20 Episode results for "Thomas Keller"

A Fancy Dinner Isnt a Moral Failure

The BreakPoint Podcast

05:09 min | 2 weeks ago

A Fancy Dinner Isnt a Moral Failure

"Is charging for an expensive meal at an exclusive restaurant. A moral failure of the chef. It's not just an economic question. Not just a foodie question. The worldview question for the colson center. Johnstone street this is break point earlier this month when celebrity chef thomas keller was interviewed by. Npr about a new cookbook. His interviewer didn't seem all that interested in recipes instead. He wanted to talk about the eight hundred fifty dollars per play. Price tag at keller's recently reopened san francisco restaurant with so many people struggling financially during the pandemic said the reporter. Is it really fair to charge that much. Or is it to use his words. Tone-deaf that an interview which was most likely intended to be just a puff piece turned into this social justice. Diatribe is just further proof that worldview affects everything now to be clear i cannot ever spending eight hundred fifty dollars for a single meal but the reporters problem had nothing to do with prudence or with financial stewardship. The interviewers problem was with the price tag which meant not that some people would not have access to food but that everyone would not have equal access to thomas keller's food in other words. His was the problem with a free market. And of course having a problem with the free market is just all the rage. These days often called. Capitalism is a term popularized by karl marx intended to be derogatory. The free market is an economic system unlike communism it is not a complete worldview in other words. It doesn't try to answer questions about the ultimate nature of reality who we are. Why we're here. what's right and wrong. What's ultimately the problems in the world. And how can they be fixed. This is a significant distinction the failures of communism everywhere that it has ever been tried is due to the fact that it assumes wrongly about the nature of reality morality and human nature you see it's failures are intrinsic to the system. A free market on the other hand is premised on allowing consumers and entrepreneurs to make their own decisions. It's failures are the failures of the human beings. It involves economic freedom for a largely moral people leads to the explosion of wealth to innovation even generosity economic freedoms outside of a moral framework can lead to exploitation and greed. Dust and said of the total is in control of a communist framework of free market lanes on this day to provide legal protections and religious institutions to provide moral instruction or it should arthur brooks president. Emeritus the american enterprise institute and a professor at harvard business school once said that he supports the free market. Not because he cares about the rich but because he cares about the poor after decades of studying global poverty. He found four fifths of starvation level. Poverty around the world has been eradicated since one thousand nine hundred seventy the. How did that happen wasn't through additional. Federal aid wasn't by throwing money at a problem. That fundamentally isn't a money problem. Poverty is addressed to opportunity through innovation when people actually benefit from their hardworking expertise. Thomas keller charge more because he sources the best produce inmate. He buys the best kitchen tools. He pays the best other chefs he tosses in his own innovation and skill on top of all that. I'm not saying that he should charge that much. I'm not saying that people should ever pay that much. I'm just explaining why his work and his product is more valuable than a big mac and posing absolute financial equality on the other hand. Just doesn't lift anyone to ingenuity or to wealth instead lowers everyone to the lowest common denominator not only economically but also in creativity and quality a free market works best not when acquiring wealth is value but when labor and expertise is valued. Jesus said we can't serve both god and money and that it's more difficult for the wealthy to enter the kingdom of god. But jesus never said accumulating wealth is sinful exploitation of the poor that's info looking to wealth for salvation or meaning that central failing to steward what we've been given failing to care for those in need that sinful. When these potential downfalls are mitigated or avoided a free market can inspire people to actually give more. According to data from the philanthropy roundtable americans give to charity at a rate seven times higher than continental europeans. And the top one percent of all earners in the us give a full one third of all. The charitable donations. It was interesting once. Npr finally did ask. Thomas keller about what was in his new cookbook. The interview took this ironic turn. Keller cautioned that his recipes just aren't necessarily for home cooks has recipes required a certain amount of previously obtained skill. Interestingly the reporter didn't seem to think that was unfair. Look i'm won't be buying keller's book. And i likely won't be eating at his restaurant but i do respect. What his labor and skill of created. And that's okay. All that's how freedom works for more on why a free market economic system tends to be the best option for human flourishing. Check out our latest. What would you say video at. What would you say dot. Org that's what would you say dot org for breakpoint. I'm john stonestreet.

eight hundred fifty dollars colson center arthur brooks Npr keller karl marx Thomas keller four fifths san francisco american enterprise institute harvard business school Jesus one percent Keller keller us john stonestreet
S3 Ep. 1: Phil Rosenthal

Green Eggs and Dan

50:27 min | 3 weeks ago

S3 Ep. 1: Phil Rosenthal

"The music and gov old saito role sick camp as kini beautiful who log data dude and welcome to green eggs and dan like many of you. I'm stuck at home during this pandemic eating and drinking my face off. And so we're most of my guests so that leaves me with a laptop from twenty twelve you for dealing with my glitches and all that my own mike and me alone in a room hoping my guests are able to record their half of the conversation We all have glitches so bear with us guys. Welcome to green eggs. Excellent dan where i interview amazing people with amazing minds but all i care about is what is in their fridge. My guest today. Oh boy sure. He's the creator writer. Executive producer of everybody loves raymond which has been dubbed or subtitled in one hundred forty eight countries. Whatever we don't care about that today today we care about the fact that he is the host and creator of my new favorite food travel. Show somebody feed mill. Please welcome sure one of my comedy. Gods but quickly becoming one of my favorite food. God's spill rosenthal welcome to the podcast great to be here very excited to have you here. You guys can see fills fridge on my instagram at. Stand up dan. Share the screen here so we can go through it feel i. I always tell people you don't need to stage your fridge. And i don't know if your fridge always looks like this but it looks so perfectly organized very well staged. Did you save this. The line by wife though cares deeply about clutter and too much and is this food still good and got rid of. This is what you're seeing a lot of leftovers from everywhere we order from. I order out almost every day because number one. I'm trying to support the restaurant industry locally. And i love it. That's the other reason. I absolutely love it. I i think every can't travel. We can't go out right. Yeah the can come to you. We're so blessed in los angeles to have sucha diverse population and that means a diverse culinary scene. Right up your odds hitting it. Big at dinner are really good because we have more people in los angeles from different parts of the world any other place. Yes there we get. We get the benefit of lots and lots of choices and lots and lots of talent. Don't you find that he takeout game has really been elevated little. Have a restaurant and what used to be assigned business. Takeout and delivery is now v business. And so. I'm so proud of everybody for really upping your day. Yeah i agree with you. I feel like before all this The pandemic stuff. I feel like triggerfish was the only one that had a real dutiful curated takeout game and now it seems like everyone is following their lead in making really cool boxes and you know the way that it's They put a lot of thought the presentation and it's pretty awesome. I think everything from pizza to to you know the big heavy hitters even like providence. The valley best the end mozart. All phenomenal just phenomenal. Like my son said this is one of the best meals. I've ever had in life and we were sitting at the kitchen table eating out of the containers from which i don't know if that says little about You and your wipes clean accu chefs chef. I don't have the time or the temperament the patients. I'm just not but chef. Seem to likely because i love that i mean it comes off very authentically in the show. We'll get to the show in a second. I wanna go back to the fridge here. So you have. You have bottle sake. here i feel. Is that apollo sake in the bottom there. Are you a big sake drinker. When when i'm eating sushi i am. It's the best you have so many jars. You're you guys are such a jar family. I love it a lot of pickle sauerkraut. I love the hobe sound crowd. They came out with a spicy sauerkraut with a put. Some red peppers in with the with the and that's like my favorite thing out. Those i mean you have a lot. You're hot sauce. Dr is like it's you have a whole hot sauce. Terrar- this is. Why might my. My brother used to call my mom's we grew up. We didn't have any real food. In the house were the houses condiments. We always had and hot sauce. No now it doesn't it doesn't really and then ketchupy things like like really not great stuff but you know i'm a i'm hot saucepan a mustard fan. I'm a i'm a barbecue sauce. Fan of an everything sauce. Loves salts of the world is sauce isn't and the whole the whole world cuisine is about taking maybe less than stellar or first rate ingredients and adding a source that not only make them palatable but make the delays absolutely. I like any food. That makes your eyes bug out and so when you eat spicy foods. It's my favorite thing. Top shelf in the fridge king. That's pink top on a can. That's former the dog. Oh really that's his dog food. We share the. We share the fridge. And how the done you don't even share. The dog gets top. Shelf's he's talk. Show see a lot of the containers all the containers. that's all take. Where are you ordering from mostly right now but was leslie last night. We got screened by turn on that. I have done that. And i don't know if we're gonna get along here because i didn't love it. Did you do the monday night saying no. It's the monday night thing. He does like a beautiful bento box. Okay i had the soup. I had one of the soups. I went there. And i don't know i always. I always compare maybe me. Maybe this is wrong of me. But i i feel like japanese soups. Have korean soups. Beat like for me. A rahman will i'll i'll take a rahman over a korean noodles or or even fo- any any day yes. Tell me that. I'm wrong that you had to be a nominee. Your show looks insane with the beef fat. Very lucky i get to case a lot of great stuff and i like almost everything people look at the show. Say it looks like you like everything and most of the time that's true but here's the other truth if i don't like it i'm not putting it in the show show. Would that be a try this you all the way here. If put this in your mouth. Okay what do you think it's all right. I'm not showing you that. I'm sure my main goal is to get you to travel. So i wanted to show you the best stuff all the good stuff so i'm not acting. I really really do. Write this stuff. We some for a week. You're seeing less than an hour. Some shown you. The highlights highlight ended. So that your show is so important right now because it's like i feel like before we used to watch it and be like. Oh i want to go to that place like i. I would watch feeling by the end. I'd be like on kayak looking boarding passes i i never had anxiety go to ireland for example and i was like oh my god i gotta get to. Ireland is i. I can't italy's my absolute favorite. 'cause i just feel like it's hard to me. I feel like maybe in another life. I was just feels like another whole to me and it has for me everything. I love which is gorgeous scenery incredible food. Everyone's hugging kissing. So that's like for me. That's that's absolutely love of everywhere in. There's not a clinker. The bunch. So far i also love the place i love it. You went to modina in your italy episode in the venice episode because he's modin as one of my favorite places and it's kind of an unsung hero until you know massimo came in and put on the map but just even even taking massimo out. It is aesthetically one of those beautiful city. That i've ever been to. It is kinda a beautiful quiet town it feels like with it seems so livable. Doesn't it absolutely. We were there only three nights but it just fell in love with it. It just seemed like this dream center to to you know to base your vacation from if you want to you in a live in italy for you you choose that. Let's right because it has anything you about italy. This kind of small town feel yet enough to do and enough restaurants and places to go and it's like central so you can shoot out from there to everywhere else interesting. Yeah i'm with you. I i love it there. I can't wait to go back. But i was saying. I think your show is so almost more important now. Because it's not it's less of like. Where am i going to go next. It's like i need to live vicariously through someone. Because i can't go anywhere and so it's it's almost like we're putting on our virtual are vr. Glasses now going place will. Here's what i've been saying unevenness. I understand living. Virtually through me. And i understand that you might even be a little melancholy watching for the world that you can't this right now but the key phrase there was right now so use this time. You have to plan a vacation because guess what this is going to end. None of us are thinking like that right kind of a tragedy so we were kind of isn't tragedy with all the loss life and everything else and it's a horrible time but and i'm speaking as the fardie this why authority. Only because of the evidence that it's ended every other time he the greatest benefit for me from doing. The show is hearing from people on my instagram. Dm or my twitter comes or my. Facebook comes people writing in saying we went to lisbon because of you and we ate at that place load. Here's a picture of us at the same place. You nothing gives me greater drew. I love why you do what you do. We love nothing more than turning people onto stuff. Right i agree one hundred percent and i'm always. I'm curious if i'm onto something here because my ashkenazi jewish rents are either the biggest foodies. I know or they're super picky about food. And i'm curious has to do with the fact that they normally they usually grow up in households that had a a lack of flavor and so either they fell into that camp or there were like i need to get away. It seemed like we the web. Yes but how about this. So i grew up in in that type of house. No flavor and meet was punishment. And i go now. I get to meet these chaps and like alice florida's tells me her mother was terrible and it wasn't until she went to france when she was swept maybe early twenties late teens even and her mind exploded right from when she had fresh food and then she came back. It's like for me when i went. I didn't have i yes. I had that experience. When i went to your early twenties but even before left the house when i went to college and i was eating crappy pasta with some friends as a freshman hush university and i was. Oh my god this delicious. They supply pasta. This is fantastic. What are you talking about you so excited. Just the no-no the sauce once red sauce yet had no no is little white. Bits of these little white bits dropped up what garlic. I never had garden when she opens the door. Now the world ezekiel other absolutely accidents. Like how good for garlic to do that for you. That's the type of food that would do that is because isn't it amazing isn't delicious. Isn't it just like roasted garlic of Gets you know over. The harshness comes out. It's just this kinda sweet beautiful of a kind flavor. It is the bed. maybe you haven't always thought of socks as the perfect gift or the perfect way to give back to bumba socks were made to give literally when you give a pair of super comfortable bomba socks. You're not only giving someone a gift a love your also donating especially designed pair to someone in need. Because for every pair of socks bama cells. They'll donate a pair to someone experiencing homelessness across the us and since sox are the number one most requested clothing item in homeless shelters. The generosity of giving bomb us will make a meaningful impact this holiday season a bomb us come in tons of different colors and styles including athletic performance ox limited edition holiday socks dress. Socks and socks made from merino wool. A natural wonder fiber. That's super warm. 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I've been taken it for about a month now. And i gotta say it's nice to know that the ingredients are good. It's nice to take during these times. And i'm happy that i have ritual in my life. It's actually made me feel a lot. Better ritual is formulated with key nutrients including vitamin d. Three to help fill gaps in the diet. Their fresh tasting delayed release. Capsules are designed to dissolve later and less sensitive areas of the stomach. So you can take them with or without food. Ritual is designed with different life stages in mind now available for women men and teens ritual multivitamins are scientifically developed to help support different life stages ritual mix healthy habits easy. Your multivitamins are delivered to your door. Every month with free shipping always ritual is offering my listeners. You guys ten percent off during your first three months. Visit dot com slash. Ged as green eggs and dan to start your ritual today. So now phil. I want to get into our history a little bit. I met you. Probably i dunno was a four years ago. I think i was at a coffee shop with my friend. Avi done and i tell you. And i was like oh my god. That's phil rosenthal. And we started. We we started to strike up a conversation and we. We were all foods together and let's go out. Let's let's go get lunch some time. We started to go out to lunch together. And i just love to eat with each other and i. I bet a lot of people. Watch your show. And they're like oats phil rosenthal. He probably just walked into a network was like i want. Show give me a show. And they're like here's her show. That is not the way that it happened for you. I remember you were struggling back then to try to get anyone to put you on the air you remember. This there was there was an and years. There was like an american express. Food thing you were going to. Thomas keller or something and then didn't work out well. It didn't work out because they only wanted Iphone here that we're finding What's going to be a pilot for a show but it wasn't it was. They were financing a week in london. With thomas keller being so that they could sell tickets to their platinum card holders for event than they would show clips of our trip from. I never saw such a wasteful. Thank right i mean. They spent the must've spent a fortune to to get a few fill clips for three hundred people at at a fancy. I didn't understand that. But here's what happened. I took some of those flips. And i took them around town and took him to every single network and finally my my agency let me take them to pbs. Which was the first place. I wanted to go because i thought. Pbs maybe would do a show with me. Because i'm a guy who guy and of course the adt was like pbs. This'll money pbs. Why would you go there. They only care about the money. I could care less about the money right. Finally go to pbs. And they gave me six right away and that was fantastic. What wasn't fantastic was that i didn't know only to be six. And even though we were there number one show of the year and we won the james beard award for best food and travel show. But what was your competition. Pbs it was like you guys on holocaust documentaries and trying to work in the holocaust whatever food so so so here comes netflix. And that's then picked up a ten year effort to get back because people first of all your own agency if you walk into your agency after having done sitcom that was successful and tell them you know what i think instead of a sitcom now i'd like to do a food and travel show. They act like you pooped on their desk it. It wasn't like that was a priority for them either and then the networks. Like what are you. You're not a guy who should be on your the right of go right another rain understand. But i didn't want to accept it. And i have to tell you also dan it's not like an untried to another sitcom writer reagan. I couldn't sell anything could does that. They wanted me to do. This was also a the reason. I couldn't sell him was because the business has changed so drastically while we were doing rate. The type of show raymond was valued anymore. It would be five or six years until another family. Sitcom cold modern family would come along but they all wanted to imitate friends. They all wanted young. Hit gorgeous sexy. And france was kind of the exception to the rule because god doesn usually give with both hands. The young pretty people are usually not the funniest. The reason friends is such a hit is because these kids were. You're very hip and sexy for pbs. I don't even think. I didn't even think there but i loved what i was doing and i couldn't honestly to be fair. I couldn't do the kinds of shows that the now automated. So i was like trying wrote three four. Five pilots tried to get him to go. Nope nobody will. Maybe they were not as good. That's also possible and it might be my own shortcomings. But i thought if you're gonna hit your head against the wall trying to sell stuff maysville paint a wall. You really really love. So i remember. We did this episode of raymond where we went to italy in raymond. Show 'em when ray romano. When i saw ramona would never travel before it was all impetus for doing that. Southwest see i asked him where is going to go on scientists and he said i go to the jersey shore and i said you ever go to europe and he goes down. I said why not he goes. I'm not really interested in other cultures even his own culture. And so i thought i'm gonna write that up so we're going to go to italy and you're gonna go there with that attitude of not wanting not being interested in culture and you're gonna come back after italy's transformed With my attitude about it and loving it and falling in love him. The food the people the culture the beauty. So we go. We filled that up so special one hour and what happened to the character that i wrote that character arc. I saw happen to ray. The person out vote while that like i went holy shit. I wanna do this for people i want to do. This is no greater high and turning people on the some you love right. yeah absolute. That was the year we found that twenty years ago the year two thousand and since then. I wanted to do this ship i got. I mean that is that is so inspirational. I mean this is so it's so crazy to me to hear that literally someone who is. Okay there's two things that are created from media your number one to have a hit show on on a network like one of the biggest hits ever biggest-ever and then to not be able to sell a show after that the blow to most people's ego would be much even try to stay in the business let alone to pivot into a complete other part of the industry the food host world which you you had zero experience and and you just kept believing in yourself and you basically have to go from the ground floor. Put your ego to the side of having literally the most popular comedy show of all time worldwide. I don't know but it was. It certainly was successful and to to be able to do it again was depressing. I won't lie to you. It was sad not to be able to. And of course you start doubting yourself. Of course she knew anybody would maybe number one hit wonder. Maybe i can't do it again especially if you get rejected. I don't i don't necessarily subscribe to the everything happens for a reason but do you think that it was all to get to this place to have this show. This show is. You're having zeitgeist moment. It seems. I'm so lucky right. I i'm. I'm the luckiest guy you'll ever talk to one your shape prompted because i you know i studied theatre in college and i thought you know i got a lot of attention for being funny on stage in place not as a stand up but i was a character actor i was i was somewhat successful in high school and college and i made the mistake of thinking that it would be that easy when i went moved to new york. New york care. If i was flooding in college then i had to transition into writing to write something with my friends that we could be in together right. It's it's always the same thing you got right. Neuron ticket literally wro-wrote ticket and i wrote swing play with another friend and these states have some presents. You with what you're supposed to be so i guess i'm supposed to be a writer and then i moved to. How and i started writing on shows if you never heard of i gotta video cassette of a comedian named ray romano who needed a show created for him. Right yeah and then there was that and that just to get. The pilot made is is hitting the jackpot for every single thing. That happened after that was like hitting the jackpot over and over and over again. Yeah so listen how many things you have to be remembered for right if i just had that diana dying and people said to me why are you trying so hard to get another. Show one studio executive sent to me. Why are you pitching to me if i were you. I would just sit on a mountaintop. I'm like what so i i was. I was how old is when raymond ended. Forty five i should. I should have forty five. She retired and never work again. I want to describe do why do you. What do you mean it was almost insulted. Shop this is what. I do this hour defined but i. I don't know about this studio guy. But i happen to love doing it. Yeah so i was going to do it. I was going to do it by hooker. Bike at was gonna do ussia just so happened that i now do show where i've taken everything i've learned about how to make us show. Tell a story right. Because i have experienced. Not but it's in the service. Now of everything i love in life. Yes beverly friends who travel laughs over in a way. This show is the culmination of my stupid existence on their. You know what i i am. I'm with you because the show definitely has a stroke. It has like a like an act structure to it like you're like you're watching. Tv show exactly right. No you're smart. Structure is something that can be taught right. Not necessarily you learn to be funnier. But if you don't have a sense of humor your your feet. Yes so and that's a lot of life by the way if you don't have a sense of humor i. It's our most underrated battle. Yeah i think. I think that's the basis for who we're friends with and i'll even say it but the structure beginning middle end is what that needs right. Yeah that's what you can be taught. And that makes every form of art stronger. A good structure structure like building building. You gotta have the beams the foundation. Everything else is yes. It has to be eye catching. It has to be beautiful. It has the honey has to be in making the show. But if you don't have a strong foundation like an end for for shows the that foundation is what is this about. And then how do you service that. What is it about what what points you're hitting along the way Showing us. that's what it's about. yeah. So i'm using certain sitcom tropes even in the show. What's that it's character based comedy. You know lion of the way. I solve the show. I said i'm exactly like anthony. Bourdain if he was afraid of rarely. That's how you sell it at the tower so lucia that way people would know where i was coming from. The tone of the show was gonna be like It's a pretty act description now as we go on again. A tiny bit raver. But i'm still not doing what he was able to do. It was a superhero. Yeah and people. Can i looking at need that. I am not shep. Here's the thing though. And this is what i tell. People is that after denied. Everyone was trying to to to be the next. Dan and i heard this at in meetings with networks. There were like we want to be the next day. And the next prudence. We're looking for and i was. I kept saying no one can be the next dan because no one can fill dancers. He was dan. Someone has to do something different. And i think the reason why you've successfully. I'm gonna say filled his shoes. Because i think you're doing completely different but the thing that made board so great was he was so authentically him. He wasn't fake on camera. he was he. The things he loved loved the things he hated. And you're doing that to you are being so authentically you that you can't. It's something that that can't be fixed. You're so authentic people see it feel it and i think that it itches. The same scratch that that bodine was itching. Thanks yeah. I can't help it. That's a you know we overlapped our time a little bit. Yeah it was devastating to lose him. Because you know my show is really only a take on the type of show that he did. It's based on showing that the whole series because he fired up a form and reinvented a form of food and travel right. Yeah and i thought literally thought of him when coming up with the show. Because i would look at him and go. He's amazing i'm never doing but maybe there's a show for people who are like me who look at him and say wow. He's amazing of never doing exactly but if they see a putz like me out there. Maybe they'll say okay. Maybe i'll go outside. You gotta know what the stain your land. That's the key. You sexting limbaugh. Also americans especially two thirds of us. Don't even have a passenger. did you. not wow so. Don't you think the world will be a little better if they if they did absolutely better if we all could experience a tiny bit of someone else's experience yeah wouldn't be in the position. We are today if people you were a little more open to other people and other cultures and things that are not exactly like the one of the great ways to get you. There is through the food because we all got eat. We all liked by the way. You don't have to go very far your mexico city and montreal episodes or two of my favorites and that all very close to where we are now. Oh yeah well. Mexico you can be in mexico from california can be there in an hour and a half two hours. Yeah montreal's knob troops hour from new york and our flight you're right i've always said montreal's my favorite food city in north america. I think it's pretty awesome. It's pretty. I was winning. I will say. La's exploding on the food scene and it's like an uncontrollable expansion of how good it's getting. It's because even more than new york i would say. It's the best food city in the country if not work. Wow moment yet because the world is here. it's true life's too short for boring food. It deserves to be filled with fresh flavorful mouth watering dishes. That you and your family are excited to share it together. And guess what. Now it's so easy to broaden your cooking skills and try out fund recipes and the best part is you don't need a bunch of fancy appliances to do it with panasonic's home chef for in one multi oven. You can heat. You can fry breughel your wait. A foodie heaven yup. It's a microwave a broiler and air fire and the convection oven all wrapped up in one place whether you're trying out a new food trend your grandma's intimidating recipe or a spanish asian fusion dish. This multi oven makes cooking experience and enjoyable one so start thinking of all those recipes. You've been dying to try out because this multi oven makes even the most complicated of recipes super simple. It's the foreign one that inspires your inner chef to try daring new dishes with confidence through special offers. Go to panasonic kitchen dot com and become a panasonic kitchen insider. Hello green eggs and dan listeners. It's me damn. I wanted to tell you about a podcast. That food fifty. Two's new podcast network. Just launched the genius recipe tapes. What are genius recipes. They're the recipes that defy everything we've been taught or are so simple just shouldn't work or sometimes they're just so good so memorable. We have to tell our friends. They surprise us. They get us talking and once we start cooking them they make us feel pretty genius to. I'm looking at chew. Avocado toast on the show. Kristen talks with genius behind the recipes. Themselves you'll hear more of their stories even more genius riffs tips and tricks and those personal stories in the moments that have nothing to do with the recipes. Those are all in their to the genius. Tapes is out. Now subscribe on apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you get your podcast so you don't miss out gonna get to these questions that i ask all my guests at the old every towards the mid points the mid point. We're going to tell it like a story. Nice so number one is. What is your earliest memory. It's not nice. It's as bad kinda gray. Shui stake. I thought stake. I really thought steak was horrible because we would get our cuisine or house was cheap. Right whatever whatever's on sale. That's what we got an at. It's not my mom's fault. She worked fulltime job and race to really awful children. My brother and my dad works oakland. So the food was kind of after thought. We didn't have a lot of so state. Was this great tough thing that actually i remember heard. It's hurting my gps. I turned my jaws. Because i hardly want to eat any of this stuff. I was told you're not leaving the table until you finish so i would store it in my cheeks. Look like i was finished. And then i turned Beth's day when your food the status early food memory we've had on the podcast. Yes but you gotta start somewhere better. Start there than ending. Absolutely what is your death row meal. I get this a lot. And i'd given it a lot of thought and i actually say this in the london episode to you saw that trump's favorites on that play hotdogs pizza hamburgers chicken ice cream. And it's because you're backed down so you come full circle to comfort food. And i'd probably end with a bowl of my mom. The one thing my mom may very well Mb lists the last set. Something from your mom would be bad at ball soup before you get the why not. You wanna be listening. You're going to die. You wanna be comforted. Could have neil from the french laundry. Would it be amazing. Yeah but it'd be empty experience because you don't have a personal connection unless you grew up in the fridge right unless we thomas. Keller you know that beautiful spring the thomas keller and these moments that moment in ratu. He was a consultant on the movie route to even makes the ratatouille that is then rose and made into animated route to. Yeah when that critic take that by and his bang transported back being a child that's everything that's waterworks. But that's everything that's that's more that transcends food that moment that's the feeling that we chase the rest of our lives in whatever we do absolutely speaking of thomas keller and his ilk what is the best high end meal you've ever had while that certainly one of them again stupidly lucky life. I've had a few. Yeah you know i've got. I got the job. We i got to eat at the linea. I got to eat at the french laundry and per se. I got to eat at a narrow sawa in tokyo and geoghegan in thailand and while and five thana friendships gonna. They're all amazing. This place in barcelona now this fruit tar. I recommend wound enjoy in spanish. That's one of the top. I m meals. I ever had there. There's a lot of them. And i can't say i love them more than a hot dog. That's really good or or slice of a piece of pizza. I really can't. I understanding i get it but i'll tell you something you ever been stuck in a bad one a bad for our whiting. God yes is it. Everything is nice but you can. It's like a kit that anymore. I would rather have a slice of pizza with you than sit there for four hours. My back hurts. can't you know it's the worst. It's probably if the one is. If the food is good too is like i went to one. And i was fighting with my ex for our like marites in san sebastian. It was no good nobler. No no was speaking of the pizza. That could hold a candle to those things. One of the best low and meal you've ever had so this could be like a street food like just a bite of street food that you had in thailand or something you know since you mentioned time in the house oy in jama yes i did i did. It's shock of the side of the road and it's this coconut curry roth beautiful homemade noodles at the bottom. Like like the best pasta ever had and then there's pickled shallots and mustard greens and chilies. So it's kind of like incredibly a balanced than spicy and then either chicken or beef or pork or tofu or shrimp or crab. Whatever you want in there they do and then christie on top. So it's taken all the boxes for flavor texture. It's one of the most delicious things i've ever eaten my life and it's a dollar unbelievable so crazy. There was one thing that you had in the vietnam episode. I believe which was the. It was like ground meat that was rolled around in some sort of leaf. Oh yeah that was beautiful. Yes yes so cool to me. I was like. I need to get to that. That's need to go there tomorrow. But ali locked. Bali lots resented. I think i know has a lot in Joke idea a lot of this following. I lived here yet Vietnam as incredible food. Timeline has incredible food asia. That's a whole whole of its korea you saw. Did you see that one though. I haven't seen it yet. Spectrum As an iranian curious if that has that made it on the list or is that on the list of to go unlock persian food. I love i love a people. I love i really in. La we have some great. What's reassure favorite. Where should i go. There's a place that i love called atari. Atari like the the game that on fridays. They do a special which is called a which is kind of a. It's kind of a mortar and pestle mashup of beef and beans and broth and in this amazing bread called sang gac which is cooked on little rock. Yes spin and beautiful yet. It's a very like persian old man food. That's kinda hard to find. But they do a friday special of it and you go there. You see all the old persian men hanging out playing backgammon. And eating the stuff that i get it to go probably. Yeah you do. You have a favorite drunk food. I don't get drunk really. I and i like to. I like to have a drink. Very rare that i'll have to drake's in an e but maybe what you mean is like a sloppy food like something that you just don't care like just i'm a french fry at it. If you told me you would live ten years longer q. Didn't eat frank frogs because fries are known to be the worst food for purse. I would say no nope because they would be ten years without french fry. Where's your favorite french. Fry have a lot. I have a lot on the low end. would be hi ho burgers. Oh yeah that's the. The sheriff ish guy is a burger joint and they are spectacular and they travel well because they invented a perforated bag for the fries. So it doesn't steam inside so you get an having christie. Why isn't everybody doing this. I you're yelling at me like like it's my policy phil. I'm blaming you and a so. That's great the fries at republic are awesome the fries county. Ted's are awesome Bet there's more than i can't think of the big thing that peter luger's i think those are awesome. A the world is phillip could fill could fries you ever been in belgium and you go down on the street in the brussels and they have homes and the fruits they call them are sticking out they make they just keep making windows just pass and they give you the dipping sauces mostly mayonnaise. Allow all you can eat them. Play wow there you hear that. During this epidemic of the belgian government was like. Hey we're not. We need to get rid of all these potatoes that we haven't stockpiled here so everyone has to start eating more french fries. I was like. I want to become a citizen. I want just to do that at this. You might have answered this next question with the french fries but your desert island food. You're trapped on a desert island. You'll never get tired of eating something it is. I think it's french fries. Chocolate pizza yeah. All the things. I mentioned as different meal. I will never get tired of eating. Yeah and is there a food that you can't stand eating. Is there something that you hate. Yes not a good with black licorice. okay okay. a grind lumps that's acceptable. It's a weird flavor. What about like in general like are you young. It's done at the thing that reminds you. A black licorice is not my favorite. Yeah i actually went to dinner once. I was asked to attend a dinner. They were doing this series. Tell us the food. You'll want. So i told him i said now. Come to dinner. We're going to change. I'm like oh no so. This is going to be thinner. Filled with the thing. I hate and they found a way yet it would. It's a little bit of cheating because you know why like this. What because it doesn't taste like likelier. She face like that. So yes if this is michael okay now right you know mine i you might have a bone to pick with my my food that i can't stand and i don't know why this is because i love funky flavors. Get down with pickled herring. Oh you're wrong. I tried it. So i'm keep giving another shot. There's something about the sweetness with fish. Yes that i just tried to copenhagen. I tried it and all the places trying to everywhere. Yeah i i don't know why no i did. Not try to israel. There's a place in a in a in an open marketing. Toby it's in the show sherry herring elitest most beautiful taste. It doesn't it doesn't have that vinegary sweetness that you're talking about nights on a sandwich. I think there's some kind of cramped fresher something on there and onions. But without that thing that i think is the thing you don't lie. Okay what is your restaurant. Pet peeve phil rosenthal. What can't you stand restaurant very easy too loud too loud. If it's too loud amount interesting. I why am i going. I'm going for the food. But if you go with the person i wanted to talk to you only you were just saying i think in some of these places and i found out why they're so loud. You know the number one reason why restaurant is loud by cranking up now is to get out of there quicker. Yes very hilly. Very smart but also very cynical isn't off that's awful. It is awful. It's the opposite of what it should be. Great restaurants should be welcoming warm cozy beautiful inviting. Stay make this your evening. You're spending money you know. Sit with your coffee sip we love having you cranking up the music author jackhammer is not. We love you. It's we love your eat and get out. Yeah yeah. I feel like the sound has to be softened up where you can hear each other but loud enough. Where if you let out a rare big laugh. It doesn't stop the room absolutely. There's a little that the well-balanced ones are have the atmosphere. You kind of like you. You're kind of grooving without even knowing i'm talking about so loud that it's offensive. I'm one of those. Everyone leave your phone in the car. Let's go in and have dinner people. i understand. You need your phone. It's we're part human part phone now. I get i'm addicted. Also the whole world. Is there a. We've made it indispensable because now now i'm keisha because my wife needs me. What do you mean. shut your phone your phone up right. Well i will let you get back to your phone addiction after this last question. Which is what is the first restaurant that you will go to after quarantine. it might be the diner downstream. It might be. Because i thought about this too. Yeah i'd love to get jet and go to the. That'd be great but what i really want is a return to normalcy by local coffee shop and see my neighbors. I wanna go to my local diner and have some eggs and just feel like the world is right again. That will mean more to me in a book. I love it immense that while you guys know where to find. Fill the day. That quarantine is up. If you want to talk him. He'll be at that diner. Fill anything else. You wanted to tell the people where they can find you what they should be looking out for. Phil rosenthal on the instagram of phil rosenthal on the twitter youtube channel. Phil rosenthal world a website. If you want to find out every single place that i eat in on the show the address website for every place we go is phil. Rosenthal world dot com. I love that even on facebook in your living room. Watch my little show get inspired. Being nice league good tip. that's it. I love it filled. Thank you so so much for giving us so much time. You're the best and everyone you got to watch the show. It's it's my favorite food show on tv right now. Thanks really really special job where we're going to go. We found good. I'll see this episode of green eggs. And dan was produced by andrew. Stephen executive produced by jeff umbro and the pod. Glamorous you can find more of their podcasts. At the pod glummer at dot com. The theme music is beautiful. Food by dan an interstitial music is by brake master cylinder. If you like this show please tell a friend. Sharon episode and leave a rating and review on apple. Podcasts stitcher spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. Depart sonic universe.

