17 Burst results for "Thomas Pynchon"

"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

04:10 min | 6 months ago

"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

"Version of the scope bar, where we three hang out and groove to things we've heard, watched and read in the previous fortnight. I just have to add at this point that somebody did form a band in the late 70s called sick dick and the Volkswagens. You can listen to them on YouTube. What's the racket? What a horrible racket. But you have to go over there to listen to that. I'm afraid. A lot of listeners also get to hear their names read out on the show as a mark of our thanks and appreciation. John, you go first. Okay. Henrietta magistrate, Suzanne Osmond, Andrew male. Thank you. Finally. John Herod. Eleanor kleck horn, Johanna. Daniel Taub, thank you, Alan Beck, Martin Riley, Leigh Anne Crowley, veronique, Taylor McNeil. Thank you all. We're also delighted to welcome the Uber loyal backlist to supporters Joe Chopra McGowan and leann Hollister, who've both promoted themselves to our guild of master storytellers the highest tier in the back listed firm. Thank you both. Thank you guys. Thank you. Thank you for your generosity and all our patrons for enabling us to continue to do what we love and enjoy. We have as ney is now traditionally we have to hand over to our guests to ask them before they go. Is there anything I know Sarah has got nothing left to say if she could if she could see if we can coax her out of her shell one more time. Sam, is there anything you would like to add that we haven't said about the crying of lot 49 or about Thomas pynchon? Should he hear this? What would you like to say? I would like to congratulate him on inventing a Jewish volatility called Genghis Cohen. Highly specific, but I've taken in good part. Sarah is there anything I'm in I know there's lots we haven't covered, but is there anything in particular you would like to say about.

Henrietta magistrate Suzanne Osmond Andrew male John Herod Eleanor kleck Daniel Taub Alan Beck Martin Riley Leigh Anne Crowley Taylor McNeil Joe Chopra McGowan leann Hollister veronique Johanna dick YouTube ney John Sarah Thomas pynchon
"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

04:32 min | 6 months ago

"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

"Sarah, what would you say? For me, one of the reasons why I love this book so much is that although it comes so early in his career, I think there is a falling off afterwards. And he was, I think he is somebody that we could describe to a certain extent, aesthetically is a little bit of a victim of his own success because his ideas are so huge. And I think his career kind of follows that entropic model that I was talking about. He's not going to go to a certain extent. The books just start to fall apart there, but not fall apart. I mean, I'm not saying that they're bad, right? But he can't control them in quite the same way. And this book is so rigidly controlled. And it's almost like this little prose poem. And one of the reasons why I think it's useful to think about it in relation to Gatsby is that he is that he keeps it short and simple and compact and it lets all of it get really explosive, whereas all of the other books get quite diffuse. And he is allowed to be a little bit self indulgent because he is the great American writer. And so for me, I can't quite, I enjoy this novel as always. I mean, we heard why he's very funny. He's very always brilliant. It's all great. But this one to me is the masterpiece because for whatever reason, he forced himself to reign it in. And then it gets explosive. And so I feel like it's not completely a question of fashion, but also whether his books continue to quite pull it off in quite the same way that this one does. Well, I want to before we say our farewells. I think we should end the pinch only way. The counterbalance what Sarah has just said with the bit from against the day is it, Sam, that you have here. I would like to return us to the pros to the pension prose from another book because it's just amazing piece of writing. Yeah, I think this is lovely. It's buried in that enormous book. And it's when two of the characters kitten Dali they're in Venice and their parting, it's a farewell scene. Around them travelers drank wine out of cheap murano souvenirs, clap shoulders, brushed away leaf and petal debris from last minute bouquets, argued over who had failed to pack what. Dali was supposed to be past the melancholy of departure. No longer held by its gravity yet, as if she could see the entire darkened reach of what lay ahead. She wanted now to step close, embrace him this boy, for as long as it took to establish some twofold self, renounce the somber fate he seemed so sure of. He was gazing at her, as if having just glimpsed the simple longitude of what he was about to do. As if desiring to come into some shelter, though maybe only her idea of it. So, like terms on each side canceling, they only stood there. Curtains of Venetian mists between them, among the steam sirens and clamoring boatmen, and both young people understood a profound opening of the distinction between those who would be here exactly here day after tomorrow to witness the next gathering before passage. And those stepping off the night precipice of this journey, who would never be here,.

