why is that well this thing and then his time you're going to be looking at the? This is losing me a Lotta money speaking city in the cool room make you look fool. I think Speaking of cause and banks You know we're obviously coming to the end of twenty nine thousand nine here moving into a new decade. Their markets have been the most astronomical made in the last decade. Are there some other artists that you know have had a miraculous rise or miraculous fall in some ways over the past decade or any larger your trends. That you've been noticing since you know. Obviously we were in a very different financial place. Sure back in two thousand nine right after the financial crash and now we're kind kind of staring down the barrel of possible. Recession trade war is brexit. The whole Shebang wonder if you're seeing any kind of trends that you can spot okay in the last ten years of the first thing to say though of course is the that there's no The people aren't losing any money right. Yeah the guessing guessing richer and richer and richer The that the context for all this is is Thomas Spaghetti wrote the script book called capital for century and antique came up with this one fulfilled relation which is aw is always greater than Jesus returns on capital are always greater than growth which is linked to contagious so the rich get richer and richer and richer so the money is all they just they just get distracted sometimes and they're a bit distracted moments and that's that's that's the the only problem no way but what is it from. The market is blue chip off and finding new blue chip artists because house Very interesting came back to this. Aunt net report on staggered to see that in the first half of two thousand nineteen coils made mort Olshan as you'll Michel Basquiat which is a bit of a moment. Now oversleep owners of of a Big Ticket buskers. Don't want to put them on the market and they're they're concerned okay. Let's understood but with with basketball top. Ask as not coming on the market. Warhol's Kuhn's the traditional blue chip where the auction houses GonNa make the numbers. So what I have noticed is the way. They're trying in to pump up secondary names as blue chip and in London in October album. Oland suddenly be was meant to be a great artist. uh-huh so we had to deal shows. We had Serpentine Gallery Exhibition which was sponsored by subsidies and Gagosian and there was a load of Alba Roland sales. which did all right? It didn't actually have a transformative effect. I think Edry Shea last night was another example of this Now he's interesting artist in academically and in terms of art history. That's in terms of Papa. You know he doesn't have the directs. The visual impact of Warhol Lichtenstein or Allen Jones Frogman. Say but what I thought was interesting was that they gave gave that painting. Take Pride of place where the Kuhn's Bundy had been in this shrine to blue chip timeless. Ause I thought they were really pushing the envelope there but on the other hand it made fifty two million now. Is that a reflection of well. Find the histories catching up with Trichet. All this just a hell of a lot of money in California. It's probably a mixture of the two but I think the trend next decade will be. The auction house is desperately trying to find blue chip names to replace Bacon Rick to all the others and I think they're struggling because we're not living living in a great period of I would say.

Kuhn Martin Edry Shea Kohl Oland basketball London Warhol Lichtenstein Bacon Rick Thomas Spaghetti Trichet California Serpentine Gallery Exhibition mort Olshan Warhol Allen Jones Frogman the art newspaper Alba Roland Michel Basquiat Bundy
"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on Chapo Trap House