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013: What to Get an Architect for Christmas [2018]

Life of an Architect

1:03:43 hr | 2 years ago

013: What to Get an Architect for Christmas [2018]

"This is life of an architect a podcast dedicated to all things architecture with a little bit of life thrown in for balance. Today is the definitive and highly anticipated ninth annual what to give an architect for Christmas gift guy. Thanks for joining us today. I'm Bob Borsen. And I am joined today, but my good friend and architect, Andrew Hawkins. Hey there as it turns out Landon. My previous co host likes being twenty five years old more than he liked recording podcasts. So he is decided to step away and focus his attention on fewer pursuits. He was great. And I still like him. He still sits next me in the office. But as it turns out, recording and editing podcast takes a lot of time at work, and he wanted to do other things in his spare time. That was a little tip of cat to my good buddy land. All right. So hi, Andrew, welcome to the show. How are you doing the ham doing all right today? Are you excited to be sitting in the front room my house? Of course, I am always excited to be in the Borsen household now. It's just the best place for me to be right now. Yeah. Oh, you know, fight the cat off. I'm trying that's something that Landon had to deal with as well, cat attraction. Some but that spot on the couch over their cats. It's spot when there's nobody here. This is where the cat I didn't ever there in this corner. Nice and curled up. I've never there. I think it's maybe like Landon new both look like you have very soft and comfortable laps, man. Yes. I try not to take that. A dig you shouldn't. Yeah. Do you like shopping for Christmas presents I don't I don't mind it, actually, it's not too bad. It's not my favorite thing to do. But it's not it's not your favorite thing to do. But I can I can manage their only a few people on my list that I always have a hard time with you. And it's like, my grandmother, or my mother nobody else, I can I can manage you. Don't just get your grandmother, like a jumbo pack sweet and low packets. No. I don't really do try to be little more thoughtful than that, you know, me Ma Hairston ketchup packets. Yes. Here's a plate of sugar cookies that I took from a function separate party that I went to yesterday any office, actually, no I'm regifter to stuff that product rep- brought by. Your grandma here is a squishy. Donkey. No, they bring food at the holidays bring food. They bring candy they'd bring cookies you get a lot of. Yeah. I have one that I can count on every year. They bring us a giant sandwich tray, and it's fantastic like sandwiches. Yeah. Office, man. They go nuts, and it's not like pre made sandwiches, right? Like, they bring us. It's like a meat and cheese tray. And then they bring like the condiments and then like a sack of like little buns and stuff in my office. That usually go nuts and like a sack the youngster of the we call it a bag. Sure, the youngsters amount officer like awesome, man. This is launch for like the next three weeks or whatever. And so they're like. I'm like, okay. So yeah, I have one today that it shows up. But then after that you should get scattered by the four kids in my office. Yeah. I don't know we got one of those. We've got a couple of those actually and you get like a like these buckets of mustard. There's something about it. I go it's always like roast beef. It's the I'm not saying which guy. I mean, I like sandwiches. Don't me wrong. But I don't like eating other people saying witches because frankly, I think my sandwiches a better. I mean, I want I want to will some for the effort like I would never go out to a restaurant and get a sandwich. You're wasting my time, bro. What had a restaurant, but do you don't like have a sandwich for lunch? Sometimes if I make it and bring it I will, but you wouldn't buy I wouldn't no I would never go to like a deli. Get a sandwich. Interesting. I know people that feel like sandwiches or the only appropriate lunch meal. Like, that's all they want for lunch sandwich. All the time. Yeah, I'm not anti sandwich. So don't get me wrong. I just don't wanna sandwich. I don't want to go out and pay for sandwich that I can make. So like if I go to there's certain sandwich places where like the bread is different. Right. Like, I can't make that kind of bread. So I do that. But you could buy that kind of breed. No. You can't of course. Sometimes you can't sometimes you can't. All right. Well, it's interesting. Thanks for joining us today on sandwich talk. So I hate I hate shopping so much. Oh my God. I can't tell you how much I hate to shop. And it's not because I don't like giving gifts to people. I love that. I just I don't like going into crowds. I'm it sounds like I'm very like I just hold up in a bar. I live in a refrigerator box until I get wrapped in and go to work. But that's not true. I just don't like going to malls. I don't like walking behind people that are like five people shoulder to shoulder, and they're like talking about how they like, bold eggs, or whatever. And I'm just Galloway. I came here to get some done. I'm gonna do it. And I'm gonna get out of here. That's my mentality and it's not the right mentality. When you're buying a gift for someone that you care about angry. You know? That's not the right. I don't like being in that mood. So I'd much rather go like, oh, I just watched this hilarious comedian on YouTube. And oh, it made me think about this gift. I'm going to buy on Amazon, and I'm happy because I'm thinking about how much catcher better than dogs from a comedic standpoint. I mean, yeah. But I'm not when I say, I'm shopping, I don't necessarily go to malls and stuff either. I'm ninety percent of what I do is online some people really like leaving the house, and I don't even like doing that. I don't wanna leave this. I'm an old guy. Yeah, I'm fine. So that's a great segue shopping in the comfort of my pajamas and sofa. Well, that's a lovely segue. Two guys talking about how much they hate to shop. Let's get into the gift guide perfect. Perfect. Segue. Perfect segue. So I started putting this gift got together in two thousand and ten which was the first year that I started my blog that makes this from the research that I've done which was exhaustive extensive. Yes. The longest running architecturally themed gift guide in history your apart a history now, Andrew I am. Yeah. This even back to fourteen ten or whatever when you school and fourteen ten when I was in eighth grade. There were no this wasn't put together when you get your first job. That's right. Okay. So I'm gonna say this the only thing worse than shopping which we've already stabbed that. We're not. We don't love it it shopping for an architect. They suck to shop for because they are exceedingly particular, and you know, that they think your taste is garbage. This is true. This is totally true. Even architects think that of other architects, let's be honest, right? We all know, this is this is not this is not trade secrets were given away here. Everybody knows. There. It's really not great. So what is the well intentioned gift giver to do? Right. That's the question. So architects do like Dudas, but this is kind of a slippery slope. At least it is in in my world. It has to be a timeless doodo and one that is very well made as proof of their awesome taste and worldly knowledge because they wanna show it off if you're gonna have some sitting out into do you really want people to go. Wow. That's amazing. Yeah. I find that do does though for architecture usually really expensive. Dude us, right. Yes. This is my you know, whatever salt and pepper shakers, and they were thousand dollars each. Yes. They're really important. No, we do not put salt or pepper in them. They just sit going to get into the tried. No, don't touch it exquisite. Yeah. Back away. Now, breathe on my salt pepper shakers, and they're like in the living room on the table. They're not even nowhere near the kitchen is not near food. So that's where I come in with my list of things to get your architect for Christmas. So really the smart angle here is that. Since I myself when architect if the architect you're shopping for doesn't like to gift off of this list. You can blame me. So how can you lose? Did you know that when I first started this list? It was basically the list I put together for myself to give my family. So the first list in two thousand ten as like, let's see what does Bob want like this is what I want. And I went I turned this into a blog post like this is what you should. So I had like sue birds one stone. I was like who sweater vest that was on like one of the first list was like clothing who does comfy pair socks give me some of those. All right. So basically, this is literally this list is built upon things that I actually want which makes sense, right? I mean, I'm telling you if I want it other people should probably want it to at least, they should maybe wouldn't go that far. But I understand the premise. Yes. So so in that spirit since two thousand and ten year every year I've done this list. And I've already started getting emails from. Saying wins the list coming up. So to that end. Let's get to the goodies. You're ready. Sure. Okay. We're gonna do five each I'll start. So I'll I'll tell one of my mazing gifts. And we'll talk about it. If we want to or you just say that's terrible. Tell me they had to be amazing. I didn't you're right. That was reference that you just said gifts, you didn't say that had to be amazing. All right. That's my bad. I'm gonna apologize in advance. Maybe some of my choices. Yes. A box of paper clips, very useful. Yeah. They are practical every architect needs them. So I'll do mine and you'll comment or if you feel so moved which you will. I mean, if you can work your way through the tears of like, how amazing the gift solving this list are I'm overselling this the first one if I can actually maneuver the -bility to speak that because the first gift on my list is an insta- pot or instant pot made by instant pot. Do you know what these things are? Yeah. It's a super cooker thing. Right. Yeah. It's. It's a crock pot pressure cooker. Yes, they're all the rage. I know there. I didn't have been for fertile years. Yeah. At least a year I did had to do research because I was talking. I originally I was gonna put a crock pot on this list this way to make the one pot. Slop, it is one pot slot. It is thing is so I do like to cook. And I we have a crock pot. We have a big one, and I like it. So I was going to put one on a list because the truth is I think it's a good gift. I think of crock pot is a good gift for somebody. And my wife. This literally was last night. She goes crock pot. That's so old school and what she goes everyone's into the instant pot now. And so I had to go last night. I'm scrambling doing research on it's like, okay, I get it. I read a actually read an article in the Wall Street Journal, the talked about like the differences between the two of them, and they're kind of describing the craze of it. And there's nothing crock pot. A rather there's nothing an instant pot can do that a crock pot. Can't do like a slow cooker ought to say, slow cooker cities and brand name the instant pot and the slow cooker. They do the. Same thing. The really only difference is one does it in a fraction of the time. Right. So if you're a person who gets prepared like you're like, oh, I wanna have stew for dinner before I go to work. I'm gonna put all the stuff in the pot. And then go go to work, and then come home in my food is waiting for me. Get a slow cooker. If you're that person that comes home from work and goes, so I don't know what I want to eat. I can make stew. But I don't have eight hours. Hey, guess what? The instant pot is for you. Yes. Yeah. Would you ever use either of those two things? Yeah. Actually, I do I've been wanting to get a one of them that I can control from my phone. That's how bad it is. Right. The reason though is so that I can put some stuff in it before I go to work, but then I can like turn it on at the right time. So that when I get home. Well, you can do that. With the instant says, I'm her, and it has your timer built into it have old one, right? I have fourteen twelve slow cooker that has eight on Ono has a high and a low and that is it. Yeah. Like one knob. That's all it does. Right. So there's the a the chance that if I turn it on before I go to work in the morning by the time. I get home, you know, because I'm an architect kind of work a little bit later all the liquid is evaporated out of whatever I was trying to cook. Right. So it's like, yeah. I don't have student. I have some other sort of consistency of something. It's just turned into gruel. Yeah. Yeah. Well, most of them. Now, if you bought one that wasn't made in the fifteenth century have the ability to set a timer on them, and that's true for both instant pot and crock pots so but anyway, I'm a fan. And now, but I'm wondering now that it all this research when I wanna make something the crock pot. I prepare for it. Right. So I have the ability to do it. The question is what I ever want to come home from work and go. Wow. I'd really like this one pot slop thing and Ali when to spend an hour making it. Yeah. Right. I don't know that I'm that person either. Well, the other thing I think about the instant thing they Bill them kind of as a it's a seven in one thing. It's a rice cooker, it's a steamer to all these other. You can make yogurt in it. Yeah. Right. So again, you might be able to do the same thing in a slow cooker. But they don't you can they don't. Market it as such right, which I think is another part of the art the crazy thing, right? The reason it gets it because it's like it's a seven and one utensil. Yeah. And so it kind of got popular because of that. Yeah. Well, it's really the only difference is the speed. I mean, it's like a pressure cooker. Right. A mini pressure cookers. And that's what it is. Yeah. An article I read it's like the texture foods. No different. There's like there's no difference except for the time. It takes to prepare it, which for some people. That's a big deal. Yeah. Right. So I think it's a good gift, but slows the slow cooker. Right. I agree. So that's the first gift on my list. All right. You're up I up. Okay. Long those things that have absolutely nothing to do with architecture. I have a a botchy ball set. Does it come with the botchy ball court? No, you have to do that on your own, right? I think it's I like playing botchy I would like to have like a area in my backyard. I have a spot for it for when my kids don't want a playground anymore. My sister has botchy bus. She put it she built in herself. Nice. And it was. Not a small undertaking. Yeah. Because first off you got to like stake. It all out you dig it out. You gotta put in the rock bass. And then you gotta put in the masonry dust on top of that. And there's like railroad ties or what they use for the borders, and then driving through giant rebar to hold it in place, and she got I don't know two or three for friends to help one. It. It wasn't cheap. It's awesome. I should start by saying, it's awesome. So if it's something you wanna do a you could totally do it. She did it and she has like no building skills at all. And yes, she does. She the budget. Well, yeah. But that's about I think that's the only thing she's ever done. Yeah. Right. And she said I wanna do this. So that's what she did. So the point being if this is something where you have an interest, you could tackle it and make an app. Yeah. Well, and that's the thing that I have a area where this playground is already built up, and it has the border except right now, it's cut grass all in it. Right. Real nice grass. So just have to scrape stuff. Out because but I could make a court there. But I like the thought of, you know, having a couple of drinks playing botchy, you know. Yeah. I like to sound of that. It's nice to get a couple of other architectural friends around. We could enjoy that. And you know. Yeah. You turn into a conversation about like the design of the ball. Yeah. Absolutely. Exactly. And we, you know, measurement angles. And all these things about totally dissect in the game for no good reason. Yeah. But if it was just you and me, we'd just probably get drunk and like it turned into something else. Yeah. For sure maybe that's a majority of my friends, but you know. Yeah. Or d shot put this ball. Exactly. Can I throw it backwards between my legs and still get there? I would absolutely. That would be me. No question gift. I like it. All right. I'm going to take us in more technological angle. So the next thing on my list are noon, home switches, so full disclosure. I'm in love with these things. And they're not on this year's list because I want them you can simply glance over to the wall right there and right over there and see that already have them and their amazing, right? I really do like him. There are lighting system that can be installed in new or existing construction. They use existing three three wire like she had to have a basically positive negative and a ground to have groundwater stalling them is really pretty easy. I mean, I don't like doing electrical work because you can kill yourself. Like, I'll I'll tackle just about anything just takes breaker, and you can not kill yourself. I know, but like I've been at houses where he like, oh, I'm flip this breaker in it some still jacked up like they've triple legged it to something else. And then somebody flips a switch and that becomes hot again. And there's some weirdness that goes on sometimes. So this is true. So I just kinda worry about it. But I don't have a problem, replacing switches and outlets. I've done that in every house of ever own. And so so I got a like, a huge pack. So I saw these I went up to the CD at convention in you won them. I know I so I heard I want them, and it wasn't just so the one that I'm putting on this list is kind of like a starter kit. So there's like a director switch which has like an LED screen on it. So you can swipe it and set scenes whatever, but also works like a traditional lights, which you can just press it and lights turn on or off at you. Don't have to swipe it and do all this different stuff to make it work. And it you can sync it to like if you have a Amazon or Google or any like a series or whatever you can say, hey, Google, turn on the lights in the living room. And it will it will control for you. So it's activate you can also use your phone to set up different scenes, you know, so it also has like a night light feature to it. So that you can set the hour so that it can detect movement. So that if you get up at two. In the morning, and you walk into a room, and it will turn the lights onto whatever preset level that you want it. So that you don't have to like navigate through dark room in your house in your house be able to do. Anyway, you know, it's actually pretty cool. I really like to switch his I like the theme ING, I like the I mean, it can detect what kind of light bulbs, you have like it's so intelligent like it can tell if you have incandescent or LED or CFL all the different kinds of lights, and it will help like has predetermined settings as part of it. If he didn't want to really get into it and super fine tuning yourself. Just like out of the box. It will it will bust three scenes together for you. But it doesn't it over your existing circuitry figures it out. Yeah. Interesting. Yeah. So they they have MRs all voltage amperage Omid stuff that. Yeah. So and it doesn't take batteries, right? Because it's getting line feed power. It's got bluetooth technology to it. So you actually connect it to your wifi, and you. House. So that was part of the way that it connects. But the thing is let's say your wife, I goes down. They're still regular switches. It's not like you're without lights because you know, the technology part of it's currently not working WI FIS down or whatever. So the thing that really works is what I put on this list is just kind of like a starter pack, just some kind of wet your palate a little bit to see what they are the pack that I one which I was so happy I want because I left going these things are awesome. I'm gonna buy it. And they're like, hey, we Jude your car out of a bowl, and we're gonna send you this huge package. Amazing. And I'll tell you I did have a problem installing my house because I don't have a proper ground wire because the age of my house I called him up on the phone and one of the guys like face time to me for like three hours. Like, I'm holding my phone in front of the the the box, and he's like drawing up the wiring diagrams. He's like, okay. Take that wire and your left. Don't that one this one? Yeah. Yeah. That's one that he's watching me as I do it. And he helped me wired all up that's pretty cool. That's amazing. That's. That's that's above and beyond customer Bosma beyond. Right. So I love it highly highly recommended for me, I was waiting for you to say in your story that you were in Germany, and you were like play with the mood lights in your house. And so, you know shows gonna freak out because he was like you're sitting here in the lights are going back and forth off and on and off and on. That's what I would do if it was me. I've done that. I've done that to my daughter before I'm thinking like you need to go to bed. So instead of yelling across and you go to bed. I just turn the lights off in a room. Nice. Yeah. So you're up. Okay. So will stay in it somewhat technological vein and other this is really applicable to your work practice. I guess, but it's a twenty six by seventeen light table like a portable little light table. Yeah. And it's a essentially, it's a it's just a point four inch piece of glass, right? You have one in your office. Right. LED table, right? It's an LED lighting. It's variable light nece density. Whatever you wanna call it brightness. That's the word I'm looking for. And I think it's a great little thing. And it's easy to if you wanted to pack it around, but I keep it in my office. And I use it know as an architect you want to be able to trace over something on top of something else a top something else. And right turn up that brightness. And I can get, you know, four sheets of paper that I'm drawing, you know, regular sheets of paper that wrong to tracing over and kind of getting this stuff together, and you like it. Yeah. I do like it. And again, it's it's really light weight. And it's easy to like if I wanted to take it with me, I could and they come in various sizes, but the my like to win this kind of big enough that I can do stuff with. I mean, they have like eight like in half by eleven size. Right. So smaller would carry around with you all the time. You could. Yeah. That's my next. It's fairly inexpensive. It's not too bad. But I think it's a it's something I use almost every day Kana suggests or supposes much which is the right word to use in this regard that the person you're giving it to actually sketches. This is true. So that's kind of important caveat that just because they're an architect. They may not have need for this. This is true. But for those who do sketch you do draw and use trace paper like I do like it would be pretty the number of times. Probably at least a few times a month. I will go over to the window, and I will take things on the window because I need to see through something a little bit better. Yeah. Lotta times, I use it when I'm taping together sheets, and I need to make sure that everything lines up. Well, like e- even on regular because it works on regular paper to. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Definitely. That's what I'm that's what I was saying I could stack up. Yeah. Regular paper traced. Yeah. That's an important distinction. Because like if I was xeroxing five or six things, and I want assemble them before I put my trace paper over it. I'll need to all use like a light table or am. I case since I don't have one I'll use a window. So I can make sure everything's lined up natural IT, try earth, slight Dave. That's right. It's more cost effective. But it's not nearly as convenient being sure. All right. Well, it's not good with. I think we're four four right. I take all these clearly I'd take the ones on my list, of course. Yeah. Okay. The next one. I have this is I'm not sure what category to put this in. It is the ember temperature control ceramic mug, what this thing is is basically to stainless steel mug that has a ceramic coating on it that has a lithium battery in it, and it sits on a charging base. And we'll keep your. Beverages. Hot for e if you leave it on the base all day long. Or if you take it off the base, and you know, you you're freelancing around the office. It'll keep your temperatures hot for up to two hours an hour. If you like super hot it has an app on your phone that you can use. So you can set like what temperature you want your beverage to be at like say the default. I think they have it is at one hundred and thirty degrees. So whatever liquid you put in there it will maintain that temperature of that liquid one hundred thirty degrees. But if you wanted to say, I one hundred thirty five because I have such discriminating palate, I need that. I'd notice the difference because they have no feeling in my tone. That's right. 'cause I drink boiling hot liquid all the time. I don't drink coffee. I was gonna say this. This is a weird gift coming from you from someone who doesn't drink coffee, but I was like a coffee drinkers. Yeah stream. Yeah. It'd be great for coffee drinker. I drink a lot of tea, and especially as we're heading into the cooler months. I might even be known to partake in. Hot chocolate at the office. Okay. Right. And the thing this falls into the if I have a hot beverage if it just drops a little bit it tastes cold to me. And I go things that are room temperature that are supposed to be hot tastes, cold and things that are room temperature that are supposed to be cold tastes hot. If you're no set sort of yet. So it's like, my here little more particular than I I mean, I'm discerning it's one twenty eight and it's cold. I'm out one thirty up. Good perfect. Yes. So I was at Costco, like two weeks ago and for three dollars they had like a file five thousand pound box of individual Swiss Miss chocolate hot chocolate packet tickets. I mean, there's like one hundred in this thing. I mean, it's easily. It's one per day for all winter. It's so many I had a I bought a box not that box. I bought like a regular box of the Christ store last year. I think I drink like he was like, a twelve pack, and I drank number twelve like a month ago. I mean it lasts a long time. This has one hundred. So I was like I'm not gonna keep it at my desk. Ask I put it in the kitchen house like everybody just like go crazy with hot chocolate. But the thing is that I'll make a hot chocolate, I'm drinking it. All right. I don't just like drink it until it's done a set it down because I work, right? I got work to do. And then I pick up later, Mike. This has licensed this is this is now cold chocolate. And that and it's yeah, it's not like, you know. Oh, and I might not set it at one thirty even I might even be more like a one one seventeen very specific. That's perfect temperature. I want it hot enough toward doesn't taste cold. But not so hot that hasn't been like burning your skin from my palate. Exactly hot enough that it's hot. But not that you're having a blow on it. Every time you take like brace myself. So it's a battery powered mug, essentially, basically. Yeah. But it's got a little be plate in the bottom or not. Yes. So it's the whole side. So it's got a disk. That's got charging pins in it. And you can set it down on this disc. And that basically just charges the battery that's within the Cup. But the Cup itself has a battery and a heating element that when you'd like lifted off the heating the charging pad. You know, it works will keep it heated. The charge the pad has nothing to do with the heat the heating element in the battery are all entirely contained within this mug. This is not like a hot plate that you set a Cup down in the Cup gets hot. And that's what keeps your drink cut. This actually heats the cook the Cup. But I thought it was cool. And I like the idea of it and since I don't like hot beverages that are room temperature like I'm out with a hot beverage. But yeah, yeah. It's a room to beverage. Yeah. Well, no, I don't like hot beverages that are now room temperature. That's what I don't like. Okay. I got you. All right. What are you got your next? I have and again, this is sort of have a proclivity for geeky sort of nerdy things. Right. And I I love these things and I have several of them the office. This is LEGO architecture sits. Yeah. Those are those are some of my favorite. I like the bigger ones some of the. Miler ones that are not many pieces. I don't really I'm like you. Can't you can't make the F Tara out of four pieces. That's not even you know. That's just garbage. And they do it anyway. But sorry, go. But you know, the set that they have to right now, they have a United States capitol. It's like a thousand pieces pretty cool. Yeah. And they have a Guggenheim, and I have the old Guggenheim which is much smaller slip, but they made a larger one. And so I enjoy those because I put those together with my daughters, you know, and it's sort of let them learn a little bit about architecture, but have fun kind of thing. And so they still do it. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. My not my oldest my youngest still desert. She's really big into Legos. So well, let's go, but I like the LEGO thing, and then they're done. I kind of keep them office at my desk or something like that. So couple of them I've a couple of those small ones. Yeah. And they're fun and they're cool for like four minutes because then you're done. Yeah. Like, I don't need to look at the instructions on how to put together. Yeah. And then I'm done. And you not and I I didn't really keep I didn't put anything on this normally on almost all my list. I want some technology. Gadget I want something. That's going to entertain me on Christmas day like like, those noon, light switches, right? If I got those as a present, I would know for the rest of the day. I'm putting these in like in that would be a lot of fun for me. I like the I like the get it out pulled apart. Put it together figure it out the technology. I like I need something to occupy my time on Christmas day because Christmas days pretty boring. Yeah. The family the food. Yeah. It's boarding. Yes. So dull. Well, you know, when you got little kids, then they're like going crazy over, you know, what Dr cram something you like that's key for awhile. But then you're like, we have any more most. Time for Turkey. We out I'm gonna pour making more. Right. So I gotta go to the store which is closed. I signed the drive around for three hours to find one that was open. So I liked the aspect of having like a thousand piece capital. Yeah. To put together because that would take a couple of hours. Maybe well, if you're working with a nine year old or something. Yes, for sure here's like get out of the way, daddy's gonna bang us out in the next hour. You know, we have I have the half several of the older ones that I really liked are discontinued that I wanna get that are big big pieces. They have a a falling water when that's several thousand pieces into. Yeah. That'd be fun. But it's fairly expensive now because it's secondary market. Sure. That's two hundred fifty dollars or something did I ever show you? So I went to Shanghai with my wife last year. And we went to some of the the crazy Asian markets that are actually like gargantuan, but they're like in train stations. Yeah. And lots of LEGO gear, but to try to avoid some of the the licensing issues like instead, a Star Wars it said star warts, right? Like, they just changed the nail like everything about it. Looks exactly same except for. It says warts one of them said star W R and R s. Wieners. Since star wieners. And it was like it was like eight dollars. Yeah. They'd have to be slightly off key. 'cause they couldn't match the song. Exactly. Yeah. All right. So I like Legos were a big player in this house a couple years ago, but they haven't they moved my daughter, she's fourteen. Now, she hasn't been interested in that come thing for years. Yeah. Well, my daughter my youngest is ten in my entire kitchen table is LEGO land. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. What did you have you seen? That's the architecture studio. It's like all white. Yeah. Bricks. I have three of them. Yeah. Those seem like they'd be fun for grownups. Yeah. They're pretty cool grownup architects. Yes, they would be the only problem is they don't have enough like they don't have enough of the pieces that I want right like the window pieces in the, you know, the more detailed little doors. Can't you go to the LEGO shop and buy that stuff? Maybe the windows are hard one to find actually windows and doors, or you know, you can only, you know, kind of get you with the it's four dollars a dollar gas gonna get you for that. Yeah. Well, here's a it's like, oh, I need that seven hundred dollars for the doors. I need for this. This hotel building. Okay. The next thing on my list is another thing. I'm so into this. And I love it. And I actually think this is a great deal. And so it's you I'm sure you know, it. I'm sure half the people that are listening to are going to know what I'm about to say. But they've been either like should I do it should not do it. A bet they've thought about it. It is the masterclass series you seen these. So maybe maybe so masterclass, so they actually reached out to me like, I don't know nine months ago, and they wanted me to help promote their masterclass. They're like, hey, you know, we'll we'll send you some of these masterclasses if he wanna talk about it. And because we think people that are in your area to are going gonna like it, and I was like whatever and do it because you know, Frank Gehry did a masterclass. So what they do is they they identify these really top-flight or notable or celebrity type individuals that have that are known for being good at what they do. And they film them making the series of classes that you can buy and watch and learn from the masters. Yes. No, no your time. Yes. Masterclass? Well, if you look at the list of like, George Burns doing one on documentaries or Malcolm glad well on writing. Or you know, they have astronauts talking about being astronauts, and they have they have cooking. Once have a bunch of cooking. Once they have you say, George Burns. I did who am I thinking Kimber Ken burns. Like, you're going to go with doing comedy. And you say documentary. You sounds like wait what he hasn't been with us for while. Yeah. It's an interesting one. Yeah. Ken burns. So they said we'll send you courtesy of us because we want you to know what you're talking about make the pitch yet. If you're going to talk about it, we want you to be honest about it because there's no way that no other way to do it. So they sent me a link for the Frank everyone which haven't used yet, quite honestly, and a friend of mine Eric up at thirty by forty studio. He did the same thing he watched and he actually has a really good video on video review. And so I kind of watched it, and at that time I wanted to and I go it actually looks pretty interesting looks pretty good. Sorry, finally responded back, and I said, okay, maybe I'll do this. But I have to interest architecture's just one of them the other one is I like to cook. And you got some really good ones on cooking here. So I'd like to see the one on Thomas Keller. And they said, okay. So they sent me the one on Thomas Keller. It's amazing. It's so great. And so here's here's basically how it works. You can here's why it's a good deal. If you buy one class, and like I'll use the Thomas Keller won because I have watched that one twenty two episodes twenty two lessons. It's for I won't say it's for ninety dollars. You get all of these or for one hundred eighty dollars you get every single one that they do. I mean every show every class. There's and there's a ton of them. Oh, like for every single every single person. He creative writing play poker learned the banjo to learn how to tell jokes. Yeah. There's tons of them. And so one hundred eight dollars basically says we're opening the vault opened the whole thing you can do every single one of them and most of the the architects that isos shared with they like to learn new stuff like they like to be exposed at a level. That's not just superficial. But enough to where they know how much more of a deep dive do they want to take on it? So what I've gathered from the so far from I haven't watched all of them, obviously. But from the ones that I've internal. Is is there were two pretty specific. And I know someone who did one of the cooking ones, and you can upload your own video of your product, or whatever it is. And the other students can comment on it. But it's possible that Thomas Keller might say, oh, you should do like you can get feedback from the guy who's doing the class. Right. Like like there are legit. Professor. Not just I made a bunch of videos, and I'm out and I'm out, right? They're still kind of engaged and as evidence that these are being very warmly received very positively reviewed like I'm here. I'm standing up got Mahan race gone. They're awesome. You should do it. That's why put him on the list is that the same people are making another series. So like the one that I'm gonna put a link to in the post is to Thomas Keller's second, go round the first one it was like on eggs and vegetables and things like that. This one is for like brazing in meat and sauces. Right. So it's like you wanna learn how to cook a Roach chicken. He there's he'll teach you how to do a roast chicken. You wanna learn how to brace something? To do it. Here's how you do sauces. And I had the really really great. And since I like to cook. I love it. And you know, the likelihood that you would get Thomas Keller might be the most renowned and recognized chef American chef effort. I mean, he is the pinnacle he is considered to be the very best. That guy's teaching you. How to do a roast chicken come on, man? That can be a good chicken. You hope. Right. Yeah. I'm just thinking about mind of those like, you know, Pinterest fails shows or whatever. Right. And so it's like, here's my roast chicken looks like a gray mush. Yeah. But these are videos, right? Teaching you. Here's the technique. Here's how you move the the whisk in the pan when you're sauce doesn't break. But you don't introduce too much air into it. You know, I mean. Yeah, there's technique involved to it. And they're in the there's philosophy. This guy's teaching his philosophy. And for Thomas Keller, his floss Fay's slowdown. Like it takes time time in patients. You want to cook good food? It's work. It's effort. But it takes time. It's work for you, be patient masterclass. I'm a big fan. I think it's a good value for what you're paying for. And I think it's a it's a it's a pretty good value ninety dollars a lot for like the Thomas Keller the second one that I'll put the link to it's twenty two lessons. Right. That's a lot. How long are the lessons is a very it varies. Yeah. I haven't seen them all but they're not short. Maybe it's not like five minute lessons or something. That's right. Yeah. You can for one hundred and eighty dollars which is twice as much you can one of. Yeah. But it's for a year. It's basically just bought like a one year key to the vault. So it's still up. I mean big fan mass class thumbs up. So that's really neat. You've got me. Intrigued I'm yeah. My interest is piqued. Yeah. I'm gonna have to go check it out is there, and there's a lot of different. There's so many of topics. I guess is what I'm saying like, photography or. Oh, yeah. Whatever whatever art any kind of thing music scoring dance music. Like if you they have like dead mouse, though. Yeah. Yeah. Dead mouse teaches us. Yeah. On techno music on DJ, or whatever. And then Armand van Buren does one on dance music. Wow. It's crazy. I mean, and I go these are all the gods that are widely considered to be like their their top of their game. And there's so many of them. I really speaks the testimony. How could a product they're putting together because. These aren't knuckleheads, right? When somebody says, hey, we want to do this. I think all these people would be skeptical. Right. Like, oh, yeah. The people at the top of their game would be. Well, why would I do that? Right. But there's so much like acting lessons. I mean say I mean, there's so many of them that you can do is there. One on podcasting. I can go check. Actually, there's a lot. But just not do masterclass. Oh, yeah. So all right. So that's masterclass. Good. What else? What's your next for you? Okay. So my next one is completely tangent. Here. I know that a lot of my architect colleagues enjoy skin. Art, right tattoos. Yes. Yes. So my next gift is a temporary tattoo company. That's called Inc box. Okay. What they've done is. They went to a believe was Africa or South America. Remember in? There's a tribe that makes this essentially stain out of Berry's, right? Like, some locally kind of fruit that they use you know, they paint themselves with it. And it's. You know for them at last month or something, right? They got ten figured it out. So they they sell tattoos that are temporary tattoos. And they're only one color kind of black that you can get a little bit of a grey. Now, it's a temporary tattoo that lasts about two to three weeks. Can you send them a design that they'll turn into will know, this is the thing? Right. So they have preset designs. But the thing that I think is interesting now say they sell like a self creative kit where you can descend draw your own stuff, and it's actually like a little pin bottle. So since you would be kind of drawing on yourself or on someone else you're literally making your own teddy making your own tattoo. Yeah. And so I think that that's that's pretty cool for a lot of the folks really liked that twos. And you know, these kind of things I just have a few of their pre made designs that I've tried out. But really, yeah. But I think that if I was a better artist. Maybe I would do that. And I know that some of our colleagues are really good artist. But also the same time I just doodle around something to make like crazy designs and in a couple of weeks. It's gone. And it's no big deal. And it's all because they had some other people that they would test out that they wanted something, right? Like they were thinking of getting a permanent tattoo, but they were like I'm going to try it. See what if I like it there or if I like the size, or you know, whatever that air. Yeah. Like the location, right. Like if I wanted to my arm or some all of their back. Yeah. Whatever. Yeah. But I think it's a really cool thing for a creative person right called Inca pox Inc box. And they have they do have a plethora of premade tattoos. Yeah designs, and they come in various sizes on all this kind of stuff. And I mean, I mean, they're really well done. But again, it's all sort of. It's just kind of a black. How do you apply them almost like a real temporary like normal temporary tattoo that your kids have or whatever? I mean like you get something wet it comes in this. Well, actually comes in this. It's not a stamp, but it's almost like a band aid kind of thing. So it's a tattoo. So for some three plied system that you have to wet that. And then you tape it to your skin, and you leave it there for v. Fifteen minutes and then in like two days it shows up like it's just sort of. It's because it stains your skin, but it has to do some stuff. There's some chemistry behind it. Right. That it char it'll show up eventually. So when you pull it off. It's not like it's right there right now. It's kinda like, but in overtime it gets the next couple of days it gets darker, and then it goes away. Then it starts to feign. Yeah. Again, that's cool. But I mean they last about two to three weeks. You know, I've tried I've had a couple. And so I've I was like, well, what if I don't, you know, overly wash that part like I had one of my forum. Right. So when I shower I wouldn't scrub or any of that it does matter. It's ten minutes. Yeah. It just I think it's the whatever that organic stain thing is has got this life expectancy, and that's kind of like Hannah. But it comes prepackaged. Yeah. Yeah. China. Yeah. Y'all thought that Brown? I mean, it's black which appeals to me is an architecture this dark bold thing. Yeah. You have to show me which one jeez. Because I'll tell you. I'm I've generally as a person I'm down. I meaning. I'm not down. I'm not a big fan of tattoos. Yeah. And I'm not anti tattoo for the reasons that people would think, and it's because personally, I don't want anything that tastes change too often to tour. I go like if you're in the marine, you're ADHD doesn't allow you to to really, well, I think they ought to mean, something and think what what this one thing means when you're eighteen years old you don't care about. And you stop seeing it by the time. You're thirty years old, right? It's just it's there. It's part of you, you true, it's gone for all intents and purposes as opposed to let's say that you're in the one hundred first airborne or something, and you and all the guys that you tried to stay alive with guts that has. Meaning man, that's that's a reflection of chapter in your life that I think is worth remembering and you're going to see it for your entire life. Because when you see it you don't see tattoo, you see the guys that you put your life on the line with. So there's some things in some capacities that I'm really down with I go. That's exactly the reason why you'd want to get a tattoo. You get like barb wire, your bicep, I go it's not gonna look old. It's Lawson when you're old and got flabby. Biceps looks awesome. Now that you're Jack. Right. So that's you're just remember the time that you jacked remember that time when I was looked down at that bar that flabby Bob, why are you going to go at one point time man that was taught Bob wire, this was a gun show right here, actually. So I'm not against the tattoo as a thing. I'm against it and its permanency. Yeah. Right. So yeah, I kind of the idea that you could get a tattoo in its semi-permanent. I mean, even at the permanency was like for year, I'm still okay with that. But the idea that oh, you're going to get a half, son half million, or whatever I go that seems like spur of the moment kind of thinking right now, I'm not against people have that these are my personal predilections. So I don't judge people that have them I go just not for me. Yeah. But the thing that does appeal to me as I liked the artistic nature of it. I liked the fact that it says something about us a person, and I can look at your tattoos, and and kind of go that's really neat or the out what the thought about our wise, why the fact that you have a wolf on your arm like what's the story behind that? I'm that person that wants. To ask people who have tattoos about their tattoos. Like, why'd you get that. And if the answer is I saw look good. I'm I go. I mean, I guess that's the thing is I I don't think that that's really the majority of people to get to they're not which one they're not like author Lukoil, most of the people least the ones that. I know that have them in including myself, right? It's got it's got some kind of. Meaning it's not just oh that was the coolest dragon. I'd ever seen. So I wanted to run it down my entire leg. You know, people just really like it, and they will give it as like a piece of art. I want a piece of art on my leg that it's not speaking to them on the internet is so full of photos of stuff, you go that looks amazing. But what does that have to do with you or your life experience? Did you involve yourself with wizards at some point this? This is true. Right. I could see that yet. Did you have demons in your life at some point that tried to flay the skin off your skull? I mean understand this. Yeah. It just looks cool. I get that. I get I there's a play. And maybe that's what I'm saying. Maybe it's the. Majority of people that I know their tattoos have reason. Yeah. But I don't know a lot of people that are like head to toe kind of. I've got you know, wizards and dragons and demons which apparently wizards those are the only guy tattoos it Bob ever seen now. Wizards dragons and demons Zemin's, I'll watch a lot of movies and skulls skulls. Yeah. The coolest tattoo I ever saw was this one I was in college and this guy, and here's nothing where you get. It's like really I go man that that's that is as important as what you get in my mind and I got a tattoo. I don't wanna look at. So it has this tattoo first off let me just say, it was a really cool. I'll tell you. Why is cool and just second. But it was on his shoulder blade. So I'm like that is amazing. And you can't see it. Like it. I go. I'm thinking why would you do that? It's awesome. I'd wanna look at it. If that were me so that kind of drove me little crazy. So what he had is. It was a perfect circle is probably about oh, no three inches across maybe four inches. Cross. So it wasn't little, but it wasn't huge it occupied shoulder blade. And it was a tartan grid is very very colorful. And it has a tartan grit was plaid, basically. And because I like asking people tell me about your tattoo while his family was Scottish, and that was their family plaid their family tartan pattern. So it had a historical. But it meant something to his family. And I was like, that's awesome. That's why you get a tattoo like that. And it just looked avenues beautiful. I thought God the skill took to make something like that seems like really intense. I mean, it was plaid, and it wasn't just like black and White House teeth plan. I mean, it was like oranges and Browns, and yellows and greens and overlapping, and it was it was beautiful. I thought it was amazing. Kind of like I wish I was Scottish. So I could put one of those on me. Yeah. These for year, but see it had reason I go maybe I would keep that one. But for me, I'd I'd I'd put it like all my forums. I could go. I love it. I could look at it anytime. I wanted to go amazing. Yeah. I'm with you on that one. We'll will see it because I've got a friend that got one when he was younger, and it's like on his back. He he has no idea. Now, what it looks like like if it's degraded if it's faded. I can't you know can look in the mirror, but that's really not the same. Okay. We're down to our last gift. We've done our four round number five. So I have certain categories of gifts that always try to make sure I get something represented and this year's list will include all Andrews items, and it'll clued the ones I've talked about here. But also include a lot of other things like I'll always put books on my list because I always like books. So there's gonna be books. I'm just not talking about them. It has pages. There's all the letters in the alphabet are represented. I'm not gonna talk about books. Great gifts for market, text should be great gift for architects, China that younger persons. Don't care for the books as much really I attend been my experience for my office. Like, I get books and a lot to me quite a bit. Yeah. And the first thing I have to do is that to write my name him or man, they will they're like, it's office book. I'm like, no, they sent it to me. It's my book interested in my book. So even though I have behind you. I have a a large library books, but most of my architecture books at least a fair chunk them. I keep up in my office because I look at them. Yeah. That's a source of reference and inspiration. And I don't want people to because anyone can take one in bringing home. Right. And it may not ever come back. Right. I wanna make sure I wrote my name on it. So they'll be they'll be other items represented on this gift cut. It's not just the ones we have now. But there's usually certain kind of categories that I like to hit one of the categories I like to hit is normally bar related alcohol alcohol related sometimes alcohol. Right. So I've had like ice fear makers on the list before a couple years ago. I think I put the Moscow mule. Copper cups on there. Which are great. I need more of them actually only have two. So the last item on my list is wine, but not just anyone right? Because this is a lot of garbage wine out there. And I like boxed Francie is garbage. Well, I'm not I'm not gonna say it's garbage. I'm saying it's not for me. Okay. Right. It's not for me. I'm a, but I'm fairly particular because I don't drink that much. But when I do I don't want to drink swill. I know you're not a bit of a one-stop. I mean, not a bit. I like I like learning about it. That's kind of attendant that goes through like if I go I'm gonna make food. I wanna learn I wanna be like food master. I want to know what I'm doing. So the wind number put on this list is actually my favorite bottle of wine is called dairy ish in. It's spelled D A R I U S H. Okay. Now, it's not cheap. It's about one hundred dollars a bottle for the cab, which that is that is a special occasion wine. That's not a Tuesday night. At one unless you had a great Tuesday but one hundred dollars Tuesday one hundred dollars Tuesday. So my wife, and I went this was maybe before Kate was born this is a long time ago. We went out to for special dinner, and I'm talking to sommelier, and I'm like pretend and like, I know some stuff, right? We're getting along. Okay. But we don't have a lot of money. I mean, we're expensive restaurants. So when I say a lot of money, I mean, I'm ready to drop couple hundred bucks on dinner, but I can't drop three hundred dollars on a bottle of wine. I just I'm not that guy. I can't double down dinner on a bottle of wine. That's right. Yeah. So I talked to the guy go this is what I like this is what we're into. This is whatever whatever whatever's any goes, we just got in a bottle. I really like it. And it's called dare us. I was like, okay. So he brings it out. And it was great. I mean, I loved it. But one of the things I love about this bottle. Is it literally, you know, what I'm gonna pause this recording? I'm gonna go get the bottle, and I'm handed to you for the rest of. Conversation. Okay. So for the listeners, it'll be seamless, but I'm actually going to pause the recording here. Okay. Hold on. Okay. So we're back. I went to my bar. I grabbed a bottle of this one because I bought us. I bought a six or of it like a while back have one bottle left. It is now sitting next to Andrew. Okay. Andrew picked up all up. It's heavy. Oh my gosh. It's filled with lid, not wine. So at the bottom of all wine bottles. They have what's called the bell. Now put your finger. How deep is that bell? It's pretty yeah. It's it's like twice as deep as most bottles are yes. Indeed. And if you hold it up like look how dark dark it is a glass. Yeah. Dark last. You can't see anything even. Yeah. If I if I drank the wine out of it, you'd be able to see you'd see it's Greenglass, but it's really really dark green glass. I have this kind of mental thing in my head that if I ever had a vineyard, and I was making wine the very first thing, I would do is. I would buy the very best bottle. I get my hands on it would be a bottle just like that one. It'd be big. It'd be heavy. It have a deep Elon it it'd be dark class because I look at that. And it just it feels like quality, right? Feels like they actually care about the contents on our inside that might be packaging. But for group of people who are architects packaging is a big part of it. Sure right now, the wind itself is. Really, really good and Robert Parker reviewed it. So that's a the two thousand fifteen I think that's the current really the fifteen years. Yes. So the two thousand fifteen is the current release and Robert Parker, which anyone who knows anything about. Why knows Robert Parker's like the guy that rates wines gave that a ninety eight. Right. So it's expensive. But it's really good and somebody who holds onto that bottles going to know this didn't come from the grocery store that this didn't come from. This is not a bar the moment on the way between your house and the destination. Somebody got his bottle. Somebody's gonna know that that's a good ball on. Yeah. But I mean, this seems pretty amazing actually that it's ninety eight and one hundred dollars but hundred dollars not is not extreme right for a bottle of wine sounds expensive. But I mean, they're bottles of wine that costs way more than that way. More than the probably don't have that same rating, or even you know are in that same rating, but not a hundred bucks or like four hundred dollars or some. Yeah, you can definitely even go. You can go crazy with wine. And in the grand scheme of things that doesn't fall into the crazy. There's not a lot of people out there that can justify spending one hundred dollars on a bottle of wine it and it's got its four glasses like four. It's four pours. That's two hundred five dollars to reclaim one. That is in my world. That's pretty luxurious. That's pretty I'm not saying, it's not. I'm just saying in the wine world. Yes. Right. One hundred dollars. It's not crazy. But but that ball right there. It's the last one I own and it won't see two thousand nineteen. I'll tell you that Trump. Sure that'll probably go down at during Christmas at some point. I was at Christmas or thanksgiving. But now it won't go don't thanksgiving. It doesn't have to be that Bala wine. But I will tell you that if your person who you're buying this gift for it only be one bottle guilty by a lot of you can buy one you give that to them. They're going to know even before they open it that this is a good product. It's a great bottle packaging is on point the labels on point everything about that is it's my favorite. There's I have. No, I have. I have zero downside to that. As a product highly recommended with your infinite one knowledge. All right, your Europe. Yeah. I can't. I don't know if I can compete with your wonderfulness there. Okay. So my last gift, I don't know if I can compete with one hundred dollar bottle of wine, but it's actually it's art in a way, there's this group called pop chart on a few familiar with them. I'm not they make sort of pop culture, art prints poster prints, and they have a they have a large selection of these almost info graphic type posters that you can get. Yeah. And they have some on. I they have one on cocktails that has alcohol and mixing down the side. And it has this pinwheel sort of in the middle that gives you all the different combinations to make certain drinks now. Yeah. Yeah. And they have one on beer that has all the different varieties of beer and how they're interconnected, so they have these informational yet, very artistic posters chur. They also have some four all these. All the buildings the significant buildings of New York. I got on this poster and they have one for architects. It's all these glasses worn by famous people. So they have the different frames from like Elvis, and there's the white sunglass frames from Nevada, and there's buddy Holly. And there's that's interesting. I'd like to see that one Thomas Edison or in Benjamin Franklin, and you know, morpheus from nitric this whole mixed bag of all these different. I wear so and they make several different posters and many that are like, you know, thirty to forty dollars for, you know, twenty four by thirty six I have a couple of them in their good quality the paper's nice. And I think there's most of them are screen print. You know? So it's a nice process, but they have the informational and artistic combination is what appeals to me kind of as an act, right? Sure. I've got that five to them that I can learn a little bit. But they're also really cool to look at where you have yours. Are they in your house there in the office? Yeah. Yeah. I haven't been office. They have won cameras that I don't have that. I would like it sort of. History of cameras. Yeah. And so it goes through, you know, the first camera ever in. There's like essentially images or drawings of cameras from whenever the first cameras have been until now all the different kinds of styles stuff. So I'm like I wanna look that up there. Pretty yeah. They're pretty cool. I mean, like I say they have him on whiskey have them on. I'm looking now they have one on sharks. They have one on Wales. A lot of different things that you're interested. Beatles songs. Oh, they also have an American house one from the book the American house had the field guide to marry houses. They have the Virginia McLeod one. Yeah. They have the when it's similar to that like the poster so there's some very architecture related things. But then other things I think architects would just enjoy. Yeah. It's hard to go against any kind of good graphic. Yeah. Well, cou I dig it. I'm gonna check it out. I like that kind of stuff. I don't know. You know, my first reaction was oh, we need some to put in our bathroom at the office. But that kind of well not that they're they need to be in the bathroom. I'm sure that that that's not the point of it. I just know that in my office. Work, okay. In a bathroom look at. But yes, they are. I mean, they are display where the pieces I think most of them from from a standpoint. Okay. So there you go. There's ten gifts that will all be represented on the two thousand eighteen version of the what to get an architect for Christmas list. Film. Pretty good about it too. Good list. It's an interesting list. Yeah. And like I said there's more stuff that's on the list like last year's list had forty three items on it. Oh, well, okay. So you imported sock because we were talking about this last night. There's duplicates that go on these lists right because I don't come up with one hundred percent, original ideas, all the time. And now crazy, but the reason I don't is because people ask for links. Like, I always include the sketch paper I use. I always use the pens that I use. There's certain things that I get asked over and over and over out throughout the year because I don't have like the same ten people that read my sight. So every year like seventy five percent of the people that read this list are not familiar with any of the other ones. It's a rather than me have to go go look at this other one or like, I used my put out voice. So instead of me hound I go, you know, what everybody always asks about the Tombo markers us, everyone always asks about what pens. Do I use whereabout the trace paper like even when I had that couple of here the other night. I gave them all a trace you thought. I just handed them to keys to the kingdom. Right. You're like this is two dollars and thirty. I got a lot of the stuff. Yeah. You know? And they're like because a lot of people don't know what it is. Like if you don't do what we do bet. It's something that like if you're say, you're a parent buying a gift for your senior in high school who's going to go to Arctic to school getting a role of traits would be kind of a big deal. But that parent might not know because they don't follow me on Instagram and know that I use trace paper does a lot of moving parts to it. So and then I also I always add some new books, but then there's always a handful books that I gotta go. I'm gonna curate a couple of the really good ones out. Like don't MRIs if you miss these last year, don't miss them again because they're really really good. We'll there are certain number books. I think it should be in every architect library, right? I mean like there's a there's a baseline of book. Value. Right. That you should have. If you have any books, these these these should be the first five or six that you put in there. Right. So I'll put a couple of those in there. So there's always a couple of rehashes. And it's not because I'm lazy. It's because people ask about him every single year like architectural graphics every year somebody asked me about architectural graphics. So I go, you know, what I'm just gonna put on the list every year. It's a default. It's going to go on the list. But it's a good list. This is good. I like the variety we put in this year. I think I kinda hit the the nice range and the truth is I want everything on my list this year except for the things already have like the new lights, which is. But I'd take more. I would take more intent, and I would definitely take more of that wine will. Yeah. Who wouldn't I'm like it's out. It's on the couch on my time is this is this is not gonna make two thousand nineteen. It's not gonna make November the eighteenth. It's not gonna make it till tomorrow. Thank you for being with Andrew in me for episode thirteen what to get an architect for Christmas. Pretty sure this was our best episode ever for that reason. I would really like for you to take thirty seconds out of your day and overnight to leave us a five star festivus rating. If you haven't already makes a huge difference in. We'll definitely put me in the holiday spirit without actually having to drink spirits. Be sure to visit the original life of an architect dot com for show notes. Links info and photos from the episode. Thanks so much for tuning in and Ojo. Happy holidays. Everyone. I have to pay attention to you. Right. That is true. So that's the default. I know. So when you oh, just focus. Let's get going here. Sorry, man. It's like you're smoker. Some how you got so much fluid. No, I've been fighting a cold. My entire life. It's life. I haven't been feeling well since last, you know, birth. So if you like eating that's a good place to go. Yeah. You can actually get like bird on a stick like the whole bird. Yeah. Stick and like they run the stick like in the field. Yeah. In the beak is it's it's a horror show. Yeah. But I can imagine. I bet it's delicious. Yeah. I try to say I'm going to get one. And they're like, no, we gotta get going. Come on USC me eat this thing. Seating like whole bird on this thing. Like, it wasn't a big bird. It's like, oh, yeah. It was a baby birth. Exactly e- to Sparrow on a stick. Yeah. But look it's glazed beautifully. I know it's beautiful did chart bird. You can out to eat. Okay. Hold on here. Sold him on. Full full show. If I had if I had a restaurant, that's what it would be called. Folks show for show.