Sarah Gatsby Dali Sam Venice
"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

05:39 min | 6 months ago

"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

"But entropy, of course, is about heat death. Now, as I said, I think this is a book about death, right? Fundamentally, it's a book about grief. And one of the things that Oedipus finds herself stumbling on is this is this interest in the ways in which physical entropy that entropy of thermodynamics gradual running down of the world, the gradual running down of matter because of thermodynamics, which is the running down of earth the running down of stars, but also of course the running down of human life. Actually, meshes with another metaphor where entropy is also about noise and communication theory. We all know noise means now. Pigeon had to explain it in 1966, but the interference between the message and the meaning and the attempt to get there, right? So what pension really I think begins with here is that is the beauty of this one word linking these two ideas and the whole book is really about how those two ideas come together. Maxwell's demon is and where it comes into the post offices that Maxwell's demon is an image of so that when they were trying to attempt to explain thermodynamics, there was this early theory that basically there was a little man who sordid the atoms. Oh yeah, he just got a little like a male guy. Started the hop from the cold. And he kept the hot things hot in the cold things cold. And then you'd have kind of started moving them around, right? And what's important about this is that the idea was that it was the sorting they thought that sorting didn't necessarily require an input of further energy, right? Because the irreversible process is the energy will eventually run down. You can't keep putting energy in, right? And eventually you're going to run out of it, right? So the search for the irreversible process is an attempt to find something that doesn't require an input of energy. And if we can do that, we reverse that. If we don't, that's the idea, right? That's the theory. I don't think you can plot spoil a mystery that has no solution. So I'm just going to say that to me, what makes this book so ecstatic? And it is, to me, it's an ecstatic experience reading this book. Like, I get goosebumps every single time I read it, because what I believe pension does is posit that metaphor reverses the irreversible process because it explodes meaning without us having to put anything into it. The metaphors create pulsing stelliferous meaning. And that's why it's such a dizzying experience and why I said at the beginning it's about the ecstasy and the insanity because the language goes places we don't expect it to go. And one of the things he does in this compact little novel is create these patterns that control it. And that resist entropy. The whole thing is constantly threatening to pull apart from him all of these ideas pulling in all of these directions, but he has these metaphors, these anchoring metaphors that hold it together. That was amazing. You asked, I asked you a hard question you answered it. Effortlessly. But I want to ask Sam, right? Sam, can I ask you.

Maxwell Oedipus Pigeon Sam
"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

05:02 min | 6 months ago

"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

"Yeah. To code word, of course it's a code word. Deborah Rogers literally agent knew him, well, knew him a little and knew his wife, who was also literally very well. She said to me, you know, top goes out. Yeah. He has friends. He has a normal life. They are covered for him. I think he forms full sort of perfectly between two stools because the sorts of newspapers that would want to doorstep pension aren't going to be interested in him because they're redesigned interested. And the sort of newspapers that are really interested in pension. They'd regard as bad manners. Exactly. Exactly. The observer of The New York Times wouldn't do that sort of story. So he reminds me that that idea of him being a recluse is really like how people felt about the late Scott walker, which is that Scott walker would say, well, I'm not really recluse. I just don't do public stuff when I don't want to do it. And Scott walker would famously, I mean, I wish who wouldn't want to do this. This is just common sense. He'd have his phone plugged in for one hour a week. So if you wanted to get Scott for any business stuff, you had to call him on a Wednesday between 4 o'clock and 5 o'clock. And the rest of the time you couldn't get him. Because he was working and he was, you know, doing the stuff that he wanted to do without having to deal with anything else. And I feel like you say that's surely what pinch is pinching just doesn't want to be in that game. But he wants to be in all the other games. Yeah, yeah. So I was going to say sort of slight sidebar, but it is one of the great satisfactions in my professional life that have reason to believe that Thomas pynchon possesses a photograph of me at a Santa hat reading in here in vice. You're going to have to unpack that one for a 7. It's too good. Well, well, for about a year, I was writing the lead book review for the daily mail and a red Christmas they wanted me to do Christmas books to read. So the organ I was working for. Insisted on doing it here advice and obviously it big the bell that wanted to photograph. And so they took me into this hotel in sometime in October. And they had a Christmas tree and they put a son to hat on me and I had to put a big stack of books and obviously the book I chose to be photographed reading was in here in place which is your listeners may know is a kind of all about a sort of weed head 1970s private eye. Which is again not perfectly daily bell stuff and I think that might have been why I lost the gig shortly on. Jeopardy will just set, oh, I said that to Tom..