Chapo Trap House

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on Chapo Trap House

"And says stop all your investigations and prospering prosecutions to us in the justice department of the illegal pill mills in west virginia and everywhere else we have a town of five five hundred people and a million pills are being sent to them a week and you know what you administration stopped it. That's why i'm running for town ability to the people above self special interest or party look. What you're saying is people. It's not just the system. The system is so unaccountable. That's why people voted for trump trump attell. Everybody's not the problem. He's a symptom of the problem of how you can have all these country corporations outsourcing their supply chains jobs in everything and who's who's holding them accountable and they then lobby america to do do the business of china liberally. You know that every one of them has a communist so it's it's just like labor organization but the last law just passed said oh now they get a voting right right because china smart they do things methodically then although i want them to have a voting right on the boards and that's kinda minor to some degree but you know if you can have have china force marriott to fire employees in kansas because they happened to tweet a friendly post about tibet. Is that the system or or is that politicians that just a bet that we are leading or corporations runamuck on accountability to me what you guys wanna do about this all this stuff about l. corporate power absolutely you're right. It's wrong that doesn't mean the system's wrong means the enforcement of fair standards and accountability is wrong from tax laws to outsourcing outsourcing our national security and that's why we have trump in my opinion and you know what i don't want to be president unless somebody that's why i'm running can unite this country because they don't trust anybody to do. Go up against the system. Look what happened when i did my party put more money in against my race for senate from the s._e._c. television ads and they put in against mitch mcconnell two years because because i had the audacity to say to the party from the president on down. I don't agree mr spector the senator switching parties now today politically. You weren't with me too generation. You just say whoa he. We don't want somebody tried. Amelia need a hill you know but back then it was just the system. No it was politicians who just weren't public servants. I that's my belief. They let the they set the rules lose corporations that do what they want so you you bench that the corporations have an outsized power and essentially you're describing the process by which they dictate the terms and the legal regime so then how do you counterbalance balanced that power <hes> if if you are not opposed to the system of capitalism and presumably not opposed to say read not supportive say redistribution <hes> a wealth tax similar the one <hes> thomas spaghetti and elizabeth warren a proposed. How do you create a regime of accountability because because from what i can see these institutions are only accountable to capital only accountable to capital capital their account because the government a mint was established in this nation in such a way that people have always said we don't want the government. You know to be an us how we set up a government to interfere in individual rights. We are to be -pected against the power of government people fail to realize is government was also so established to protect us against the abuse and the power of private industry and power so much as they did it with the trust busters all that back in the day late eighteen hundreds. We have to do that again and it's going to take a new generation of people not necessarily a young or anything but actually believe you're going to go down there and actually say no to where carried interest you're familiar with that has been protected protected by new york senators..

mr spector president west virginia china mitch mcconnell senate america Amelia new york tibet senator thomas spaghetti kansas elizabeth warren two years
"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"More than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries. I'm suzanne. Anna Palmer, this is Bloomberg. You're listening to politics policy and power on Bloomberg radio. I'm here to Barnes with June Grasso, June President Trump's waves of tariffs. Ultimately extended to more than two hundred fifty billion dollars of imports last year that may be helping the Federal Reserve closing on its two percent target. Joining us is Bloomberg news economy reporter Gina smiling. So Gina explain how the tariffs are helping. Right. So basically these terrorists allowed producers so people who are producing things in the US to sort of sneak in some price increases. So they've really had very limited pricing power throughout this cycle. But as their competitors from other countries became less competitive. It allowed them to realize her to pass along some some of their costs to consumers, and so that was important, and then there were all these direct effects in which tariffs, obviously, make good smarts pensive made inputs tip American products more expensive in ended up getting passed along t- businesses, and then eventually to consumers and so between the two of those. Facts, both Goldman Sachs and UBS is saying that, you know tariffs. Last year added something in the range of you know, point one point one five two prices, which doesn't sound like a lot. But it's significant when you think that that's about how much we edged up toward that two percent inflation goal last year. You know, we did a little bit of a stronger year for for prices than we have been seeing really since two thousand twelve and the fed at first adopted its two percent target and so on net. This is this is pretty significant and important because it might just be a one off. And then what? Because obviously, we're the reason we were talking about this is because we wanna know what this might mean for Fred policy, particularly rate hikes. Right. Absolutely. So I think there are two things think about here. I think on one hand one potential threat from terrorists is that if they would escalate or if they would become more intense for any reason, there's no reason to expect that on the horizon at the moment. But if if you would see that evolve you. You could see a fed that has to act more aggressively to really counterbalance that effect on other hand, if you see de-escalation, which you know, murmurings in recent weeks have sort of pointed to you. But I don't think it's clearly in the sights yet. But if you do see a market de-escalation, you could see a world where inflation comes in a little bit softer, which would make the fed a little bit nervous. And I think very hesitant to go forward with future rate increases because they really are concerned about hitting this two percent inflation target from both ends. They're not just worried about inflation. It goes too high at this point. They're pretty concerned about inflation that stagnates at a level that's too low for them. And so if they've been helped out by these tariffs and the tears fade away. I think you're gonna see a fed that's more hesitant to hike rates said, Gena what other echo news are you expecting right? So we have had some interesting data out showing that existing home sales had a really weak print. The expected month over month. Prentice was expected to come in a little bit down so down one point five percent while we actually solve as a six point. Four percent drop. And so that was pretty interesting. And I think you're really seeing from the housing market. Not just kind of confirms what we've already known that. We have been relating this combination of rate increases and relatively tight inventories sort of bite in this this market, although in in this particular print, we saw some inventory increases. So maybe some help for relief ahead as far as your other research. You also are reading about a new working paper on global wealth inequality and the subject seems to be. Yup. There's full of wealth inequality, but the level depends. Absolutely. It depends on what data you're consulting. So Gabriel's you've been at university of California Berkeley has been on this topic for a long time. This is sort of the most recent education of a large body of work. He's produced on this subject. And basically he's trying to take a survey of the data here in vain. You know, if you look at tax state, I feel income data if you look at all the best data, we have what is happening with wealth concentration. And what he finds is that. Basically across a range of measures. It looks like about forty percent of all wealth in America is owned by the top one percent twenty sixteen that's up from twenty-five percent or thirty percent in the nineteen eighties. And so a pretty dramatically, but what's really interesting here is he also takes sort of this who local look at what's going on with tax evasion and says that you know, in Norway where we we've decent data for what's happening in the tax evasion picture because of leaks from a couple of years ago. You can see it suggests that the top zero point zero one percent, which is really where the money is is hiding something like twenty five percent of their wealth. We're underestimating their holdings by about a quarter. And so his point here is that we could sell significantly have some major holes in our best metrics of wealth measurement and sort of one percent wealth shares in the world. And so this is an ongoing project that I'm sure we'll be hearing more from him about are there other surveys that support this or contradict it? Absolutely. So I think that you see a lot of different organizations sort of jumping into the scheme and trying to sass global wealth and global income. Distributions IMF has good data on this OECD. Well, occasionally put something out zook men and his colleagues and Tomas spaghetti who you probably recognize because he's a he wrote the book on this. Yeah. So his cO F is Thomas spaghetti and Emmanuel say as have really sort of led the plush in creating some sort of centralized database, and you can actually find it online. It's the I think it's called the world wealth index our global income index they it goes back to names, you can Google it and play around with the day day. It's just a really great resource. A lot of a lot of interesting numbers there. All right. Thanks so much Gina at Bloomberg. News economy reported genus pilot. You're listening to Bloomberg politics policy and power on Bloomberg radio. Coming up more politicians are announcing presidential runs in.