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Lionel

Mark Simone

36:21 min | 7 months ago

Lionel

"The morning morning, everyone we are still waiting for mark, simone to show up I know he's there. We have a little technical problem there, so We'll just sort of get things going. I'm sure he's going to have more to say about this controversy involving president, trump and hydroxy chloroquine now obviously mark is a defender of this practice lot of controversy about it and I I will tell you that in terms of the use of this drug to treat corona virus. There are a number. Number of stories I know a couple of individuals and actually several that have taken this, and it's been very very effective in treating corona virus the issue here for the president and I. Guess You gotTa. Give encourages a man of his conviction. He's touted this thing from the very beginning so he's taking it, but as a prophylactic and I guess you have a lot of people are worried about that. Of course. Nancy Pelosi was worried about him. Right calling him obese in. In the the delicate category, so you gotta wonder, but again it's it's. It's his decision. Now we have another part of the tri-state area opening today. Believe it or not even realize that Connecticut was the last state in the nation to open up. You would've thought New York is, but I mean that's the only New York City here. We're under lockdown for God knows how long, but Connecticut reopened today. they have allowed retail stores to open? A malls can open on. You can go to restaurants as long as you're dying outside. And I will tell you. I'm here in South Carolina and that's the situation that we had here for a number of weeks now and Y'all remain under a big lockdown up there in new. York but I must say it's fairly normal down here and I. Think what life can return to a fairly normal routine with certain precautions. Clearly if you are in the endangered category, I mean if you're a patient at a nursing home, or if you are undergoing chemotherapy or your immune challenged, you gotta stay home. You gotTA. Stay home to protect yourself. You don't mingle with people, but if you're a relatively healthy person, I gotta believe that you can go out. Maintain that social distance going to be a a thing that we're going to have to for quite a while anyway, but you can go out you can go to. A restaurant made reservations for dinner tomorrow night. I'm going to eat outside, but What you get you go to the table. There's plenty of space between tables. And for the most part, your servers have masks and gloves on, they sanitize the table. They don't give you re usable menu. You'll get a piece of paper, or they'll just put it up on a board and you can read the the menu items and choose from that. And then when you're done, your table is sanitized. It's rinsed off with a disinfectant salt pepper shakers are replaced, too, and it sets there for awhile, and in most cases you're outside, so if it's in the sun, it's going to help with that and everything's fine, and I will tell you to here in this particular part of South Carolina head area I keep. Keep Track of the local statistics and amazingly when this thing opened partially, there were about two hundred eighty I can get you. The numbers for two hundred eighty cases of corona virus in this particular county, and it's pretty much stayed the same well. It's two hundred ninety nine right now, but twelve and twelve deaths, and that's been the case for like a couple of. Weeks here in the death toll is very very minimal, so. Mark Are you. There yeah I'm on my phone. Oh, what happened? Well we had as you know this perfect system, the greatest software that I would connect with, and they decided to put in some different Tom. Oh you know what I know what you're talking about because I have I have? The new tuna works perfectly you got you gotta push the right buttons. Oh now I've lost the phone. Can you hear me on the air? I yeah. I've got you I got jogging here. Where you can hear me on the air. I can hear you Well I. Assume you're on here. I can hear you in my headphones. Okay I guess they go ahead. What. Now, you know we had. We had the system we had set up. The software knows for like four weeks. Not a glitch never went off once, and then they wanted to put in a whole new system and I said well. Maybe maybe we should just stick with the. Of this new one? So. I knew this was going to happen, so you can hear me fine. Everybody can hear me I, got you. Okay Great. So, what we're talking about I I was I was listening to burning and sit. What were you guys talking about? Talking about reopening, I was telling me about how it's. You know it can be functional. There's no need to be locked down forever. That's true except our ratings are up like forty percents since this lockdown people not only listening, listening now for the whole show, and governor Cuomo. He wants you locked down, so you? What briefings are ratings are through the roof? Maybe you should stay lockdown. Okay, go ahead. Don't get out of the House. Now we need everybody at first of all Connecticut is open right now right now. What's it what time is? Ten twelve things are open. You can go into stores. You can go into restaurants open in an hour and they at the last minute pulled back on the hair salons. They can't open yet. That's going to be delayed. The Governor says the hair salons needed more time. from what I hear hair salon owners telling me they didn't need any more time. They were ready to go, but the state wants a lot of things done. They want like plexiglass between the stations and that kind of stuff, so they'll be opening a week or so, and are you talking about hydroxy chloroquine? Yes, yes. Yeah lot of doctors have called me. they're worried that Democrats in the fake news and the media might actually be killing people. Now you might cause some deaths They're all using hydroxy chloroquine. They've all been using it. can't used on every patient. The doctor has to check you. Make sure you can take it. If you've got any kind of certain conditions, you can't take it, but in all. All the cases they've used it on different great success dramatically brought down the symptoms, and it saved a lot of lives, but they're telling me now. Because of what fake news has been doing, they give it to. People and people are afraid to take it, so there were actually worried. There could be a death or two from people, not taking their hydroxy Clark. Don't listen to fake news. Your doctors know what they're doing when your doctor tells you. Hill check your medical history and your heart and your ekg and your other medicines. If he tells you to take it, it's okay to take it. They usually give it with a z pack or with zinc vitamin. C. But it's working on everybody, but you know what I've decided. The birth this and even doctors have said they think this. it it. It does work, but no one's convinced. One hundred percent of works preventative wise. They're not sure it can absolutely prevent it. In fact, they don't think it can really prevent it. What they think is. If you're about to get it, because Kita Hydroxy Clark. Get it in the earliest stage. You can get it if you can get it on day one. It's going to really help you, so they think if the president's taking if that's true. that he must have had a much bigger exposure than what's being reported. You know there was what was the story that Valet that he that served them lunch. HAS THAT NOW? That makes sense that makes sense. If, somebody else had yeah, because bunch of doctors have told me that if they had them start on drastically that that means the valid interest bringing a classic coke put down and leave. He must have been in the room for twenty minutes here and there. Must have been around a lot and it must have been a couple of other if if they think there was some serious exposure to the. That's why they would start him on it so if he's taken it. You know if he's really taken it. That would be the reason why so We got Have you been around anybody who later got it. That happens sometimes. No, no I haven't been near anyone. Thank God yeah. Yeah, and I've been careful I'm going to go, but what's like I was with somebody or are. They ran into start talking to me too long or they got too close. and you start to worry about it came right up to. He's talking me so now. I call the person like a few days later. Just make sure they're okay. I call them But five days later. How you doing everything good? found. Then I do for fourteen days because fourteen days is the longest incubation then on the fourteenth I call Sunday sound great and he's fine. I JUST WANNA. See how you doing now. The Guy Thinks I love him. Calling him. We want to know how he's doing I. Hope they notice that after fourteen days I never talked to you again. You got to that so. Connecticut is reopening today. You'll be now. Here's the problem. They're GONNA do outdoor dining and Connecticut as great outdoor restaurants, but. you're going to now be dependent on the weather. I was checking the forecast It's Memorial Day weekend looks pretty good. It'll be like in the. Upper sixties you can eat outside in the upper sixties, but look It looks like rains possible one of these nights, but the most crucial thing is getting US reopen getting people back to work especially this area New York. You know we have a million people in the tri-state area, the work in the restaurant industry or depend on it. You gotta get them back to work. Did you watch the president yesterday? Do the roundtable with all the restaurant owners yeah, I was reading. The fake news went after him. They said Oh the president was awful. It was. Was cringe-worthy watching and talk to these guys. And they pointed to the Thomas Keller, segment! Thomas. Keller is one of the three or four chefs in America in the world. per se in new. York French kitchen in California, and he kept interrupting. Thomas Keller was cringe-worthy article, said I went and watched it. I could see why he was interrupting Keller's Great Guy. He's a genius makes the best cooking videos you'll ever see. You could never cook anything in his videos. It's too complicated. You'd have to set aside three years of your life one of these dishes. But Keller was talking about his problems. Now with suppliers. You can't get supplied and trump was asking. What do you mean like butter? You can't get because we'll have to have a certain kind of butter. And he said it's very important to get the butter from certain months of the year where the cows eating the right type of green grass, because of it's a little later in the year there eating. Hey, and it can affect the flavor of his butter. So this is why trump was cutting them off. Realizes their millions of people in the heartland of America, starving to death who can't afford a can of tuna? And this guy is worried about what the cow ate that he got the butter. Butter might be a list. that. That's why trump is president because he actually stays in contact with the real world. He's not a guy who's ever gonNA. Eat Any Thomas Keller anything I've seen president trump's diet. It's a Cheeseburger, a club sandwich, grilled cheese, a milkshake, a steak, and that's about it. There's no. Fee. Chef came out of the way to came back to the table, said Mr. Trump I'm sorry. We don't have any butter with the cows eating green green grass, the cows eating. Hey, would that be okay? It's not something. He's. So now this is, it's hard to believe. This is Memorial Day weekend coming up. I cannot believe it so the beaches. will be open in long, island and so the beaches in New York. City are the only thing close right. The governor's open the beaches. And it's only here in New York. So what would that be? That would be rockaway Queens. Brooklyn Coney. Island all that. Kinda stuff now you can. Mayor has set it up, so you can go to the beach, but you can't go in the water. You can't near the water. You can look at the sand. You can't sit on the sand you can Walk on the beach, but you got to walk very fast. Don't stop. So what is he thinking? You know you cannot get the virus in very bright sunlight I mean. If if somebody came right up and spit in your face, you might get it, but the virus is killed in bright sunlight. It doesn't transmit very well by the way yesterday was very windy, so I talked to. Some people think I'm afraid to go out in the win. They save somebody, coughs or sneezes droplets come out. They could go six feet, and then you read these crazy reports. It can go ten feet fifteen feet if it's really windy. People got worried, so I asked a few experts on this, they said high wind is better. It disperses the virus all over the place. It's less likely to. In high winds, so if you get a bright sunny day with a lot of wind, you're all, said Actually, a very humid day when it gets really humid in the summer. Don't worry. That's when you're absolutely. The safest virus cannot get you on a hot humid day. Because the way it gets to you if somebody coughs sneezes, or even talks reallowed droplets come out of their mouth, little microscopic droplets come and hit you. But on a very humid day the air is is moist, so it's filled with millions of water droplets. So when they shoot the droplets out of their mouth, they'll go to all these water droplets and be totally watered down by the time they get to you, so you're safe on a hot humid day so in the middle of July. Don't complain about the weather. It's saving your life now. There's all these people saying We'll never get back to I. Hate this new normal. This raise new normal. We'll never get back to this EVAC seen. Vaccines not coming for a while. That's probably the end of the year. And even then you know when they have a vaccine. When it come up with it, they got a test to see. If there's any after effects or anything, so wh- Joe Bartlett. Would you be the Guinea pig? You go first and get that I don't want any vaccines. No Sir I'll take my chances with the droplets. Yeah Let's have Democrats take vaccine, and then we'll wait. And see what happens. and and by the way all you in the fake news. Democrats all you trumpeters. We'd like you to sign a release form that you will never take hydroxy chloroquine. Quinn's should God. Forbid you get the disease, you will not take it. You'll refuse it. save it for the. People that want Hey. We got lots to get to Check out the webpage. There's some really good stuff up there. If I could remember what it is, but I'll tell ya just click here and oh. this is great. Did you see Biden yesterday Now? This guy's brain is completely fried. He is not there anymore. You know he can't remember things. Sometimes. He's talking about the corona virus and he can't remember what it's called. Watch this video. He can't remember the name of the virus. That's a tough one nowadays and then Oh. What's this? Seinfeld maybe oversaw saw this. This is the corona virus episode of Seinfeld. Also I. We kept. I kept telling you about this that the Tesla's going to get wiped out by There's all these tesla killers coming. These are incredible. Electric Cars Porsche has one Jaguar has BMW. Take a look at this video. Here's the tesla killer from BMW. This is the electric car of the future of this. It's all up in the web page to seven ten W. O., R. Dot Com Slash Mark, seven ten W. O. R. Dot com slash mark. President going to to the Ford Plant. He's GonNa Visit Implant today, and in this plant they require everybody to wear masks so as asking. What is the president wearing masks quasi wearing a mask in every briefing start? Why don't you wearing a mask and? have you ever heard? CUOMO takes questions everyday. Nobody nobody's ever said to him a y you wearing a mask and he does the briefings from a different part of the state every day one days in Buffalo, one days in Queens at the MTA headquarters I, think yesterday was at North Long Angel, traveling all over the state, never with a mask on. Nobody ever asked him that they asked the president every. Favorite part of the briefing when he takes questions and fake news into their act, and then the president has to respond. We've announced a plan. We're opening up our country just rude person you are. Yeah, that was her. When are you GonNa? Come up with a plan to. Do all day they're. They got five thousand people putting together a plan older, she actually said. Why don't you have a plan on how to Ryoko? We've announced a plan. We're opening up our country, just a rude person you are. Y-. So, but listen, let's. Remember. If you look at Florida. They have a bigger population than New York City. They've got Miami which has got his bottom many people as a New York City and densely populated, and they've got other major cities like. O or Landau in Tampa they had like a thousand cases are thousand deaths, and we had a phenomenal number They had forty thousand total cases. We have three hundred and forty thousand. They get totally out of control. Not to mention their budget is totally balanced. Ours was ten billion before this even started so cuomo become the hero. Go Round the Santa's isn't the here well? We know the answer to that liberal PL- privilege of course now governor Cuomo made possibly the dumbest mistakes ever threw out every step of this crisis from not shutting down now we're looking back at. It said he didn't shut down fast enough. The Santa's shut down at a much earlier stage I don't mean the date, but it's how many cases you know. Disentis like a thousand cases shut the state down Cuomo. Wait until whatever was twenty thousand cases before shutting down, so we shutdown way too late. Governor. Cuomo made this the dumbest decision ever in history of sending corona virus patients into the nursing homes. Remember, even had a rule. Nobody's allowed no visitors, no family or visitors in the nursing home. They were worried. These people might have the virus, but when it came to the people that definitely had the virus just got tested for the virus. They're sick with the virus. He ordered the nursing homes to take them. Telling them they can't take the family or visitors, but they could take the P- The people with virus and spread it all over the place. Four thousand senior citizens dead as a result. Now, give the governor credit for this. This was a smart decision for him. He then secretly snuck into the recent budget a law that you cannot sue a nursing home now so if you're one of the relatives of somebody that this decision killed. You can't sue the nursing home now. Can you imagine that is one sneaky governor, isn't it? Sneaky he does that do. You gotTa give them credit. That's pretty smart. Anyway. Let's go to Kevin Fairfield Connecticut Hey Kevin how you doing? Mark Mark I'm just calling to say just calling to say thank you. Just, calling to say, thank you for not taking a single day off through this whole thing. For being there for us every single day you and joe both. Honestly it means so much. You've taken this all really seriously. Like your responsibility to us. It's been amazing, and that's why I'm calling true. I think every day at noon. People should lean out their window and blow horns and banged pots. For me in jail. I don't see that ideas not going over, so no, no, no, no! It's still happens every night at seven o'clock I hear a banging a rattling I think it's my my dishwasher's broken or something I say go into what the hell's that noise? And then I realized. It's seven o'clock banging their pots outside but it's. It's well deserved for those frontline healthcare workers. They are doing incredible work. Let's go to Vincent in Brooklyn Vincent. Good Morning Mock rock I s I spoke to yesterday I had my research revisit what my doctor finally! This is one of the top Manhattan. I suppose they're going to perform the surgery. Can we. Can we ask what it is this? All slugging day I think they want frank removing. So anyway, they the doctors did not have kind words for Andrew Cuomo and Dr Fao. One of them called Saudi. I'm Chad, doctor and the whole controversy surrounding hydroxy chloroquine one of the doctors while they were working me. Say Hey, look, if you. If you know the person, the country indications, their previous conditions it's fine more more often than not and another thing they also trashed Cuomo on is not using US as conflict, the hospital ship, and not using the Javid Center and also when all of this was done at two and a half hour work up. The doctor takes me in his office de Doctrine, says look almost still king. Cuomo still has this on lockdown and we're not gonNA be able to do your surgery until. So. Tell the truth. Be Honest. What is this is a sex change? Tell us what it is. What are you get? I'm old school. Man I'm only. Kidding you? But I day and they even said I. Mean this is totally unnecessary for most surgeries because you even get to be in the hospital overnight more often than not, it's just it's just really a power trip, and a lot of these guys afraid to speak out because they'll they'll. Doug kicked CUOMO's for sending inspectors and pull their licenses, and they're going to be careful because they worked for major hospital chains. Mark Vincent Good Luck with I. Hope you get it. Thanks for help. You get the surgery. Thanks, you know killing these hospitals in these doctors that the can't do the elective surgery because that's ninety percent of their revenue under normal times. When you talk to doctors, they all hate vouching. They used to love them two months now. They realize you can't at one of the complaints about. he's in bed with big Pharma. Bill Gates the World Health Organization. He was recommending chloroquine five years ago ten years ago for Corona viruses suddenly against it and the other problem with him. He's never worked as a doctor. He's a clinical researcher. A whatever the hell he is. He's a politician with a stethoscope, but he's never worked as a doctor. He's never treated a patient in his life. That's one reason Deborah burkes is. Is very good. It's GonNa much better background than faculty, and somewhere in that background for fourteen years. She treated patients at Walter. Reed hospitals doctor, so she knows about prescribing medicating watching cases all the way through anyway when we come back, Lionel will be with us. You'll get to the bottom of what the hell's really going on with. These people but I on seven ten W. O. R., let's get the latest news. Here's Joe Bartlett. Mark Mayor de Blasio, announcing a four-part plan to keep seniors safe by addressing concerns in nursing homes that includes expanded testing more staff response teams to deal with an outbreak and a shift to home based CARE Governor Cuomo easing restrictions in New York for the Memorial Day weekend. He says the holiday should be commemorated, so he'll allow ceremonies with ten people are less MTA testing ultraviolet lights in the subways to see if it's effective in killing corona virus. They paid a million dollars for two hundred thirty UV lamps. They say it will be expanded to buses and commuter trains that successful and president trump continues to defend his use of. Of the anti-malaria malaria drug hydroxy chloroquine, there's no proof that implants off corona virus, but the president believes it gives him some additional safety. The next update at eleven breaking news at one start your day with Len Berman and Michael. Riedel, in the morning six to ten tomorrow I'm Joe Bartlett on seven ten W Wars Uw O., our weather channel forecast below average temperatures again today, mostly still a bit breezy with winds out of the East northeast at times, gusting up over twenty miles per hour high's mid sixties, forty five tonight sunny tomorrow mid sixties, increasing clouds Friday with a chance of late day, showers, low seventies, meteorologist Ken Boone. Well of course you know Lionel Longtime. Radio TV host Youtube Star. You should check out his shows Lionel nation at Youtube Lionel nation at Youtube Lionel how you doing? I'm doing terrific by the way you make fun of Joe Biden all the time. 'cause you know Joe Biden's out of his mind that Joe Biden is wary is Joe. Biden doesn't know how to pronounce Covet How many times have you ask? Joe Bartlett everyday. Joe North Carolina South Carolina South. Next Day job North Carolina's two choices thirty times into you finally get it right I'm kinda worried about you. All right you can't tell. Could you tell North Carolina from South Carolina? Don't don't even deign to. Solve these people you know mark. This is one of the most fascinating social experiment ever. This is really not about Cova by the race, not corona virus because there's seven of them. It's one in particular, but I'm finding people. That I thought I knew who are acting. Incredibly insane, not asking any questions just doing things. You all have these funds a friend of mine on Facebook I. Look at me I'm getting. My. I'm doing my part getting my getting. Anyone for check chess for what Larry? The the thing. What are they doing? You stick it Joe Rod in my nose. And what are the results? Go now. Are they checking for anybody? Well What did they do with What does that mean if you're positive prowl? It means Eh, you are. Are you in control of those findings? Well, what if YOU WANNA contest? Those you know I I'm just trying to do my part now going to say this, there's music you can come in if we check your temperature. Mr Simone. You're ninety eight, oh. You're ninety nine. Is that too high? I don't know I brought my own temperature. You'RE GONNA. Have Your own while I'm going to challenge you as I can to be at Wimbledon. Referee what are you got a hundred or one I got ninety eight nine. Oh. That's. What does that mean? Can you imagine excuse me? I gotTa Reservation Pardon me I'm doing basil temperatures I've got some minimum wage highschool drop. Excuse me, who is scanning foreheads and going to apply this data to a chart. To German whether your degree of Febrile l'idee. Nobody knows what what they're doing, but I think I can't wait for the vaccines. What is the vaccine check You know. Is it tested while I? I can't tested any side effects No, you know why. Everybody's so upset with the Hydroxy Clark with because the vaccine industry think about eight billion doses for every man woman, child and Inbetween on the planet. Versus some Kinda cheap hydroxy Clark win, which proves to be effective. In, not vaccinating you. Not Preventing maybe. But actually addressing the problem that that problem, and then you've got this poor judge a General Flynn now mark. You're attorney and prosecutor why the Hell could adjudge takeover a case in prosecuted. Kevin Judge Sullivan. Yes. Am I allowed to withdraw the plea? Well? Yes, underworld eleven and others, yes, so the federal rules contemplate me pleading guilty under oath, and then changing my mind and was drawing right. Yes, that's what the rule says. Yes, without being charged with perjury for having live, the wool says you can withdraw if you like. Now. You would think somebody was saying you never hear. Withdraw Plea, wipe because you pled under oath, and we're not going to accounting inter facilitate or suborned perjury. What Flynn's doing. He's basically trying to avail himself of the rule which allows you to withdraw plea now. The funny part of this is normally most most judges say look. I've got a docket. I kinda liked to speed up even big cases. If the Department of Justice doesn't want their case, Hey dismiss it. It's your case especially when the DOJ says Whoa Whoa wait a minute. Hold it. This is wrong. Yeah, I mean the idea of what this man has been through. and. You know mark the thing. I can't figure out. Is Bar to your trust him. He's the only man I know who can tell you something. And you feel good. But nothing happens like he catherine Herridge, who was fantastic on CBS how they allow her to maintain her job on CBS where she basically puts out more. I think not pro trump appro, pro justice stuff so bar six with her and says. We're concerned what they do. Their general funding what they did during the course of the transition is on. And therefore severely calls into question, the degree of due process that may have been violent wall general bar. Are you do anything about it, you know. What about this? This judge is clearly an activist a judge. What can it be removed what? About him. What people that people he's. Activists is in the mind the holder, but here's the best part you bring it. You're bringing your judge. You bring in gleason. As it was of course God, he's attorney. GLEASON was a prosecutor himself judge Gleeson I mean. He retired judge now he's gotTa make money in real life, but but but judge Gleeson when you were a prosecutor. Did you ever drop charge? Yes? Why did you do it because I had to to? Of Justice rules. Did you ever law allow a defendant to withdraw plea? Maybe there was a mistake. Maybe there was coercion, maybe yes. Well, did anybody come in and stop them? No, but that was okay, so you are familiar with defenders withdrawing their plea, but this is different. Every time this flint turned around. His legal bill is going through the roof. Can you think of one person? There one time where the Justice Department. What the trump administration has everyone very quickly two times. He's ever done that. Like Louis, Palmer, from taxi. The first one was when Nancy Pelosi had her trip to Afghanistan canceled, and they basically redeposited the luggage in front of her office. No CAN'T DO NANCY. Sorry. That was like and the second time was bar trying to dismiss. Bad case, not one member of the deep state police state Intel state government Lulin class. Not One person has been indicted charged with a misdemeanor parking ticket messing. But we've got manafort engaging popadopoulos Roger Stone Dona General Flynn so as far as our side goes. I think the good guys. We haven't had mark one person so out the entire trump tenure with sessions and bar. Not One person has been booked fingerprinted indicted nothing. You explain that one to me. How does that? That's the way Donald. Trump has always been deep down. He's just not a ruthless guy. Can't pull the trigger on stuff. But he should have ruthless people around him. That's why you enjoy work together. Joe's the Nice Guy Your card cold bastards. That's the way that's very ago. Perfect well, you can watch Lionel on Youtube, Lionel nation at Youtube. He's got millions of followers. They're Lionel, nation at Youtube a follow on twitter and all that stuff. Marks. Thank you so much for what you do before. You appear to do what I mean that is. Thanks for being with us. oh check out the webpage a lot of good stuff up there as Joe Biden his brain is, it's just shot just east. His brain is Fried Watch this yesterday. He's trying to discuss corona virus, but I can't remember the name of the virus Take a look at it Oh, also here! Seinfeld, here's the corona virus episode of sign of of Seinfeld. He also there are. Better Electric, cars coming the Tesla could ever be much nicer. Look at look at they call him Tesla Killers Porsche Jaguar. Few other companies have looked at this one from BMW. This is the new electric car. This is the future. This thing is the most amazing looking thing. It's all up in the web page. Seven Ten W. O. R. DOT COM SLASH MARK, seven ten W., o., R. dot com slash mark, teak PC's the mark Simone woman show seven ten W or Hey a lot of stuff opening today Connecticut is open. Stores are open. You can go to the mall. Go restaurants. You can go to You can get you go into stores now. you can go into. Let's say it's. Or Richards Greenwich Avenue there you can, you can go in The fitting rooms know we try on clothes. Those are closed now. What happens if you pick up a handbag or a person? You look at it, you hold it you touch it. You put it over your shoulder. open it. You leave your hands all over now. What happens supposedly the employees who are all supposed to wear gloves and masks will then take it and put it into a quarantine Rome where nobody will touch it for. Days and supposedly at the restaurant. When you get up and walk away from you table, they will come out and they will spray it down with disinfectant spray. Everything disinfected Now of course we're trusting this I mean the water in their looks great with all of this spring, but. I assume it's really disinfectant Did you do the story about the subways? Buying UV lights big EMC lights So I guess they could come up with something like that. They'll take the handbag into another room in UV. Light it inside outside and get rid of everything all the germs on it Of course it won't look like the same handbag when it comes out, we'll be frayed burned in, but boy Would you give to be in the disinfectant business? Imagine if you just said Two Thousand and the fall of two thousand, eighteen, I'm GONNA, start, making disinfectant. Fish! In a fortune right now, so We come back. We'll over what's open what you can do wake goes Memorial Day weekend we'll get to what we've got to get to Matt Lauer to He's fighting back. I don't know why now, but don't forget. Rush at noon a Sean Hannity. Three actually at six. o'clock I'M GONNA fill in for Buck sexton for an hour from six seven the night, because he's going to the White House well, we'll get to that later back right after the news on seven ten. W O R.

president governor Cuomo Connecticut Mr. Trump New York City Joe Biden chloroquine TA Thomas Keller Joe Bartlett Mark Mark Joe South Carolina Youtube Kita Hydroxy Clark Nancy Pelosi BMW Seinfeld Lionel
Voters With Disabilities Face Barriers; Chef Thomas Keller