Scott walker Deborah Rogers The observer of The New York T Thomas pynchon Scott Santa Tom
"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

03:53 min | 6 months ago

"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

"Nikki. What is Thomas pynchon known for? Oh no. Okay, excellent. What's the answer? He's a novelist, Nikki. Yeah, okay, yeah. No, no, that's fine. No. What's he known by? He's known for writing a lot of 49. He's playing it straight. John, next question, what happened to Thomas pynchon? What happened to Thomas pincher? That's such a big question to answer. I mean, Thomas pincher became very, very famous. And has remained famous, although we haven't nailed the Izzy as famous as he used to be, is he is important and influential as he used to be. I love Sam earlier said that we kind of grew up surrounded by pensions children. Well, let's ask Sam the next one. What is Thomas pynchon's writing style? The answer Google gives this probably post modern, but I'd say pinch onion. Pretty good. Brown we go, the spinning wheel. And finally, Sarah to you, the question people wanted to know above all other questions on Google is Thomas pynchon real. I mean, I can't personally attest to it, but I have reason to believe that he is real and I have met people who purport to have met him. So I've got 1° of separation. So I think he's real, but I can't prove it, and of course this is very much a novel about paranoia and about how do we know if we know what we think we know is true or not. So that was such a great question. And does it matter? Exactly. I could get very paranoid wondering. Someone rushed to had dinner with him, didn't he and said, and when they asked because I think he'd given it a nice review of Vineland when a lot of people were not being anywhere they had dinner and when asked about it afterwards all rushed he would say he was the Thomas pynchon. I wanted him to be. Which I think is pretty good answer. Well, he's famous for being supposedly a recluse and in the 1997 CNN set a reporter on his trail. And here's a little excerpt of the piece that they ran back then. One of the 20th century's most respected novelists, many of his fans don't even know what he looks like. Senator Charles Feldman draws to pierce the mystery and Thomas pincher. He's the Greta Garbo of literature. And this fascinates quite a few readers. Some of them have tried to seek him out. Others suspect that he's a kind of a Wizard of Oz type character behind the scenes who has access to all sorts of special knowledge. Fans may be disappointed to learn pension leads us somewhat conventional life in New York City. In fact, should you pass the now 60 year old author on a busy Manhattan sidewalk. You wouldn't even know. It's true point CNN caught up with pynchon, and he is among the people you have been looking at. At pensions request and after much debate, CNN has opted not to point them out in the crowd. Pension told CNN by phone, a rare public comment. Let me be unambiguous. I prefer not to be photographed. And as for the notion that he is a recluse, pension told us and we quote my belief is that recluse is a code word, generated by journalists, meaning doesn't like to talk to reporters. He's actually a recluse and not an author, not just he's famous for being a recluse. That's correct. That was a it's a real. He's a reclusive Manhattan. He's not a recluse..

Thomas pynchon Thomas pincher Nikki Sam Izzy Google CNN Senator Charles Feldman Vineland Sarah John Brown Greta Garbo pierce pynchon New York City Manhattan
"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

02:50 min | 6 months ago

"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

"Flap copy. Is there a secret privately owned post office operating on that? There is no. Is there a secret privately owned post office operating in competition with the state monopolies? A slightly sinister method of communication for those who have opted out of our society, this is the question that increasingly bugs oedipal mass. Heroin of Thomas pynchon's second work of fiction, the crying of lot 49. Pynchon, whose first novel V was widely and enthusiastically reviewed, was described by George Plimpton in The New York Times book review as a young writer of staggering promise. In his new book, there is the same combination of wild hilarity and grim reality that made V so notable. Pensions work has been called avant garde as indeed it is. But it's basic concern with breaking the walls of human isolation is as old as literature itself. The crying of lot 49 takes place in California. It is the story of oedipal mass, a young woman who finds herself appointed executive tricks of a former lover's estate. This is annoying enough. But when it leads to the gradual revelation of the secret postal system of the outcasts, discovered, of course, through a bizarre Philadelphia. Editor begins to want out unhappily by this time she is in too deeply with among others a fake British musical group called the paranoids, a child actor turned lawyer called metzger and a whole gang of dangerous zanies trying to kick the love habit. Thomas pynchon is a young writer, he is splendidly talented and the crying of lot 49 is a book that will sell to the ever growing market of pension fans. That's pretty good. I think that's great. I think that's really good. If you were coming to that cold, I can definitely detect some Tom at work in the latter stages of that, right? You didn't usually talented young copyrighted Philippines..