Bloomberg Gina smiling Federal Reserve Anna Palmer US Goldman Sachs Google Trump reporter Barnes June Grasso President Fred Thomas spaghetti Gena Prentice university of California Berke America Tomas spaghetti
"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Policy and power on Bloomberg radio. I'm Peter Barnes with June Grosso, June President Trump's waves of tariffs. Ultimately extended to more than two hundred fifty billion dollars of imports last year that may be helping the Federal Reserve closing on its two percent target. Joining us is Bloomberg news economy reporter Gina smiling. So Gina explain how the tariffs are helping. Right. So basically these terrorists allowed producers so people who are producing things in the US to sort of sneak in some price increases. So they've really had very limited pricing power throughout this cycle. But as their competitors from other countries became less competitive. It allowed them to really sort of pass along some some of their costs to consumers, and so that was important, and then there were all these direct effects in which tariffs, obviously, make good smart expensive made inputs tip American products, expensive outlet ended up getting passed along businesses and then eventually to consumers and so between the two of those affects both Goldman Sachs. UBS is saying that, you know tariffs. Last year added something in the range of you know, point one point one five two prices, which doesn't sound like a lot. But it's significant when you think that that's about how much we edged up toward that two percent inflation goal last year. You know, we did a little bit of a a stronger year for for prices than we have been seeing really since two thousand twelve in the fed at first adopted its two percent target. And so you know on net. This is this is pretty significant and important because it might just be a one off. And then what? Because obviously, we're the reason we were talking about this is because we want to know what this might mean for future policy particularly rate hikes. Right. Absolutely. So I think there are two things to think about here. I think on one hand one potential threat from terrace is that if they would escalate or if they would become more intense for any reason, there's no reason to expect that on the horizon at the moment, but if if all you could see a fed that has to act more. Aggressively to really counterbalance that effect on the other hand if you see de-escalation which murmurings in recent weeks have sort of pointed to, but I don't think it's clearly in the sights yet. But if you do see a market de-escalation, you could see a world where inflation comes in a little bit softer, which would make the fed a little bit nervous. And I think very hesitant to go forward with future rate increases because they really are concerned about hitting this percents inflation target from both ends. They're not just worried about inflation that goes too high at this point. They're pretty concerned about inflation that sag needs at a level. That's too low for them. And so if if they have been helped out by these tariffs in those tears fade away, I think you're gonna see a fed that's more hesitant to hike rates. So you know, what other EKO news are you expecting right? So we have had some interesting data out showing that existing home sales had a really weak print. The expected month over month. Prentice was expected to come in a little bit down. So down one point five percent while we actually solve a six point four percent, drop and. So that was pretty interesting. And I think you're really seeing some effects from affordability in the housing market. Not just kind of confirms what we've already known that. You know, we have been relating this combination of rate increases and relatively tight inventories sort of bite in this this market, although in in this particular print, we saw some inventory increases. So maybe some help for relief ahead as far as your other research. You also a reading about a new working paper on global wealth inequality and the subject seems to be. Yup. This global wealth inequality, but the level depends. Absolutely. It depends on what data you're consulting in so Gabriel's you've been at university of California Berkeley has been on this topic for a long time. This is sort of the most recent editor of a large body of work. He's produced on this subject. And basically he's trying to take a survey of the data here and saying, you know, if you look at tax day fueled hitting come data if you look at all the best data, we have what is happening with wealth concentration. And what he finds is that basically across a. Range of measures. It looks like about forty percent of all wealth in America is owned by the top one percent twenty sixteen that's up from twenty-five percent or thirty percent in the nineteen eighties. And so a pretty dramatically, but what's really interesting here is he also takes sort of this global look at what's going on with tax evasion and says that you know, in Norway where we've decent data for what's happening of the tax evasion picture because of leaks from a couple of years ago. You can see it suggests that the top zero point zero one percent, which is really where the money is is hiding something like twenty five percent of their wealth. We're underestimating their holdings by about a quarter. And so his point here is that we could still significantly have some major holes in our best metrics of wealth measurement and one percent wealth shares in the world. And so this is an ongoing project that I'm sure we'll be hearing more from him about are there other surveys that support this or contradict it? Absolutely. So I think that. You see a lot of different organizations sort of dumping into this scheme and trying to sass global wealth and global income. Distributions IMF has good data on this. So a CD well, occasionally put something out Zukerman and his colleagues Tim uh spaghetti you who you probably recognize because he's a he wrote the book on this. Yeah. So his cO as Thomas spaghetti and Emmanuel says have really sort of led the plush in creating some sort of centralized database, and you can actually find it online. It's the I think it's called the world wealth index global income index they it goes back to names you can Google play around with their day. Just a really great resource. A lot of a lot of interesting numbers there. All right. Thanks so much Gina. That's a Bloomberg news economy reported Gina smiling. You're listening to Bloomberg politics policy and power on Bloomberg radio. Coming up more politicians are announcing presidential runs in an already crowded field of democratic candidates in twenty twenty. This is Bloomberg. Imagine. Imagine being denied an apartment because of your religion race or because you have children or disability. It's so wrong. Yes. But who has the power to stop this? Do each of us has the power. The law is on your side. It's illegal for landlords to discriminate because of race color, religion, sex, national, origin, disability or familial status. If you suspect that you're experienced housing discrimination filed a complaint with HUD. So.