Here & Now

42:09 min | Last month

Voters With Disabilities Face Barriers; Chef Thomas Keller

"From, NPR in Wbz you are tiny. Moseley. Dowd this is here now now less than a week before Election Day already more than seventy three million Americans have voted by mail or in person and nearly eight million of those voters live. In Texas that number is astounding for the state because it surpasses the total early voting turnout from any other presidential election there, and this record turnout could be the latest sign of a changing Texas joining us to break this down is Alana Roach a multimedia reporter with the Texture Byun Hye Alana. Thanks for having me. Yes. So The records have been broken in two counties that are very different in terms of size and voting history and demographics. What does that tell you about the enthusiasm for voting this election? In Texas there's a unique determination I seems maybe not just in Texas but obviously, that's what we cover and we're definitely seeing here for people to to cast their ballots this election of course, the pandemic we believe is driving a lot of the early voting turnout people want to avoid crowds when avoid exposure to the virus, and so you're seeing that across the state and as you mentioned two very diverse. Counties here in the state politically Denton County up near Dallas in North Texas, and then of course, Harris County that's home to Houston. Of course, the big cities here have tended to lean democratic in recent years Denton County is a conservative stronghold. So you're saying no matter the politics people definitely want their voices heard and heard early the cycle to your earlier point we've heard anecdotally from other places around the country that what's driving people to the polls in record numbers is a feeling that a lot more is at stake this election. What are the reasons you're here in Texas? It's a mixed bag. Of course, it's out partisan depending on the candidates on what issues they're highlighting on the campaign trail for Republicans they are talking about you know back the blue and and saying that you know Democrats want to de-fund Police Department. So that's kind of a rallying cry on the on the right on the left, you're seeing healthcare a big talking point for those you know all the way from the State House to Congressional races. How much do you think in state migration is influencing perhaps the changes that you're seeing in terms of of voting early voting numbers that is a factor for sure and we've seen that just because the state added one point eight, million voters since the last presidential election twenty sixteen but the numbers show you can't just attributed it to population growth. There is a real enthusiasm and drive for people to get to the polls and yes migration has something to do without him and we saw that really highlighted in two thousand eighteen. When you saw normally you know Republican stronghold counties in the suburbs of flip and vote for Democrat the rourke over the incumbent US Senator Ted Cruz We'll be diving into the Texas Senate race elsewhere in the program but it's worth noting a lot of heavy spending from both sides up and down the races, the ballot races. There's a lot of outside money coming into Texas to what are you saying yeah, and just this week we published a story and others about Michael Bloomberg investing heavily here in Texas in this final week before the election, some fifteen million dollars in TV AD spending, and that's not just for the Senate race not just for the presidential race I mean he's also looking again at the State House where Democrats especially given now the. Solid Conservative majority on the US Supreme Court Stay Democrats having a say in or control rather of one of the chambers here in the state as their way to make a gate what they see as bad legislation before it gets to the court system and could be elevated to the highest court where they are at a disadvantage now. Will, what do the polls show about the state of the presidential race in Texas how close it? Yeah. Well, as far as the race for President I mean it's within single digits. Our recent poll the Texas Tribune with the University of Texas. Showed trump beating Joe Biden by five points within five points, and it's a matter of looking at trends and the majority of the polls do show Donald Trump still ahead here in the state. But within single digits, he won by nine points in two thousand sixteen, which was the smallest margin of victory. For Republican here in quite some time in the state mind, you hasn't elected Democrat president since Jimmy Carter in seventy six so we'll have to see. And there's also the race for the Electoral College. Votes were the second largest prize in the country when it comes to electoral, college votes in two thousand sixteen. You saw two electors defect and there was a push from the governor to be able to have Texas become the thirtieth state in the country to bind the electoral to the popular vote in the state and fell short. Were still not one of the twenty nine states that bind the electors to the popular vote. But the thought here is that if Biden were to take Texas, it's not gonna be the deciding state if you will as far as putting him over the top to get into the presidency if he wins Texas it's more of a sign that it's just a landslide for Biden. Alana Rota is a multimedia reporter with the Texas Tribune. So. Much. Thank you. And let's get a view of the race in Washington state it's a deep blue state but one of the big surprises of two thousand sixteen was that four reliably democratic counties flipped for Donald Trump. So what are voters thinking now? David Hide from Member Station K. U. O. W. is in the Middletown of McCleary in Grays Harbor. County. If you want to understand the shift in McClure's politics. It helps to start with the McCleary bear festival and the hundreds of pounds of bear meat that usually go into the STU at the event. Mostly we start about seven o'clock in the morning on Friday and by. Eight, nine, o'clock Saturday morning it's basically ready and festival's been around since nineteen, fifty, nine but last year something changed environmentalists brought a lawsuit that put a stop to some kinds of bear hunting on Timberland's that meant no bear meet in the Stu Jams Berry serves on the McCleary City Council and she's not happy about the ban people like tradition. You know sometimes it it'd be nice to have different ways that you maybe you could work around regulations. The bear hunting controversy is symbolic of long simmering political tensions over the environment and other issues that. Boiled over here in two thousand sixteen. That's when Donald Trump became the first republican presidential candidate to win. Grays. Harbor County since Herbert Hoover back in nineteen twenty, eight Ben Andor stone is a political consultant based in Seattle McCleary kind of the epicenter of swing in Washington state it had one of the strongest swings towards Donald Trump. It's an ancestral democratic town it voted for trump and I in two, thousand eighteen and even voted Republican for US Senate. So why did this place go so read so fast Linda Thompson's president of the McCleary historical society. I I don't know why the change I don't know who who switched because. The people that I know are longtime Republicans thompsons a Democrat. She says, she can't think of a single person in town who flipped from Obama to trump except. I know one he's not in this county, but he's my son. Thompson says her son voted for Obama and still loves Obama. But now he's a trump voter. He lives just down the road in Mason. County. Which Light Grays Harbor County also turned red for trump in two thousand, sixteen Republicans Suzanne Hickel lives there too. She supported Obama, and used to be an independent. But last election she voted trump I never voted party and I really only started voting party in the last election Hickok calls trump a strong man she likes that He. told Washington Governor Jay Inslee to crack down hard on protests should black people are right to protest unfair policing but she doesn't support some of their tactics. I think trump will wield a little bit more power enforced to hopefully get the country back on track, but it's not just about trump historian Steve Beta at the University of Oregon says voters in northwest timber country have been losing faith in the Democratic Party over a long period of time for most of the twentieth century. They were radically pro union and pro democratic. Party but things changed for one thing unions declined and Beta says another big turning point came in the early nineteen nineties when Democrats started to embrace a new kind of environmental politics to protect forests that never delivered on the promises to protect jobs all of the money that was supposed to be earmarked for job retraining of helping timber workers transition away from a resource extraction economy. A lot of the funding never came to fruition. It was never paid out timber towns felt like they were being. Abandoned by Democrats and in 2016, they swung to Donald trump who promised to bring timber jobs back to the northwest. But so far neither place has recovered jobs lost in the great recession of two, thousand, eight and today. There are fewer lumber and wood products jobs in Mason County than in two thousand sixteen and only a slight uptick in Grays Harbor County political consultant. Ben Anderson. Says Biden could win out here but longer term he says the drift away from the Democratic Party may be hard to stop for here and now I'm David Hyde. After a long and difficult year, the city of angels is celebrating. Dave Roberts. Los Angeles dodgers won their first world series title since Nineteen eighty-eight beating the Tampa Bay rays three to one last night. Dodger Third Baseman. Justin Turner had to be removed mid game after testing positive for covid Nineteen Turner is the first player to test positive this postseason, but he says he feels fine and he was seen celebrating on the field after the game and you know tiny my first memory of baseball was that nineteen eighty-eight series with Kirk Gibson famously pumping his fists around the basis. So it has been a while for dodger fans. Yes. In my house last night in. So cal all you could see was fireworks in the sky as Angelenos celebrated this long awaited victory. Thomas. Keller's one of the country's most honored chefs. His restaurants have been awarded seven Michelin Stars Three for the French laundry don't fill California three for per se in New York City and one for Bush on is latest cookbook is out this week. The French laundry per se is named for Thomas Keller's to marquee restaurants. It includes recipes, beautiful photographs, lessons learned from his decades of cooking. Thomas Keller joins me now on skype. Thank you for being here. Your book begins with an acknowledgment that the pandemic is really upended your industry how hard has code hit you and your restaurants well, like everybody else I think the hospitality profession was one of the hardest hit we are the largest private employer in. America. We employ Costa Sixteen million people just in the restaurant profession that's not including lodging bells and things like that nor is that includes supply chain. So you can imagine you know if you start to add all those others in were well over twenty million people, and so the pandemic shut us down overnight the eighteenth of March here the author was our last service for four restaurants. And close to four, hundred, fifty employees, which the next day you know ninety five percent of them or furloughed. So it it was a devastating blow and one that I think as Moshe Restaurant Tours. The most chefs we pip it we're able to develop different ways of nurturing our guests and so here in that, we did that. By keeping our general managers are shift was enes who then worked feeding our community making over roughly over five hundred meals a day for our community and for our staff that had been furloughed. Right. In pivoting is not the same as opening your restaurant at full capacity. Have you had the ability to look at your books to see how much twenty twenty will end up costing you when it's all said and done? We don't know I. Mean it's all speculation right now we lost In all of our restaurants from seven to eight months, worth of business and and certainly at one of the most important times the spring summer and even part of the fall. But you know we're optimistic in our team takes care of our guests and then we also want to make sure that we're taking care of our our partners who are suppliers in our farmers are Fishman of orders are gardeners and our purposes to make sure that we face those challenges strengthened conviction and commitment. And we'll as time passes, it looks like you're starting to make some progress to see in the San Francisco Chronicle that the French laundry reopened indoor dining in September three tables available at a time eight, hundred and fifty dollars per person Tuffy through that decision making I mean, is it safe to have people back in your restaurant? I mean we we're following all the regulations and the rules that have been set out by not just state government but CDC is well social distancing with three tables in the restaurant is fairly easy because we have basically four rooms and so we're occupying three of those four rooms for. Fifteen people in total were allowed to have an inside our restaurant and really what what we WANNA do is make sure that the guest is comfortable and feel safe and that our staff is comfortable and feel safe The other question is about the price tag I mean who can pay eight hundred and fifty dollars per person for a meal. You know we're in the middle of a historic recession. So many people are hurting and I know some people responded to your reopening announcement by saying that it was tone. Deaf do you think that's fair? Well, you know we have to think about where the dollars came from. So what we've been doing for over a decade was an experience card and that experience guard affords them a special experience. So the silver card zillions expensive than it was the gold card and then the black card, the black card offers them this extraordinary dining experience inside our historic dining room. It's not for everybody we admit that, but it's for those who you know who ben pence up for seven or eight months. Not, being able to get dressed up to go out to dinner. be able to celebrate their birthday not be able to celebrate their anniversary, not be able to celebrate their wedding or or their engagement or any of those celebratory moments that people have throughout the year. and. They felt that this was a great opportunity for them to experience something at an elevated level that was an experience that they could remember. So I don't think we were tone deaf really understand you know where we are today and this is the context in which you come out with this beautiful new cookbook, the French laundry, per se. Let's talk about that for just a minute I wrote in here that one of your goals was to reflect the evolution of fine dining over the past twenty, six years. How has it evolved in that time? So. When we opened the French laundry, my goal was to open a wonderful. Restaurant that gave our guests an extraordinary experience to the quality of the food that we sourced from our suppliers. Through the quality of service that we offer to our guest, the quality of the wine list, and of course, the quality environment, and so that became for me a fine dining environment, the tasting menu as the cornerstone of what we did and we evolved into just a pure tasty menu five or six years after we initially opened our restaurant, it's That allows people to feel more comfortable I think in a restaurant. That's fine. Dining when I was younger fine dining restaurants were relatively intimidating. They weren't run by chefs were more or less run by Maitre D.'s or restaurant tours, and there was a feeling that you were. You know if you weren't up the right background, the right knowledge or correctly dressed, you're going to be somehow discriminated against it was just a difficult situation and that's not something that I believe in. Billy whatever Kind of dining experience find nightmare casual dining. It should be placed where you have a great amount of comfort and that's exactly why I asked you about the cost of the meal when people return to the restaurant I mean, because if something cost eight hundred and fifty dollars a plate for instance or even a couple of hundred dollars a plate I mean, how do you make that accessible to everybody so that they don't feel like they're unwelcomed because there are certain kind of person. I don't think you can out of the experience is going to be different for everybody. You know our normal tasting menu which compromises about eighty percent of our guests is three, hundred, fifty, five dollars, and that's still expensive recognize that as being expensive. But if you compare that to other three-star dining established around the world where one of the least expensive and it's accessible to everybody, we have had a number of people who come in young people come in who are saving their money. So they can have this type of experience and it's very important for them. So we're trying to produce the best possible experience with the best possible ingredients, the best possible staff, and that's how much it costs to do that, and so accessibility is in question but accessibility and anything is it questioned whether you're buying a suit whether you're going to Broadway play with doctor that you have I mean if you're talking about accessibility, you know fine dining is probably the least of concerns about what accessibility is because there's so many other more things that are needed in person's life then finding. So this is this is a bit of a luxury. There was a point in the book that was very interesting. You point out that the seventy plus recipes are in fact, pretty elaborate and even more complex than the ones that were in the first French laundry cookbook. Do you think like if someone novice were to get this book here, she would be able to pull off were the recipes inside it. You'd have to define what a novice is our approach to our cookbooks from the very beginning have always been recipes and techniques that we use in our restaurants. In other words, they haven't been written for the home cook because we don't really know who don't cook has I mean, there's some home cooks out. There are pretty skillful have. Pretty robust equipment in their in their great kitchens. I think that the book is so well written. In. The procedural process that if somebody who has the ambition. And a certain amount of skill they can achieve a result that would be. I don't want to say exactly what we do because it's not, but there's going to be something that they think they can be proud of, and I think that's really important. Thing about cooking is your cooking for somebody. It's an affectionate thing something that is emotional and no matter how well it comes out the most important thing about cooking for somebody is sharing that affection sharing that love sharing that emotion. So. Walk me through one of your favorites from the book which one do you like the most well, know it's it's like asking me which the most that's unfair. But I'll point out one that was kinda reflected in the franchisee cookbook. There was called Jabba do in the French army cookbook and Jose to buff right or or. Sisa. Prime Rib on the bone But we did steak and potatoes in French per se cookbook, which is tribute. Not only to what we're used to as as kids having steak and potatoes. Right? We always talk about people just love steak and potatoes, but also you know attributed to yeah but do. And you know this is a beautiful. Beautiful. Bone rib steak with some of my favorites from kid Tater tots, and then a salad with green goddess dressing. So you look at these different things and those pan roasted you know stay on bone tater tots and green goddess dressing on Romaine lettuce at does that sound like it is approachable is that sound like accessible sounds quite edible as well? Right. So there you go I, mean that's that's that's the recipe that. I believe most people who who want to eat steak and potatoes and have a green salad. Those elements are released. They could actually start to extract some of the sub recipes. Steak and potatoes has the TATER tots is a sub recipe, the green goddess dressing sub recipe those two things you can make any time you can make dressing and you can make a you know a pint of it or quarterback having on hand for two weeks and use it on on different things it could become a sauce for piece of fish. It can be assault for a piece of chicken. Of course, it can dress salads with it I mean you could have lentil salad with. So many different things you can do with it. So I think that you know if you're really gonNA use a cookbook, it's not about taking the recipes or the compositions that we've done that come directly from our restaurants. Remember that comforting directly from our restaurants, there's not dumbed down doll, but the recipes in there are are so valuable and then the techniques and the skills that were trying to teach are so valuable. So look beyond just the superficial part of it say, okay do I really want to cook All artichokes that's a process but is there something in there that I can learn from that recipe? Chef Thomas Keller the new book is the French laundry per se. Thank you so much for speaking with me. Appreciate it. Thanks for your time. and. We'll have his recipe for steak and potatoes adhering now door. The. Corona virus, of course, has kept many travelers from riding subways and buses, and those systems are starting to feel the financial weight of the drop in ridership for more on the larger implications. Let's bring in here and now transportation analysts Seth Kaplan Hey seth it's on you. So the American Public Transportation Association, which represents over fifteen hundred transit systems. Nationwide says most will be forced to cut staff and service unless they get additional relief from the federal government. Could the financial situation get even worse without this relief? It could because these are what you call fixed costs, systems Tania, and with that means is that these are systems that cost roughly the same amount to run the matter how many people are using them. Running. Rush Hour train even if it's empty cost nearly as much as it does when it's packed but you don't have all that fair revenue from riders and so people can. Disagree on the details of how bad it is and what they should get but they're clearly right that this is a financial catastrophe for them. What do the numbers tell us generally speaking what are transit ridership numbers looking like right now? Way. Off this is one of the areas in the world. You know nothing's normal right now but there are some industries that are somewhat resilient. There are others that just a still, very much in the middle of the crisis, and that's that's the case here all of these systems not only off their highs, but in most cases down by at least half in terms of ridership. You know as we get deeper into this pandemic studies have shown that public transportation does not spread the virus as much as originally thought but many people, of course don't feel safe hopping on a a subway or train or a bus. What measures have have these systems taken to help reduce the spread? Pretty much the same ones that society is taken masking social distancing which on a train or a bus sometimes means not allowing people to get on that trainer bus have seen buses go by city buses fall, but it's not packed with people. Standing shoulder to shoulder might have just a couple dozen people on it. Why why should someone care about public transportation I mean how does keeping these systems humming impact the overall economy? What public transportation advocates say the reason it matters even to people who don't use it is that it takes cars off the road. So in other words, if you see a bus full of people, even if you're not on that bus, even if you're driving a car, well, imagine all those people maybe not as many now as usual but in normal times a few dozen people all in separate single occupancy vehicles that would make traffic worse for you. Say another rail system suffering in this pandemic Amtrak. The company is projecting seventy percent decline in ridership next year down from pre pandemic levels. What measures his Amtrak taken to deal with it's financial woes. Well one is that it's asking for money just like public transportation systems are doing just like airlines are doing like all of them it got a first tranche of aid. Not a subsequent one. And then of course, it's taking all the measures, the masking social, distancing social, distancing very costly for systems because you know when you can't sell as many seats whether you're an airlines blocking middle seat or whether you're Amtrak. Of. It, it's that costs money and then obviously demand is just down. Amtrak is also cut some of his long distance trains down to to as much as just three times per week through a lot of cities in America. Well here and now transportation analyst. Seth Kaplan as always. Thank you. Thank you Tanya. You're listening to here now. The Gulf coast is yet again getting battered by another Hurricane Zeta is the twenty seventh named Atlantic storm following. Hurricanes Laura, and Sally Jeff. Huffman. Is Tracking this storm and he's the director and chief meteorologist of the Florida public radio, emergency network and Jeff Win, and where do you expect this landfall? Oh good afternoon Tanya. Imminent within the next few hours across portions of southeast Louisiana coming very close to the city of new. Orleans. And then it will likely also make a second landfall early. This evening Mississippi Alabama Gulf coast of the storm curly has winds of around ninety miles per hour. It's a strong category. One could be close to category two by the time it makes landfall here in the next few hours. For folks who are not from this area because they know based on what you're telling us, what they can expect what is the biggest concern for data is the? Is it the damage from the winds or the heavy rain or the flooding? Well, every storm is unique and this one is as well. Thankfully, this one is moving quickly. So the heavy rainfall will be mitigated by its fast forward motion still. Some localized flooding possible. But because it is moving so fast and somewhat intensifying still storm surge is a significant concern along those very vulnerable coastlines of Mississippi Alabama and Lake Pontchartrain in southeast Louisiana, a storm surge values they're expected to be anywhere between four and nine feet. Storm surge could also affect portions of the Florida panhandle and then also because of its fast forward motion tornadoes are a risk in addition. Of course to the potential hurricane force winds, there could be several Tornados with this storm on its eastern side possibly spreading as far inland as far east as portions of the Florida panhandle and well up into portions of Alabama and Georgia later tonight. Oh my guys. So put this in perspective for us an average season sees six hurricanes in twelve named storms. How does Zeta compare with the other hurricanes that? have hit the Gulf coast this particular season. Well, there are so many records to mention this year but some of the most glaring ones or the fact that this will likely be the eleventh named storm. To hit this year, we broke the record earlier this year, which was nine hitting the US in nineteen sixteen. This will also likely break a record for Louisiana landfalls in a single season at five the. Previous. Record was four and two thousand and two and it's also now the strongest hurricane in the Gulf this far west this late in the season. So I could list off many more records as well. It has certainly been a hyperactive season and a historic hurricane season in the Atlantic basin. I mean, Jeff we're in the Greek alphabet for storm names. Are you anticipating more storms before the season ends? Officially the season ends November thirtieth We do see the weather pattern changing a bit in the next two weeks. We have a couple of strong cold fronts that will likely move all the way off the coast of Florida that should at least hopefully, fingers crossed keep another storm from approaching the US but we can't let our guard down We had hurricane kate hit portions of the Florida panhandle late November that has happened before. So we still have to watch that was back in one, thousand, nine, hundred, five. So of course, we will keep a watch for the next few weeks but fingers crossed hopefully this will be the last one at least in the US absolutely Jeff Huffman is Chief meteorologist of the Florida. Public. Radio. Emergency Network. Thank you so much. You're welcome. Okay let's hear more on the voting underway right now and those long lines in states across the country. But what if you're physically unable to stand for long periods of time for some thirty eight, million voters with disabilities voting comes with challenges. Studies have shown that one in three voters with disabilities will face difficulty voting at polling places. Sabrina Epstein is John Hopkins University Student with a disability that prevents her from standing in line for long stretches to vote and facing these barriers in her own life. She's become a vocal advocate for disability rights and she joins us now. Sabrina welcome. Thanks for having me. Yes. So how did you cast your ballot? This election? I was able to cast my own private independent ballots through vote by mail but I had to jump through some hoops to do so they don't make it easy. I can't vote in person for a couple of reasons I that many polling places are inaccessible even though they're required by law to be compliant, that's pretty rarely enforced and also standing in long lines is not something I can do with my disability and also I'm high risk for covid nineteen. So the idea of going to a polling place amongst all these crowds of early voters is not something that would work for me this year what has been the breakdown why these polling places, which are often libraries and churches and places like that not Ada compliant. It's mostly a matter of enforcement when federal laws at the most basic level like the Americans with Disabilities Act which has been around for thirty years is an enforced by the federal government than it all trickles down to creating even more problems at the state and local level I know also in places like Texas poll workers have to give disabled people priority when standing in line to vote but that is not a law in. Maryland. Yet, what else can Maryland do to improve accessibility for voters with disabilities while it's really exciting to see these images of long lines to vote. Because so many people are early voting to people with physical disabilities like myself. That is an image of inaccessibility. So some states do have laws requiring poll workers to prioritize people with disabilities and older adults, and in some states, parents of children with disabilities or caregivers. Another change that I'm concerned about is that last week the Supreme Court reinstated a ban on curbside voting in Alabama, which is another form of accessible voting to. be able to have someone bring out a ballot to your car and the Supreme Court decided that Alabama can continue its ban on curbside voting, which is just a huge step backwards especially right now when people are trying not to be in big crowds because of social distancing I wanna ask you about something else. Can you describe the electronic voting system for blind voters in Maryland? Yeah. So here in Maryland there's two different. For Blind and low vision voters, the I would be to go to a poll in place and use a ballot marker. Every polling place is required to have at least one ballot marking device, which lets you be able to hear what's on the ballot. However, the sometimes becomes a problem because if only blind low vision voters are using this device, then it becomes a segregated form of voting. So some poll workers are trying to encourage People without disabilities to also use these ballot marking devices. The other option is newer here in. Maryland. Came about due to a blind advocacy groups lawsuit the National Federation for the blind, which allows voters to request a ballot electronically which they can fill out on their computer at home. which is really excellent because it allows people to use a screen reader to read them the ballot and fill it out privately and independently which as we know is the goal however, you then have to print it out and mail it in, and of course, not everyone has printers or access to the internet or a screen reader technology. So although it's a huge step forward, there's still a lot of barriers for blind demo- vision voters yen, and is used as you speak I'm just thinking about access to information about all of this. Is it really clear it really depends on where where you live whether or not? You have access to even know these Resources are available to you. Absolutely. It's hard to figure out what all the options are for voting especially right now with covert and so many of the rules and policies changing around voting on top of that, it's hard to find accessible information from candidates especially, local candidates down the ballot not all of their websites are accessible to people using screen readers. They don't all have high contrast text and not all of those videos are captioned and it's really frustrating to feel left out of the political discussion. Even just in that, what some may say is a small way every election season, there's a call to action to be more accessible for for folks with disabilities. But. This particular election is different than others because we're seeing record turnout at voting places and really a push for people to vote by mail. What changes do you still hope to see come out of this election I do hope that vote by mail sticks around as an option for all voters but it's important for the disability community that vote by mail is not the only option that's available because as you can see, although voting by mail is the most accessible option for my particular disability it's not for everyone. We all have different experiences that Sabrina Epstein a student in Maryland who advocates for the rights of people with disabilities. Thank you so much Sabrina thanks for having me. Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolfe mobilized the National Guard to respond to violence and looting that broke out during protests in Philadelphia last night following the police killing of twenty seven year old Walter Wallace junior on Monday walls. His family says he was in the grip of mental health crisis. Here's his cousin Sam White talking to NBC Ten Philadelphia. Police officers are trained to diffuse de escalate situations where they should be trained to defuse a de escalate situations they could have been something else done before you take a person's life. And there are many who agree with that joining us now on skype is Alex vitale a professor of sociology and coordinator of the policing and social justice. Project at Brooklyn College Alex. thanks for being here. You, bet. And walls is family say that his mother called for an ambulance but it was the police arrived first. So when you look at what happened in Philadelphia this week and you hear that cut from Wallace cousin, what's your reaction? Well, we have this systemic problem that goes so far beyond this one case we know, for instance, that police in the United States between a quarter and a half of all the people they kill or having a mental health crisis, and we've completely eviscerated any kind of community based mental health system left people vulnerable to having mental health crises, and then when people call for help what they usually get as an armed police response and too often this just leads to these terrible outcomes. When the police arrived on the scene what do you think they should have done? Why think they should've tried to keep their distance? We hear this narrative. Well, he had a knife in therefore we had no choice, but to shoot him but really they could have engaged in what's called a strategic retreat. The mother was there on the scene trying to talk to him. She was not in immediate danger and they could have waited to take action. They could have waited for the ambulance to come. They could've waited possibly for a clinical mental health response but instead, they have this forced neutralization mindset that unfortunately leads actually to the escalation of violence. The police chief in Philadelphia has acknowledged a few important details in this case number one that the officers on the scene didn't have tasers. A mistake I mean, could that have helped save his life? Perhaps it could have although we've seen many cases where even officers with tasers. Have resorted to deadly violence very quickly in these situations another detail the police chief revealed is that a program designed to put a mental health professional in the dispatch room when the nine eleven call comes in was still in its infancy and it wasn't in place for this call. As the details here, emerge about the police response. What kind of questions do you think that the department should have to answer I think the department has to answer why they feel the need to intervene in every single one of these calls I think we have to ask a bigger question, which is why the political leadership of Philadelphia Refuses to Fund Non Police Face Mental Health Services and crisis response teams that other cities are rapidly implementing all across the country. There has been as you well know calls to fund the police or to move money into these types of programs that you refer to non police responses to things like Mental Health Drug Abuse Homelessness I mean is that the answer to the problem that we're facing across the country right now? That's only one part of the answer. Right? We need to change this crisis response capacity. So in Oregon, they have a pretty robust system there that's integrated into the nine one, one system last year, they went on twenty, four thousand of these calls and they only requested police backup in one hundred, fifty less than one percent. It's now twenty percent of all. Nine one one calls go to this non police response, but also we have to create the baseline community mental health services so that we don't have so many crisis calls in the first place Mr Wallace was someone who had a long history of mental health challenges, and if those challenges had been addressed more successfully than this entire episode might never have happened. In you referred there to a program called Cahoots we've reported on that here. The fact is though many departments are not doing those types of training programs in police are still often the only resource for people to call in these situations, and then when they get on the scene, it's a very complicated and tough situation for these officers to deal with do you have any sympathy for the situation that they find themselves in? Look a lot of police do not want to be in the mental health business I actually spoke with commissioner outlaw not long ago about this at an event at the University of Texas Law School, and she's very sympathetic to this idea that we need to build up community based mental health services, and we need to create alternative response capacities in why aren't more departments doing that it's not up to police departments it's up to city councils mayors. I think we have to ask some tough questions them about why they are not up to this task. They continue to sort of embrace this austerity politics that says that the only way we can solve our problems is to turn it over to police, and that is really well, it's causing a lot of these problems. Alex vitale. Is a professor of sociology and coordinator of the policing and Social Justice Project at Brooklyn College thanks for your time. You Bet. was production of NPR. And W. R. and association with the BBC. World Service, I'm Peter. I'm Tanya mostly this is here now. Alexandra Pelosi spent the past year talking to people around the country for her latest film and she says, the US is even more divided than previously thought. That's next time on here now.

Donald Trump Texas United States Thomas Keller Joe Biden Maryland Florida US Senate Amtrak NPR Democratic Party Gulf Louisiana Sabrina Epstein Philadelphia President Denton County Texas Tribune US Supreme Court Tanya
Food Neighbourhoods 212: Recipe edition, Thomas Keller

Monocle 24: The Menu

04:54 min | Last week

Food Neighbourhoods 212: Recipe edition, Thomas Keller

"The menu is brought to you in association with sam moretz. It's of you from the top with an average of three hundred twenty two sunny days per year getting outdoors is a way of life in summer. It's colder months a multitude about fresco pursuits awaits in. the powdery. peeks. Around town until. I sing winter sports enthusiasts events out on skis. Snowboards snowshoes to make the most of the day get up early and take the first gondola up more than three thousand meters to the summit of pits. Nad you'll be rewarded with crisp fresh air and the freshest snow glistening onslaught in the morning sun and as the venue of the world's oldest bobsleigh tracks summer. It has plenty more opportunities to get the adrenaline pumping. A good place to start is the historic. Summer it's bob experience. Where devils can halen ice taxi and zip to the finishing line. Just seventy five seconds. That's a cool one hundred thirty kilometers per hour for unparalleled views from the top head for the cavaliers. Ski area and trout's mountain restaurant managed by the famous sorretto house hotel and let the outdoor adventures continue even after dark the devil. That's a mountain is famed for full. Moon scared to plan your trip to find out more about the latest. On events activities restaurants accommodation and more visits emerets dot com. Hello and welcome to food neighborhood. Sauna monocle twenty four. I am oracles hippie. During the pandemic we continue this show in a slightly different form as many of you find yourself spending more time atone. We do follow suit. Stay obese domestic delve into the world of great recipes. This week we hear from the chef and owner of one of the world's most famous restaurants. Jeff thomas coward from the french laundry here to california. I want to share with you. A very simple repeat simple technique as well. What a dish that. I eat several times a week. It's a pan roasted of salmon with Sauteed spinach reasons. I like this so much because a number one. It has great nutritional value in the salmon and certainly in the spinach and then acquires went piece of work. So it's easy to clean up from and so just get a two hundred fifty to three hundred gram piece of flake of salmon. Skin on our skin off. It depends a little more tricky. Do with the skin on. So i recommend taking the skin off. You know. he'd episode taped ban with some grapeseed oil or some other type of has high flash point recommend using olive oil for this. And then make sure you temporary or salmon so take your samina refrigerator. Least our Edit time so tempers temperature season with a little bit of kosher salt abundant amount of oil in the bottom of the pan. Turn it onto medium high heat when you see start to shimmer or you may see the smoke coming off of it. Turn it down to medium. He and then gently allay your stamina suggests laying it in their skin. Side for skin is off where the skin was on that side of the smooth aside and let that saute. Don't move it for a little while. The hand of the heat that the salmon do their job and for about three or four minutes at that saute again depending on the thickness of the salmon. I'm talking about these salmon's of an inch and a half thick and then turn over quickly the other side. I like my salmon medium rare so total fulltime navy four minutes four and a half minutes taken off drain. In the meantime remove the oil from the pan. And that have your spin it ready and just start layering your spinach and seasoning. I used to use probably six or seven ounces of spinach. So we know that amount of ross Quite abundant so. I'll add layers. Engine put some salt on another layer spinach cooking down and making sure that i remove as much as possible before i played it moving the liquid. There's a lot of water and spinners once it's cooked dispatcher. And just kind of push all this finish to one side. Tilt my sought to eight man and kind of chris out that water. You can see that water running out. Drain the spinach. But in the middle of plate with my salmon. Sweet some lemon juice over and then garnished with a little bit of modern saw. Which is what am i ever and some extra virgin wanna that you have a little late dinner my thanks to thomas keller for this week's recipe for more from the battalion sectors. Stay tuned to monaco. Twenty four you can also subscribe to our magazine and sign up to our email newsletter. The monaco minutes. It's to monaco dot com for more info. Marcus hippie thanks for listening and by for now.

sam moretz three thousand meters seventy five seconds one hundred thirty kilometers sorretto house hotel Sauna monocle Jeff thomas coward three hundred gram cavaliers four minutes bob seven ounces california salmon ross chris thomas keller monaco Marcus hippie monaco
EP20: Daniel Chan: World's first Zoom Magician - (Part 2)

Masters Decoded

12:13 min | 4 months ago

EP20: Daniel Chan: World's first Zoom Magician - (Part 2)

"You're listening to masters decoded podcast series. I'm your host and the Chief Dakota unease margin. Through this podcast I bring guests were successful in different walk of life. And Mapa careers and journeys with the hope that begin all our learnings. The world around is changing exponentially. And how impact off artificial intelligence technology And other socio economic factors have either influenced are enhanced my guests. Korea's welcome back to the second episode with Daniel. Chan. In today's episode, we continue our conversation from last week. Very look at how his family has enabled him to be where he is today listening to know more about why he's called a master magician of Silicon Valley you spoke a little bit about your family, your wife. is also helping you cheese a a great content and creative your children both of them are performing tricks and you start them. House family supported our influence, your entire career as you've gone through this phase of your journey. I was very structured in figuring out what I wanted to do like when I first named my son I knew it was gonna be James for James a juggler. So it's alliteration alliteration sell. I knew that it was going to be grace because of my faith. And Amazing grace is a wonderful song but amazing grace is also. A cool stage name. So I factored that all in before they were more. H-. Planned out the I was going to teach my son how to juggle five balls three flaming torches before he was born I actually made that as I actually planned that out. So a lot of the other things that I'm planning out in the future like getting investors and other things that's actually very strategic in meek going on both your podcast and many other podcast because I'm looking for other business people, other investors because there's a lot of people who hire me, who are billionaires they have. Given away a billion dollars to certain organizations or worth like. Ten billion dollars and they want to support. The Arts, some of them are Asian some of them want to support Asian entertainers but they don't see me as a business person. They see me as like, Oh, you're a really good magician, but I don't really see the business model. I don't see anything behind that. So they don't know that everything that I approach is from a very strategic place I don't take very many risk. Every single risk I take is very safe and I treat my. Money very safe just like I'm going to treat my investors money. When I went to build a venue. So my next stage is teaching enough people. So I fill in the gaps. So I don't have to travel to as many show so I can five or ten x what my current fees are. So. That I can specifically custom-tailored things and I can have an army of magicians. So when I do have a permanent venue, those people can't entertain at my venue. In it. With their specialties. It's almost like a stand up comedy club. I'm not trying to don't get me wrong. I'm not trying to relieve magicians to Comedians, but it's almost like what you're trying to think about is, how can I create a standup? Club any comedian can come and entertain people. It's almost to that effect where magic can be alternate demon which Dazzles baffles. Individuals. Are People Right. There's a place in Hollywood California called the Magic Castle. When you walk into the room, you speak to the AL open sesame and a bookshelf slides off to the side and you can enter. It's a members only club. There's other match clubs like Chicago? Magic Lounge and Shanghai Magic Theatre. So I've spent my career flying around the world seeing these magic clubs in Hawaii and many other places. The ironic thing is there's no magic club in the bay area with so much wealth accumulation bay area I feel that it would be perfect to have that and having a full supply chain people. When I started talking investors, they said, we don't want to invest in you because if something happened to you. If, we don't have an investment so they asked who's on your team. So I'm trying to build up a team. That they can invest in and that's something that I wanna do is merge fine dining. Like Michelin rated dining or Michelin rated chefs. With magic so it becomes a destination so people would actually plan their vacations. Thomas Keller is one of the Great. Chefs of the French laundry. He's a three star Michelin rated chef everyone in the world who knows fine dining knows of him and they'll make a trip to. His place plus probably five or ten other places in the world. There's very famous chefs I want to actually get one or two stars with chefs and. Incorporate magic so people will fly. Around the world to this destination, because the magic castle has already done it. So it just who's that that concept can be done. and. They don't even have a Michelin rated chef. So, if we can attract the talent and have that cultivation of talent. And also even a higher caliber I believe that it can be a destination. Pretty impressive. So talking about just changing gears and you spoke about you want to be known as. These zoom magician has zoom reached out to you and said Hey why don't we partner? Almost. They sure. Yeah that's a I. Think. That's also why am on these business podcasts is. People are starting to recognize it I've performed for. Congressman recently. Performed for AIRBNB several times for their staff Nintendo. Google again I can't remember, but we have quite a new new big list of clients that have just hired me McKinsey Company. twitch. Twitch hired me recently. And, some of these shows have been rebroadcast on facebook or other platforms Linked just hired me as well. So. There's quite a few different. Companies and law firm called Orrick hire me which is a very big global law firm. That's great. So what's so you spoke about your grand plan about having almost like Magic Carson. having a Michelin Star. Is it also to probably introduce your children as part of that show are? You're having them continue their studies get certified, and then come on or do both together. You know I can see that there's A. Business Wise, I've already made the path. So it's GonNa be easier if they decide to do something else that's fine but I would prefer that they would carry on or at least. Some part of it in their life, not everyone is meant to be a magician but other people are meant to be directors or agents or. Doctors or whatever else they have true interest in but they see that I'm passionate about my shows. I did a show recently I slept at one. Am I believe I woke up about four four thirty and that's how passionate about it and I didn't complain I. Love That Day literally I woke up for five thirty show at thirty two get ready for a show across the world in a different time zone. And you have to be passionate like that to. To get to the levels whatever they do I want them to be really passionate about it. Regardless of what they choose to do. That's impressive. Then vere almost on top of our conversation today but is there any specific message you wanna go ahead and leave a magical note for the audience today? Yeah. I wanted to have people reach out to me through my website, Dan Chan Magic Dot Com. There's a lot of information lot of content lots of videos. You can see what we're up to. Also, if you have a corporate event and you needed some team building, I can do some team building for you typically. We start off at five hundred dollars for events online on Zoom A for. For what we do currently, I, don't know how when you're listening to this podcast it, it may be quite more. Significantly more in the future but that's where we're at right now and it's just wonderful being able to entertain people I also have. Demos that I'm running quite often if you just say your friend of nieces. Sure how do a demo for you? A no obligation three to five minute demo. To See what we do let us know which corporation you're with or what sort of event you're trying to plan. We're doing events all around the world right now within the last couple of weeks actually within the last two months I can tell you. We have performed in amazing amount of places Let me just pull up that list we've performed for virtual audiences. In. UK. South Africa. Virgin Islands Australia Malaysia. Singapore Mexico, city. All around the United States and that was within the since March I think March seventh was our last physical show. And since then we've done over seventy shows I believe on zoom. That's impressive than and definitely A friend of these I'll share that so that people can reach out to you. and hopefully you're able to reach out tomorrow audience and if they want to book. Your shows. They will definitely be more than happy to do that. So thank you for taking time. Dan Today. Absolutely and don't forget I do have A. On airbnb experiences hopefully, you'll be able to share that link. Those are twenty dollars per person for the shells. And if you WANNA sneak in one or two people on that same screen your friends of the niece, right Definitely. Friends avenues. Thanks Dan. This was great chatting with you have And I'm sure many listeners will be reaching out to you do get a little bit of magic. In the dime of. Off Your going through. Thank you. Thank you for listening in. And close yet another episode of pastas decoded. If you've enjoyed the episode, please you can help us out by shining it on social media. I would personally appreciate that. It's how we can reach more listeners and the listeners. We have the more awesome guest I can get in touch and convinced participate in these conversations. That are joy to me and I. Hope they are a joy for you to listen as well. You can also help a lot leaving views on itunes or your podcast of choice. Reviews are surprisingly helpful and supporting the broadcast to get to more listeners. If this episode has included you, I would request you to subscribe to the podcast to stay up today date. And get notified to the future episodes. With that I bid you and see you in the next episode.