Thomas pynchon George Plimpton Pynchon The New York Times California metzger Philadelphia Tom Philippines
"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

03:53 min | 6 months ago

"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

"And the images that even the night of deliverance couldn't break her out of the tower in which she's trapped, which is to suggest that he's more than just an ex-boyfriend, right? He's the night of deliverance and even he couldn't get her out. I actually think this book is also a love story. I think she wasn't profoundly in love with Pearson variety. And part of that comedy there is a way of deflecting around all of that. Because she goes on this quest to find out whether he cheated death, whether he left her something, not money. She's actually money at all. Whether he left her son, whether he constructed something meaningful for her. That could help them find this connection and whether it will make sense of the world, whether it will make sense of her life, whether it will make sense of anything. And then it spirals her into this paranoia. She seeks it. So it's about grief to me. And we were talking a minute ago about a Samsung, these wonderful suspended clauses. And these metaphors these riffs, right? And yeah, pension is like, he's just showing what he can do. It's a tour to force this novel of a 150 pages. But he can also write beautifully simple piercing sentences. And there's one where she's drinking some dandelion wine that has been made from the dandelions that there was a cemetery that has been turned into a freeway. And somebody has preserved some of the deadlines, and it was Latin that pierce owned. And she's gone on this quest and she's given this bottle of dandelion wine that's glass of dandelion wine. She has a little bit of tipsy again and she does in the issues in the opening scene there. And the narration says, no oedipa thought sad. As if the dead really do persist even in a bottle of wine. It's an incredibly beautiful sentence, right? I mean, I just did that you love a test that I just did that from memory because it's a book a sentence that has stuck in my head. It's Shakespearean, I think. And it's rhythms. And it is so simple and lovely, but it's also getting at the heart of it that thought oedipa sad. I just want to orientate listeners if they're wondering, we're still answering Nikki's question. And perhaps always will not. You know, twice twice, it had never occurred to me, but the word buffering has come up, but that's sitting looking at that little spinning wheel. That's what reading, that's what the book's like, Nikki. That's sadness that Sarah talks about is absolutely integral, and it sort of throughout picture, and I think that's one of the things that's really makes him so so special and sort of unique. People think of him as being clever and think of him as being kind of antique and all the silly names and the puns and the dark jokes and the kind of Looney Tunes zaniness of it. But there is, and it's a line again, I think it's from against the day that I found that he talks about how it's the incorporation of death into what would otherwise be only a carnival ride. There is a carnival ride quality to pension,.

Pearson paranoia Samsung pierce Nikki Sarah
"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

03:33 min | 6 months ago

"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

"A vanishingly small instant in which change had to be confronted at last for what it was. Where it could no longer disguise itself for something innocuous, like an average rate, where velocity dwelled in the projectile, though the projectile be frozen in mid flight, where death dwelled in the cell, though the cell be looked on, at its most quick. She knew that the sailor had seen worlds no other band had seen. If only because there was that high magic to low puns, because DTs must give access to deities of spectra beyond the known sun, music made purely of Antarctic loneliness and fright. But nothing she knew of would preserve them or him. She gave him goodbye, walked downstairs, and then on, in the direction he told her. Wow. I mean, just wow. Everyone who takes part in this episode will be awarded their cub scout reading badge afterwards. Because this is really, I mean, it's not easy necessarily to read, but what I get from both of you is your pleasure. In the. Your pure pleasure in pensions pleasure in making the language dance. Right? There's a sort of the luxuriating in the vocabulary, which I could see Mitch your face was utterly transported there while Sam was reading. It's just so it's so rich, that's the thing. It's profound and beautiful, which is, you know, what else do you want from fiction really? I think he has the most astonishing ear. I mean, the cadences, and one of the things that's interesting, you say they're tricky to read and you're right there, I think, because one of the things loves to do is produce a great long sentence of feeble series of sentences where he has these suspended clauses. Right in the middle and sort of holds off to the main to the weather sentences heading. Can you give me I'm not saying give me an example, but when you say a suspended clause, what do you mean? The sentence is sort of defers constantly the sort of completion, so the safety is walking to the light labs, the Cleveland is lapsing vehicle, the true paranoid. You're heading to the verb. There's always something else interposing between the beginning of the sentence and the main verb. Exactly. I mean, the first sentence of the book is a brilliant example of that. Because it's okay. One summer afternoon, misses oedipal mass came home from a Tupperware party whose hostess had put perhaps too much kirsch in the fondue to find that she oedipa had been named executor, all she supposed executive tricks of the estate of one Pearce in virality. A California real estate mogul who had once lost $2 million in his spare time, but still had assets numerous and tangled enough to make the job of sorting it all out more than honorary. Something gleeful about it, isn't there? The sense that, oh, look, I could go crazy. I could go there. But let's also remember there that so what we know as we read the novel is that she's discovered that this is the death of her lover. Yeah. And in the past, what I just read, she calls him the night of deliverance..