Bloomberg Gina smiling Federal Reserve US Goldman Sachs Peter Barnes Trump reporter UBS President June Grosso EKO Google Prentice university of California Berke HUD America editor Gabriel
"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You're listening to politics policy and power on Bloomberg radio. I'm here to Barnes with June Grosso Coon, President Trump's waves of tariffs. Ultimately extended to more than two hundred fifty billion dollars of imports last year that may be helping the Federal Reserve closing on its two percent target. Joining us is Bloomberg news Konami reporter Gina smiling. So gene, explain how the tariffs are helping. Right. So basically these terrorists allowed producers so people who are producing things in the US to sneak in some price increases. So they've really had very limited pricing power throughout this cycle. But as their competitors from other countries became less competitive at allowed them to really sort of pass along some some of their costs to consumers, and so that was important, and then there were all these direct effects in which. Tariffs obviously, make that's more expensive made inputs tip American products more expensive and not with ended up getting pats too long. Businesses and then eventually to consumers, and so between the two of those affects both Goldman Sachs and UBS is saying that tariffs last year added something in the range of you know, point one point one five two prices, which doesn't sound like a lot. But it's significant when you think that that's about how much we edged up toward that two percent inflation goal last year. You know, we did see a little bit of a a stronger year for for prices than we have been seeing really since two thousand twelve in the fed at first adopted its two percent target and so on net. This is this is pretty significant and important because it might just be a one off. And then what? Because obviously, we're the reason we were talking about this is because we want to know what this might mean for featured policy particularly rate hikes. Right. Absolutely. So I think there are two things to think out here. I think on one hand one potential threat from terrorists is that if they would escalate or if they would become more intense for any reason, there's no reason. Expect that on the horizon at the moment. But if if you would see that of all, you could see a fed that has to act more aggressively to really counterbalance that effect on the other hand, if you see de-escalation which murmurings in recent weeks have sort of pointed to you. But I don't think it's clearly in the sights yet. But if you do see a market de-escalation, you could see a world where inflation comes in a little bit softer. What you make the fed a little bit nervous. And I think very hesitant to go forward with future rate increases because they really are concerned about hitting this two percent inflation target from both ends. They're not just worried about it goes too high at this point. They're pretty concerned about inflation that sag mates at a level. That's too low for them. And so if if they've been helped out by these tariffs in those cares fade away, I think you're gonna see a fed that's more hesitant to hike rates. So what other EKO news are you expecting, right? So we have had some interesting data out showing that existing home sales had a really weak print. The expected month over month. Print was was expec. Wanted to come in a little bit down. So down one point five percent while we actually saw a six point four percent drop. And so that was pretty interesting, and I think you're really seeing some effects from ability in the housing market. Not just kind of confirms what we've already known that. You know, we have been really team this combination of rate increases and relatively tight inventories sort of bite in this market. Although in in this particular print, we saw some inventory increases. So maybe some help for relief ahead as far as your other research. You also reading about a new working paper on global wealth inequality and the subject seems to be. Yup. The wealth inequality, but the level depends. Absolutely. It depends on what data you're consulting info Gabriel's Zeke minute university of California Berkeley has been on this topic for a long time. This is the most recent of a large body of work. He's produced on this subject. And basically he's trying to take a survey of the data here and saying, you know, if you look at tax state, I feel it income data. If you look at all the best data we have. What is happening with wealth concentration? And what he finds is that basically across a range of measures. It looks like about forty percent of all wealth in America is owned by the top one percent twenty sixteen that's up from twenty-five percent or thirty percent in the nineteen eighties. And so a pretty dramatically, but what's really interesting here is he also takes sort of this global look at what's going on with tax evasion and says that you know, in Norway where we've decent data for what's happening in the tax evasion picture because of leaks from a couple of years ago. You can see it suggests that the top zero point zero one percent, which is really where the money is is hiding something like twenty five percent of their wealth. You know, we're underestimating their holdings by about a quarter. And so his point here is that we could still significantly have some major holes in our best metrics of wealth measurement and one percent wealth shares in the world. And so this is an ongoing project that I'm sure we'll be hearing more from him about our. There other surveys that support this or contradict it. Absolutely. So I think that you see a lot of different organizations sort of dumping into the scheme and trying to sass clip wealth and global income. Distributions IMF has good data on this OECD will occasionally put something out zook men and his colleagues Tim uh spaghetti you who you probably recognize because he's a he wrote the book on this. Yeah. So his cO as Thomas spaghetti and Emmanuel says have really sort of the plush in creating some sort of centralized database, and you can actually find it online. It's the I think it's called the world wealth index our global income index it goes back to names you can Google play around with they day day. It's just a really great resource. A lot of a lot of interesting numbers there. All right. Thanks so much, Gino. That's a Bloomberg news economy reported genus violet. You're listening to Bloomberg politics policy and power on Bloomberg radio. Coming up more politicians are announcing presidential runs in an already.