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Episode 112: Josh Gets VoD

Working Interferences Dental Podcast for Dentists

56:40 min | 10 months ago

Episode 112: Josh Gets VoD

"Working Interferences is intended for mature audiences. Since the hosts never grew up. Someone needs to be the adult breath. Welcome to working interferences with Josh and Lintz the dental advice podcast for the average dentist. I think it's time to get together to hear his Josh. What is up? Welcome to the working interferences. PODCAST I am your host Land Timmerman and joining me this week for we're very special episode is my daughter Bianca. Bianca haunt you say everybody hello. This is still his thing in the entire world. All right so what one point you had mentioned as you were mocking my podcast saying what the hell are you doing. You then followed up with. When can I be on? This is true this is fact. All right so it's not too unusual tool for me to to have you on although briefly for a show so we have a couple listeners. Maybe three that are subscribers. So what what do you want them to know. He doesn't talk like this and realize I don't what do I talk like. I'm pretty sure I talk like this. This is my voice. You sound like a robot right now. Really all right this is a robot lance coming to you live. Well regarded life really. I don't don't speak talk like this. I'd be curious to know how I really really date. Okay so this so this is like you talking right now normal. Aw Ha ha dentistry and then you start the megaphone. Hello everybody and then. It's all sports announcer. Well you have to start off that away. Because the people there's the interim music that I would've been shifted over in attenuated down to intro and normally that's actually Josh's role. I'm the psychic that kind of church chimes in. I'm the Andy Richter to his Conan O'Brien. I'm the what okay I could be Robin. AH WITH LESS SPANDEX. Don't know all right. I'm not wearing SPANDEX. Yeah I'm not wearing anything. Wait no okay all right. That's anything unusual. We're GONNA go with that so this week nick. Those that weren't paying attention. Josh is not with US Josh. I think he's at the Seattle Study Club and we were supposed to get together to record a little bit right before he took off and we just never able to cross paths and hookup and speak for a few minutes but this episode. This week is actually his appearance. When He lectured at the voices of Dentistry Conference. That was the third week weekend in January and traditionally. That's the way it is going to be. It's always the third weekend in January. It's usually the the dead weekend before the Super Bowl so that there's less conflict For people to have football getting away. So Josh Josh was able to get it recorded and so this week is pretty much Josh's episode although he's not speaking that very moment but this is this is episode episode so Bianca. What else do you want people to to know? I swear I'm not this awkward in real life right right okay. So without further Ado Josh live at voices of Dentistry. This next speaker Meeker is honestly the only speaker I can say who's speaking here this weekend that I have shared a bed with and I would not admit that if there wasn't proof of it happening so let me tell you what's the weirdest thing about. This photograph is what you can't see and that's Alan Meade standing right here in a loincloth. Taking this picture he wasn't even staying at that hotel. Josh and I were sharing a rope the second thing I wanna point this is just the sheet that is just the sheet that peak. You see right there. If if you've never seen that on a sheet you need up. Your Sheet Gannet get some twelve hundred county Egyptian cotton threads sheets. That's just what expensive sheets do. Okay the third. The thing that I want to point out it would appear that one of US namely Josh is relaxing and some post couple bliss at this point S.. Essel the other guy had just popped up from under the sheets or something from a service or perhaps performing job of some sort and I just WanNa make sure you understand. That is not what's happening here. That is not what is happening here. That is what's happening here. That is absolutely what is happening here. So Ladies and gentlemen please help me give a warm voices of dentistry. Welcome to my ex boyfriend my best friend and my favorite speaker Joshua Austin not extinct. Pink Gaydos my Detroit players. Tim's from my hooligans. IMBER Dan Right in the big day and Pop Up in schools and save lives under. ooh never lose. Never Choose Bruce Cruise to some so. That's the closest I've ever come to saying the N.. Word on stage. I'm sorry in case anyone's wondering boxer briefs but no one has ever wondered what kind of underwear I'm wearing. Take it as a compliment. Honestly no one has ever showed that much wonder and curiosity about me but just the wrong person and next thing you know everyone's panties are in a bunch. The that might not be a good choice of words in that one. If you don't know what I'm talking about just ignore what I said. You remember that like mind eraser thing from men in black. Let's use that but seriously at some point in August I made a joke about what kind of underwear a certain dental influence or may have been wearing on a private facebook group and she got a hold of that and ran with it and she took it to her group and they ran with it. Wow and then a company who sponsored a lot of my lectures I got a hold of it and they issued a statement and that statement said quote. We don't condone bigotry. A Bra. That's not bigotry. It sexist but it's not bigotry. Get it right when it all happened. I liked bailed off of facebook. I was just gone deactivated. I cut that AH toxic thing out of my life. It's been great. I missed all the baby. Yoda memes missed. All the new year's resolution posts nuhere new me. Cool Cool Bro. Same story last year But it does get a little weird when I'm when I'm out talking to a group of dentists about digital stuff. Internet marketing anyone not in the subject to facebook comes up because I have to admit I'm not on it. I don't have an account but luckily for me Netflix. Build me up. That's right Netflix. Net flicks saved me. They gave me an out. No they didn't give me my own comedy special. I only wish they came out with this documentary. Called the greatest hack. Have you guys seen this the great attack attack. That's about all that nasty stuff that Zuckerberg does with all your information. So I got to use it as it came out a week before I dared. Say anything against the Queen Right so I had to pretend on my mother and I had to feign outrage over something thing I saw on television. What facebook Oh? I'm not on that. I saw something on television about what they do with your data like show you the spring in line from sperry top site as crazy but it sounds better than the truth. Nah I'm not on facebook. Because I'm mildly mildly poked fun at a Jamaican lady a Jamaican Lady. Are you a bobsled coach. Are you're reggae music critic. Did you call Miss Miss. Cleo the truth is like ninety seven percent of the dentist in this country have no. Oh idea that there's a dental side social media but for us we're in the trenches every day it's our community and it's probably not good for us. I'm somewhat known for using online reviews to build my practice but that topic's not so cut and dry. It's a mixed bag. There's good there's bad but we can't afford good to ignore our practices online reputation. It's really important. I'M GONNA use a cringe-worthy word to describe myself. I'm gonNA use the F.. Word heard I heard it got used a lot yesterday. I'm a Foodie anybody here foodie. Yeah all right good. I'm a Foodie I like to chase Michelin MM stars. I don't know if that's a game that you play up to one hundred and forty seven Michelin Stars and a couple of years ago. I got a chance to get reservations at the French laundry with in. which if you've never been there before you don't know the French laundry is generally ranked in the top one two or three of restaurants in the country? It's absolutely amazing. Thomas Keller is the executive chef. He she is America's greatest living chef. James Beard Award winner absolutely spectacular. It's in Napa California technically Yountville which is right by NAPA. The setting is gorgeous gorgeous. The team is Johnny on the spot with everything if my team worked like the team at the French laundry I'd have no worries in life. We're at a table of ten and every single one of us had our own waiter so every plate of food touch the table at the same time every drop of water was poured at the same time. Every drop of wine whispered at the same time. Yes that means. We had ten bottles of wine open. It's what you do in Napa nine courses all paired with perfect wines. Now I'm sure the food here at the Hilton will live up to this food pornography that you're seeing here. This is the seventh course. The Wu you literally the greatest thing I've ever put in my mouth in my entire life absolutely breathtaking. I think about it when I go to bed at night now as part of the experience at the French laundry we got to take a tour at the kitchen in the French laundry now. This photo was taken at eight o'clock Saturday night. Did anybody here working restaurants in dental school a few people. Is there a busier time in a restaurant. Then between seven and eight o'clock on a Saturday night that's it everyone's in the weeds between seven and nate on a Saturday night. This is the kitchen in the French laundry at eight o'clock on a Saturday night and I look at this picture and I'm amazed at how neat and clean everything is and I think about what my opportunity looks like after I prep to crowns. Hell I think about women after it looks like after police four sealants and it looks like a freaking tornado or NATO blew through the room and this place looks like Mister Clean is the Maitre D. I don't want you to ignore how the kitchen is. And look above the vent hood above that island. And what do you see five stars. Every single team member at the French laundry has to look at this when they walk into the kitchen. Five stars ars to remind them what their goal is. Now we as dentists are guilty of having trophy walls right walls devoted. To how amazing we are all the plaques awards we've one certificate we got from the implant placement courses we took at a four hour holiday inn express ready to do an on four four now Forget implant pathways. We don't need to do that. We went to a Holiday Inn Express. Here's my trophy wall embarrassingly. I have more than one. Oh we're still going you. We're not done yet here. We go I want to show you the trophy wall at the French laundry. There's one thing on the wall. Thomas Keller is the Michael Michael Jordan of chefs in America and he's won a million awards and has a thousand plaques and the only one on the wall is the only one that counts the the three Michelin Stars. That's the highest rating. A chef can get now Keller said in an interview after he got his third star. This is the greatest and worst day of my life. It's the greatest his life because he reached the peach peak of his pinnacle of his profession in his career. Why is it the worst day of his life no place else to go but down and losing a Michelin Star is the worst day of a chef's life? Now whipple all triple. You went to Notre Dame win the football players at Notre Dame walk out of the locker room and onto the field. They all touch a sign above the door. What does that sign say? Play like a champion. Today it's been there since knute rockne and every Notre Dame football player has touched that before every game. This is the French laundry version of play. Like a champion today. If you can't read it it's the definition of finesse refinement in delicacy of performance execution or artisan ship. How does that not just in fine dining but what we do industry? If Frank Spear came to your office and watched you PREPA Imax crown on number three and said that your finish line demonstrated finesse. That's the third Michelin Star. It doesn't get any better than that. If Stanley Melamed came to your office administered an inferior I'll veal or block on him and he said wow. Your technique really demonstrated finesse unlike told his father that's the third Michelin Star. I love this word. Every single team member at the French laundry must walk under this sign to leave the kitchen to go to the dining room. Now on one of the other walls in the kitchen it has carved in white marble relief a quote from Keller himself. I love the HUT SPA that it takes to put a quote from yourself in your own kitchen. I wish I had had a quarter of that in me. I know it's hard to read so I have it. Typed out here when you acknowledged as you must that. There's no such thing as perfect food only the idea of it then. The real purpose striving towards perfection becomes clear to make people happy that is what cooking is all about now replaced cooking with dentistry. When you realize that there there is no such thing as perfect dentistry? Just the pursuit of it. Then you realize what we're here to do to make our patients happy now. After that experience went back to the hotel and also I use that word experience strategically that was not a meal. That was dinner winner. That was an experience after that experience and went back to tell and I was thinking about it so much. I had to see what other people thought about so I pulled up there yelp and sure enough. They're not five stars. The French laundry has twenty one hundred reviews at four and a half stars. Don't get me wrong crushing it. They got a ton of five-star reviews. The guess what they also have a bunch of one star reviews. So when digging through their one-star reviews and I found this one from this guy named Luke and often times when I read a review. I like to read it in the voice that I imagine the patient to have if I could give this place zero stars I would. I was so disappointed by the my experience here that I didn't WanNa waste more than two minutes interviewing it loop. Listen I don't know how fast you type brother but it certainly seems to me like you've invested more than two minutes into this. I don't know how hard you've been hit hitting that Mavis beacon typing tutor but it certainly seems like you're lying in the first sentence of this review so you know hey stages set. We went here for my wife's lice. Birthday with two friends where to begin. How about what the Sixteen Hundred Dollar Tab an unbelievably snobby crappy service? We were so appalled by the roots down because towards Elaine waitstaff. The weird them stop are nine course meal at the six and walked out. You missed the Y.. Go you idiot. That was a seven course. If I would have been sitting in the table next to him I would have been like Bro. Bring that rate over here. Nothing was comte as we decided to leave early and nobody apologized to us for experience. I was so mad I let her describing are experienced by Fedex. Hold on a second time out thirty second time out huddle up huddle up tunnel team. I thought you said you didn't WanNA spend more than two minutes reviewing this now. You're typing out a letter. You're finding Thomas Keller's address you're driving to the FEDEX KINKO's store to ship this nice to him which one is it. Are you in or are you out. I need to know now and I got no response. I haven't included. Did a copy of the sixteen hundred dollars. See with the letter. You think a manager another one of his lame latkes at least send a letter back a should have included a picture of my middle finger for him to poster is we will never step foot in one of his restaurants again and I will continue my anti Keller Crusade everywhere I go crusade. What are you charlemagne nine? Never Crusade against anything. It only makes you look crazy. One of my favorite features of yelp that you can see someone's other reviews so I checked out luke so so the reviews and I found this gym a five star review for Taco Bell. how Aw love this Taco Bell? The staff is very friendly and outgoing and goes out of the way to make delicious food for you. I thoroughly enjoyed my five cheesy. Gordeeva the crunches on top of my Mexican pizza and spicy toast. I highly recommend this Taco Bell. Oh that's the TACO bell. That must be the good one I've yet to find the good Taco Bell when I saw this I literally like you know how to get centric relation like you use a leaf gauge and that sort of deprogrammed elevator muscles so that the kondile slides back and centric relation. Listen I found an even better method. Look at this because my elevator muscles just completely relaxed and I fell into centric relation just immediately and they would've been so easy to manipulate me back and get a CR bite. It would have been crazy so this is now my method that I use in my opportunity to get cr just show patients this and it's like boom there. We go by reg done. How is this even possible? How is it that Lucan? I share ninety nine percent of our genetic material. How are we both in Kingdom and Amelia file? Mammalia that's about as deep as I can go family genus species. I think somewhere in their high school biology. I mean I thought about this for weeks I could not figure this guy out. Do you remember silence of the lambs when clery starling. God obsessed with Hannibal Lecter and I had to like get into the mind of this man. If you're at work that's became me and Luke. I would argue that Hannibal Lecter better human being in this guy. I mean at least Hannibal Lecter I taste right like when he was frying up. The brain like pants shallots and a little olive oil. Like that's at least better taste than Taco Bell. Can we agree on that. I know that it's a hot take that cannibalism is better doc. Oh Bell but I stand by that hot take promise and I thought about it for weeks and finally figured out. It came down to one thing. Expectations -tations when you go to the French laundry expect perfection. The dining experience of a lifetime. Any little detail becomes magnified because of your expectations. Thomas Keller set the bar so high that he has to be perfect to meet your expectations. What are your expectations? When you go to Taco Bell A norovirus free? Dining experience would be high on my my list. If I'm not in that that pose that norovirus pose for three hours afterwards five stars right great experience love Taco Geico Belt Right. What do you think your patients expectations are there? I visit with you. I'll tell you most of my patients. Their expectations are I walked in the room. Hey Josh Walston Nice to meet you. How's it going? I hate you I hate all of you. I hate all of your existence. I hate being here. I've been writing this for a month. Their expectations are through the floor. All we have to do is be better than horrible and we exceed their expectations. The Bar for rushed to clear is comically low. Be Better than horrible. They have a great experience. They tell their family. They tell their friends. They tell the world with a five star review. We're set up for success. Much better than Thomas Keller is now. That's generally good news right. Most people aren't expecting the world when it comes to their dental visit but that it doesn't mean that we sometimes don't get slammed you don't have to be dragging Dullard with a belt driven hand piece and a dirty customer door to get a bad review. It can happen to anybody. These are my dogs screaming fig more beloved and more popular than me by a long shot. When you don't have kids you get it professional portraits taken of your dogs? They chose their own outfits for this. Graham locked out of the closet tried on four different scarves. Daddy does this make me look. Fat Fig was in his hipster phase at this point. He's moved out of that a little bit. Thank goodness but before I had the doodles roles I had these guys and my great Danes. Anybody ever have great Danes though the most amazing dogs they're gentle giants. They're absolutely great and I live very close to in my office by design. That could go home at lunch and see these guys and that would help get through the rest of my day as they got older though it became less about their needs in less about my needs needs more about their needs. And everyone's while I would come in to the house and they would have had an accident and it's okay you know it's a pile I get it. It's a great Danes just a little bit bigger but you clean ended up going about your day and it's done and it reminds me of what it's been like to get negative feedback and dental offices traditionally as long as there have been Dennis dating dating back to Paul Revere and the barber surgeons of the seventeen hundreds as long as there have been Dennis. There's been people and patients pissed off dentists. And how would they voice that displeasure in the past. They would corner you outside your auditory awkwardly. I just wanted to tell you that lorraine was to me on the phone. I thought you should know great. You clean up the pile you move on. It sucks for two minutes and then it's done done and you never have to deal with it again right so one day. I come home for lunch and I opened the back door and I'm immediately greeted by the odiferous sense that it's something's gone horribly wrong. In one of the Danes had an accident. No big deal right but it also happens that that was the day that the Roomba robot vacuum cleaner uh was automatically programmed to go off Roomba. No stop come back no. Don't come back back. Stay right where you are stop. Why doesn't Room Siri in other news unrelated to that? I have a slightly used Roomba for sale. If anyone is interested in comes from a nonsmoking home needs a little bit of a touch up but other than that. It's ready to roll. That reminds me of what. It's like to get negative feedback today. What was once a little pile? That was easy to clean up is now spread all over the place and we have a much bigger problem. This is something I have personal experience with. I want you to ignore nor Graham. Obviously spoiled and doodling on a pile of toys bigger than he is ignore grandma and focus on what the Red Arrow is pointing towards. Does anybody know what that is speckled over a hole in the wall that hasn't been painted hasn't been painted because I'm the king of starting household projects and then not finishing them. I am unchecked freaking gains on steps one through eight and on steps nine and ten I turn into Paulie shore. I have zero follow through. But we're not here to talk about me and my shortcomings a man. We're here to talk about that whole and how it got there so one night watching sports center at the end of the day brought to get ready for bed and I get an alert on my phone from my yelp for business owners out and I pull it out and start reading it. And it's a bad review for me that you're GonNa seen seen just a second and as I read the first paragraph. My Apple Watch vibrated and I looked at it and it said are you working out. Your heart rate's one one ten and as I read on through that review and read on that heart rate got to one twenty to thirty got to one forty. We're well in zone four of cardiovascular exercise here people before I knew it Nolan Ryan fastball. Right into the wall. I threw a temper tantrum. I'm a forty year old man to quote Mike Gundy. I'm a man I'm forty and and I threw a temper tantrum like a nine year old girl. Why because our first reaction to this is always as anger never respond with anything until twenty four to forty eight hours and you've allowed to cool down? Relax it'll be okay. It's is not the end of the world will be the end of the world is if you respond when you're keyed up and win your heart rate's one forty and you say something. You regret Grete the next morning. Here's why Review Luke you again. What the Hell is in San Francisco? He's never been to my office. I'm kidding it was a luke. I'm GonNa read this aloud. Normally I read need a review in a voice that I imagine the person to have but in this case I know who this patient surnames. Kara so I'm going to do what I promise. You is a very Accurate impression of her. Okay we're going to set the stage with the little mood music here we go. You know what's up you know what's up are in for life book an appointment as a new patient after reading all the glowing reviews on hair reception staff and premises or welcoming coming hover at a pretty bad expensive hygienist after apparently wincing and telling her head very sensitive teeth. She continued to dump ice cold. Water excruciating all over them. Do you really think that my hygienist dumped ice cold water all over this patient maybe it was. LS Ice Bucket Challenge Day. And she didn't get the memo. Maybe my hygienist felt. She wasn't being exactly honest under medical and dental history and felt some enhanced interrogation techniques were needed to get the real truth for this country but I think either way we can agree that she set at this stage with a Lotta hyperbole here in the first part of her review when she pushed the Polisher gums and it started to hurt quite badly again told her heart and Chechens. Make any up saying it's just the friction making hurting you. I'm sorry if something hurts hurts and she's right it's something hurts. It does hurt and I think we can all identify with the horrific damage that can be caused by profit cup and profile paste. I mean that stuff's a death trap sure repeatedly questioned me on whether I'd fillings sealants and clearly did not believe me that I never had a cavity. Just seems when she found a weak spot or one of my Muller's repeatedly pushed her dental into it. Going while you have a cavity hair it's fine. That developed a Cabbie but there was no need for attitude or disbelieve. We've regarding my previous sealants and no excuse repeatedly causing a patient unnecessary pain so I pulled up her by wings. And she's right she's never had a cavity just sealants. You know those Amalgam sealants that we used to do all the time right. She's got nine Amalgam sealants thing God for Preventive Dentistry I mean I I really admire her and her parents devotion to Clinton to preventative dentistry. Really great work. I get my teeth cleaned in every six months and this was by far the most painful cleaning ever also informed at a total of four cavities. which considering I'm never had a cabinet in my life was somewhat difficult to believe at this point? I was pretty much their hostage hostage. I'm not reading anymore hostage. I don't remember Kevin Spacey. The negotiator coming in to break. Wake up this hostage crisis. I don't remember the SWAT team repelling through my auditory windows as I sit there and my operator stool stroking a hairless Louis cat. You've stepped right into my job. Mr Bond hostages the word she used cut to the end. So sorry to Enron things places so great maybe if all these mishaps on hold up I'd be happy this practice bring guarantee right now. I won't be going back. I think the kids today say by Felicia Felicia so I pulled up her review history on Yelp and sure enough. Well it looks like maybe. She's got some kind of allergy to leaving a good review. Do you remember how many star she gave me three. That's the highest is terrific. She's ever given despite the waterboarding despite masquerading her Jinja with the cup despite Jamie and explorer into her gaping decay despite the hostage crisis. Yellow Ribbon on my lapel for that one Hashtag. Never forget how accent Antonio on your strong despite all of those things. That's the greatest consumer experience. She's ever had. So what do you call someone who only leaves nasty reviews exactly. It's actually really close to her name. Very good my mother would call her negative. Nancy Konya would call her hater. Peter What do you do when you get a hater. You know the words what are you doing. You gotTA shake it off. Turn your attention attention to the positives and focus on getting more great reviews. That's the key to practice. Focus on the positives which is really hard for a lot of us. This is my dad and thank goodness that the greats in our industry didn't have to deal with bad reviews. Can you imagine. GV blacks response to a one star Yelp Review Hickok away like all of my tooth and filled it with an ugly silver filling or attention and resistance forums you pretentious entitled Harlot. Dr wheedle said use this like crazy chisel on me. My children is most excellent you. Let's see same for my dad. I can't imagine how he would deal with with a one star review. My Dad had practice for twenty five years in Amarillo Texas before he sold his practice and moved to San Antonio to teach at the dental school. I have some pictures of his practice. They're fun to look at. This is his office office. Five doctor practice in the seventies it was Kinda revolutionary biggest a group practice east or west of the Mississippi. Here's here's the waiting room really. Classic Design classy modern. It smells of Oak and Mahogany Here's the other side of the waiting room extensively in another zip code because that waiting room so being this next picture is my the second favorite picture of the whole set this. My Dad's office manager Georgia. who had that Beehive Haircut from one thousand nine hundred fifty eight until the day? She died in two thousand and one she was the epitome of a Sassy Southern Woman that thing on the wall behind her. That was the height of dental technology in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy four. Does anybody with that. Is it's an intercom system to page. That was the prime scan and the prime mill of Nineteen seventy-four or absolutely amazing. This is the other office manager. Debbie you may say the Georgia's stuck in the sixties. This is nine hundred seventy four in this picture. Debbie is is ready for the eighty S. She's got the the the haircut the cut off sleeves. She is ready for Whitesnake to pour some sugar on her. You're on the hood of a Camaro right writhing around tee tops off baby. This is my dad doing exactly what I do in the laboratory. This is my impression of lab work. Apparently it's genetic this is something I don't have in my office a library. Does anybody know that's not a computer in the back there. Does anybody know what that is microfiche. Because if you needed to look up our designs there wasn't Google image search to help you out. You had to pull out the fish to do it. Here's the staff break room again timeless design. I love the wallpaper and nothing better than a really loud wallpaper in a small room and putting mirror in that room to make it feel like you're in a fun house while you're on your break at work I also love. What's on the table next star? Does he made that is. Yeah Man I just finished this extraction. Let me go blow a Marlboro and the break break room. We'll be right back. It was a different time is a better time probably radiology room. I love the wallpaper here. I love the piano machine with the lap bar like it's a rollercoaster like does the tube stay stationary. The chair move around. How does this work? Here's one of the opportunities. I love the positioning of the phone right by the patients head. Great who is this phone for. Is it for the patient. Is it for my dad. Is he placing you bet sliced packing on album. What's happening? I also love the choice of red carpet. It's really great in an opportunity because if you're extracting tooth and you drop it on the floor you just kick it off to the sign. No harm done love chocolate brown delivery system really good stuff. It comes in red too. So you're started a group Ashley. If you're talking about doc designed to please let people know that this also comes in red now. I haven't seen the catalog for this equipment but I'm quite sure that there's another color option not pictured here. Anybody Wanna I guess what it might be from nine hundred seventy four avocado green baby. But we can't put that on red carpet. This place is classy. Here's my dad. which is my favorite picture? Because I really wish I knew what someone said to him right before this picture got taken. My only thing I can imagine is that he's just asking who the fuck picked red carpet right. I mean I can't look at this picture without thinking of this so then you might remember this. Does it make you think of that. The red carpet such shit choice. Such a choice now. I don't know why you guys became a dentist but for me was down and that many many of you in this room have parents who were also Dennis Allen Mike Mike Aaron probably amongst a bunch of others and I think this is a common path of entry into the dental field and patients. Ask me all the time. Apropos of nothing. We share data dentist which I actually kind of low key find insulting Because the way I translate that into my head is why. Would you WanNa do this if you weren't pressured into it by a helicopter parent. I certainly wasn't pressured into this by my dad but today it's clear to me. I became a dentist because I wanted his his approval. I want to make my father happy. I wanted to hear. He was proud of me. And I think we're all hardwired to hear that. I think it's something that we all want. There's there's one problem with that. I'm never going to be able to get my Dad's approval because my dad died when I was ten years old and I've been chasing a ghost for the last thirty years in fact I never even got a chance to tell him. I wanted to be a dentist now as an adult. I realize it seems crazy to try to seek the the approval of someone who's not even here with US physically right. took me a long time to figure that out. There's always been an emptiness and I've tried to fill all that emptiness with a lot of things. HOOKERS drugs base jumping. Hello skiing. I'm kidding achievements achievements achievements. What I've tried to fill that with this is serious people and I've tried to fill it with the chievements ever since I was ten? I've tried to do things that I thought would make my dad FRAPP. I thought it would make we feel better. When I was in dental school I ran for and became class president killing the game son? Prom king starting quarterback back dental school class president. Every young boys dream right. I got picked to give a dental school speech at graduation. Like Kaji didn't make me feel any better. Ivan ran for the Board of the Texas Dental Association. Because I once saw that my dad had a twenty five year member pin which is crazy because I won on the election and then I had to be on the board for three years going to ten meetings a year. It was terrible. I didn't WanNa do that. It look at this picture. It is the least diverse group in the world. I'm like Benjamin Button down in the bottom left. Hand Corner her aging backwards on the only one in this photo not on Medicare in the meeting agenda at ten thirty. AM It would say. Take your lipitor Bra. I listened to Konya on the way over here. What am I doing at this table? The thought process is crazy looking back on it. I mean it would be like me finding a Dallas cowboys. Cheerleader calendar. The my dad owned and then trying out to become a Dallas cowboys cheerleader. And making it. I can't wear that outfit those boots don't don't look comfortable. I can't do those leg. Kicks what am I doing. None of it ever filled the emptiness. None of it did what I didn't realize that I started to resent dentistry for not filling that emptiness that it never could. I started to wear. We're that resentment outwardly. And I didn't notice it but my people around me could and not just my team. We use this software to reactivate patients who've gone inactive and one morning I come to the office and I get this email informing me of a patient's response to reactivation attempt Chris's Seeking in care with another dentist. Because and I quote Dr Austin just seems so angry all the time you mother. This shocked me. I thought it was a great actor. I thought I was Daniel Day. Lewis Louis Putting on an Oscar worthy show every day for my patients and I thought they loved it and I thought they loved me it turns out it was wrong. They could sense it. They could tell it could sense wine happiness. I couldn't let that continue to happen. This helped me realize I needed to talk to someone I needed to talk to someone professionally and and because of how. I'm wired the only place I knew to look for. That help is on you. Help make sense right. Best cheeseburger go to Yelp the best Sushi best mental health professional equipped to the unique skills to help you with your relationships. And keep you from jumping off your building every morning. Yeah right so I went to the top rated therapist in yelp on San Antonio and it turns out the top rated therapists on Yelp. Because all they do is listen to you. Talk and never challenge you. You want anything same thing with Google and went to the top rate at their Google and had the same experience nothing was a good fit in desperation. I checked out tender turns out. It's a great place to meet people with mental health issues just not mental health professionals. No I didn't go to grinder. Okay just letting you now. Aw but I did actually go to an APP that I use is called talk space. You get paired with the therapist based on a questionnaire that you fill out. I can have a phone call with my therapist. I I can have a face time with my therapist but most of the time we just text and actually fits in my life much better. I don't have to cancel patients. Don't have to miss any patient time or leave the office office and a Lotta Times. It'd be a lot more honest over text than I can in person. Let's give an example of how this is improved my life so my therapist checked in on me one morning and we had the following exchange. How are you feeling today? It's tough day. Seems like I've been having a lot of issues getting my team on board with what I want him to do. That's interesting is there one team member that seems to the the problem. It's a good question. Let me think about that. You've mentioned your office manager before. Is that her no. It's not her. Is it your dental assistant. Who has been calling in sick recently? No she's been much better are actually someone. I've never blamed anything for before. Who is that? I think the problem Um as me and I'd be lying if I told you that wasn't hard to type. That is a great insight. Now we have some great work. We can dale. You've seen me show some examples this morning of maybe some anger issues right. This isn't an instinct cure. It's not like instantly. This get gets better. It's not like extracting an abscessed tooth where there's immediate relief it's a process. It's about progress. Not Perfection Day by day week by week month by month. Progress so far my team is known as the difference. My friends have noticed the difference and hopefully my patients agents notice it too. Am I sing that. Everyone needs therapy. No just all. Dentists need therapy but I do think everyone could benefit from an objective third party who listens to your complaints about your relationships in your life and helps you figure that out. It doesn't matter how you go to therapy. Just go find what works for you. It's like dental school. Faculty says always in a condescending tone tone. Well do what works in your hands which is always really secret code for everyone else. Does it like this but you suck so so go figure it out on your own right. How many times have you been a party or a happy hour and met someone new and told him your dentist? And what do they bring up to you. Is it true about the suicide thing which again to me. What I hear from the patient is? Wow your job sucks so much you should just kill yourself right. That's what I hear when they ask that and that's probably not what they mean. But that's what I hear. This is an easy patients. Don't want to be in our chairs. They don't WanNa pay anything because their insurance should cover all of it. They don't WanNA WANNA have any problems afterwards and they want whatever we did to last for ever dock use did that filling fourteen years years ago. And you're saying it's a crown. Don't feelings last forever later. You're forty four years old and your breasts hanging down pinches lead toward your waist fan. All you do is drink. Diet Red Bulls at your desk all day and sneak off your Toyota Sequoia to get a suck off your jewel vape mango mango flavored. Nothing lasts forever especially that resin that I did in the George W Bush administration. Aw One day I heard that someone a couple years ahead of me in dental school had died by suicide so I did some research on it and I found this article on vice which by the way shouts to the graphic design team advice for this illustration I. Don't they know that. No Dennis wear a suit to the office. Can we just revised this with some big scrub. Sleaze that's more appropriate that the jogger version they gotta be tight on the ankles and there's actually some pretty interesting research in this article that I wanNA share with you. The says the dentists are two and a half times more likely to to die via suicide than the general population the Journal of deviant behavior which I didn't know about but is now a must read subscription placed seriously. I actually think every dench should get the journal of deviant behavior it has to be more more effective on our day to day life than the Journal of prosthetic dentistry. I SORTA got being a dentist increase. Ones risk of suicide by five hundred and sixty four percent percent according to the ADA. Dennis are twice as likely to have to depression. Anxiety disorder and panic tax than the general population. Has Anybody been to an ADA meeting recently. What kind of courses do you see? All in fours. Veneers Falmouth rehabs implant placement. Hell a couple years ago. I saw course at a meeting for Gold Foil placement. Not only are. Are we obsessed with minutia. We're obsessed with minutia that hasn't been done since Nixon was impeached. But will you find a a single course on mental health. Can we please talk about this openly as a profession every once in a while can we try to save our own lives instead of going to courses that. Sell us on the idea that we're saving a patient's life life with the prophylaxis. Why does this happen? Why do Dennis have some of these issues? Well this study said that ninety percent of dentists are in musculoskeletal pain some or all of the time. That seems like it could be a problem. I hurt my back in December. I strained my lower back. I went to physical therapy happy. She recommended that I go to yoga so I started going to yoga and my first yoga class. I had one thought in my mind the entire class from start to finish please. God don't Fart and I made it. I made it through that class and then I went to the second class and I wasn't so lucky bro. Childs pose if you don't know what child's poses don't Google it because you will get it on the Jeffrey Epstein List with the government do not Google childs suppose. I'll explain it to you. It's like norovirus pose. It's all fours for my guys over here face down ass up. That's what's out suppose is how are you not supposed to blast. How is a man not supposed to blast in childs pose? So I figured out the keys bras if you go to yoga. There's this minute at the beginning. Where all the other weird people in the class do this That's where you unload the cartridge. Empty the magazine right in there. That is your moment to do it because when you get into child suppose dude just. It's it's tough man. It is tough breath according to the ADA more than one third of dentists are frequently are always worried read more than one third of dentist are always or physically emotionally exhausted. Yeah that might be a problem and that self reported reported so the CDC has some risk factors for suicide. Let's look at him history of mental disorders. There's particularly discretion for dentist check. We already saw that. Subject right. Feelings are history of alcohol and Substance Abuse. Yeah I I feel like I've heard about that a few times in dentistry feelings of hopelessness. I remember the thirty four percent of dentists who are always physically or emotionally exhausted isolation. I don't think they're talking about rubber dams physical illness. You remember knbr ninety percent of the dentists that hurt all the time in an unwillingness to talk about it because a stigma but yeah bro. Let's take that Dick Tucker gold foil course right because that's got to be more beneficial Best name in the history of dentistry. Dick Tucker what Pronoun do I use. Aw I wrote this article. It's the best thing I've ever written in my life. I'm the most proud of this article of post anything I've ever had published and it was written for the dental hacks is called porn for your practice make yourself miserable we social media. It's only fitting that the best thing I've ever written has the word porn in the title. My mother other is like ridiculously proud of me on this one at listen I I just think sometimes people say that social media helps with the Nice elation does it does it really. I posted this on instagram. Because my biggest issue with instagram Graham is. It's everyone's highlight reel and so every time you flick through it. I see something that looks better than what I can do. And every time that happens you do a rep in your. I'm not good enough muscle and next thing you know that I'm not good enough. Muscle is stronger than your. I am good enough muscle and that's when we get into problems so I challenged some people to post failures. I posted three crowns that I had that all broke within a three month period all five to seven years old all coincidentally Imax is on number fourteen for some reason. I don't know why I guess I suck on the left and I'm like average on there. I guess how many other people posted a failure zero. 's Okay to be vulnerable. It's okay to not be perfect. Let's stop flexing that. I'm not good enough muscle. Let's flex the it's going to be okay muscle. These are a couple of the APPS that I use regularly. We talked about talk. Space earlier. Column is a guided meditation APP. Shout out to a dawn Kuan Polish name for her. It's okay my fiance's Polish so I can make jokes about Polish people. It's actually the last minority group that you can make jokes about. Actually if you haven't gotten the memo Don's podcast talks a lot about meditation and I'm not good at it so I I need a guided meditation. And here's how I do in my practice. We do our morning huddle every morning which is generally a waste of time because all we do is read the schedule. It's like it's like a Hamid Church right where you're just like going through the motions. Mrs Jones is scheduled for her pro offi examined by his praise. GAW waste of fucking time right. What are we doing so we finished the morning? Huddle I go in my office. I closed the door. I put in some your buds and put on a sleep mask and I do a ten minute guided meditation and it really does make a difference and I challenge all of you to do the same thing. I actually do think it helps a lot. That's why the title of today is shattered. Psyche thank you. I'm sure you saw that and wonder like did. He hit a fifty milligram edible before he made that title right before. Alan texted me like Bro. You're my face is melting like Sanford Psyche. Sounds great no. I didn't hit any edibles. Listen we spent so much time. Industry focused on minutia. We spent so so much time refining our margins with a double red stripe diamond we spend so much time polishing are anti composites till we can see our double chins reflected reflected back at us. If you just spent a portion of the time you spent refining your margins polishing your your composites on your own happiness in your own mental health it would make a world of good. You'll be happier. Your team will be happier your patients and will be happier and your loved ones. We'll be happier. Thank you guys so much to be. Well the doctor Joshua Austin thank you so much. I'd like to thank Mike to Tola for helping me on this. You're my brother. I love view forever. Thanks to the The guys that Dental Hack Smart Kostas Justin Moody. You guys are great. Thank you so much.

yelp Thomas Keller Josh Josh Google Joshua Austin facebook US Dan Right Taco Bell. ADA Alan Meade Dennis Allen norovirus football office manager Luke America Bianca Detroit
Interview with Spike Spencer

Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

52:01 min | 6 months ago

Interview with Spike Spencer

"Hi Jim most contribution interviews. They were spikes venture business coach and wish actor to sit back. Relax Geek Fest Begin now. I say things awesome. Hello everybody Thank you so much for having me on here. And we're GONNA talk about to all sorts of amazing things from voice acting making goofy voices. Two training people in relationships sales dynamics neuro linguistic programming success motivation connection communication. Yada Yada Yada all the things that I work on and train and teach people along with a bunch of silly silly stories. I'm quite sure so. Ask those questions what do you need what can I do for you? All right? Really big running comes down with you like best about dealing businesses. You know it's an interesting. Let me start with my back story. I guess So I've been in the you know the business of shoe for thirty years. I was on camera. And I've I've camera till about two thousand five and I went to college. Got A baccalaureate degree from the Honors Program Majoring drama. Big Big big deal. Nobody's ever asked me for. Nobody cares but I went pro and started acting in out of Houston Texas so there was a lot going on Austin Dallas New Orleans etc at the time so that was my focus. I always wanted to be an actor. And so over the course of twenty years or so fifteen twenty years. I had Logged up on camera with Four Academy Award nominees two of them one and scenes where I was talking with them and it's I moved out to Hollywood in two thousand five and nobody really cared what I had done it. The time before then Excuse me you might hear me cough and a little bit. As of saying earlier I got E Bola a touch of be Bola nothing. Big No cove it no coronavirus just just Ebola. It's good it's tasty so back to how I got into this weird world where I am so when I was acting in Houston I wanted to also be a business person. I wanted to make a lot of money and I had more free time because of being an actor so I trained in real estate I wanted to learn how to flip houses and things of that nature so I did that for ten years as well. flipped over route sixty seventy properties on my own and and then Things didn't quite work out. I was very successful in about two thousand five. Had A four thousand square foot house with Dojo pub And Ben Acre and a quarter and a beautiful wife and three amazing dogs Nacho Fajita embryo and it all came crashing down There was an affair not mine My ex decided to hang out with my best buddy and they're still together to stay and there was a divorce and bankruptcy that ensued and Basically I lost everything I imagined. The you know the whole Atom bomb. You lose everything you know in love and shot whammo. And that's what happened and I moved to La and that's what started my Couple of things started my voice over career Ernest I have been doing voiceover for several years Back in Houston but really jump started in two thousand five here in La and That also started my Might Trek on personal growth and self help more than it had been in the past because I thought I had a really good handle on everything right up until the explosion and then Isaac. Bauer ahead to I had to go back and refigure who I was and what I was doing. And where my communication and connection and all the personal growth and self help? That had gotten me to that point apparently had worked so I had to start over from ground zero so I did and I started training and learning in so there was two thousand five newly divorced thirty five years old and I had to start dating again. So that's what I was focusing The relationships dating Pickup a psychological learning and anything. I could become a more attractive. Human being be a better better man. Better lover better friend. Better husband eventually old impossibly a father which I am now and Through the course of about seven years I dated a lot. I learned a lot and I talked to a lot of women who taught me a ton. Amazing One and I wrote my book. Food Game Ammann's recipe for dating success. Utilizing the dating techniques that. I used which was game I cooked for dates and they came over That's how I landed my other lazing beautiful wife. Kimberly is another one of these podcast here and over the course of that seven years. I realized that I found out that I had the fame in the voiceover world. Some of you may know me from Animation Video Games and anime Like Evan Gillian Idly Shinji Hikari for twenty five years And I don't even know what's popular now to Black Butler borough thome still on that and I did A some world of warcraft and a couple of The League of Legends Heroes UCONN and clad But you know lots more out there you can you know Google me But with that fame Kane in a convention appearances around the world and that's developed my training for a dating and relationships back in the day it was called. Don't kill your date and other cooking tips. Which eventually became the book? Food game and I've been in front of thousands of people internationally talking about relationships and once I met my nursing life Kimberly in two thousand twelve We even went further down that at and I got a neuro. Linguistic Program Certified Coaching Certified Bank Personality Code Trainer We've studied with Brennan Bouchard Tony Robbins. And my wife is a sort of highpoints coaches. Well so we have gone down that coaching half people's business coach Life Coach. Etcetera Etcetera in. But there are so many titles on coach and my jam is relationships. Communication connection so So I talk goofy for a living and sometimes I talk Goofy when coaching people in business or relationships. Or whatever. So that's in a nutshell where I am right now. And oddly enough at this very moment We are down in Australia where we have been since. March if I will I was appearing convention called Supernova With members of the walking dead oddly enough so that was fitting and we pulled into was a Melbourne and the Gold Coast and we pulled into the Gold Coast. Just as Tom. Hanks came down with it and He was literally blocks away from US and We've been in the ghost ever since so we may end up staying here for another few months because Qantas isn't even flying. The borders aren't open so everything everything's been doing. He's been doing from Australia and loving it. 'cause Australia's amazing and So that's Kinda mean a nutshell. I long winded but hope that tells you how I got here and what I do a cycle you start curiosity how much of a slow down because of the coronavirus business goes for you. Oh hugely huge slowdown literally everybody in the royal role in La had their own Studios so a lot of people did that. I had a studio. I have a studio in Burbank Ready to go but it's in Burbank. Anaheim in Australia so I mean I get a few auditions but it really can audition that much because in order to do anything here. I'd have to go buy a new Mike Fashion a studio which is almost impossible in the place that I am or I'll have to go to a studio and actually pay for the studio time on top of everything which makes it almost Financially ridiculous for me So yeah basically. I'm not working Down here done one GIG since up and down here it's Fisher On adult swim. Because he'd been doing the my hero academia apparently they've been doing voiceover from actual home studio so yeah. Oh everybody S I mean I know Like facebook friends with everybody in Hollywood there. And you know there's there's threads of you know. Hey How do I put my studio together? You know let's all get together and do it so like everybody's got A. Was it sound? Oh my gosh sound something. Source a source connect. That's every source. Connect them like. I'M NOT GOING TO GET SOURCE. Can Down here and and put all this stuff together as is just. It's not really worth it and I'll just focus on you know opposed coaching again. My podcast up and so on disposing of a lot of that. Getting the word out about what I'm doing and Setting the groundwork so they want to get back to La. That I have to run. What is exactly? You're now starring. Set up what what what. I'm starting to set up a this. The basics for my my whole coaching empire like Kim has in a podcast and program. So I'm I'm developing programs. Coaching programs. I have a membership group design for people in the. I mean say the NERD Dome Community. Because that's me I'm like I'm a huge science finder I'm just I know now and the personal growth and self help in business coaching. You don't really get a lot of that. In you know anime in animation and comics and fantasy games etcetera etcetera in our realm. There's not a lot of personal growth Teaching Training There are some people that you know. We'll we'll talk it talk about it in a facebook post and things will. They'll post quotes and all of that. Which is really nice but I actually coached people. I've been in front of thousands of fans helping them with their relationships and communication connection per over ten years. Now so I've honed my message I love it for our community because I see it. I've been there. I've been front of the that that community kind of the nerd them and it's like hey you know. Let's let's get better. Let's have more confidence. Let's get some communication developing relationships. Help you in your business in life. Success that's important and I'm there in that realm in that In the the community so I built membership community called the Reluctant Heroes Journey It's not open to the public right now. I will be opening the doors again in probably next month for the next round but You know that's part of it. Plus I coach. You know one on one. So developing the entire business and expanding on my Trainings programs that are like food. Game dating success strategies or Using your voice with neuro linguistic programming for success in business and personal life or Working with a clear connect close relationships sales dynamics that I put together. There's a lot of different trainings that I can put together while I'm here. If I've got some downtime got a computer I gotta microphone and I got a lot of knowledge so together package it up and there you go to the business. He bring up neuro linguistic programming. What is a about? Mr Programming is it's known as NLP and it's basically the basis for most of Tony Robbins teachings. That's how he got started longtime ago and our coaches were the ones who teaches his people. And it's it's basically the study of excellence and then you take that excellence. Who is if? Somebody's really excellent at what they do. Then you do what they did. You know it's it's basically breaking down. Excellence and saying all right for example Tony Robbins to cub a army. Snipers the famous thing. And I'm I'm kind of paraphrasing. Probably get a role but he said look. I'll say I want your ten worst snipers and I'm GonNa make them you ten best snipers like in a month and they said okay fine and he's if I do it. I get this much money. If I don't do it. I get okay great so he went and he did it. He turned them into the last night. Or something along that line. They were like phenomenal and Because what he did was. He studied the best snipers any hung out with the best neighbors for a little while. How do you do this? When you're shooting. What are you thinking? What which your mindset you. Know what are your? What are your morning principles? What do you do and you study? Excellence is what you do. You study excellence. And then you apply to your own life and your own goals and whatever it is you want me goes really really deep into because our our brains and words we use are very very important. It's Tight to our subconscious and I go into London. My podcasts are but that's basically he. Is You know looking at what you do. How you do it and what you say and you break it all down into its components and then you can build it back up by refrains and and all sorts of timelines therapies. And it's really getting in diving deep into your subconscious realm and shifting. Thanks because a lot of times when you're not doing something or you're mad about something. It's not what you're mad about. It's not what you're doing. It's something else that's going on from your past Or the story you've been telling yourself etc and once you get out of that way when you get out of your own way you're able to move forward faster and that's one of the one of the facets of of what we teach in our trainings in me as well in fact it was talking candidat dot how people perception of themselves effects. How things in the real world absolutely absolutely when it comes to biggest in your community wouldn't be property. She is furnished. The far as league nerds in general as far as what now killing me free. Let me go with something different of these problems. A lot of Shall we say academically? Gifted fans nerd have is basically a confidence issue. Are we see this all over the place and you definitely see it with the artist's community is their way to actually build up your confidence. Oh absolutely absolutely I. As a matter of fact I've got a inside the group. I just did a training on confidence exactly that and then what was so interesting about confidence is. It's not something you can kind of pick up. You can't buy. It is something you have to become and when you understand how you can become Confident then it's a different animal because you are. It's a process you can learn it. You can learn confidence. There are people for example. Who you know. I'm not confident speaker. Let's say somebody says Oh my Gosh I can't speak in front of somebody you can use simply will not because you're scared or because you think you lack the ability etc etc when you break it down like I said bring it down to its component ours. Can you speak in front of people? Yes you have the physical capability okay. Then it's not that it's not that you can't. It's that you won't earlier afraid you okay. What's the fear? What's the worst it's going to happen? Break it down And you it's like taking baby steps towards competence so for example the definition of confidence which I found when I looked it up I was like Holy Crap. I thought it was something different. Confidence is the feeling or belief that you can have faith in or rely on someone or something only state dead again. Confidence is the feeling or belief that you can have faith in or rely on someone or something. That doesn't sound like the competence. A lot of people say they want but when you break it down. It's interesting because what they're multiple Courage courage and competence are not the same thing. So if you break down confidence if you can have the feeling of belief that you can have faith in or rely on somebody or something mild and everything's GonNa turn out okay like saying okay. I have the the leaf that I'm going to figure out whatever problem I have in my life I have the ability and I know I can do that so I have a feeling the belief that I can have faith that I will figure that out so I have confidence that I will figure that out so if somebody decide will you what I won't have confidence. Then bring it backwards and say okay. Now how can I have faith? What if you don't have faith while you go down for the okay? Is there a belief that can have? Well Yeah I can believe that I can do something. What would you don't even have? You don't have a that. You can even believe you gotta have a feeling good onto that feeling. Say Well I feel that I would like to believe that I can do this thing so I have faith that I can accomplish that. Okay well Niagara Feeling Level as start and that's how you you start building up competence you break it down to the beginning and you add a little bit at a time so prime example. When we're you know we hear about affirmations people say Oh say am millionaire. Act as if I am a millionaire. I am a millionaire. I am a millionaire where you're calling bullshit on on striking to see bullshit. Yeah Okay Great I say Able Schnitzel that's better recoverable with. I'm sorry whatever you're more comfortable with okay. So for example. If somebody says you know I I am a millionaire. Your heart doesn't agree with that because why because you're not a millionaire if you're not a millionaire. He say I'm a millionaire. What is that that is a lot? Your Heart Says No okay. Say Well Okay. There's so break it back and you say I I can be a millionaire. Well does your heart thing. You can be a millionaire. If that point your heart says not. I don't think you can be a main here okay. Then you don't have the belief okay then go further down and you say okay. Well I'd like to believe that I can be a millionaire to her. Were yeah that's true that's true you would like to believe that you can be a minor. Okay cool now. You're spot where your mind? Your mouth and your heart are agreeing now. You are in flow and that is the place where confidence starts. Once you get that level. Then he'd start adding onto that by adding on training learning abilities and since and as you you grow from there you become confident because once you get that confident all it is the feeling or belief that you can have faith in on somebody someone or something and usually that some things you and most people like you're saying most people they don't have the confidence in themselves so that's one of those areas that that. I help them work on especially dating in the relationship world's when I was teaching. It's like is confidence. Is the thing man. Competence is the number one attractive magnets for relationships and business love and life so once you get the the understanding of confidence. You're going to move forward in life. A whole lot better relationships will get better. Your Business will get better. Your feeling about yourself would get better and in turn your health will get better because when you are in a helpful place in a happy place your invariably healthier so I mean that goes lot during the time we're dealing with right now. For example there is a way to boost your Your immune system rapidly and it simply gratitude. It's real true honest gratitude. This has been measured scientifically that it can boost your immune system if you take a minute and meditate like for five minutes on everything you're grateful for so for example inside my my membership group. This is one of the exercises. I have them do say for. Start with one minute. Go Up to five minutes and just be thankful for everything. Say I'm grateful for air and you. You'll have air you're dead. I'm grateful for water. Water dead you know. I'm grateful for shelter. I'm grateful for my hands my legs you know. I'm grateful that my heartbeats that my eyes see that I can taste food. There's so much to be grateful for and yet so many people living victim mentality and that's where the fear comes in. That's what's happening right now. We're seeing this on a global scale. It's not the pandemic of Corona. It's a pandemic of fear because that's that's what's being sold to US daily and I'm going off on a tangent but that's about confidence once. You have confidence that you are in charge of you. Then things started to change and that's important and that's one of the one of the things that I teach this drive you crazy. What's the best meal you found When you basically trying to create a meal for a date with usually the one of the best meals to try out L. fabulous good questions. He Food Game. A man's ultimate recipe dating exists available Amazon now That is my book and there are ten recipes. I have ten Goto recipes that I've used for years that are on as ing easy to cook. Five ingredients are less for the most part and Yeah and they work because I feel tested them for years. Hey Joe and But my go to my favorite goto and I still do this. I just did it two nights ago. It's a baked chicken. Simplest baked chicken you ever make at. It's the south. Thomas Keller arguably when the debate chef in the world this out he makes a he bakes chicken and you can look it up online just go. Thomas Keller Baked Chicken and he'll tell you and it's so simple. The difference is technique and You know what you do is the oven is four hundred and fifty degrees you wash and dry Jagan and then you salt and pepper. The chicken inside. Excuse me I know you it in like a heavy heavy pan is best But you know whatever you've got works. I'm doing it here in Australia and got some. You know kind of a sheet pan in aluminum foil but the base exists no oil. It's completely dry and as long as your oven is four hundred fifty degrees Fahrenheit Celsius. It's about two hundred thirty three degrees Celsius and you're going to bake it and the only salt pepper. And maybe a little bit of a Tarragon or Some Savory Rosemary wetter. That's it he does. He uses time and the main thing. Is You want to trust the chicken if you don't trust at chicken look it up. But there's a way to trusted chicken without using the twine us. Poke a hole in the back. Flap of where the fat is in the new coq the legs through that and it's automatically done for you easy. Peasy you pop it in about forty five minutes to an hour. It is done Once you take it out of the oven you let it sit. You have to let it sit and timber for bit At arrest. That's not temporary but you have to let it rest and taking aluminum foil. She'd women foil tended. Just put the Lulu Foil. Top Lee that ten or fifteen minutes. You log best chicken you've ever had and it's easy and a chicken in if you organic. Maybe what ten fifteen bucks. But if you go non-organic you can get a chicken for free via bucks right. Oh Yeah you WANNA talk about. I mean food game is I. DON'T SELL IT. As de cheapest way to have an amazing thriving dating life but it is. I mean I had you can I know in Burbank. I know place ranking by really good solid wines like fifteen to twenty to fifty dollars bottles of wine for like seven eight bucks pair that with the chicken and on that chicken what I would use you. Ow chopped vegetables like onions. Tomatoes carrots or potatoes Kenya. Whatever chop up some of those said the hobbled those pop that all in the oven. You got a full meal right there as that chicken all this juices go all over those amazing vegetables at Man who you got that you get the vegetables you got the chicken and you got some wine. You got a date world. A free class asks accurate. How're you on the fake it to make it a philosophy? That's that's pretty much what we just went over. That's it's not a fake it till you make it. You can't fake it till you make it. That's not right because doesn't resonate with your heart so the fake it till you make it doesn't work. What does work is like? I said bring it back to where you're not faking it. That's the key. Do not fake it. You can say I can't say I millionaire and just be like oh album. Great Cool you know. And it just doesn't happen that way. It's like a millionaire. Yeah no you're not your heart says no you're you have to figure out where it is where you are you're aligned. We say I believe I am the type of person who can have this in your heart agrees with you. Then you're like great. You're right past then you start taking the steps to become that person. It's not about what you have. It's not about what you do about who you are who you are becoming once you become that person. The the do an hat happens. And you know it's easy for me to say I'm telling you this is not easy stuff to do. But it's worth it. It is so worth it. And that's how that's how I did the dating stuff. I became a guy who was like dude. This guy knows his stuff and I did one day when I just kind of Went Holy Crap. I really do know my stuff. My confidence soared instead dating ability. Who's Great Yeah? I know sally goes could be a little redundant. Sometimes you actually were basically hardcore apetite philosophy. Basically just you go into a situation that your skill level is or whatever and you simply do your best and so you actually. You actually become good at whatever the trying to accomplish. Well yes if you send by manner yes but it really comes down to what's underneath. What is your subconscious? Mind your subconscious is going to go with whatever the dominant thought is in your head for good or bad negative or positive so you say I'm a millionaire and you're in the back of your head saying you can't rub two nickels together. This is not right. It's not you this is not. This is not feel right. It doesn't Work Yada Yada Yada Yada. That's what's going to be happening so it's going to be running in the mud and you're not getting anywhere like you're spinning your wheels in the mud and it's not anywhere but you thinking you're saying you're going yes yes yes yes yes yes but underneath. It's not going that's where people mess up and get into failure so much because they don't understand that I've been in that area for a long time so I have to go back and I didn't this myself. I go back and said okay. What does your heart say? What do you believe you believe that this is that you have as you can be this and if you don't then you gotta go back until you can get aligned and say okay? This feels right. Okay I may not have any money right now but I believe I can get money okay. Great Art says yes. You can get okay awesome. I believe I can get a million dollars. Your Heart Says No. You'RE NOT GONNA get a million dollars right now but I believe I can make one hundred dollars in this we. Oh yeah absolutely I believe thousand dollars absolutely both make ten thousand dollars we can. Maybe maybe not okay steal two thousand and move from there. But you've got to get to the point where you are in agreement and alignment because otherwise. It's not working. It's like trying to put a square peg in a round hole. It just doesn't fit. It doesn't matter if you're if you've got square peg in a square hole. It doesn't matter it's a small where pagans where small square hole. You can always make bigger as you go. That's the key you may get bigger. You make belief bigger as you go. You know as you add on like. I said if you can't speak in front of people usually you're going to have to if you want to speak in front of a fifty thousand people start with one. Start with to move up to three move up to five when she got up to seven or eight s feels good fifty any of two hundred to three hundred thousand two thousand. You're feeling pretty good. One hundred and fifty thousand. Not much difference. Yeah it's definitely help artist. Kitty BE A lot. You know. When you start messiaen juicy drying the reading regionally you have absolutely no competence. Which is more than he do. When you feel comfortable with and more you study a little bit here in their day. You're going to be doing it because you're increasing confidence with it absolutely. Well think about that though. What what you said is very valuable. Because what if you're an artist? What are you doing all the time drawing drawing all the time? It's not like you drew something. Once and the artists have to draw anymore does work that way. You've got to draw if you're an artist you draw if you're a speaker you speak if you're coach you coach your voice actor Voice Ac. It's what you do you know. And every time I do like a voice acting session. I'm learning something new. I'm using the muscles that I have and learning. It's like anything else. You know what you could do something for ten years. The same repetitive action. Ten years ten years somebody could show you a video. Hey you been doing this wrong all this time and in that little tip suddenly. You're doing whatever you've been doing. The last ten years fifty percent better. That's what coaching is coaching. Is I see somebody. I can sit back and I go okay. I'm not in your story in your head. I'm watching you. I'm watching what you're doing. I'm helping you guys who come in like for example we were talking about in the in the nerd community when I'm in front of hundreds of them and I'm telling them stuff that I know for a fact works. They never heard of this stuff because they haven't studied the way I haven't been out in the field doing the things I've done in. I tell them a couple of things and I can see them and I can see what they're doing right there in front of me and I'm like okay. I know what your situation as saw giving them a little tip and wow. I didn't even know I was doing like. Yeah I know you are and she knows you but you don't and that's something that you gotta shine the light on for people national learning. This ongoing learnings called Kazan in Japanese. And that's what I. That's one of my Chapters in my book flu game. It's constant never ending improvement. I will always be a student. I will never be a master and even when I really really incredibly good at something I will still want to learn. And that's an open way to to think about things. Yeah anchors the phone party. You've got some of us. The Desk Masters keep pointing out that the you know they have students thinking of everything masters himselves while issue stations beginning of knowledge. Thank you know everything. There's so much you don't equities always find me. It's been certified Swordsman of all time. He he's. They're constantly surprised. My homage though learning over time even me a lot of massage therapists refunds. She was stuff. He learned this. The reason you're the storage it's interesting. I trained in a some martial arts It's been a long time since I've trained but I was a second degree black belt in taekwondo. I was almost black belt tonight. Kito and AIKIDO. I like so much. Because it's it's also based on swords A lot of the strikes your hand and the whip a you move your hands etc it's Using a sword and it's just repetition over and over again and you plateau and you plateau in your leg doing your work working working and working like Oh my God I'm not getting anywhere you're stuck on a plateau for a time but you keep going and then suddenly something shifts and boom you excel up to a higher level. You don't know when it's going to happen but it does happen as long as you keep. Going and relationships are the same way. We take our relationships for granted in business love in life and we don't see what we don't see and that's where I come in. I hope people see things and I bring in different ideas different viewpoints and help them because they know the problems. Everybody knows the problems. Everybody knows the answers. They're all inside your head. It's accessing them. That is the situation because you cannot access the answer to a problem from within the problem. That's where you need help. And that's that's what coaches do coaches help you figure it out. All right in shifts The other area I threatened suck. Yeah absolutely great. So honey is going to be interesting to see if people actually apply. That can be interesting to see your coaching on. That I live. I mean it's on my website SPIKE SPENCER DOT COM. I got a lot of Info up there and I'm putting together some new new products like I said so. We've got some downtime now people so we're going to do that and I will have more products that will help trainings. All right. So shifting drew drastically when it comes to the voice asking. What's the challenges for his eating mess performance? As far as the acting goes well. A lot of people think when with voice acting. It's people think it's something that you're doing. There's a the part that people miss about voice acting is my job as a voice actor is to do what the director tells me and said. Oh you can do funny voices. You can do this. You can do all these crazy things. I guess I can but the point is I can't do that and be successful unless that's what the director wants so we have the nuance our performances in many different ways because the director once what the director wants. And that's we do so when I tell people all I didn't like your performance in such as I don't really care the director did and they're the ones paying so it's like you have to understand what our job the real real job of voice actors to be able to change the voice in teeny tiny increments teeny tiny increments that will allow The performance to work out exactly. How the director Watts Sort of interesting? Prompt voice actor is your only. Your only district is your voice. You don't have the full reign. Give gassing stuff you have all the movement in props and all that you have only your voice work with exactly and as a matter of fact. Sometimes you have to be sure that you're not moving. All I did a a called Buso many years ago and I was a character papillon and we had a mike in that booth. That was so frigging sensitive. He can read my thoughts man. It was crazy I mean I could not move at all like we can hear you moving. I'm like I'm not moving there like. Did you eat breakfast today because we can hear your stomach? What Holy Crap So Yeah I love. You can't move and so when relate like running where my my funny stories like. We're we're running in the booth or in the. Let's say in the anime every running down the street. And you're in the booth. We can't really run so what we're basically doing his hyperventilate. Sound like we're running and you know. Sometimes they can get to your head. We've had actually a an actress who fainted at a DVD and she fainted. The she fell over hit. The desk launched a glass pitcher full water against the the big glass window and shattered and she passed out in front of the couldn't open the door to to get in Jerusalem Egypt seeing a lot of after hugh when it comes to actually giving you into the head of the Portraying I'm try. What about getting ahead of the character when you actually start when you do the voice you actually get into the Stage actors you actually start getting into the head of the character. You're portraying you try to a lot of times. We don't have time But we edition like say for example you audition for a show and your election for ten roles and then they say okay you gotTa Roll. You're like I don't even know what role I got. But you go in and they say okay. This is the character you did. We're GONNA play for you what you did and you go. Oh okay now I can get into that because we've located in your head and your body it Cetera etc That's that's usually. How like anime goes getting animation? You can get into animation a lot lot better because you can really. They animated to after your performance which is really cool. Because that that's my favorite that is like like Family Guy Simpsons and things like that. It's like you get to really Working chew on that that script and have fun with an explore and you find so much more fun stuff like Identity as series called Get Blake me and Robbie Damon and it was hysterically funny. We had so much fun with it and we got to really get out there and be silly with it and it's just it's just better because with With that kind of animation the regional animation. You're also usually have other people in the room with you and you. Can you can riff off of each other. Which is a lot of fun? Riffing is is really cool you especially for. Us somebody who's actually having as much as you. Oh Yeah Yeah you get used get you get those moments that a Lotta Times are completely improv. And they become that that relationship between characters you know lots of his coach written down this way but you delivered a certain other way like Oh my God. That's magic whatever that is magic do that. Let's keep it up. I love what are some of the characters some real fun with I? It's funny because I tell people say. So what what do you do in in the voice of the world is a little bit of everything because as voice actors we do your TV radio at Cetera. But I'm probably best known for Voicing Feminine Little Girl Voice to save the world in a biomechanical freedom or a psychopath so the psychopaths or fun. I'm just going to say and like Papillon from Buso Rankin. And he just you know he's like a crazy guy roy around in a Thong a butterfly mass who can eat people through his hands. You know and he was just like ooh. I know I'll kill everyone who doesn't recognize. That'll be fun. That's old man. Just just beautiful that but like blaze blue the character Arachne e who talked in broken sentences to be Osijek ever. It's like wait. What the Hell Asia's say I don't know but it was fun. And he also eats people always find What else like a League of legends clad colonel gled- I love Colonel led? That is my favorite now. That was one that really got me because he it's basically it's it's a deeper voice for me right now. My voice is deeper because I got the Croup but and I've been coughing allowed but he's crazy and in so much fun to play because he would have a deep voice. If anybody knows who is character is he's I think is your life think is is when it was just complete bad ass and things like Elementary Badger spied use it for a bag scratcher. And then he'd go into is crazy high pitch because my back is Jay which I can't really get by pitch right now screaming and it was so much fun to do so generally those are great and just fun characters You know anime has a lot of similar characters. You know so people all your this character. Sounds like this sounds like this character. Yes yes it does. And that's what the director want it? So there you go when you get into the original stuff you get to have fun with it and I love to have fun. So that's why I say. My My tagline for even even for corporate or business training as a Spike Spencer talks goofy for a living seriously and then it goes into night you business stuff because Like court you know if I'm going to be speaking if I'm GonNa be doing a motivational speech or talk about communication or connection or confidence or whatever it is it's a lot more fun to be animated thrilling shabery now and they'd be in Kansas City. It's cool it's fun otherwise it's only. Let's talk about confidence for a minute. I want everybody to feel confident. Yeah man happy on is actually one of my favorite characters of yours is awesome. I'm glad of so much fun. To do. Many always like the bad boys so go figure et CETERA. Et Roll Man. It's a it's like. What am I doing today? Psychopath will or cats. Apparently I've been like cats. I've been a cat. I've been like eight cats McKinley. Barbie Dream Topi. Ah I'm on the cat there the cat's name I'm in another series right now. Playing professor. Who's also video games? I was like am I can't again is that what's going on here. There are were shot as you could be your characteristic. I had been so many things I was an was a chicken chicken or chicken man. In what what is it called the shinned Mu Shinwa three or whatever it was. I think it was a chicken. We're your world on the world. I'll bet all right so you to wrap up any final thoughts as far as how to see business. Well Yeah I mean. The main thing is everything starts within inside of you everything. The answer is inside of you. Always in relationships communication connection and business love and light in his inside of you. It takes work to get it out. It's not going to happen overnight. And all these places where you can succeed overnight Blah Blah Blah. It's a bunch of crap doesn't happen sometimes but like to one point point zero zero zero one percent. That stuff's going happen overnight. So you got be in for the long haul. You gotta be able to say all right. I'm going to succeed and this really competence comes in and says you say like my success is inevitable though. My success is inevitable therefore let's work back on the confidence scale. If my success is inevitable than I have faith that I can rely on and rely on myself to figure out how to make that happen so therefore I have the belief and the feeling that I can have that which means I am confident that I will succeed bone. You embody that on the inside any move forward even bad times. I believe me I've had bad times bad times. And I have all sorts of challenges all the time I get some challenges right now. You wouldn't even believe but it happens and I look at it and I go. You know my success is inevitable. So whatever's going on right now is not going to last but I am and that's where you have come. It's not I'm a full on success right now look at my Cape No. It's that competency. You are going to get it. You got it is happened is only in the process. That is gonNA appeal appear to you. So here's successes inevitable. Then everything that you're doing for good or bad right or wrong is exactly what's supposed to be right now. When you can figure that out you start moving towards the right. The right path right answer no matter what it is in p called. 'cause were suspect either. You're one hundred percent at cause for your life meaning you. You're in charge. Everything bad agree. Or you're at effect which means you're not in charge of anything. You're a little plastic bag floating in the wind where everyone carries you. You're a victim and that's where most people reside but the people who really WanNa make something happen again reside from one hundred percent. It's up to me good bad ugly. I'm creating it'll and how do I change that for the For me? There's your success question at your play is restarted from. Then you move fall over and getting help is very valuable so this wrap it up. This is where I say go to Spike Spencer Dot Com and look at my site. Look at some of the different things that I have for you there. I have free things for you. There I have trainings. Have all sorts of things and for this For our NERD Dome Community Keep an eye out for their reluctant heroes journey. There's a link there on the site somewhere. I think it's active. But there's a link to sign up for the waiting list because you cannot get in right now. It's a membership group and I train people in there who are in our community who want to better themselves and when I it back up again then you can get in but it's not available to get in right now but yeah I mean there in our community you know. Keep an eye out. Check my stuff out. Obviously you know who I am at the voices and all that there's more to it and business wise I've trained seven figure earners so I know what I'm talking about. This journey is basically just four the community that you know that has a solid place in my heart. Obviously because I've been in it for so long But I also teach regular business people and real estate real estate is another thing that I I've a lot of training and aired on. I haven't put together any real project real products for that. So we're GONNA a few products there for people that won't be real estate investors swell leading relationship stuff. Is You know the book which is on Amazon. I don't think we're having earth. Thanks for coming on my pleasure. My friend I hope I didn't jog your ears off. You did excellent interesting helping support to show. Please check us out over a Patriot dot com slash two sparrows Twa. Oh we are different types of tips tricks and all that surviving ratings. Life is well as unedited versions of certain interviews. Yeah they either ran too long or they needed to be showy shaped out those are available in their form at patriots dot com slash sparrow. Twa also currently working on trying to get transcripts of so there are occasional transcripts. This shows expects more over the coming months and of course. If you're not a much more curated versions of this project chat over to Youtube. Yes web comics reviews interviews. Has its very own special youtube channel. Where he actually breaks down into the various issues regarding different topics while separating out the reviews as well as the interviews straight up and we also add in the election plash briefs as well as some of the mini cast that you'll find be finding on the Patriot Dot COM account so definitely check that out last but not least I do have a couple of books available on Amazon Dot Com under James Joke J. A. M. A. S. J. O. C. H. I am I want. Obviously the character building book is up and also you got the howdy create comic workbook ups as well both of those really great trying to basically just figure how to write a comic again. Thanks and have a great evening.

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Dara Khosrowshahi: How Uber is changing and being challenged by a global pandemic

Recode Decode

1:07:07 hr | 6 months ago

Dara Khosrowshahi: How Uber is changing and being challenged by a global pandemic