Mitch Sam oedipa Cleveland kirsch Pearce California
"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

03:40 min | 6 months ago

"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

"Reference joke, you had to balance it with a gag of Homer banging his head and as long as you as long as you have both those things circling one another, then the show worked. It's Shakespearean, right? It's that basic concept of it's that you have to the tragic and the comic has to be in balance for the thing to work. Can I say one thing to answer Nicki's question just because I feel there is also another line from the novel that does answer the question and I always say to my students because this is a book that is it's a quest and it's a mystery. And it's a puzzle. And about halfway through the novel character says something. And I always say to my students, if you're reading a book that's a puzzle and a mystery and at the center point of the book, a character shouts communication is the key. Then communication is the key. Communication is the key to the puzzle. In my view, and it does actually connect all of the things that we've already been talking about as particularly what John was saying there. I think that the postal service is an email as well networks that the importance of communication or the attempt to create a true communication to find true communication. Okay, so what we're going to do in a minute is I am going to, I'm going to read you the jacket blurb from the U.S. first edition. Before people knew the crying of lot 49 was the crying of a lot of 49. Somebody had to try and write a sales passion. We're going to hear what that is. But Sam, could you read us a bit from the book as well? So we can get some more of the pynchon pros. Well, this is another person that I think as well as being extraordinarily beautiful. Has that sadness that Sarah talks about? Has that concern with with metaphor with connection? And it comes from passage after she's been wondering the streets in this sort of fugal state where she suddenly stops seeing the muted post horn everywhere. And she encounters an old drug sailor who has the muted post called tattooed on his hands. And she sees him in his sitting on this sort of radio mattress and she realizes he's dying. And she says, it astonished her to think that so much could be lost. Even the quantity of hallucination belonging just to the sailor, that the world would bear no further trace of. She knew, because she had held him, that he suffered DTs. Behind the initials was a metaphor, a delirium tremens, a trembling, unfollowing of the mind's plowshare. The saint whose water can light lamps, the clairvoyant, whose laps in recall as the breath of God, the true paranoid, whom all is organized in spheres, joyful or threatening about the central pulse of himself, the dreamer whose puns probe ancient fetid shafts and tunnels of truth, all act in the same special relevance to the word, or whatever it is the word is there, buffering, to protect us from. The act of metaphor, then, was a thrust at truth, and a lie. Depending on where you were inside, safe, or outside, lost. Oedipa did not know where she was. Trembling, unfurled. She slipped sidewise, screeching back across grooves of years to hear again the earnest, high voice of her second or third collegiate love, ray closing, bitching among us and the syncopated tugging of a cavity about his freshman calculus. DT God help this old tattooed man meant also time differential..

Nicki Homer Sam John Sarah U.S. Oedipa ray
"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

03:25 min | 6 months ago

"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

"Can manifest as a sort of understanding that absolutely everything is interconnected in everything rhymes with everything else and everything is a metaphor for everything else. So it's this kind of hall of mirrors and hall of echoes that I think is what it's getting at. It's almost a way of seeing the world rather than a series of events. And as I think you said to me, and certainly that's the sense I got from the that passage Sarah red. When you say what it's about, when we try and we were having a laugh really with the idea that you can say what it's about. But there's something fractal about it, right? The sense that it goes round and reflects in on itself and everything's connected to everything else. The serif we ask you, what's this about? Well, you just said, well, it's about those four things. No, I said that's the plot. That's what happens. So it is partly about those four things, right? But I will say something different about what I think it's about. I'm ready for me. I'm going to quote pynchon from this novel here. So I don't want to take credit for this phrase. In fact, we'll come back to this phrase. It's about the high magic of low puns. It's about the ecstasy and insanity of language as a desperate search for meaning that we may want may not want to know. And it's about how this kind of antic surface of language and comedy and irony and energy is actually dancing on the grave of a profound grief and loss. All right. John mitchinson, what is in there, Nikki you asked John, you asked John. John I don't get it. You will by the end, Nikki. Among other things, Nikki, it's about it's about the importance of the postal service. That's true. One of the things that really struck me about this was this is a book written before email. And the idea of people's lives bleeding and leaking into one another. Which is affected now, I suppose electronically. I mean, this is a novel that is somehow manages to be brilliant about the digital age when the digital age was in its infancy. So the idea that having networks and networks within networks. And that those networks can turn very, very nasty. There's kind of the alt right of predicted in this novel in a really sort of creepy way. So it's about the connections that generate meaning, but the connections also that repel people from one another. So what was the phrase you highlighted there from pinching the low? The high magic of low puns. Okay, the high magic of low puns said that what that makes me think of is which seems relevant is that pynchon, of course, who has made very, very few public appearances over the years. Almost none, we have almost no recordings of his voice, but one of the recordings that we do have a pension is from his guest appearances in The Simpsons. With a paper bag over said right back over and we know that Matt Groening is a huge pinch and fan and we know that pinch and was a big fan of The Simpsons. And one of the things I remember, Matt Groening said that they discovered very early in The Simpsons is for the balance was really important. Yin and Yang was really important in the gags in The Simpsons. So that every time you included a high concept.