Bloomberg Federal Reserve US Goldman Sachs Gina smiling Google Konami Trump Barnes reporter President Grosso Coon Thomas spaghetti EKO Gino university of California Berke America Gabriel OECD
"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Listening to politics policy and power on Bloomberg radio. I'm Peter Barnes with June Grasso, June President Trump's waves of tariffs. Ultimately extended to more than two hundred fifty billion dollars of imports last year that may be helping the Federal Reserve closing on its two percent target. Joining us is Bloomberg news economy reporter genus smiling. So Gina explain how the tariffs are helping. Right. So basically these terrorists allowed producers so people who are producing things in the US to sort of sneak in some price increases. So they've really had very limited pricing power throughout this cycle. But as their competitors from other countries became less competitive, it allowed them to really sort of pass along some of their costs to consumers, and so that was important, and then there were all these direct effects in which tariffs, obviously, make that's more expensive made inputs chip American products more expensive and not with ended up getting passed along businesses and then eventually to consumers and so between the two of those effects, both Goldman Sachs. And UBS is saying that, you know tariffs. Last year added something in the range of you know, point one point one five two prices, which doesn't sound like a lot. But it's significant when you think that that's about how much we edged up toward that two percent inflation goal last year. You know, we did see a little bit of a stronger year for for prices than we have been seeing really since two thousand twelve in the fed at first adopted its two percent target. And so on that this is this is pretty significant and of important as it might just be a one off. And then what? Because obviously be the reason we were talking about this is because we want to know what this might mean for feature. Fred policy, particularly rate hikes. Right. Absolutely. So I think there are two things to think about here. I think on one hand one potential threat from tariffs is that if they would ask late, or if they would become more intense for any reason, there's no reason to expect that on the horizon at the moment, but if if you would see better Paul you could see a fed that has to act. More aggressively to really counterbalance that effect on other hand, if you see deescalation which murmurings in recent weeks have sort of pointed to you. But I don't think it's clearly in the sights yet if you do see a market. Yes, Galatian you could see a world where inflation comes in a little bit softer, which would make the fed a little bit nervous. And I think very hesitant to go forward with future rate increases because they really are concerned about hitting this two percent inflation target from both ends. They're not just worried about inflation. It goes too high at this point. They're pretty concerned about inflation that stagnates at a level that's too low for them. And so if they've been helped out by these tariffs in those tears fade away, I think you're gonna see a fed that's more hesitant to hike rates said, you know, what other echo news are you expecting right? So we have had some interesting data out showing that existing home sales had a really weak print. The expected month over month. Prentice was expected to come in a little bit down so down one point five percent while we actually solve as a six point four percent drop. And so that was pretty interesting. And I think you're really seeing some effects from affordability in the housing market. Not just kind of confirms what we've already known that. You know, we have been really seeing this combination of rate increases and relatively tight inventories sort of bite in this this market, although in in this particular print, we saw some inventory increases. So maybe some hope for relief ahead as far as your other research. You also are reading about a new working paper on global wealth inequality and the subject seems to be, Yup. This wealth inequality, but the level depends. Absolutely. It depends on what data you're consulting and Gabriel's Zeke minute university of California Berkeley has been on this topic for a long time. This is the most recent ration- of a large body of work. He's produced on this subject. And basically he's trying to take a survey of the data here and saying, you know, if you look at tax state getting data if you look at all the best data, we have what is happening with wealth concentration, and what he finds is that basically across a range of measures. It looks like about forty percent of all wealth in America is owned by the top one percent twenty sixteen that's up from twenty-five percent or thirty percent in the nineteen eighties. And so a pretty dramatically, but what's really interesting here is he also takes sort of this global look at what's going on with tax evasion and says that you know, in Norway where we decent data for what's happening of the tax evasion picture because of leaks from a couple of years ago. You can see it suggests that the top zero point zero one percent, which is. Really where the money is is hiding something like twenty five percent of their wealth. You know, we're underestimating their holdings by about a quarter. And so his point here is that we could still significantly have some major holes in our best metrics wealth measurement and sort of one percent wealth shares in the world. And so this is an ongoing project that I'm sure we'll be hearing more from him about are there other surveys that support this or contradict it? Absolutely. So I think that you see a lot of different organizations sort of jumping into this scheme trying to sass global wealth and global income. Distributions IMF is good data on SO will occasionally put something out zook men and his colleagues Tim uh spaghetti you who you probably recognize because he's a he wrote the book on this. Yeah. Thomas spaghetti and Emmanuel says have really sort of led the push in creating some sort of centralized database, and you can actually find it online. It's the I think it's called the world wealth index our global income index it goes back to you names, you can Google play around with day day. Just a really great resource. A lot of lot of interesting numbers there. All right. Thanks so much Gina. Bloomberg news economy reported genus pilot. You're listening to Bloomberg politics policy and power on Bloomberg radio. Coming up more politicians are announcing presidential runs in an already crowded field of democratic candidates in twenty twenty. This is Bloomberg. Man, imagine being denied an apartment because of your religion or your race or because you have children or disability. It's so wrong. Yes. But who has the power to stop this? Each of us has the power. The law is on your side. It's illegal for landlords to discriminate because of race color religion, sex, national origin. Disability familiar status. If you suspect that you experienced housing discrimination complaint with HUD, so we can investigate it..