"This episode is brought to you by Lynda farms on my favorite places. I love you guys at Linda Farms. Now that we've all become elite quarantine chests. It's time to try some of the incredible ingredients that have been used in the kitchens of actual chefs. Like David Shank Sean Brock and Thomas Keller and also Luis Swisher. Who's been using these products from dairy farms and making delicious meals? Dairy farms makes small batch organic vinegars and more that are all hand bottled and source within two hundred miles of their farm. They literally everything. You Cook. Tastes better like a lots better. Go to lend Linda farms dot com and use the code recode for ten percent off your first order. That's L. I N. D. E. R. A. FARMS DOT COM and code. Recode for ten percent off your first order. We only have fifteen seconds. So let's make this quick one and get around. Geo blocked content but not have your data logged. Hma VPN is right for you get HMO VPN now for seventy five percent off at HMA VPN DOT com slash deal. Hi I'm Cara Swisher editor at large at recode. You may know me as the person who basically got Dr Coasters shot. He his job but in my spare time. I'm just reporter and you're listening to Rico decode a podcast about power change and the people you need to know were part of the VOX media podcast network. Today on the Red Chair is in fact. Darko shot. He did not get him his job. He's the CEO of Bluebird. He's been in that role for almost three years. I cannot believe it after previously serving as CEO of EXPEDIA. So there's a lot we can talk about right now From his various experiences I wanted to have him on the show to talk about the ways. Uber is being changed the covid nineteen outbreak over the past few weeks laid off more than six thousand workers his putting new rules in place for its riders and drivers and it's one of the companies that has been most challenged by the this crisis in Silicon Valley Not Across the country. Obviously lots more but dr welcome to the show. Thank you for having me appreciate it. So let's start. I interviewed Brian Key. Lesson I'm sort of in my the. Ceo's that actually have work to do mode right now this week and of course he is airbnb. Which is very analog and so as your business talk a little bit about your experience over the over the past. I Guess Ninety Days Sure. Our business is most definitely has a very strong virtual component but even stronger physical component were very local business And especially arrived business. You know moves when cities moves and when cities don't move it doesn't move So we did see a very very significant decrease in Iraq volume We talked about a bit in our in our investor call volumes. Were down Over eighty percent on a global basis. It's a pretty tough hit for everybody on. I amongst them are drivers who didn't have earnings opportunities The businesses coming back a little bit but coming back off of a pretty low floor and I think as the world opens up again. Our business will come back how that happens. What that looks like. It's era remains to be seen. We've got a delivery business. Who Reese which is doing really really well But the ride business which is a big profit generator has taken a hit and it will come back but you know. The timing of that is uncertain. Let's talk about sort of how I'm just curious. Actually who were the twenty percent who are taking rides? That's kind of interesting. Where is that happening? I think there there are people who we need healthcare workers going and getting the job done. I think there are a lot of folks on the front lines. We have tried to help them out. And we have you know contributed ten million rides in and meals for these folks but life goes on is still going on in the cities and it is these essential workers who are keeping the heartbeat as a patient gets better. Let's go through. I went through with Brian sort of when he became aware that it was a problem. Oddly enough he had he. He had sort of gotten flagged too early because they have business in China and had seen that fallen off quite worried and that it it went to Europe and then to the US so they sort of it sort of went around the globe. You have some exposure internationally So you would have that experience. But they'd have especially in China where you're not operating talk a little bit about how it rolled out for you. All we saw. I think it was in February or March and Hong Kong Early on obviously to Hong Kong. We don't have a business in China. We got investment in Didi who does But we really saw the first signal in Hong Kong and it had hit that business Hong Kong. My guess is at the time went from growing very very quickly to being down about sixty percents And we watched it as it expanded hongkong-taiwan some of the other A back markets Annan. March. It really became a real thing In early March we're actually going to have a leadership team meeting get together to talk strategy and we said We're not GONNA talk strategy. We have to organize a strike force as it relates to cove. At first order of business was to make sure that our service was safe that our drivers were safe at Cetera but then we had to organize businesses along all the lines to understand what was happening and then and then react to it all right so you had. You were watching. Dd We're talking to dating about what was happening to them. Not really not really. We don't have A. We don't have the daily caller relationship with DD. It's really through the Lens upon Kong and Taiwan some other APEC markets and then expanded from there very very quickly as you know it was. It was weeks what were the reports. People were saying. Just just rides off. They were just saying people aren't doing it or what was the message. You're getting visits from cities. Were closing down. People were becoming more more worried about This becoming a real issue and UP FOR US. The biggest issue was you know. We're we're network business and we get people together right. You've gotta driver and a rider in the car and the biggest issue for US laws. How do we make sure that a driver who for one reason or the other is feeling sick does not feel the need To work because then we could write a part of this issue so almost immediately. We went out employed a policy in place where drivers who were feeling sick Dacoven etc. They could stay home and they could keep earning and so that we remove that issue of any to keep earning. So I'm GONNA take risks. Not only for myself but for others than was order number one and then we started going. It's it really was getting health. Experts country by country government by government. Because we're very very local business and just being on the round receptive And frankly being part of the solution and not part of all right so getting people people working working when they make money and getting in the cars and doing as many rises possible at the beginning and I want to talk about what you're doing now on a second but how would you imagine you could monitor that in any way you're taking away an economic incentive to do it to be an dangerous Exactly it's impossible for us to monitor health. But we wanted to make sure that we communicated very quickly in very directly to our driver base I and now with our base to. If you open up the APP we say Hey. Make sure you know you need to go where you're going. Make sure that you're staying safe etc. It really was making sure that we're providing a safe service I that was the focus and perfection there because we don't know who's healthy or unhealthy so for us. It was getting health. Visors in every single government as far as what is deemed to be healthy. And then making sure that we're putting incentives in place for marketplace to be a healthy compensate marketplace in a way that work continues today. What about from the passenger side? How quickly did you do? You require masks. And and when did you start to tap besides communicating on the APP? Being worried about the safety of the drivers you. We have been a shrine to acquire masks. Mpv equipment for some time as you can imagine. There's been this enormous demand him and we've had a team that is an and it's not just acquiring them it's according them at big scale and then getting them to people. You know getting them to agree. The was actually pretty difficult. We've committed like fifty million dollars data on this We purchase nearly thirty million masks. I think we have gone in deeper here than anyone else. were buying up e- e- kind of cleaning equipment supplies and we're getting it either driver homes or we have it available. Green light hubs where drivers can come and pick it up and we have now a feature in the APP that we're rolling out now. We need to test where drivers essentially take a Selfie to show that they are wearing the masks. So we are requiring that drivers where mask we double check it. And we are advising riders very strongly washer hands wear masks etcetera so that you have both parties there acquire. You don't think you should be requiring. Don't get in this car unless you have a mass it really really depends on the local health practices. You know we. We don't Wanna be held experts etc. Expectations are different country to country to country. We have taken the stand. That as drivers drivers should and should wear masks and were rolling out tech guarantee. We very very strongly encourage riders to wear masks. If a driver doesn't feel comfortable with a rider who is not wearing a mass. That driver can cancel. Doesn't suffer any kind of economic repercussions. So far we've seen behavior has been has been good has been positive here. So people understand And you know we want to be a parlous solution we're trying to be as communicative possible in and I do think we've taken the lead here in the Industry Mike consistently so let's talk a little bit about the strikeforce at South here you were. You were last time you interviewed. I think it was by Andrew. Ross Sorkin you know we you and I ask you a question about what you thought about the core business of driving and you said this is going to be the engine. That grows everything. Well the drops off by that much. What are you talking about what you do when you're faced with that because you were trying to sort of equalize these things get it back into shape and I know you were doing a lot of other initiatives? We'll talk about it. But what happens when your core. It's sort of like. Google can't search anymore or you know this was the business that wrote everything else you know was carried by yet. Listen our our business. Is Our profit generator. I think near term is going to continue to be our profit generator once the once the business gets going again and and we see good signs but it ain't fair and I order of business for us was make sure that the services safe gas supplies out make sure we have the right health experts etc so the first thing was not about the profitability of the service but it was about the safety of the service we have strikeforce really is thinking and acting on the ground once we secure that and only after we secure that we started thinking about what do we do and I business whereas was hey take down any costs. Marketing costs variable costs. Take down costs. That aren't structural and try to be as disciplined on the cost side as can be with some time in understanding what was happening with the markets. At just how quickly the business down We have to take action on the side and that includes part time employees in full time employees. We may really significant and painful cuts Over the past three to four weeks we made sure that we treated employees super super well in terms of healthcare benefits etc But we had to take some painful cuts because the company has to be here two years from now five years from now et Cetera. And when your business that kind of a hit especially your profit generator so we adjust it. It's not something you wanted to and love. I think a lot. He wouldn't go a lot especially other people who are in business. Especially how did you go up at deciding? What was I've talked to a lot of people? And they said are bored sat and we went through every single expense item and said no and some people see as an opportunity to sort of get rid of that was working or or things like that. How what was your approach to it because like Brian had a hundred and ten projects that were going on AIRBNB and he cuts seventy of them. Even though the ones alive thought they were promising Like they're playing program their Their content programme a lot of their LUX program. Although that's not gone completely. Well how did you look at it? What was your thinking? We certainly talked to the board in terms of guidance from them what they see in the world how other companies are reacting. You always want context. You want the wisdom that aboard gives you And and we concluded that significant cuts in order of your call. Twenty five percent were needed in order to get to not a break-even level in circumstances but improper level based on what we think likely outcomes are. That's an average but that consists of our killing And discontinuing some projects that were nice to have our were making some moves like we We have a business that that we frankly really love our jump. Business Micro Mobility Bikes merging. It with line who was accompanied that we'd invested in a competitor of sorts You know in difficult times consolidation makes sense and so we kind of created a bigger entity but we also reduced our cost base and then there are some other projects in many of them that we discontinued so that was third and fourth. This we did take down. You know costs in parts of the business and it's up to my team then to decide what to adjust and whatnot to adjust And they're doing that so it's a combination of hundred percent stoppage of work and then just taking down the cost base because affect on the business. Was that big. I want to talk about jump separately but talk about some projects. You're working on that. You thought had promise I mean freight was one of the ones. You were talking about what what happened. What does it stop or just gets put in the freezer? Or what's the rate for example continues for us going forward and we will. We believe wasn't the logistics business is going to be here to stay We are continuing to invest in frayed. But for example we had very ambitious plans as it relates to Credit cards and building Bank if you WANNA call that financial services for especially our drivers you less fortunate. People aren't particularly well bent ride And Uber is to some extent a gateway into digital earnings etcetera. When you earn on Uber you can almost instantly take your money out We were building Essentially Service says a financial services for drivers that something that either we're going to partner up with or it's a project that we are going to delay in. We'll decided to three years from now whether we take that up or not Those are the kinds of projects. Were said you know what? It's a great ambitious plan is just not a great ambitious plan for today would have had a thomas cars. You've been you know you've been struggling with that accident before you had to do with that. How do you look at that now? I think on autonomous. The accident was was tragic I think that the team has come together to rebuild from that accident And and re based at business so to speak. I think autonomous again. That's technology that is going to last going forward. The good news era that we'd find it Yet YODA denser of with a Billion Dollars. So that part of the business is funding going forward but again in this kind of environment. You've got to be creative so continue to bet into autonomous absolutely but will look to partner up increasingly will look to bring other players in looking. Kinda complement our research efforts with capital. Right what you wanted to do yourself. Yeah definitely yeah. It was something that we started predisposes that we essentially accelerated going Going forward and you know services like Uber Pool. We stopped were pool because we didn't think it was necessarily safe And we will revisit `services really important service in terms of helping the environment. It's a lower cost transportation alternatives. So we do think it's good for society is something that we will rebuild so to speak when it's safe in that really depends country by country and it depends on health advisory. So there's absolutely like. Is there a pool going forward there? Is We just have to redefine it? And make? Sure it's safe and reboot that that kind of a project or service by tackling that jump because that was a pretty confident thing to do before in the midst of this you're making it's not a it's a consolidation move and to save money but it's also we believe in this kind of thing you're listening about the thinking but I think that you gotta be able to take bold action during crises right. And we absolutely believe micro It's a great way to get around on cities it's another method of transportation. It's eco-friendly it's traffic's friendly. So we believe in the category and there is an opportunity to consolidate and we got to were big believers in that in that line management team Wayne who's the CEO is the word for me personally. So he's he's just terrific and they company like Uber with a brand that we have. We know we're going to be here two to three years from now. it's my job as CEO to secure that future. That doesn't mean taking bets and we still wanted to take a bet on my ability. We want to take a bet on the the lime team and we just think this is a better combination going forward so this is scooters and bikes together. This is not the last mile kind of stuff that you were that we talked about. Pre School are still confident in this business and away from having to clean them because eventually that won't be as big a deal. But what is the challenge? You face there. I mean obviously. These valuations were quite large and they're coming down rather significantly. What from your perspective is to challenge you see there. I think the biggest challenge in that business is that it truly is a local scale business. We can we'll look at the ride. Share THE COST ENVELOPE. Kind of the cost. Structure of rideshare is pretty variable. Right is we can take marketing costs down if a driver is in driving than we as a company or the Ryder isn't paying drivers. So it's a pretty variable cost base and our rides business can still be profitable as a segment even with volumes being down fifty percent for example. So it's it is as a business model it's actually a very attractive business model. We talked about two thirds of our costs. Being variable one third of our cost being fixed. If you look at a micro mobility it's probably reversed which is you actually need to have is. Yeah you gotTa buy the scooters by You. Need a high nation of those of those scooters. You need multiple rides for For Day on the scooters you have a warehouse to To repair them etc. So you have a fleet and the cost of upkeep of that etc is fixed so you actually need scale within a city in order for that business model to work which is why we Solid these players together Uber can bring volume to line. Lime has volume as well. Structurally position a position to win. And advances the business in terms of profitability. And you know during hard tons. Consolidation happens when we want to be consolidated here. All right we're going to talk about consolidation and the delivery business which some people worried about Uber. And the GRUB up deal when we get back we're here with Dr Coast Reshad he. He's the CEO of Uber. And we'll be back after this. Vpn keeps you private and lets you access content from around the world yes please. Vpn that watches what you're watching and logs data about. No that's why. 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I've Valera integrates with more than seven hundred earp e e commerce mobile payment and point of sale systems. Likely the systems. You use today. Your Business can be sales tax ready at EVOLA DOT COM SLASH. Box avalon tax compliance. Done right we're here with Derek Costa Shot. He's the CEO Uber. He just left a perfect opening to consolidation. You had made another pretty aggressive move. Which is talking to GRANDPA. Can you give us all the details of that right now? Please thank you very much for that. Introduction Dancer Cares. No these are rumored discussions. We're not going to comment on on rumor. Discussions for US delivery. Food delivery is a big category. We talked last night when we when we talked about focusing and we have this eight. Let's focus on mobility which is getting people from point Ebi and we really want to focus on delivery as well as food deliberately bought a company called Corner Shop and closed on that deal yet. But it's in. The grocery business and food delivering grocery are accelerating hugely like those businesses are growing in incredible rates are businesses is accelerating so that is an attractive segment in general. We're going to keep investing organically in that segment and in organically. If there are opportunities out there were absolutely going to take a look at them. I think one of the concerns is if you if you were buying if you were in talks of pub which you obviously are And you have door dash as the other competitor between you. You have not close in ninety percent of the market if that was the merger that you chose to do. I can't imagine right now. There's a lot of people worried about consolidation. During Corona virus in terms of it may be good for businesses but it might not be good for businesses in the long run. He talk to this idea of owning that much market share between two companies if that was say to happen hypothetically again. I don't WanNa talk specifics. I do think that this market is much broader than some people are presenting it to be right Restaurant restaurants deliver directly domino's ET CETERA. Delivers directly Grocery is delivered directly including hot food et CETERA. So I think that I would disagree with the definition market. This market just got bigger like we're getting into groceries well Both organically an organically. I think that this delivery of food and essential to homes is an enormous market. And I don't see anyone or any to having ninety percent of that market it's way too big a market their way too many players getting so you're putting yourself in the same bucket as an Amazon. Which is doing its delivery services grocery delivery so you don't Coal Amazon. Yeah Amazon invested in in one of our competitors in Europe right. So this is this is an area that will undoubtedly be be addressed both by restaurants direct big restaurant small restaurants etc and anyone. Who's in the grocery business is GonNa look at this? And anyone who's in the food delivery business is GONNA look at grocery marketplace it Cetera. So it's just a much much bigger market than just food and the market just got accelerate the market got huge leaks out rated by cove etcetera. There's a on Russia of new consumers looking at these services so it's GonNa attract a lot capital Very clear about that. We are one of the few players at has a true global presence and we're building scale in the business. We love the Management Team in and we love the category categories just food. It's much bigger than that. So do you expect pushback if you move forward with something like this where you are because there is a mood around this idea you had? Afc and Elizabeth Warren doing a no consolidation bill during the crisis. There's obviously been a mood. Not just from the left from from the Democrats but from the Republicans on this issue Josh Hawley and others had look at when you were talking about the idea that a lot of these companies have to to strengthen have to be together decides that it's a lot bigger. Are you concerned with their concern? I think we always have to be concerned with their concern. Because these are important people that you have to listen to like we've been we've been a highly regulated locally regulated business for a long time and will continue to be And and I listen to. The concern comes from Restaurant partners Baking sure that restaurant The restaurant business is sustainable. And they can grow if the concern comes from couriers getting paid. That's a great concern if it's from People being able to afford this. These are all people being a food being affordable and available to to everybody we are aligned in that direction and and the thing is no one's really making money in business right so the business itself has to be sustainable in it has to be sustainable way. That works restaurants. A works for couriers works for people who are ordering the food and it works for businesses. Wow so things are gonNA change will definitely listen to opinions of regulators to talk about. What has to change. Because besides the regulars worrying about consolidation. You have restaurant owners distress right now in terrible distress. And obviously they've been cleaning before this about the fees all these delivery service charge. How would you answer? They're concerned about their like. We're getting nothing from you know were. They aren't being chains like dominos but most most restaurants are small and they don't have the ability to get together and fight you all like in terms of technology. They don't have the ability to organize it in the same way. How do you answer that? Say the worry of restaurant owners who right now are really in. Probably the one of the worst shopowners retailers in general are really going to have been taking on the chin. Here I think most of those It's a industry that has been hit really hard and these are people who build our lives around. You know a a great business and they are being hurt in. I guess what what is? It's easy to generalize but as far as Uber Goes. Just take a look at what we're doing first of all in our business it in our food business. What we charge a restaurant includes kind of the cost of running the business but also paying our careers so after you actually net out how much we pay our couriers. We make twelve percents in this business. Rides up for sale one hundred dollars. We make twelve bucks on average and were publicly reported companies. Like it's out there. That's a fact. Our goal over the long term is to get the twelve percent to fifteen percent. So of you know. Let's get twelve dollars to fifteen dollars. A lot of that has actually geographic. Mix as well so to make fifty dollars off of a hundred dollar. Bill is not these horror stories that you hear from others and I do think that this is. This is what happens. When businesses are young businesses grow right like there are certain practices. That don't make sense. I know from my rights days like certain practices in rideshare employees. Were you know in the olden days getting into cars and recruiting drivers or scraping Cetera? We stop that. Like if you're GONNA grow you'RE GONNA BE LEADING BRAND. You're going to have consumers trust theory. Guy Have Riders Trust. You actually have to start doing business. The right way and as it relates the restaurants delivery. Well we don't have to. We have to keep them what we're doing like we are running this business in the right way we are being. I think very strong partners restaurants. Will we charge? Our restaurant includes delivery. It's not just the marketplace be. Go deliver your own food. The vast majority business we are. You know there's a there's a pass through to the currier and net of the pastor to the courier we're making twelve percent which I think is very reasonable. Goals are to make fifteen percent so the vast majority of the money here goes to the restaurant and goes to the career which we think is appropriate and basically the way we can make money is scaling the business and really really growing it which we are investing in a very heavily. So when you're talking about the twelve fifteen percent who loses that three percent and then secondly the careers themselves. How do you? Because there's been a lot of controversies about tipping and this and that and obviously that's what you're that's that would be the negative thing the the equivalent I think problems on the tipping side. You know we. We never took the tips right. The tips are one hundred percent pass through and again there were competitors who were kind of messing around with with tipping being part of earnings like. We never did that we will. We will not do that. We we actually have have A. We introduced a feature where The eater can now. Hey the restaurant directly right. If you just want to help out your local restaurant you can pay restaurant directly that actually heard our volumes vary slightly right so we actually heard in volumes to have more of a pass through to restaurants. We didn't change anything else but it was the right thing to do at the right time so I do believe listen. Can we get better? Yes but we're building these businesses in the right way and I think when we have a dialogue with regulators and and you and I think the press will hold everyone accountable and I think that's a power. The president is good thing. I think people will find that we are one of the good actors and as we grow the business. We can set a standard that others can follow. What do you say when you talk to restaurant owners? What are because they're obviously this has been now. They're only business and you were there to help them. But some of them are worried about the power. You might have over them. That's not a tell you in the in the discussions that we have with strong Boehner's those aren't discussions that we have They want demand We talk about how we can partner up We talk about how we can help. But that discussion with restaurant. Owners hasn't been about consolidation. Where the industry's going. It's like what are we doing tomorrow. How much business can drop tomorrow? How much business can we draw the next day CETERA? This is like you know we're we're taking day to day right here in terms of dealing with them when you when you think about post. Kovin when this comes back. Are you expecting a much smaller restaurants? Scene? I mean everybody I mean everybody. What is that Duty Your Business Gone? Hosanna honestly the banners. I don't know We have about four hundred fifty thousand restaurants or so on the platform. That number was grown. Really really quickly. And then when covid happened. Conduct dip in a flattened out because some restaurants went off. Line we're seeing restaurants. Come online I think I think that the entrepreneurial spirit that you see where these folks is powerful I think we underestimate individuals and the duty of these businesses to get back online. My hope is that they will get back online but I do know on a daily basis. They're hurting and my honest. Answer is I don't know how this comes back. It's it's it's it's GonNa take time and we WANNA play a constructive part in it and like every day where we're doing our best. And how much should you visits? You expect ubereats to be going forward. What's your name so I think that arise business is going to be profit generator for the next two years? But I can see our each business in grocery being just as big as the ride business going forward just because a category has expanded so much and I'll say that was not my expectation pre covered. But you just have had such an acceleration of delivery being a service. That's not only accepted but I think it's going to become more more than a of the norm and I think it was interesting about our businesses. We can't have a hedge right. Which is if the world comes back faster than expected and people start going again you can imagine that our Food business may not grow quickly. I think it will still grow but arrived. Businesses GONNA come ask super fast if the world is slower coming back. Well then we've got a food business delivery business that is rocketing And will have a rise business that comes back slower and I think that we take in the actions on the cost side to be able to survive right now because it's not like good times of honest about that but to make it through and make through continuing to be a leader and then you know continuing to lean forward and really innovate. So I want to the next time we talk about sort of drivers in healthcare and things like that and the struggle that you've had with them but in this you would also wanted to push into public transportation quite a bit and we talked about that the idea that you put your and that had been rolling out New York. A lot of these wasn't Uber. But it was a different thing like you pay with your phones. How do you look at that because you were like? I could for any Transportation Uber. You called yourself a transportation business. Who was there? How do you look at that? This is that people aren't on public transit. They will be on public transit in with we very much believe in that business and actually now when we talk about a rise business we call it our mobility business and the transit. We've built up a transit business in the past two years. It's a great team who are true believers that you know Trent public transit is is continue and we are example during some of these tough times For The New York subway system were providing UBER. Rides to make sure that that system is available for folks who are less fortunate between midnight. I think it's five. Am while they are cleaning the subway system. So I I do think that from our standpoint. Goodness comes from people moving. We want to be there for any way people move in cities or we also WANNA move packages in cities. Those are two core businesses. And we are going to continue to invest in public transit will be demand generated for them but will also be a service provider for them as well. Because there's a lot of tech that we're building that we think can help a transit agencies and it's area that I absolutely believe in and it's an area that we're building and you're continuing to invest in obsolete continuing to be the idea that you use a newborn up to use all your public transit. That's where that's one of the parts of it. It's not provide transportation buses or things in this case. We will be a demand generator and to the extent that we can provide services that provide mobility to folks who are need cheaper for example van. Public Transit Agencies. Can do that. We'll also do that but it's not it's it's really is a compliment and I think that we can be this. Intelligent layer on top. That can help. People make trade offs between price availability time and just preferences what you see more of an opportunity. Coming out of this with the city's distress you know getting people back into public transportation once it is safe or it's still there it's still it's still available. It's just I used to take time. I Walk Everywhere in our. He take an electric bike. Or something like that. You should try line by. I have China line bike. I've tried to jump bike. Not Aligned. Bike is their linebacker. Yes well the jump jump. Bikes are going to become line bikes. So why temp is red. Colored ones are kind of unattractive with a big by the way we love the red and it really is up to ninety earn bikes. I think we'll call one by. It really depends on on that team. Wants to by the turn At cargo bikes that I have. I have an electric bike in my garage. It's a great way of getting around. I do think as far as public transit Goes there is going to be appeared on when you're going to have some folks. I don't feel safe taking transit and they will look for alternatives whether that's private cars whether that's Uber. And we will be there for them and we will provide a safe means but I do think that's going to be temporal at some point. We're going to have a vaccine come out. At some point we're going to have people feel safe again And I think public transit is going to be a big part of how people get around cities. I think it is in assessing and we WANNA partner without like ultimately the the way I think about Uber's future as movement people movement of things in cities in a we wanna be that local os whether or not you're going someplace or you want something delivered to your home And we want to be an intelligent layer. That's providing armed services but also providing third party services and lastly in the in the mobility area. You Talk About Vertical. Lift you you mentioned. You just had an announcement relatively resear- that how do you is. That been shelved for now the idea of the king. Yeah we're looking at what our options are there. So there's a team that is that continues to build attack And we are kind of my my statement to the team is there are no sacred cows were going to. I think we take the actions right now. We have a great balance sheet. And we're re look at her folio and that includes vitale like is a part of the future absolutely can we partner up or are there other alternatives. Were looking at everything. You think. It's a good idea right now. These ideas of non city are just not not right now. Not not today. I think it'll it'll take some time but but listen do you have to. We are tactically. We are thinking today and we think about our partners and we think about had a had a help get cities going but you also have to continue. Think three to five years down the line. So you know it's my job to think about both And that's vitale's or. At G or afraid or where take mobility? You have to think short term that we got the capability to do. Both all right. We're here with Dr Costa Shot. He is the CEO of Uber. We've been talking about mobility and some of their products. When I get back I want to talk about. We're employment is going and also a number of other topics around travel because he certainly has a long history there. We'll be back after this and response to covid. Nineteen people around the world are coming together to help one another in an unprecedented show of solidarity and resilience. Facebook's community help feature is making that easier from delivering groceries two neighbors to donate to a local fundraiser. A Food Pantry community health provides a place where you can offer or request support in your area so if you need help or can offer it go to facebook dot com slash covert support facebook dot com slash. Covert support. Hello this is Neil Patel editor in chief of the virgin host of the verge cast recently my coast Data Ronin. I interviewed alphabet and Google CEO. Soon Dr Pichai. We talked about a whole host of things. Google's Covid nineteen response the way the companies handling the pandemic. How sooners working with. Tim Cook from apple on a virus exposure tracking system for ANDROID and IOS. We also talked about how seniors running one of the biggest companies world remotely now. He's changing his management style to deal with working from home and of course we talk products the future of the Pixel phone competing with companies like apple and Samsung and deeds favorite topic are CS messaging. Because I know there's wants to talk about it so I had had to go there. You can listen to our interviews patrol. Ceo of Google in the verge cast podcast feed anywhere. You get podcast. We're here. Dr Coast Shot. He's the CEO Uber. One of the things that has happened recently. These debates around employees and this cove nineteen crisis has certainly brought into sharp relief. How many people do not have healthcare? How many people are vulnerable You had you had been going back and forth about the designation of what employee is California's been pretty tough on Uber. And other GIG working companies around this. Where do you think the state of things are with Ab five and then around the country? Because I think a lot of people will be revisiting. Exactly what a worker is going forward? I think that that revisiting. What a worker is Going forward I think that's entirely appropriate. And I do think that we don't believe in the status quo and we don't think that status quo is is good enough in based on our society how we go forward. Etcetera. I just WanNa be clear there in. We do believe that a go forward model where you keep the flexibility that the vast majority of drivers who use a system value the flexibility of earnings. Above anything else. We do think that there is a go forward model where you retain flexibility again work when you want to. You can work on multiple APPS. It really is your agenda as to whether you want to work in win and earn. And you've got protections minimum protections in terms of earnings protections in terms of of your health et Cetera. So I do think that this is. It's important debate. I think covid brings it even more into focus and we absolutely want to have a dialogue. And it's not a dialogue of LS not change. Anything it is about. How do we change going forward? How do we retain flexibility and provide protections of the same time? I I think that's the right direction. Where are you with eighty-five five right? Now this is the bill in California that you have been opposing about what a worker is essentially. How do you look at that right now? I mean I think on the on the five side. We don't think it applies to our service as it is today and we are going to essentially to a vote And we think that we're confident of our position care that there was actually a I was looking at a A survey on a cycle. The rideshare guy. It's it's very much kind of inside baseball on on on the industry and has been quite critical of us and the survey itself was asking drivers. Who are reading the rideshare guy. What percentage of them wants to be Employees what percentage of them of them don't seventeen percent one seven said that they actually want to be employees. One seven eleven percent issues. That don't don't ask construed the way employees construed now which doesn't work in our new assist new environment but go ahead please and traditional seven eighty five is seems to be trying to do which is get people employed in the traditional sense. And All we're saying is that's actually not only a bad answer. It's a answer that the vast majority of of our of drivers don't want seventy one percent of drivers who use systems whether officer left want to be independent so the the actual right solution is not everybody's an employee. That's the solution that this group does not want this group that is supposedly being protected by the government. This group wanted dependence on what we're saying is we are willing to provide independence amd protections at the same time. That is the solution going forward and Mike. We're here let's talk. What would you propose? What would what would be let beyond? Let's talk what would you think you should provide? What or help for by in some way for we have. We have made a proposal that has minimum earnings as part of the proposal. Which is when you when you sign onto the system you actually do get minimum earnings and a system that contributes into a portable benefit fund. Based on a by the way this will be funded by multiple services. It's it's whatever service you're using. Essentially a fund is is built up in that fund is used to give you protections And it's not exactly the same but this is we're doing this. For example you can France where there is some room in the law where drivers who who use a system have the flexibility uses a system whenever they want but we provide insurance coverage through APARNA. Call Axa to protect them if they get sick if they need maternity leave if they have an accident etc so that we think is is a better solution. And we've actually specific in a proposal And and we will be specific and ballot box. You get attacked countless constantly. Around this issue this is one that persists the way it does with Uber in markings airbnb and wrecking neighborhoods and stuff like that. When do you imagine this will be solved by giving these benefits that where people would have solid health whereas this a bigger national issue that people need Universal healthcare or an ability not to have depend if they want to be independent to have some sort of protection especially in this case around healthcare. But there's all kinds of other benefits. I think we are a A reflection the bigger national issue you know the fact is that you have a very significant vulnerable population in this country and we are the most wealthy nation out there and this population doesn't have protections including basic protections like healthcare that it's my opinion they should on as a CEO the company. I'm going to try to be positive in actually come up with a solution that moves a step in direction and that is what we are proposing because I do think that companies like Uber. All of us have to be part of the solution. But I think this is a bigger societal issue. It's about inequality it's about healthcare and I think it's right that is coming up and we do need a change. We absolutely need change. Are you more inclined towards Medicare for all or some solution like that now? After this I think that the US health care Model costs more than any other country. That outcomes are are worse than many countries out there I think we're providing care at the same rate looks like than most countries but the price for that care is significantly higher than many countries who provide less governmental healthcare Provide our our prices are out of line so whether it's medicare for all CETERA honestly. I'm not spending my time. I'm not an expert in that field but I do think that another way of rod or coverage that results in lower prices Which will allow us to essentially spend the same amount on cover many many more people and better solution. But that's a that's coming from Dora. The the person not necessarily Dr the CEO. 'cause you know. I'm spending my time on the things right now. Sure I'm guessing but I want to stick on this first second because one of the interesting interviews. I recently was with Nicole Hannah Jones and she was. She's at the New York Times. She did the sixteen nineteen project and one of the things she said stuck out stuck with me rather for a long time now. And that's the idea of these essential workers because on a lot of ways you know your delivery. People have been now deemed essential workers year. They've been able to operate during this time. The drivers have been deemed essential workers but we tend to treat them not that way at all when when things are good or when things are not pandemic essentially and so she called. She called a lot of workers not necessarily Uber Drivers. But in general you know a lot of people home health. Aides things like that sacrificial workers that they become we have this society of this that these companies have gotten very wealthy upon the Labor of others. And I think about this. I think a lot of people have been thinking about this a lot when I was thinking about bang. Four dollars for an uber a couple years ago. Remember when they were all for it? I was like this is not when it costs. And WHO's paying the price here? You got the Uber of the many companies. Got In this idea this concept and I think it's only going to be accelerated going forward. So how do you look at that? Idea of what essential worker is and how we need to treat them. Better going forward. Because you're you know I think it's fair to say you you've been you all have been seen as a bogeyman in this fight right or have been painted by some Whoever you want to put it but how do repair that idea that? It's not just these tech giants winning off of the backs of other people. It's not necessarily cut joins. It's is the way than our approach it is. It's impossible to tell in my opinion who's essential and who's not essential these humans and and I think that it should start with the government and everything will follow. Religious people who work should have protections and that includes minimum earnings and that includes health. Care the delivery of Uber rates etcetera much drivers who sign onto the system get paid is very much riven on the market cost of labor in any single market And if drivers are making more more drivers Joined THE SYSTEM. Utilization goes down in there and effective earnings. Goes Down so how much a driver makes signing onto uber really depends on how much labor costs are in in each market by market? Which is why what we've talked to. Matt is minimum minimum earnings above minimum Ernie so to speak or earnings above the minimum. So I think this is bigger societal issue. I do think it's about healthcare. I do think it's about minimum earnings regardless of whether you're central you're deemed essential or non essential. I think the bigger than that all right speaking bigger than that. It has to be a bigger thing. How assess the government's response? Here's your business is really getting hit like you know. There's some businesses that aren't as much. But how do you communicate with Federal State government? What what grades would you give each of them That earning in a lot of places but California. What how do you how do you go with? How do you feel about their response? I I'm I'm not one to two grade Governments is Sarah. I'm trying to earn a decent grade as a as a as a CEO. I think California. I think the response by the governor The quick response the Has has been extraordinary. I gets the I think The state has done a really really good job and kept a safe. And wasn't I know there's a trade off between opening up and how safe you are? I ascribe to the Declaration of independence. Right it's the inalienable rights are Life Liberty Pursuit of happiness and is in that order so life comes first yet. Liberty comes second. Pursuit of happiness comes there and I think the way that the government in California has reacted has been appropriate and in that order. I believe me I want to open up. I want our business comeback as quickly as possible. I want drivers to be able to earn as quickly as possible. But let's make sure we do with the Safeway and I think the government's done a good job here so far. What about from the federal point of view? What do you want from them? I think that first of all from a federal point of view What I really wanted and happy to say that but we got was protection for drivers for careers etc as far as earnings goes and I think that was great and it was a really strong response from the federal government. I think that any system that is centralized can react to dislocations quickly and more effectively And a decentralized system can innovate can optimize etc much more effectively over long term. We Are you know the our response has been more decentralized state by state especially as it comes to safety. So if there's one thing that I would like as more coordination on the safety front from the Federal Government More consistent communication and you know setting standards a bit more but we live in a decentralized system and. I have no doubt that three months from now six months from now. We're GONNA be in much better. Shape is just a bridge between now and three months where I think in the US. Because we're decentralized we are trailing Many of the other countries it's part of our system every system has the strengths and weaknesses. Well it's part of the leadership right now but you can't have hydrogen cyanide. Roxie chloroquine if you like so please don't please don't please so. I want to finish up talking about two things cities what happens to cities? Scott Galloway a big debate over what happens lubers business about city. Don't do top of rural business. He's talking about the idea that people won't live in cities that they will be moving away in ways and interestingly Brian Chassis last night talked about the idea that people will be living in lots of places maybe moving more frequently and that their business has to shift from cities because he's a city's business also her they have been if that is the trend. I have do not agree with this. But what do you do as a business with Uber? Because you're cities business? Airbnb is the city's business. Are you worried about the decline of cities or the population or or do they move to smaller cities that you'd answer? I am more in your Cam care. I think that's People like people people you know we were going to have a bunch of young employees. We're GONNA make sure that they're safe but they're gonNA WANNA get to work. That doesn't mean everybody but I think that there's this the new world after a vaccine after safety has been established is going to look a lot like the old world because we are social animals. I do think that there are certain cities where the cost of living like a San Francisco is too high and makes it truly difficult For people to have a quality like other than if they were technology companies like ours. I do think that where the cost of living has gotten to a certain point. You are going to have adjustments. So it'll be cities in surroundings. I think every single company is going to be more flexible in terms of allowing people to work from home. Whether it's it's a partial or or some some version of it but I don't think you're partial be partial. I think on many hours partial because the kinds of employees that we have got technology employees. Lots and lots of engineers who can coat from anywhere but we also have a lot of people in green light hubs. There's a physical connectivity. An on the ground side of business. Yeah so so. Those employees will get back to work. We're GONNA make sure that they're safe so I think cities are here today and I do think that our business is gonNA comeback when cities do now do i. The fastest growing part of our business has been the suburbs right. So if you look in New York City for example the New York suburbs and the and Ah a Brooklyn CETERA. Those parts of our business have been growing much faster than central Manhattan. And I do think that that pattern is going to continue. So we're GONNA go from a city's business to more of cities aunt surroundings business and I think that can be a totally fun thing for business. Okay and then. Let's WanNa talk about travel. You had a long history that experience and travel the travel industry talk about. You wouldn't WanNa be running an airline right now. I'm assuming oduber wasn't airlines for New York man at there. I think you took them out of them. Talk a little bit about the travel industry because what what happens to it going forward you know. Interestingly another thing Brian so that was interesting is that people are going to travel closer to home and do this why. They're doing a lot of experiences and they're going to rent longer term. That's the they're seeing a longer term rental of people wanting to get out of the city and the in Vermont or wherever and then and then also trying to turn other cities that are closer interesting. He was like we're going to try to make Pittsburgh like Paris. And I'm like good fucking luck but how do you look at the travel business? I mean if you were running expedia right now or what do you do? What do you you know? And I've tried to think of a job harder than yours and Brian's but I think the travel I think the airline or the were selling travel be very hard. Expedient has a new CEO. Peter Current. I and I do think that he's got A. He's got a tougher job than than I do but I think he's. He's a perfect person to run a company by the way. I think that travels GONNA come back but I totally grew with Brian. Who's in the middle of it? Which is you're going to have. A higher percentage of dry business and and there's really big market out there. Listen like people love right lanes and jets. They're sexy they look at CETERA. There are millions and hundreds of millions of people who drive And I think that you're going to have a period for a year or two years. Where in markets that are drive markets the US in Europe? Etcetera you're GONNA have a lot more driving and people still are going to want to gather half they're gonNA WANNA see. New Things is that are up and over on. But I think it's GonNa take a while you know it'll be measured in years not months. I think air travel. Welcome back but I think this is a pretty big that travel the nature. We'll bring air back. How do you see the drive part? But how do you bring you know you can talk? All they want about Disney. They'll open. They'll figure something out there. Masks and cleaning and lines line management and things like that but how do you look at air travel because that really is you know? I'm thinking of getting on a plane and I'm like thinking heart. It's a really. I WANNA inference Cisco how do you? How would you manage that as you know if you expedia trying to get people to buy tickets? What's the way out? Just wait. I think the front line is is with the airlines and I think the good news as it relates to the airlines is that I don't think that there's any industry on earth who thinks about an has built systems as it relates to safety that are equal to airline. Business is like they think about safety. All the time and there was no safer way to travel. I think it will take years to get back and it's really going to be difficult for them but these folks know how to how to do safe trowel And then it'll be up to the ecosystem it'll be up to speed as and the companies themselves to communicate what that means and listen. We're thinking about the same thing like it's it's when you get in an Uber. Is that second first trip. How do you feel about that second? I do you feel safe in once you once you do like. I think once you take that flight you're GONNA be like. Hey this is okay. I'm going to end and I think it's interesting that the travel was like it's it's too strong so people aren't GonNa stay home. I can't wait to get the hell out of here. I love my family but I ought to get out of here. Yeah and and I think I'm not the only ones who feel that way. And and you know humans are going to be here market when you market your out of it. Aside from the really they put together a whole bunch of marketing around Cova that then show them all together? You guys did a very unusual one. It's don't use business please. Don't get car stay home. Try Not to sort of. It was sort of like a Soda Company. Saying we're bad for you. We're just bad. You shouldn't be drinking drinks. What's your marketing coming out of this like? That was that was an unusual choice by the way I want. It was a break Lewis. I think those choice I can tell you when when when when I when I first got that pitch by the marketing team my reaction was was not you know game on. Let's do it. It's but but I think it was a brave choice. It was saying that are responsibly. I is with our community and whether city and a wave that all of this gets better depends on like people making sensible choices and and I do think that I'm proud of that work. And if I an and if we are to redefine the culture of this place it means more than talking about it and doing things that might hurt the business that are good for cities that we live in or good for for drivers couriers etcetera. And then he's action. It doesn't mean like saying. Nice things in platitudes. So we're going to now run a different campaign. That's all about safety. Which is which is. Okay get out there. But it's wear masks die. Wash your hands down. Can I get usually get together with their marketing folks? I really like you them. It's unlikely you'll die you could but you'll get there that's would be my market. You asked me to fail on as far as marketing goes. I see of nowhere to go. Can't go to churches. You can't go to concerts so just stay home. That's because you don't Marcus because you're not a good Texan care so there are places to go with certain states. Yes and I'm not going to the states yet for quite a bit of time. Let me ask you the last question as CEO. You came into this business. This particular company lot of cleanup big mass facing a lot. I imagined you open every door and there was a dead body and that's what I always say about. You know like Oh that killed him. Every is there a lot of great people. Yes and now this. So when does it get good even honest answers? I don't know like big lassie hair having fun and I say no but I wouldn't trade this for the world this is. This is an company back this is. It's we're building really really cool tack. It affects real lives the decisions that we make matter And this is a company is going to define how cities are going to move over the next five to ten years so I would not trade my place for anything It is a really tough job is a challenging job and You know I love it all right if you had to give wanted vice while final question. I'm asking to a CEO in this postcode period and we're not post-code by the way mid Cova. But what would you say? What is the thing that you they? They have to keep in mind as leader. Just think at this point. You can't lead in these kinds of moments by you know Bottoms up like this is the time for leaders to to lead and make tough decisions and make decisions like in our marketing campaign for wallets at that. That said don't ride on. This is the time when leaders get to define what it means and I think he got to be bold. You've got to be brave because average isn't going to get you through all right. Thank you Dr Costa Shot. He really appreciate you coming on and we hope you can get out of your house at sometime soon. You sound like you really looking forward to my next Uber Ride. I will wear mask. Thank you for coming on the show. You can follow me on twitter at Carris. Wisher my executive producer Eric. Anderson is at Eric America. My producer Johnson is it. Hey Hey Dr. Where can people find you? Online and Uber Uber. Dot Com Uber. Dot Com worried about you. You're at D. D. H. What is it on twitter if they want a complaint you owe at because at H. s? Alright if you like this episode really appreciate if you shared it with the friend and make sure to check out our other. Podcasts pivot reset recode media and land of the giants just search for them in your podcasting APP of Choice Temple link in the show notes. Thanks also to our editor Joe Robbie special thanks to squad cars dot. Fm Thanks for listening to this episode of Rico Decode. I'll be back here on Wednesday tune in then.

Uber Essentially Service CEO US China partner airbnb Hong Kong Brian Key Europe Google Geo Iraq Al Valera Linda farms dot Thomas Keller Linda Farms Lynda farms
Ep.35- Mike Naffah, Naffah Hospitality Group