Sarah red Nikki John mitchinson pynchon John Matt Groening Yin Yang
"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

04:54 min | 6 months ago

"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

"And at the end of the first chapter, she has a memory of this trip that they took together to Mexico. And it sets up everything really that the novel is going to do through this extended metaphor. It's a comparison to a real painting, which is worth everyone knowing as they listen to this as well. This is one slightly long paragraph. As things developed, she was to have all manner of revelations. Hardly about Pearson varity, or herself. But about what remained yet had somehow before this stayed away. There had hung the sense of buffering insulation. She had noticed the absence of an intensity, as if watching a movie just perceptibly out of focus that the projectionist refused to fix. And that also gently conned herself into the curious, rapunzel like role of a pensive girl, somehow, magically, prisoner among the pines and salt fogs of kinneret, looking for somebody to say, hey, let down your hair. When it turned out to be pierce, she'd happily pulled out the pins and curlers, and down at tumbled in its whispering dainty avalanche. Only when Pearson got maybe halfway up or her lovely hair turned through some sinister sorcery into a great unanchored wig and Downey fell on his ass. But dauntless, perhaps using one of his many credit cards for a shin. He'd slipped the lock on her tower door, and come up the complex stairs. Which had true guile come more naturally to him. He'd have done to begin with. But all that had then got on between them had really never escaped the confinement of that tower. In Mexico City, they somehow wandered into an exhibition of paintings by the beautiful Spanish exile Romania sparrow. In the central painting of a triptych, titled Bourdain de almanzo. Where a number of frail girls with heart shaped faces huge eyes hair. Prisoners, in the top room of a circular tower. Embroidering a kind of Tapestry which spilled out the slit windows, and into a void. Seeking hopelessly to fill the void. For all the other buildings and creatures all the waves, ships and force of the earth were contained in this Tapestry, and the Tapestry was the world. Oedipa perverse. Had stood in front of the painting and cried. No one had noticed she wore dark green bubble shades. For a moment, she'd wondered if the seal around her sockets were tight enough to allow the tears simply to go on and fill up the entire lead space and never drawn. She could carry the sadness of the moment with her that way forever. See the world refracted through those tears, those specific tears, as if indices as yet unfound varied and important ways from cry.

Pearson varity Bourdain de almanzo Mexico pierce Pearson Downey Mexico City Romania
"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

05:30 min | 6 months ago

"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

"God. There have some to tell that nothing. Cities. One neighbor. Another gift set. It will find me. God, like a dumb because I am back in. At our stylish, I, John, I did read this two years ago. I thought it was all right. And it's depressing to say that when I came back to it when I knew you were going to be talking about it, I found it jaw dropping in for all the wrong reasons in terms of because of what's happening in the world at the moment. I'm going to go tonight. I'm going to read the whole thing again. Really, really unbelievably powerful. And as you say, clairvoyant. It's powerful. I think the final final poem is this one. And it ends after this. There are some of the sign language that has been developed through the book for the people in the town, the sign language says the town watches earth story. That's the final as it were poem in the book and it's just pictures of hands on the page. The town watches earth story, which is a kind of, again, this sense that somehow things endure that things happen, buildings are destroyed, lives are destroyed, but there is something that endures and this final poem that he's going to read gives a sense of that. Our country has surrendered. He is later. So I will say none of this happened. The shops were open. We were happy. And when the sea puppet shows in the park, on Sam, I doubts people dim the lights and teach their children to sign. Our country is a stage, fun battle, smudge, visit, and our hands don't be afraid. A child science story at our Patreon smart. The avenue 70. But for the squeaks of.