Bloomberg Gina Federal Reserve US Goldman Sachs Peter Barnes reporter Fred policy Trump UBS President June Grasso Google Paul Prentice university of California Berke HUD America Gabriel
"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Republican side who were driving policies that will change our tax code and change how we tax and spend and various other laws based on that based based on these numbers and it it almost feels like there's a study to support anything that anybody wants to to put forth is that basically where we are now in america it is and i think the great boom for the writings of thomas spaghetti in france showing how they will always all these disparities and these disparities between income brackets but the turnover is so high in these brackets that that it's almost meaningless and i remember there was one he says things like the top twenty percent off the world onto themselves and so forth now in the united states three quarters of all americans will be in the top twenty percent at some point in their lives so he's he's he's trying to get people the envy those in the top twenty percent which will in the cost of their lives including themselves thomas referring to capital in the twenty first century by thomas spaghetti which became the bible i mean almost literally the bible of of those who were pushing the income redistribution policies of the last five to ten years in fact i think barack obama famously had it in his hand when he was going off to vacation let's talk about the discrimination aspect of this book again the book is called discrimination and disparities and there's a lot discussed in your book thomas all about the conclusions that are reached about discrimination whether it's race gender ethnic profile what have you and and whether policies that are actually meant to cure the discrimination or disparities actually end up perpetuating them.