John Sam
"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

05:14 min | 6 months ago

"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

"The ancient looking painting of a sparrow like figure on stage in white organ Y flanked by red curtains, one arm raised in the direction of the gallery, was the best thing I had. It is what it is, the man said. She gets 4000 pounds for the painting and she In the full knowledge of what the daughter will do with it and takes the granddaughter. So that's loved and missed by Susie boy that's absolutely wonderful novel and it's come it's out now in harbor and it's published in paperback in June and who's published it. John, what have you been reading? I have been reading a collection of poetry by the Ukrainian American poet Ilya Kaminsky. Called death republic, which was published in 2019. And it was published to very, very good reviews, both here and in the U.S.. I suppose I started reading it because I like everybody I've been I've been looking reading listening to stuff that helps you kind of pick some kind of emotional trajectory through what's happening in Ukraine at the moment. And I have to say this book reading it now. I'm not sure what I would have felt. I'm sure I'd have admired it if I'd read it two years ago. But it really feels like it has a kind of clairvoyant power. It's unique, I suppose, in collections of purchase I've been reading recently and that has a narrative structure. He described it himself as a fairytale in verse. It tells a story in two acts. It's like a play in two acts. Concerning a group of characters in a city under siege. Being besieged and without giving away too much. Two of the characters are a puppeteers. There's the sequence starts with the murder of a soldier of a small boy in a public square. And gradually as you work through the narrative that the second half of the narrative concerns another, both the husband and wife of puppeteers and have a baby and then the second half is about another older puppeteer. Who looks after the baby, but gradually there is a lot of there's a lot of death through the sequence..

Ilya Kaminsky Susie harbor Ukraine John U.S.
"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

03:13 min | 6 months ago

"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

"Self esteem. Self image. Whatever parcels of guilt or inadequacy Ruth may have picked up in her 60 odd years before we meet her, how are those in turn catalyzed by having to deal with her daughter Eleanor and Ellen's decision to have a daughter of her own? I mean, in narrative terms what it means is that Ruth effectively kidnaps Eleanor's daughter for, as she tells herself, her granddaughter's protection, but it's also made clear that. Bringing up the granddaughter becomes an opportunity to try and do things right. That she feels may have gone wrong, even though nothing may have gone wrong in relationship in relation to her daughter. And if I've made that sound a bit Chewy, that's my fault, that's not Suzy boy's fault because it's written with such clarity and with such emotional poise. It's also sort of quietly experimental. The narrative voice switches around in a way which is sort of ambitious and risky. And I just found it, I found it incredibly moving. Not sentimentally so, really deeply moving. I had to keep pausing between the chapters to try and weigh up. What had happened to any one of those four women at any given moment? And I found it profoundly illuminating. So Susie, if you listen to this, thank you very, very much. I feel like I learned so much. Can I just read two paragraphs? The start of chapter two, a particularly like to draw listener's attention to the first sentence of this. I mean, if one would be so happy if one wrote this sentence and Susie Boyd did write it. So here it is. On the morning of the christening, I took the sickert in a Sainsbury's carrier to a man off Bond street. I'm just going to read that again because I like it so much. On the morning of the christening, I took the sickert in a Sainsbury's carrier to a man of Bond street. We stood facing each other while I muttered something formal and incoherent. We were in a darkish Italian cafe three quarters empty. 12 shiny lozenge shaped rosewood effect tables, not much wider than ironing boards and Elvis droning on and on about missed opportunities. I was nervous. I felt shipwrecked almost. Ship wracked. He took the brown paper from the painting, narrowed his mouth, dipped his shoulders. He was organizing himself for disappointment I could see. I stalled it up his little insincere routine. Thought it might come in useful later, the man was wiry, and weak chested, with a stale dickensian pallor. Nicotine stones on all ten of his fingers..

Eleanor Ruth Susie Boyd Ellen Suzy Sainsbury Susie Elvis
"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

04:42 min | 6 months ago

"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

"Gale Jones imagine that. As Gail Jones publishes novel after novel at the moment, incredible. I think we inspired her, don't you think? Yeah. William. He's got one coming out too. And she made a cameo appearance on a priest miss not so priest episode as well, which was great. Johnny. The book we're here to discuss is the crying of lot 49. The second novel by Thomas pynchon, first published in the U.S. in 1966 by JB lippincott and co, although excerpts that appeared the previous year in esquire and cavalier magazines. Its first UK publication was in 1967 by Jonathan cape. Usually described, we might come on to this as a classic of postmodern fiction, it follows the attempts of a young Californian woman oedipal mass to make sense of why she's been made executives of a former lover's estate. As we will doubtless discover, the book is impossible to describe succinctly. It's a brilliant and intricate satire in 60s America a gripping page Turner, a literary hall of mirrors which scorches its way into the reader's consciousness through the strange beauty of its language, your destiny of its ideas and the zaniness of its plot and characters. Anyway, before we start comparing notes on jacobean tragedy or trolling Instagram in search of muted post horns, Andy, what have you been reading this week? So I've been reading a book that came out last year by art former guest on blacklisted Susie boyt. It's her 7th novel and it's called loved and missed. And. Susie said something to me after we recorded the episode. John berry man, wasn't it? John berryman and the dream songs, and Sam, I know you're a big fan, aren't you? We were talking about what the role that alcohol and addiction played in berryman's life and work. Both those things, life and work. And she said to me, you know, my novel that I've.