france united states thomas spaghetti barack obama america twenty percent three quarters ten years
"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Majority of the people this inequality report by thomas spaghetti and his associates uh is the evidence the smoking gun whatever you want to call it that this is a system that we ought to be debating and and criticizing rather than pretending that it is the normal that we all have to accept and yet the trump administration and the republicans in congress want a doubled down on trickle down he gets even more out there quoting a of uh relatively obscure speech the jack kennedy gave to the economic club of new york and 63 uh kennedy at that point seems to have drunks koolaid in in in two in the 1960 in the debate he said he wanted to to close loopholes to increase revenues to spend more on education more on housing i'm you know i've i've play that clip a million times um but they're they're they're doubling down on this what will be the result of that well you know here's the thing that mystifies so many of us at and when i say 'us i don't mean just one side of the political spectrum and among the communists i talked to wing economists center economists left wing economists and i'm struck as they are by the following agreement amongst us we do not agree on how we got into this mess and we do not agree on how to get out of it but we do agree that the conditions of the american economy are unspeakably sad and they have gotten worse over the last 30 years and this tax law will make you know the rich richer and the rest of us poorer instead of reacting and correcting for what's been going on it continues its it leaves you with the impression of system so uh skewed to the rich that it's spinning out of control of these folks who have already more than they know what to do list insisting on doing more so they have even still more in that kind of lunacy that makes you think over the midas touch or other stories like that when people literally destroy themselves because there's no counterbalancing in this society as we look at the centerpiece of this tax bills to cut corporate profits from thirty five percent as their official rate down to twenty two twenty two corporate tax almost fifty percent cuts in corporate taxes at the end.

thomas spaghetti congress jack kennedy new york tax law corporate tax official thirty five percent fifty percent 30 years
"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

"There is no public wealth there is only the taking of private free market american citizen money the taking of it and the giving to other american citizens there is no public wealth they use that term analogy to make you believe that the government had some pot of money it pat nevin benevolently generates from sources you'll never know and that went tax rate cuts happen that that pot of money somehow shrinks to give out goodies to others that is simply not the case tax rate cuts are simply giving a g i am using even their terminology ain't got caught i did are simply people keeping more the money they earned themselves you don't borrow money from china and spent a lot of time on this but it's necessary to pay for something you never talk all right secondly he's parodying this nonsense claim again that the wealthy you're going to benefit from this now this is crap and i'm up i wanna just make a few points as another fantastic piece in the examiner today i'll put in the show notes very well done and they talk about how cbs others at tim ryan types in the liberals keep parenting this point that these tax rates cut you're going to benefit the wealthy one of the points they're using his research by thomas or if you if you want to be to use the fake french accent told la p kitty i do not do french accents well joe is better at that type of style oh toma happy cottee i'll call him thomas spaghetti but is like spaghetti but gandhi.

china tim ryan tax rates thomas spaghetti free market pat nevin benevolently
"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

"Oh upi cottee i'll call him thomas spaghetti but is like spaghetti bumpy kenny pick up the keti wrote this book about inequality that what nuclear with the left a portions of the book had been largely debunked to based on questionable statistical methods the point of his book joe is an inequality has been increasing in the united states due to capital formation and basically a bunch of fat cats are living off investments in our working while the working class is getting their butts kicked inequality is an issue it's always in issue that is not debatable what is debatable is pettis assertions that it is somehow worse than the united states than his elsewhere why my bringing this up in defence of this tax plan their trotting out the again because this is what they do he published joe the world inequality report oh two one s t the quality report classes sounds bad it paints an unbelievably disingenuous picture and by the way the new yorker and other leftleaning rigs have doubled down on this and one of the new yorker actually said joe that in this side damning expose of the world inequality port the new yorker doubles down on the assertions and says that the united states has now more unequal than europe and china so oh yes because people are dying to leave the united states and wind up in europe and of course china that's a big problem jules we lost tens of millions of citizens last year leaving the united states to become chinese citizen to await what you just made that up yes i did as total crap of course in any common sense person knows that even liberals listening rent.

thomas spaghetti joe united states new yorker china pettis europe
"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Home your car and now you can in many parts of the world for your kids educations this is a if anything was an indictment of an economic system not working for the majority of the people this inequality report by thomas spaghetti and his associates uh is the evidence the smoking gun whatever you want to call it that this was a system that we ought to be debating and and criticizing rather than pretending that it is normal that we all have to accept and yet the trump administration and the republicans in congress won a doubled down on trickle down he got steven more out there quoting of uh relatively of scarce speech the jack kennedy gave to the economic club of new york and 63 uh kennedy at that point seems to have drunks koolaid in in in two in the 1960 in the debate he said he wanted to to close loopholes to increase revenues to spend more on education more on housing i'm you know i've play that clip a million times um but they're they're they're doubling down on this what will be the result of that well you know here's the thing it mystifies so many of us and when i say 'us i don't mean just one side of the political spectrum and among the communists i talk to rightwing economists center economist left wing economists and i'm struck as they are by the following agreement amongst us we do not agree on how we got into this mess and we do not agree on how to get out of it but we do agree that the conditions of the american economy are unspeakably dead and they have gotten worse over the last 30 years and this tax law will make you know the rich richer and the rest of us poorer instead of reacting and correcting for what's been going on it continues its it leaves you with the impression of system seoul uh due to the rich that it's spinning out of control of these folks who have already more than they know what to do list insisting on doing more so they have even still more in a kind of lunacy that makes you think over the midas touch or other stories like that when people literally destroy themselves because there's no counterbalancing in this society look at the centerpiece of.

thomas spaghetti congress jack kennedy new york tax law steven seoul 30 years
"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on The Good Fight

The Good Fight

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"thomas spaghetti" Discussed on The Good Fight

"Or whether or not you know you optimistic about economic future or whether or not you are in the kind of job that actually faces challenges in the future and then we can go in measure it in it's an an and and and actually konomi is going to become a video predictor of how you're going to vote and the sat conservative way of thinking about is to say that even that is too simple mind at that really has been a transformation from an economy in which lovey leaving his doubles from london relation to the next and people know that is a social fact about the whole society and now living standards have essentially stagnated and veges beats all of his anger and do not going to see any patents within the support of a country at all but even so it's still the converts driving it will which of this twofaced you think it is it's just that we've been looking at too simplistic valuables woods of something about how the economy is doing with of pervades the spirit of the age so the on any variables for us to find an sort of through this in yet it's an economy i again thank night also louisville i'll order and as i just paulo to peace on this savannah but he wants to look it up in the review of international political economy the very simply let us the doubling of level at living standards period you talking above the twenty glorious as the french follow elavia talayan town for even more you boom which was from the 40s through the '60s would you had not just a doubling of national anthem you had in europe travelling of national income in some places it laws is thomas spaghetti reminds us historically unprecedented and it was based upon a unique configuration which was basically social configuration were capital was very much on the bus foot.

national income thomas spaghetti london louisville review of international politi elavia talayan europe