Gale Jones Gail Jones JB lippincott and co Thomas pynchon Jonathan cape esquire U.S. Johnny William Susie boyt Turner UK John berryman Andy John berry Susie Sam berryman
"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

05:41 min | 6 months ago

"thomas pynchon" Discussed on Backlisted

"How's your book going? It's going. It's going. It's going. It's going in on Monday. I feel like you've been on before Sarah and you've been up against a deadline. And so is appearing on back listed. Does that help you finish a book? Or does it delay the book? We will have to see what people think of it when it comes out, whether I felt the final hurdle because I came on tonight. Because I've definitely got to blame you if reviewers don't like it. That seems fair. Because I could have fixed everything about it in the two hours that we're going to take to do this. If it's bad. That's right. Sam, where are you calling from? I'm calling from glamorous east finchley in North London. Have you managed to get out of east Finch the much? Barely at all. I haven't been to my office at the spectator for approximately two years now. Wow. So I'm a complete shutting. I'm becoming more controversial by the day. Aren't we all? I mean, we're all we're all now. Exactly. The world pinching dictated yet? Dear. Johnny, should we start? Why don't we? Why don't we kick on in? Hello and welcome to backlist did the podcast that gives new life to old books. Today you find us in the mid 60s, squinting into the sunshine behind the wheel of a rented Impala as we speed down the freeway towards the city of San narciso and Southern California. In front of us looms of our sprawl of houses to the left miles of barbed wire topped fencing, and the entrance to the gallic division of yo yodan Inc, the city's biggest employer, its main gateway, flanked by two 60 foot massage. I'm John mitchinson, the publisher of unbound, the platform where readers crowdfund the books they really want to read. And I'm Andy Miller, author of the year of reading dangerously, and today we welcome back to Friends of the podcasts. Dame Sam leith and dame Sarah churchwell, welcome back to both of you. Thank you. It's very nice pre promotion. Thank you. It's lovely to be back. Two days. I don't know why I said that anyway. Nothing like a day. Yeah, exactly. I've usually been called a dead we got the day my worst people than you. Can you spare a dime? Sam is literary editor of the spectator magazine and the author of a handful of books, including you talking to me, rhetoric from Aristotle to Obama and right to the point that's right with the W right to the point how to be clear, correct and persuasive on the page. He's now working on a book about the history of children's literature. And he joined us for the 96th episode of back listed, which was dedicated to Ray Bradbury and the illustrated man, and also Sam is the host of the spectators books podcast, aren't you Sam very good? Is that your whale? Is that podcast currently up for an award at the British press Guild Awards? I suspect that the answer is no but yours is. Is it oh how. Nice of.

San narciso yo yodan Inc John mitchinson Sam North London Dame Sam leith dame Sarah churchwell Sarah Andy Miller Johnny spectator magazine Southern California Obama Ray Bradbury British press Guild Awards
"thomas pynchon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"thomas pynchon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"All right let's play some games everybody our first game is about gifts you know they say it's the thought that counts but why do we only say that when the give socks let's meet our contestants first up Tyler part timers you're a community outreach coordinator and you're currently reading your way through Agatha Christie novels yes so Hercule Poirot so she's got I think twenty two novels and then a hundred and twenty two short stories so comes out to forty four books and I just started curtain which is the last one so and I love them all I will try to guess who the murderer is a not always just blows me away that these books are written back in the twenties and thirties and forties and I always think I can figure out who this is and I think I've just one out of all the story yeah so so fun when you ring in we're going to hear this your opponent is any Riley your high school English teacher thank you I am your huge Thomas Pynchon fan and every time you finish a book you get a tattoo I DO yes okay so is this is name to the pension are you have an arm that is arm in arm all right let's describe one of the tattoos for our listeners okay on the on the top of my shoulder I have a.

outreach coordinator Hercule Poirot Agatha Christie Thomas Pynchon