Homes and Hops

51:23 min | 4 months ago

Ep.35- Mike Naffah, Naffah Hospitality Group

"Homes in hops is proudly supported by Platin- insurance your local independent insurance agency offering auto home, life business, and farm insurance. They also have a team of specialists that help you with insuring your brewery or winery platinum Sheri- Helping you protect your tomorrow for more information or quote please call them at three, zero, eight, five, six, six, two, four, four or visit them on the web at Platinum assurance dot com. Hi Everyone Lisa resonated with homes in hot I am sitting outside in this beautiful weather not ninety degrees. I think we're hovering in the high eighties, but it's close enough. Yes if. Not, too, bad. We are drinking some penguin city beer and I am with today's special guests, Mike Nafta of Naphtha Hospitality Group how are you? Good. How are you today? I I'm doing good. It's breathable outside. So I'm very happy. So it's nice to be outside. So it is nice. You got a nice little breezy the birds chirping in the air. It's gorgeous. It's a nice environment. You have my herbs some growing I saw. Look. Amazing. Thank you that those would be sweet potatoes in a sack in a sack. So. During Cova the beginning of it, they had I'm not sure you've heard of master class. So masterclass is this online various courses that you can take so you can take it with. Somebody who is an expertise in the economic field all the way to Thomas Keller who obviously is an expert in culinary? To Ron Finlay who is an expert on urban gardening? Okay. So we decided my son and I to test some of his ideas out and see if they work and so far. So good it's growing it is definitely growing. So from my understanding with the sweet potato or any potato, you can take any little spider whatever that may be growing outside of the potato plant even in a sack. And it will grow. A little spot will grow but. Now. You know sit easier it does make it easier. They all look good. Trying trying some of common. but hey. What can you do braces so definitely want to take this opportunity since I'm I'm sitting down with you which I do love everything that you have done for this area and I I I want to talk to you about. The beginning I mean when you're a little kid, was it something that you started building blocks or whatever? It may be imagination what brought you to the point that you're at right now when I was little kid it was a two lane highway two, twenty, four. And it was all farms. Wow. So. We never had a thought of doing anything like that. It was just we were all basically farm country. So. Was Your family farmers as well. My father added that was his farm. Oh Wow. He farmed part of it, but then the equipment got so expensive and it was a smaller farm was only thirty five acres. So he ended up share cropping it. Okay. So what is what does it mean to share crop? It means another farmer who has the equipment will come in. He'll do the you give the land he gives the the equipment than the work and then you split fifty fifty, sixty forty however it is nice. So and that's basically how we did it. So did you grow got ask did corn Everything. Perfect and then I did learn recently that would corned you switch on and on like you can't. Grow Corn Consecutively Right? Exactly. I've learned a little bit allow army all of them. OATS. With wheat. You always throw in. Hey than on I believe the fourth year of the fifth year you do soy beans, which gives it more nutrition back into the into the ground. You switch it off. You don't do the same things you'll go like in a cycle of different things. I heard sunflowers are really good for the soil as while they are we never did that. So I think that's why they did slavery and it was easier. So did you farm land as well now? Now. We would just right on the Hay. Wagon. With the other kids who are the sharecroppers family so you just got to have fun. That's it. We lifted bales of Hay and threw him up on there and. Found out I had hay fever. So it's Kinda hard for me to do that. But I still went out there in stays my brains out but we have fun exactly as long as you're having fun. Learn not to wear shorts when you do exit because the terrorist part of your legs I'll allow when you're pushing because you're pushing with your leg and your need to throw it up onto the onto the wagon. How many How? Many acres total was the farmland originally thirty five. And now we're about. Forty two, forty, three acres and growing. We've added no I think that's about it. You're you're good right now. So. What made you decide to? Go into development from I. Mean 'cause in all honesty you go from. A scarcity of. Everything that you would have onto twenty four like you mentioned I, think it was. Was it. Nineteen eighties. That's when the southern Park Mall came about right. Seventies Oh really. So so the seventies in the whole urban sprawl everybody started coming out to the suburbs. Has for. Exactly. So is that when like the thought like came up into your mind like, Hey, this is this is intriguing. No No Matter what actually happened was. With the. The front edge of the property became commercial county just made a commercial five hundred feet deep allow shy made the taxes cut really crazy. And be able. To. Afford to keep. The property taxes there used to be a driving range right across the street, a golf driving range. Okay. What I found out they were closing. That's when I thought. That might be a good idea to do. So we did we build a driving range called our would finally on. We. have. Batting Cages Miniature Golf. Did, that for about twenty five years that does sound like fun. A lot of work. To work in a short season. Oh that's true. Because a lot of it is outdoor activity. And it's Ohio Northeast Ohio. As. I'd be out there. Picking Up Golf Balls Baseball KINDA dream. Around. Law Beden. Drums events I'd like. The. Develop the property. Slow. We started working on it. We looked at what we leave our community that we don't have. And the main thing was restaurants and hotel. That's hotel about. That's where by the way we all stayed for my wedding so Thank you. Thank you. That was two thousand and hunger to get in trouble. My husband listens to this which he will. Two Thousand and four. Yes. Okay. Yeah. Good. We appreciate it. Thank you. Again thank you was able to house my husband and I, and then a bunch of our wedding gas because my husband's from new. York so yeah. So all of them came in from there and I remember at the time it wasn't skit jetties at the time. Which I. Love. Scotties by the way. Thank you. What was the name of the restaurant had doing? Jeez. That's it. My grandmother loved that place that was like her goto spot if she was like, Hey, let's go to launch. It. was hurrying genes that was more of a southern type. Restaurants southern type food. It was very good. But it's the ended grew too fast. The had too many restaurants in ended up losing all. that. Harry, Jane's was a chain restaurant chain. Okay. So skip jetties though is. Is just an individual that's our local area, and you know how much we all love our local restaurants. Seems like everybody does. That's why we keep doing. It's a smart thing to do because I know I like going to the local restaurants I going to like not to knock applebee's. And applebee's now and then but obviously, we're going to prefer your. Vegas I think we make phenomenal food here sal I want to enjoy it great restaurants. Yes, we really do. And a lot of creative shops around here to we do. So it's pretty neat. After thing it is a good thing. So when you started off and you were like, you know what dreaming about. Developing the land bit more into the commercial bringing in some of those needs that I'm sure you're like I would enjoy having it locally near me as well. Instead of having to search it out I mean. That's usually I think we're a lot of our ideas and everything stem promise what we desire to have. And when you do that typically if you have the drives. Then, you can make it happen. And then you get the know how as you go a lot of time you learn you learn a lot. We didn't I've never developed anything before. So not knowing it. I tried to surround myself with people who did know. So I Got A actually we've had that Suave talk real estate attorneys in the country. Ron Gala, he did Hall. Leasing worked for US and. Very good at what he does and then we've got so he was originate with the Cafaro company that went out on his own that we hired to do our PR cartwright who was with the Department of Corporation. and. Then we also hired Anthony Hey who was wide the top. Architects in the area. And we had zoning lawyer we hired. So we tried to get everybody we could. Surround ourselves with people who knew what needed done. Yeah. Sharee smart as the only way I could do it. So we're fortunate to do that. And that helps a lot and when was. Was Napa Hospitality Group formulated. I believe it was around two, thousand, three started. Started with the whole development actually. we put start putting a road in. Before. We had water. Property. As confidence. We're very fortunate that the bank which was farmers National Harry ask loved had had a great foresight that they went ahead in. We're willing to do this project for us because wasn't for them. None of that would have happened and the development related Sappington can't feel probably wouldn't have happened if it wasn't for farmers national I completely we were the start of it the Atlantic continue to went Westford and. Then across the street with the. Poll as and. None of that would have been around now. If if an IT's much not to say it's easy because nothing wasn't. Yeah. Nothing nothing is easy and the banks all still have their processes to go through. But when you're dealing with the bank that is local. To have somebody who understands since seeds which you're seeing is extraordinarily important. WHO LIVES IT? Yeah. They live the area. So they knew the area between frank paid. It's time was president mark. Graham those guys knew what we needed in our community really than believed in me, which was very fortunate. Not Awesome. So we were blessed with that that made a huge difference and we. Before we started that we had to go on the ballot. To this owning. was passed unanimously through the county and township and everybody else, and then the neighbors decided they wanted to referendum vote against us. ooh US they didn't want to have. Commercial. How. Many neighbors bear at the time there. It wasn't just a tire us. It was people on summit drive. Down further on raccoon. North and South raccoons. They just didn't understand that to twenty four was actually the business corridor going into camp. Feel. This is true between Star Center and Rob Levin. That's the actual business quarter of coming in and and it was business already, it just needed to be. Larger. So You can accommodate it the traffic pattern what help allot to? Oh, completely put the fortune into our into the actual. Zoning to get zoning to go on the ballot and to. was each time we went on the ballot was Ronald Grand as about to say, that's an additional that nobody wants to incur now. Because, it is a lot of money to run those campaign without that campaign without that selling was able to do what we're doing now WESTFORD would be able to do what they doing. They were enabled us put it on. Amazing to me because I think that if the residents prevented that from happening. Like, what would their actual home value be right now? Compared to what it is because of every everything that you've done is just it's it's they're honestly they're lucky. It really change there. especially the ones that were bordering our property. One House. For example, law ranch was valued at the time at ninety, four, thousand dollars and after week and he fought US tooth and nail records had after we got zoning finished and became commercial. He put it on the market for three hundred ninety five. Wow. Never got it. Stayed on. Time but now that's hopeful. But. A lot of things that happen were happening there to be able to do that and. One of the neighbors all we have zoning meetings I mean they had to move to the fair grounds because it wouldn't the township hall wouldn't hold the number of people that showed up for this. Wow. So when you did stir some excitement canceled, didn't you? It was crazy. One of ladies that one neighbor stood up and says, I don't think we need a hotel canfield it's going to bring drugs and prostitution. Right is everybody results results that I looked at her and I said excuse me. Drugs. have been in our town from when I was in school yes. We didn't use them but they were around yes and as far as prostitution trust me they will never be able to afford him. So that kind of ended. Yeah. Well, played. But it does everybody anybody anytime anybody who's against anything that is like the bottom line drugs and prostitution is the common theme that you'll hear people say here's like, why do you frequent these places? I don't think she did did she was probably Late Seventies. At. That point. So probably probably it was something that she was always told would-be Brad that kept her on the street narrow. And then we decided we wanted to do restaurants with liquor. Can't feel dry yes. So Down at the plaza were giant Eagle is they tried they put on the ballot. West reported on the ballot they lost a couldn't do it. So I said I was GONNA. Put on the ballot but he said to me there's no way you're wasting your money. Well. We put it on the ballot. Did, another campaign spent about one hundred and twenty, five thousand dollars on that one. Did Dinners for people in our precinct township. So they would see what type restaurants were bringing in. So everybody was invited to come to it. We would explain everything that we were doing. That is such a great idea in and it worked. On well, we ended up with the campaign when it went to the ballot, did you hire a firm to help run the campaigns? Here. We Cartwright helped us. Okay. With this set up a committee. Okay. So I mean, she did a lot of the the ideas with my day was to do the the dinner time that's operating in a Maronite Center. So we did dinner at the Maronite Center. And we did quite a few different things to get people so they could understand exactly what we were doing. Yeah, and when we went on the ballot that. That election we won seventy eight percents, twenty, two percent bats awesome and it was great because we went door to door and most of the people who like on some of especially the elderly people that live there. Said, we knew your father. And we know you. And if you say it's going to be a good thing for our community. We'll go out and help campaign for you. There you go. So it was the elderly people really pushed it through for us because they they realized what we were doing. Now a lot of the neighbors who were opposed. Their kids all work for us. Isn't that funny how that works out your families of state at the hotel and? We've given a lot of jobs to allowed local kids, which is been grand for them interests. It is good and and again. I think even when it comes to the alcohol being brought into the area, a lot of people resort to the drugs and prostitution or who are you going to then bring in from out of our area, and at one point you you do want to bring people in from out of our area to increase sales volume, horse and for people to know who what our area all has to offer, which will also drive your real estate to increase as well of course, and whether people like it or not being able to go to dinner and enjoy a glass of wine for having good craft beer is is really important for people to. Determine whether they're going to go based upon that after. So question, there's no question without the alcohol restaurants would not make it. I mean, even the city of Canfield as much as everybody says, it's drive there are pockets. Yup, that are not try. It's all site specific. So you actually go on the ballot for that exact address to be able to get your license. So that's where site-specific is is just that address just make it all. Okay. It would have been a lot easier for them to do it. They could have done a lot with degreen I now on the green could be like Hudson asked what I would love to say would be amazing. But a friend of mine who has an office on green really figured out why nobody's ever on the green? He thinks it was Indian burial grounds. No. Joke. He was joking because nobody ever does anything on it other before its July that is primarily and I know that. The. Mayor has and the city manager have all tried to like bump up events on the green. So people are there more often and becomes more regular and they started that last year unfortunately this year there's not going to really. Know so But they are trying to figure out ways to consistently drive people in the area, which then will hopefully bring businesses to want to that open up around the area. I mean that's ideal. It's going to take some time but. You got a lot of ground to make up for. Mary really has canfield at heart. So yes, he saw much more progressive very much very very much. She grew up in feels he loves canfield? Yes he does. Actually, two mayors before him, they'll K.. Was the one who originally wanted to do the green to become like Hudson. Tried and tried and tried and could do it and it's going to be tough for mayor to do it also, but he's he's. He's at least had the groundwork set for him from our former, teacher? Bill K.. And former mayor. So at least a start for him to good start in like I said, he's got can't feel that heart and he really does he's trying very very hard I. think he will sixteen I. Think it's definitely going to be one more than one term. For him to work at this. Be helped and before we'll help again I mean Yeah I mean, it's I I'm a big fan of the green and I agree I think that it would be great to be a little Hudson over there a little sugar and fall back. A little something, it doesn't have to be on a massive scale now. The needs. It needs something to be able to bring money into the community and bring what we need in the community. Township that's exactly at because. I'm sure as you know, tax dollars on the commercial side is definitely beneficial to the localities. Sound much the amount of money that comes in. From our little development at Ironwood to the school system and to the township is just phenomenal. It is unbelievable and it helps keeps our residential taxes really. Was One of our key points for trying to do the zoning is trying to explain to all commercial development will drop your taxes you have to weld your taxes. And it has it really has which is nice solitaire. It is very much a good thing. So and I it really is so when We're talking about the Commercial Development Tha let's talk about the location which you have. You mentioned Ironwood and What you have available out there. Do you have anything available for for commercial space of one space left. On the plaza fronting to twenty four. Okay and that's twenty four hundred square feet. Nice. That's still available right now is it a blank shell? It's a blank show so that we would build it into a vanilla box for interested. Well, there you go. So there's still twenty four hundred square feet available. In a behind it, we've got plans for. Twenty two to twenty four thousand. Square feet. Okay. But until anybody in our community can get. More of a major tenant which is almost impossible right now, everybody talks about the anchor stores you need that anchor you need. You need leases before you even start attempting anything I. Mean that's true because it is a big gamble to just develop a plaza and especially because when you when you are doing these developments. You could. Pigeonhole yourself into a space that wouldn't work for a particular tenant and here you have people coming in and seeing the space and then they're saying, oh, but it's it's missing this and it's missing the but if you're able to do it from the ground up. Four we're waiting now we're putting it on hold. There's no rush for it and with everything with this pandemic, it's definitely on hold. Yes. Yes that is that is true I. I personally think that. Commercial? Real Estate. If it hasn't already is going to be hit. From from the pandemic. An I think it's going to be more. So the lease space than it is going to be the ownership space exactly I agree on percents because there are it's it's completely two different variables in commercial real estate. And A hundred percent I think that unfortunately are leased tenants who are very important to our communities. are going to be the ones that are gonNA get hit. In the larger. The malls are what's really getting hit right now, and it's so sad to see which they were getting hit to begin with. and. Now this is like. Like. Really Really Eric. It really is and the whole 'cause I do know and I and I appreciate southern Park, mall and how they were trying to adapt. To what people would want to see to bring them back to the law exactly I'm not exactly sure how this is impacting their plans because I know that they were going to put a magnitude of money into the southern Park Mall. They were a native they've got the wherewithal and the experience able to do it the soccer they to be able to continue to do it or they holding off now which if they are I would think that would be the smartest thing for them to do the whole off I think. What's GonNa? What's GonNa really still continue now is going to be the individual strip centers. because. People are GONNA be able to get out of their car walk in walk right back out, go to another store walk in Walk Right back out without walking a lot of people I agree completely and I've been seeing that trend, which is funny because at one point plazas. Dying off yes. There were, and then all of a sudden there's I mean I'll. I mean, one thing is true about real estate. You cannot just be like Oh this is this is definitely going to maintain every single economic environment. There's going to be a fluctuations at all times. So it's ever so exciting. Changes. Still with that, I mean, you do have the plaza's that are back. They aren't they aren't thank God. I'm that's true. People people like classes I think that they do like walking down popping into the shops coming back out and I think that they liked that outdoor feel. No matter what and really do they really really do and then if they're in a hurry. If they need to grab something real quick before they go to their next destination what better than like you said driving up running in and coming back out one coming back out that's why I think a lot of the townscape Serey is working. So well, lions legacy in places like that because you pull up, you go into you come right back out this very convenient. Yeah. So with the space that you have available have you thought about like who you would love to see in there? In general, he could be general. It could be office, but I'd rather see retail. And retail right now is struggling so. I'd rather wait for retail now when you on. When a retail because I do know with office, it's different when people go to lease space in your finding out the validity of how long this person's going to be able to last in your building. It's different. It is than it is on a retail side. So if if let's say I had this graduate sky idea to open up. I grilled cheese last night grilled cheese was our dinner last night a grilled cheese placed I know like in DC there was this popular. G C C. Place that people it was like a AAA. So if anybody has this idea wants to do it by all means go for it but. That's very popular right now with grilled cheese. Yes it really really. I. Lean I would love it obviously I eat grilled cheese in even in the summer throw a slice Al on it along. But? How would you as a new business entrepreneur when you're looking at this space proved to you the developer that I may solid business that you should allow or take a chance on to come in, and of course, you have your bank aspect and getting the loan and stuff. If they have a track record if they're they have other stores that we could see what they're doing with the other stores. We need to see a business plan to have an idea they can afford to be in there. So that's something that's huge. We do look at tax returns. People have to give us their tax returns. So we know that they're stable enough to be able to make the payments and bailable A. To last five or ten year lease. Yeah. Whether they can do it or not is you know tax returns give you Logan if an idea? Performance. Give you a little bit of an ideal people need to work it maybe have my come over and taste the feared of course. On. The restaurant. Yeah. Definitely. It'd be like that'd be part of my plan. I mean, it's it's. We have property in Lisbon in a restaurant Lisbon in I did not want to open another restaurants time so we tried to lease it. And we have a ton of people coming in the wanted to lease property at least the restaurant, it was a fully equipped restaurant. Unfortunately, a lot of what say my grandma who really good cook so I want to open up a restaurant and grandma can do the cooking. Well, you can't sustain a restaurant. Yeah with grandma doing the cooking if she is in her eighties, for example, as actually might be a great cook. But cooking at home. Cooking a restaurant being able to pursue legal things are completely different, and that's what we got a lot of we got chefs who are coming in who were really good shafts but had no idea how to handle front of the house. So. You need to have somebody a team to be able to do that. So. We ended up opening it ourselves. When my wife and I I got married I told her I said the one thing I promise you I love the bank with business. I'll always be that. You'll never see us open a restaurant. Three restaurants later she's asking. What changed your mind. And I do I think restaurants are one of the hardest businesses to be involved in I mean, it is blood sweat tears. I've been yearly is your there twenty percent that is your life it is it really is, and for many many years, I would do a lot of it myself. What we had the banquets centers. Then when we opened the restaurants, then it was different you had to have a lot more people and I mean thank God for our management staff shafts, the restaurants because they're the ones of carried it and kept everything going it really. It's great when you find good people. It is a lot of our. Staff has been with us. Twenty Years Twenty Five Years Twenty nine years so that's a good thing. That's a good thing that they've become friends and it's somebody that you really can trust in. It's also a reflection of you. It is. But it is a reflection of you as well to to be able to sustain. People and and still want to work for you for that long of time and and twenty years is especially like you're talking about even my generation where people are I mean? There was a point in time where you'd hear a lot that. Employers would be like employees are expendable like your dime a dozen at, but then there was a shift and it became the employers are a dime a dozen I mean especially depending on where you live and stuff like that of course. But but so there was always that high turnover and it's not even that that necessarily the employees had an issue with the employer is just it's programmed in you like every three to five years, you should find a new job because that's how you increase your position. So the fact that you have people that long as a great testament to change now is that people. Like we had four EPA interviews set up one day. and. They were space. So we have enough time to talk to everybody give up buddy up to an hour. afford it didn't show up what? So. What we've seen now is just been such a complete change. And that's why does point our management team is one who's been pretty much operating especially during the shutdown everything they're the ones who have really stepped up and done done the work themselves to keep the restaurant's open I was can't thank enough. I mean. If it wasn't for them I'm immuno-compromised solved between my heart lungs and everything I'm not allowed to be around people that much. So I, go in little bit in the daytime when there isn't any lot of. or any customers, and unfortunately, I have been able to mingle with the customers, which was basically my main draw I know that's the best part of your job networking. I'M GONNA. Tell you that's the maybe. That's how I like doing. What I do is the networking portion customers become friends and the regulars, and when you think back of cheers and more. We've got a lot of people who are like norm and like all the other people that game in. Cheers it's family they all become friends with each other. It's it is a reality at and we become invested when you become vested in each other. Customers to the establishment and the establishment consumers, of course, and that's why also feel that as a as a customer, I don't want these places to go. So I will make my one plug about mask where your mass. Yes. Because I don't want businesses to close, you need the masks you need to wear the masks no matter what anybody thinks real. This is here. It's hurting everybody everybody. Let's wear the mass like they're telling us to do God willing four to six weeks of everybody wearing masks might eliminate. This has actually you might not WanNa, do it for yourself, but then do it for the people that you care about and that's what it comes down to. So I, mean we've done everything that's been asked of us in the restaurants in the hotel, the bank would center. With the six foot distancing with the masks we. We've brought in professional companies to sanitize the hotel, the restaurants and the bank would center just to do whatever we possibly can do to make it safe for everybody. People. Come into our restaurant and they feel safe because there is a lot of social distancing. There is space between we will not permit people to hang out around the bars like unfortunately. Some people don't look at it like that I want the income from it and we do too but. If you don't have if you don't have healthy customers, you're not gonNA have any period. There as -actly, that's what I don't think they see a Lotta I just think that it's One of the things that and I get it I could be as libertarian as you can be like I don't like to be told what I need to do but never. Again this to me is something beyond just myself and I feel like in order. I. Take what I want. And I'm like I want these businesses maintain and I understand that I need to be responsible for helping out and it's not just for the businesses for public in general. It really is. It's so imperative that happens that we listened to what they're telling us to do. Yes. End You know what we. Law that we have to wear seatbelts. Exactly I like wearing a seatbelt not really now do I put it on every time in the car I do As everybody else does or should do. It's for your own safety is for your health. Same. Thing with masks as -actly and I'm with social distancing and it's one of those things that there's I've learned and sometimes I'm not successful but I have learned that there are things that you put your foot down on and then you fight a little bit more about and there are things. That you don't and to me, this is not the battle to be had out definitely not so. So besides the mask wearing which I hope everybody respects when they go into your establishment. So all your places remain open. How has the pandemic impacted? You guys in general like like I know that I've heard out there when it comes to. The unemployment and then you have you have people who are getting paid unemployment and then received bonuses in addition to their unemployment. So it's difficult to get these people back to work. Exactly. So is that Six hundred dollar bonus that they put on was to me. One of the stupidest things any government could possibly do I'm shocked what should have been done and? Obviously, I'm not the smartest person world I'm not in government to be able to do it, but they should have done. Think it out a little more and you WANNA give out six hundred dollars. The people give it to the people who are working on the front lines, give it to the healthcare workers give it to the grocery clerks who are still taking care of us give it to the people who are working in the drug stores I mean, that's who should have gotten extra bonus. Them getting just regular pay but still going but work as somebody else making. Eight hundred and thousand dollars a week sitting at home doing nothing, which is a complete contradiction to them wanting to open the economy. But yet they they make it less desirable for people to come back in to restart the economy, which I thought was an again like you I'm expert in government or economics even though I did sign up for the masterclass but I still feel like that's kind of a basic that I mean I'm not saying people who are are wrong for not taking advantage I just think that people are were given the unfortunate decision where it shouldn't a been. Given got onto long. Yeah. We to. It's gone on way too. Long. I hope to God it ends the end of July meet exposed to and they don't try to extended any longer because they do it's GonNa Destroy the workforce because they're not gonNA WANNA. Work now everybody's going to say well, why should I work I? Know You`re You're giving me money let's say I would love six hundred additional dollars overnight. I mean, everybody would think. I mean I'd be probably more apt to spend it. And still maintain working. Then I can just have six hundred dollars in the pocket throw back into the economy. But again, it goes back to what you were saying, give it to those that are still out there give it to the ones who are working not the one that reason to WanNa go to work, and if you get him to go to work in, they get extra money four going to work. Then they're gonNA, go out and spend it as -actly more so than giving money to sit it home. Where they're going to make sure they're going to hold onto exactly they and they probably need to hold onto. So when we say about not knowing much government or anything I Issue I majored in economics. Did you really minored in philosophy and political? Science. I have. Kind of decent background by government I love politics. I was a political science major really. So with my minor wasn't social. Science and history. So I worked in the philosophy department under ship Com. Did you really I dead doctorship that comes into our restaurants quite yet and when he first saw me only for slope and Ski Shetty's. I went over and I introduced myself to him and he says he just looked at me. And looked, and then he said, I, remember you. And I'm like, okay, that's either good or bad one or the other I remember he so. Also, did the Intro to philosophy class, which was unpopular class for everybody to take at Youngstown state. And he would have a class of one hundred kids and he took attendance and your grade. If you missed a certain amount of classes would be deducted at which was like you have a hundred kids in your class and you're taking attendance he was stripped. He was he was very, very strict, but you learned a lot trump. Yes you did. Yes. You did in the first time when he came into Scotties and we talked and everything. Four days later, five days later, I received the package in the mail. From doctorship go and it was to his two books they had written. And he had on inside, he wrote about to me an autograph them for me with a nice little note on there. So I mean that meant a lot. That's really cool. The super super individual he really is and he actually does a lot for the community as well. I know he was on the board for mill. Creek Park. For I don't know if he's still has, but he was there for a while besides his participation in everything that he did at Youngstown state which was pretty he was really really good on everything that he did. Yeah. Strict. But really good harvests a lot about him being strict and he's still a funny guy to Oh. Yeah. He was and he's a good customer. So I'm Brad. Way. Around With that goes back to like everybody's vested in one another that that. And it's a good full circle and also which I think makes our community awesome as well is because we do have that opportunity where larger cities do not. which makes makes us all move back here after we moved away some Main Street USA that's saying it's Main Street USA as right best place to raise a family. So what do you see or what would you like to see in the valley? Over the next ten years happened. First of all, I'd like to see our macy lane project. Moving a little bit we're. Going to. We're hoping that's going to. Really. The finished off ready. With all the infrastructure. Within the next month Oh. Wow. That's such a good start in it. Just because of the covert, they couldn't get employees to come in. Again everybody was laid off and we're making thousand dollars a week. Why do we WANNA come and? Work around people and take a chance of getting sick so that. Even hurt on tractors the way around, and then people weren't going and building materials that we needed to be able to put the piping everything. What is really behind? What I would like to see for the community in the future. Probably. The biggest thing right now is health everybody. With the next ten years that this goes away. And the betrayal are that healthy and have learned something from all this that their families her important. Very, this brought the families together, I think and let's hope it continues and brings it back to what it was years ago with the families I think that there's definitely this. Nostalgia of how things used to be that that you would see in your neighborhood simply people riding their bikes walking like I've met more neighbors. During this passing by waving to each other than than I have when we first moved here, three years ago, got to the point that people are so busy all the time all the thought about was being at work and doing this and doing that my father arrested Saul had a saying we're Lebanese. And he said Oh I know swear words in Lebanon. What he would always say is. People in the United. States lift work. And Lebanon they worked to live. That's true. That's very true and you know I always remember him saying nets. But I also got to the point that I was at work all the time and you come home and you're tired. So you don't have time to go walk in the neighborhood and talk to your neighbors and you don't have time to go visit like we used to. While we were younger we always visited everybody visited everybody. Yes. So there was friendship there was family and that's Gone so very possibly, God's doing this to make us get back to where we were mattress I. I completely agree with you I hope it does and realizing back as much as we utilize social media like I know I utilize it for work a lot. But that does not trump or should ever replace an actual face to face I mean I think I was over my second zoom happy hour with friends and was like you know this is I feel like depressing me even more than just actually you're not seeing each other as -actly. So I do think that that is something that I've definitely taken away. And you and I touched on this before we started the podcast is this is difficult. The Times are very difficult. But, we we need to try to remember to be patient and kind because we're still in. Were still in it. Were still knee deep in I mean yeah. It's not over now. Fortunately, and if we're if we're following apart now. Before it supposedly going to hit us again. We've got to be ready for it as actually we need to stay strong. Yep. We definitely do. Anything else in the future what I'd like to see at like the see. The youngstown area we have a lot of good workers. Is Community and I'd like to see some major manufacturing come back into our area agreed after we lost Lordstown and years ago, lost the Steel Nelson everything. It really hurts and depressed our community and we need to get it back and hopefully our government officials are able to bring back some of the larger manufacturing jobs that we need. We do need bound. That's what's going to rebuild our economy. That's what's GonNa, make the mall that comeback again, Ghana plazas come back again and retail comeback people come back to the restaurants. After the covert is over. And I do agree with that like we do need some major manufacturing, we need some we need some major businesses coming in and doing some. Mass amount of employment right? Not just ten employees talking about hundreds of employees. Yes. And then and then not only that when that happens. Obviously. Businesses retail. Office. Everything will do better as well as residential by in addition to that I think those that are in Cleveland or in Pittsburgh, we'll start saying, hey, we can commute. More freely slice exact I know that wind sounded a lot stronger than what it actually is but But I think that will help us out as well because this is the really bright place in it really is it's To me the place to live, I mean I agree there's no question in my mind I could have probably moved anywhere. I wanted by brother moved to California. Wish, she was here to help you haul this but. I didn't want to move because my life is here. My friends are here our families here and our friends have become our family. I think that not only that. But thankfully, you didn't because you've made a great impact to our community. So in a very positive way so you've tried it's visionaries such as yourself that we need to maintain and bring backs. So thank you very much. Thank you and thank you for joining me today pleasure. So hopefully, you'll come back again. Will he'll be like macy lane is done. Let's say for an invite again, you'll get another one more shore especially if you keep bringing me Brad. Always there for you. Thank you. So enjoy it and thank you for enjoying some penguin city with machines. Good. Cheers cheers.

Times Brad prostitution US southern Park Mall Youngstown Hudson Golf Platinum Ron Finlay Lisa Thomas Keller Platin Mike Nafta Canfield Naphtha Hospitality Group Cafaro company Lebanon
Momofuku Kawi Pre-Opening Diaries, Vol. 1 | The Dave Chang Show

The Dave Chang Show

58:07 min | 1 year ago

Momofuku Kawi Pre-Opening Diaries, Vol. 1 | The Dave Chang Show

"Yeah. The day changeover part of the podcast network presented by major dome via today's episode is special pre-opening diaries of Momofuku collie with executive chef under park, we recorded a couple podcasts three months ago, or so and we edited down into one longer podcast. This'll be the first of two podcasts we launch today and tomorrow where Anjar and I talk about her career where she's traveled to the amazing restaurants. She's worked at her time at MoMA Fuca co and my pitch to her to become an executive chef of a new restaurant that none of us had any idea about what it was going to actually be and we open it on March. Fifteenth Friday at the fifth floor of Hudson, yards big, new development, and it. Is something that we are very excited about you may hear some trepidation and some uncertainty in unjust voice. We call her Jo her nickname. It's because the prospect of being the head of a restaurant for the first time, especially when she said, no previous management experiences daunting task for anyone and the idea that it was going to be easy. I think we all knew wasn't going to be easy. But there's something about the lore of pre-opening where everything sort of seems possible. And then as it gets clearer that it's going to be a little bit closer to opening things. Almost always in my experience. Go off the rails and panic starts to set in and all the beautiful ideas that you had about what you were going to do all the things on paper that you thought we're going to be flawlessly executed start to sort of wilt under the pressure of opening date and. I wanted to get Joe's thoughts. The reason why she's never been Susha for executive chef before has not the nothing to do with experience. She's one of the really great kinds of cooks that decides to leave a restaurant when someone offers her a management position. So I've always admired that is that she's constantly trying to further her understanding food and brought in her knowledge about cuisine, and she was never going to feel like she was ready. So we talk a little bit about getting her on board when we had the idea that maybe she'd be a great fit for a new project that we were going to do, and she someone that is incredibly resilient and special and hardworking, and ultimately to I feel like she sort of encompasses something that is very close to me. The Korean immigrant story her parents came to this country as restaurant owners, and they wind up operating cleaner as many create immigrants do. Or stuff like that? But the idea that Korean immigrants opening up a business to further their children's prospects and the pressure that unju- put on herself to become a chef. So there's a lot there. I could talk endlessly about this. But let Joe speak for herself. You're going to hear a lot of names about the industry, and she's worked at some of the best restaurants, and it's almost a cross section of modern astronomy today because it's such a small world. And it's something that I feel that a lot of younger cooks may not understand that your reputation is so important as to how you finish where you work at a restaurant because more often than not your peer group. The cooks that you work with the Komi that might be under you, the the sous-chef that's above you. They're going to good chance be the big names down the road and unjust, you know, working group that she's she spent time with over the years at other restaurants that are all like some of the biggest names in the business today. And it's great to see Joe. Finally, get her opportunity, the one thing I definitely wanted to talk about was how I feel that this episode and tomorrow's episode of the pre-opening diaries is a good sort of thread from the past three podcast. We've had with Lois ally, Jessica Koslow and the our critic, Jerry Saltz. So if you haven't listened to them, this should make sense. But if you have listened to the past three podcast, this should sort of enrich a lot of things we've been talking about about taking a chance about editing in your head about just doing work under a deadline and ultimately failing to get better. And that's the hardest part to do is to not just to do to observe as well and stories unwritten for Anjar in the team of Cowley. It is just beginning. The future is unwritten I should say. And I'm excited to be a part of that. And to help out wherever I can. But I have no doubt that on. Joe's going to conquer a lot of these problems that are important to develop into learn her voice and to be a great chef. She has all the tools, and I know that she's gonna make the best kinds of mistakes moving forward. I'll shut the fuck up now and let you hear our conversation with under park pre-opening diaries, volume one all into coming tomorrow. The chef of the restaurant that will probably in Hudson yards on. Welcome. Thank you. So a little back story, we call you Joe Korean-American from bucks county, Pennsylvania, but you worked at some amazing restaurants. But before we go into that sort of CV, why cooking and were your parents, very happy about knowing that you were going to become a cook on it wasn't more of cooking more of surrounded by food, which I loved and my parents, they of course, wanted me to do something more stable and make money and being chef it was definitely not one of it. But they knew that how much I wanted to do it and their supporters. What was the reaction when you first told him why just because they know how hard it is? 'cause they owned restaurant in Korea there that anyone of Japanese Korean. So they're like if you're gonna go cooking. What did you go or for government or like a Biko tell where you work eight hours and make better money than they're stran-, and I ex turn in hotel. And I didn't like it. I wanted to learn raw like actual cooking with h going to the Marquette baking ingredients, I wanna cook. So I meant to restroom distri, and what was your first restaurant show? Danielle. And who is your chef at Danielle? He's still the chef there in what years were this tit thousand seven to two thousand eight in. Did you cook in school? I did anti after high school straight to see I. Yeah. Right after high school, I had three days break. And then I started right after Where'd you do your extra ship at the hotel. I did NGO in Las Vegas. Oh, that's right. God, you're in Vegas. Why did you choose Las Vegas, Alyssa, green and young in Vegas next government than so big? And I just wanted to experience the big city. My God every time. I remember that you were in Vegas. I'm always like what? So you're at CIA two years there. Now, do you feel that cooking school is something that you needed to do for me? It was I loved it. I didn't know anything about food other than Korean food. So every day was so much fun. Just learning about making pasta or scrambling ankles so much fun. So building the foundation was very important you so could you have been successful without cutting school, though, Fisher funny helped me to move faster. What is your recommendation to young aspiring cook? Do they need to go to cooking school L recommend? It definitely is easier to go to cooking school than to try to learn by yourself and to build a foundation and the skills and techniques it's a way more diplomatic answer than mine. But. You got place that Daniel right after graduation. So it's a two year program. What was Danielle like those that don't know Danielle balut is one of the most iconic most important figures in American astronomy from Leone France I worked for him. I love the man, and he has been instrumental in my career in support of it. And he has been so supportive of basically everyone. He's just one of those guys that's always on. And you worked at his flagship restaurant on seventy six and Madison. What was it like working there? Right. If they see I thought I was the chef already and starting Danielle it really opened up the reality of the restaurant life that I didn't know a lot of challenges way harder than MGM. And I doubt it myself a lot if I want to continue what made you continue I actually stopped. I worked there for little ear. And I thought this is for me. I was to ride my parents are right on. I was making minimum ages. I was also working banquet in the beginning. So some days I will make more Sundays. I will make less. So I yeah. So first few months, I barrel invaded. Evaded on Sundays. I was the worst the catering division. Yeah. Delicious. Working there descending eighteen hours a day getting yelled at I didn't want it to do is. So I decided to go back to school. So I moved back to Philadelphia and John Francois to me just give another try at his friends restaurant. He was a chef at the backfield at the time. So. So. Go from Danielle's kitchen is very regimented and faucet, French mixed with modern techniques in it's a demanding place to work with a lot of cooks, right? How many are there a lot more than thirty more than third? And bec fin is an iconic. I don't know if it's open anymore close recently. George period was the chef could you explain what bec fin is to people. If they don't know. It's a classic French restaurant institute in Philadelphia. It's been open forever. Unfortunately coast on I believe few years ago. It's an institute. What was it like working there? What kind of food is it a classic classic French Zine mushroom cappuccino. I can't even remember there is a documentary. Have you seen it? You did a trigger stuff in you. Definitely. Probably a lot of memory. So you went from one demanding kitchen to incredibly demanding kitchen after your break. No, that's right after so I moved to fell off yet. Right. After the chef there was chef Pierre. And then she decided to leave three months while I'm there stooping abuse on restaurant. So I started to leave with them you wouldn't need to work with them. And I was debating to going back to school or continue what kind of school regular college. I didn't even know what major would. But I was like, maybe maybe my parents are right. I should go back to school. There was something inside that. I didn't want to give up yet. So I sent my last resumes too. I'm like, I'm not gonna get into this restaurants. I apply every restaurants in New York in Philadelphia. And week later shove fennel, call on per se and Khrushchev metal chef fennel. He was executive chef at per se, the time German Bono was also Marsha. Right crow. He was a CDC under Marco. And Tom was the chef owner, and Jonathan no was instrumental in my career, and he now has left per se, and he was at Lincoln. And now he has his own restaurant Leonelli in Begnaud and the bakery. Lino tubby. No, I can't pronounce it. But they just got three stars. It's still issues. What did, you know about per se, Eddie know, anything except the French launcher cookbook. What's the French laundry cookbook? It's at bible to cooks cookbook. It's the book that every cooks should read in to one of the best cookbooks ever timeless. So I- plied knowing that I won't get in. But to surprise he called. So I'm into took greyhound from Philadelphia stash their today's in somehow shift been a likeness. Oh, he hired me. Would did, you know about moving to New York City nothing like, I didn't know anything on your leg even living in Philadelphia. I only travel twice during that filter but from books county, right? But in that, I only knew like it was a big city. It all different cuisines all go back which driving you here. Why are you pushing yourself in all of these uncomfortable situations at things this being Korean? But. I have to get the best restaurant. Learn the best and even though you don't want to. I prefer the comfort zone to new explain that for those that aren't Korean. They may not understand when you tell me that. I'm like, I just laugh because I know it's true. People are tired of hearing me talk. What is it to you? Why I think especially coming as in Korean immigrant knowing what my parents went through to support me. And my sister is just in there that you just have to work hardest. And if there's a better place to learn to improve then you have to be there. You always have to be better than today. There's no middle. There's no middle. It's either you're the best or you are is the worst. Yeah. You're at a per se two thousand nine working for Jonathan Benno. What stations are you are? I was Komi for ear. What's a call me is a prep to chan-. Where're you peel onion? Jons? You do all the labor intensive project on the sort of scale of importance in a traditional French brigade. Where's the Komi all day in the bottom? So you have to earn your way to get up after year of doing prep work. Then where do you go after year? I did banquet for two weeks in the night on move to cheap station, which is hard. Why the chief station so demanding per se. Because you pick up all the little minimum fos for all the stations have to do. And also picking flog raw section. So you're in charge of cornets fall gras and cheese. And when you say cornets and all the little museum plots for the other stations, you know, Thomas Keller traded away of eating with canapes, very detailed. Perfect like knife work Spacey. Pain the s so you're doing all the pain in the ass stuff for all the other station. Chopping chives parsley shallots all the good stuff. And then what? And then two weeks into my training guide into an excellent. So I was off work for ear and a half would happen. I cut my accused engine my last day of training after work. I had my long as she knife. Hi, Shay is technique to using your knife to going back and forth. Choppy, finally, it was a really long knife. So he didn't fit into my chef by putting my backpack and all my nice came out from the super, and I dropped it. My foot. I mean, the accident wasn't that bad. I just went to Yar got few stitches in the doctor told me my tendons row K. So I had a week off in the went back to work in a week later. My ankle started really gets fallen. And then I was working like sixteen eighteen hours a day and. One day might shoved just pull me aside and said, I think you have a problem you you have to doctor. And then when I did it was all ready ruptured all the way up to my ankle while so the surgery was long it was like two and a half hours. And then I moved to Philadelphia to recover were you doing I was in bed, and I was in bed for few months and then physical therapy. So you couldn't wait to get back in the kitchen though. Yeah, I I was kind of relieved 'cause I was really stressed per se starting a new station, but a thing after few months, I was really ready to go back and a thing after nine months, I was able to work, but I decided take extra few months of knowing that once I start working, I won't be taking any time self to do your time off I helped my parents the cleaners then I stayed home just recovering moons. Just getting ready to go back into it. Again. Go back to pursue. Say what station you add again? I started back. She station. Why did you have to go back to cheese station? I left she station. So I started in chase. And then I got moves to karma shea where I did cold and pasta, and after I moved to Kennedy station when someone takes that much time off is it easy to get back into chef wines instructing professionally. I think mentally it's easier because you're so full of energy in your so driven. But physically you're not 'cause it takes time to get used to being on the field again and just being surrounded by new people, you meet someone important there who did you meet when I first works per se. It was with Matthew Landau is at a mosque in COPA Copenhagen when I moved back. It was with Nick Harare. He said angler now and method Peters he just want the book. Host war last year. And you also met someone from Korea ally met Lucy, she was in X turn when I was Komi, and we became good friends. I didn't know who she was just like fun girl, you know. But her father owns a huge Crin high-end soldier company also ceramic company, and they have a one restaurant. But at the time they didn't have the restaurant that will get into a little bit. So you know, you just talked about a lot of different important American shafts. Spend time at argue the most demanding kitchen, that's not the French laundry in America you worked at Danielle. You spend time at Liebeck fin your CV is pretty intense and getting their you've shown remarkable fortitude and resilience coming after achilles injury. What's next after two thousand fifteen what did you decide to do? I was ready to leave per se. I was very to see different kind of Kuzina. Diff. Preparation and my friend said, oh, the chef across coast Momo gluco. This is where your story goes so wrong how he's looking for coax. You should just give it a try. So I ran to go stash there, and I fell in love with moment. For old co old Joe wants to three co my home six hundred square feet what made that place so different for you as a cook. During service, staying the instant reaction from the guests that was mind blowing and just using different ingredients was an eye opener for me, and I really wanted to work there in the old co was the regional noodle bar in. It's a size of one car garage. And while it was a noodle bar. We changed it a little bit different. There was a different range cooking. But essentially, there's twelve seats counter, and you're looking for twelve people right in front of you, totally transfer. What you see is what you get every day is hard because you're working against limited space, but it's fun. And I can't imagine more different operation than per se Danielle and Liebeck fan, it must have been like the polar opposite right here. So opposite that it was just so much fun. Just going into work, you know, chef gave us freedom to create to amuse to give up to guest everyday during about Chong right now. Yeah. So there are a lot of freedoms that I never had a four co it was more of a direction. That's given to me co when I show us what you can do it, and it will help you. It's about improvising about making the most of nothing. Yeah. And this is when Sean I was really getting into the peak of his powers to real artistry. So I think you were at the best possible time because what made I think co so great under Sean, and we actually never technically worked service together at the old co because there's only three cooks it's too small. The immediacy is so important, but truth be told it's still my favorite place ever. It's just too intense. I think with customer actions, but we moved your of the opening team of the NewCo. I really admire your work ethic. I thought you were incredibly gifted cook. You also made amazing family meals, and you just took it so fucking seriously. All right. Like, we would have arguments because you know, I think it's better this way, you are not going to be like what you tell me to do. I'm going to do you were free thinker. You're trying to find your way, and I always admired that and when you said you were gonna leave. I was like I think this is really good for Joe to go out in the world. And see what's there? She comes back. Right. If she doesn't know. And I said like if you do come back, we gotta work on something. Anniversary down. I think was the final one before I quit. And you kept pushing me saying you name it to grow within the company. And I remember saying I'm twenty nine I'm turning thirty. And I have to travel after the world. And then I was like, However, I can help I spoke to Lucy you did all of that yourself. But I was like, okay. Like, I know I'm gonna see Joe pretty soon. I didn't realize I'm going to see you like six months later and the two. So I- film stuff for the the Winter Olympics and NBC in Seoul. And we were there the year before the Olympic. So we're there in two thousand seventeen just that you move there and you travel and you did a lot of traveling beforehand. I did air of again southeast Asia you've been saving money, and where did you go? I started Thailand and Bangkok Chen lie and moved to Vietnam for months, and Dan Charlene, Japan Korea, and you knew you were gonna work with Lucy after. Yeah. And what did, you know about the restaurant gone not much either? Then fine dining crayon finding it didn't have mission stars yet. I think they received it that few months before I joined the team. So there were two restaurants. I think in two thousand sixteen increase I got three mission stars go on one of them. And I am in Korea. And I were emailing back and forth over your travel. And I was like, hey, I'm gonna be in Seoul next thing. You know, there's a camera crew there, and I told Lucie of time. I was like Lucy. Don't get mad at me. But I'm gonna talk to Joe about opportunities if she wants to come back. I wanna welcome back with open arms, and thankfully, Lucy was like, yeah. Sure, we spoke. I think you thought I was fucking in saying, well, I didn't take seriously. I just moved to Korea and veer to senior in at first of all, but I wasn't thinking about going back to New York at all. I lived in New York for almost ten years. So I wanted to go maybe west coast under and it never actually likes settled in till? You're a second time remind came back during the Olympics. Yeah. The two years ago. All my God. I saw you multiple times in Korea. And then I kept on repeating. We're doing something with do something. Let's do something. And I still think you thought I was serious. And then the last time I saw in Creole when I was like, okay. This is what we gotta do. You can tell me to fuck off Joe. But like, I know you are apprehensive. Like, hey, I haven't even been a sushi EFI of haven't done this. I haven't. Why will you so nervous about making sure you checked all these boxes? I think for me. I just wanted to prepare myself. I know I must slow learner. So I was never rushed to become a manager knowing that I wanna cook rest of my life. I figure I have all this time to learn the line before moving into management. So I always pushed when offers came when you came the major Domo, right? Like you've now been back with us almost a year nine. Getting back into swing things you help US Open them noodle bar and Bong bar, but you've been doing a lot of just research and getting your approach down. Right. Would you agree? That's what you sort of been doing. Can you talk about what it was like to come the major Domo? It ran. I was that major delone the things that you've been telling me your ideas end. I saw the major Domo out this guideline of what I should be doing that at the large format breakdown, which I really believe in. I think it's something super Korean like that that I wanna bring it to Cali and I worked two weeks every day with you making dishes, everyday and. I'm so sorry, man. I work like a fucking crazy person now. But I was only say I wish I had more time to spend more time with you during that. 'cause I it opened my mind in a different way that I never thought before. Just for my own edification. So I can get better at it. Like, how could that have been better for you that those couple of weeks when you're in in LA like I feel it was really overwhelming because while we were cooking and you're making dishes. It was more like the ideology and the feel of the dish more than the dish itself. I think just thinking of creating the tissue if I just thought of it as a one long alley working at measure dome with your for two weeks it opened up into. How should I say it crazy maze of shit Nick on like open, many, many different ways? Well, I mean part of it was in. We're still figuring this out. You wanna make a Korean? But you don't wanna make cream. I'm just regurgitating stuff that you're telling me you want it to be fine dining technique. But you don't wanna be fine. Dining it was like a lot of these things. And I was like, okay. Like what we need to do is not talk about it. Let's you see what we can do the first dish. We made was what chicken I believe it was chicken, Tony, Tom or something like chicken stew. And then I went out to eat it. We got some or we didn't. We saw it on the menu. Are like, oh, that's dish. That could be interesting. So I wanted to impress you. So Brian chicken took off the legs stuff that breasts which can legs, very classic French style. The little sauce decide, and then I serve it to you. And I just remember you just Shuki. Shaking your hand. You're like this, isn't it? Like, you're not thinking the right way or. You weren't thinking it wasn't that wasn't delicious. It was almost as if Thomas Keller made it, right? It wasn't your voice. I mean, I'm still trying to find my voice, but you're never I don't even know what the fuck that is all I know is what it can't be. And then I think I made my version which was pretty authentic spoil the shit out of it. And anyways, delicious than I was man 'cause he's just showed up like thirty minutes and just made it better than you. Shit. But it looked doesn't look nearly as nice, right? And to me, I was trying to explain to you about like, a creating the parameters of how you should make that dish. It's like for me. And when I explained to someone that's learning how to be their own chef is they oftentimes try to rationalize and think an edit in their heads from the middle. What they think is the ideal dish, and they work out from there. I think it's way easier to know what your limits are in the work inwards. So for me was all right. We we just saw your dish. And it's probably on the furthest end of finesse and beauty and three mission star dining, I gotta make the most basic asks normal, quote, unquote, authentic version of doctor Tom this, spicy chicken stew. And then we had them side by side in one spoke to us more than the other. You know, what I mean, it just gave us the parameters of what that might be. And I thought that was a really important day. Because I wasn't telling you what you needed to do. At least I don't think I did. I think finding the balance between how far I can go in. How traditional can be in finding the middle is the hardest part right now me to creating the dish. There was a dish. You made me recently that was delicious. What was it was might take on top? Jay was burdock with rice cake sauteed with us a quiz show. So good. And I had to be the party pooper after. Was it valid criticism was I mean the way I thought about creating foodless just flavors presentation. But now, I'm thinking more of Harlem gonna prep this. Does it make sense for prep coast to Julianne all this docs, shave the rice cake make into noodles? There's lot more thought going behind it. Now, this is the hardship. So she made his beautiful dish, and it was so subtle. And I think the user Kosho was like backdrop it was top chat, but not chop share. And it was a vegetable for dish. It was fucking genius truly problem is I think that dish would be more presentable in a twelve to fifteen seat restaurant where you're doing a multi course tasting menu. And first thing I asked how long did it take you to prep route? To me longer than it should. Think one of the things for a lot of people that are becoming their own shafts to figure out is you could have the greatest idea in the world. But if no one else can execute it. It's just too self indulgent, and you need to start with being self indulgent. But how do you communicate that? How do you get someone to want to do forty five minutes of Julianne for one dish? Because that's there's so much knife work in this dish. And it pay me to tell you that while it was delicious. I don't like telling anyone like you need to edit your dream a little bit. That's not what I wanted to do. I was just like what is sort of practically how do you make the best dish with the limitations of what might be a prep cook? Or a line cook that doesn't know anything about chop share like real world problems. And that was sort of the mantra that you sort of talked about if I'll shut up was becoming a chef has nothing to do with cookie anymore. Does that make more sense to you know, it's getting there? Starting to understand better. I really do believe that being a chef now as you know, are getting to know a little better is all about how you communicate which will get into after this. Today's episode of Dave Chang show is brought to you by ZipRecruiter. Hiring used to be hard multiple job sites. Stacks resumes. It confusing review process, but today hiring can be easy. And you only have to go to one place to get it done. Ziprecruiter dot com slash Chen. Ziprecruiter, send your job to over one hundred of the web's leading job boards, but they don't stop there with their powerful matching technology ZipRecruiter skins, thousands of resumes to find people with the right experience. Invite them to apply to your job as applications come in ZipRecruiter analyzes each one spotlight. The top candidates. So you never miss a great match. Ziprecruiter is so effective that eighty percent of employers who post on ZipRecruiter get a quality candidate through the site within the first day. And right now, my listeners can try ZipRecruiter for free at this exclusive web address ZipRecruiter dot com slash Chang. That's ZipRecruiter dot com slash Chang. C H A N G ZipRecruiter dot com. Slash chain. Ziprecruiter, the smartest way to hire. Did you grow up wanting to cook Korean food? Now, how come you grow loving in eating it you love Korean food? I know you do how can we want to cook it 'cause it was something that I grew up with that. I didn't appreciate and that's why I wanted to learn how to make French food customer does more glamorous the foundation of European Zine. Greenford wasn't cool know why I didn't think it was cool. Right. It's a combo food comfort food and to me cool food was using hydro college and making a smoke -fensive food modern distraught right as I was cooking more trying to create a dish. I always went back to Korean cuisine. And I realized that I know anything about it. And that's why he went to Korea. What did you learn about yourself and? Cooking when you were in Korea. How little I knew I thought Korean food was all about spices, sweet salty. But there were so much things that I didn't know behind. It's very elegant Casin. Did you feel ashamed that you are ashamed of Korean food or you mad at your severe like, wait. Why did I feel this way? I wouldn't say Shane I wasn't. So proud of it that I will show it or bring it what change when you're in create like, what was the realization like, oh, I was wrong. This is amazing. This is way more complex than I thought it was going to because that's really how I felt. Korean food takes so much more prep time to create something. That's so simple to the guest. And then something that can be eaten so fast. Lot of love goes into every dish. I think I mean that seems to me some examples like I'm trying real hard to sound. Like, I don't know what I'm talking about to you. Because we can't work on the sumptuous that people know what cream food is like why is it take a lot of time. What is that time? Why is it such a long process? What is it about cream food that takes such a long time to prep? The kitchen that I worked with their real when you had one utensil, which was chef's knife. So there's one like eleven inch chef's knives that all those chefs used, and that's the only tinsel there's no pillar. There's no robo coup. So you're doing everything by hand is for reason. There was only one ninth. Yeah. Chopping, garlic. If you could garlic and hand chop it day, tastes different. So imagine chopping garlic and ginger to make kimchi for the restaurant. This lot of shopping for me when I spent time in Korea and weirdly, I feel like I've been able to see a lot of different things in kitchens and spend time with Buddhist monasteries and all of these things. It's so hard to make the foundational ingredients to create food. Everything is like some kind of John which is a fermented thing. Or soy, right? Conjuncture right, which is what say SaaS. But is it my Japanese soy sauce community sauce? What's different about Korean? Soy sauce are made with met you. It's a fair mental soybean blog that's been boiled turn into a block and for mental for three months. And then you add salt ordered to that with charcoal. So it's me so right. No. It's different than me. So measles made it coachee where ten John is Korean soybean paste is made with metro green soybean paces Danja ten John. So how could you compare the difference is someone that's never tasted? They don't even know what thing young is. But they know what me so is what's the difference Korean ten? John is definitely has more kick to it. It's definitely funkier chunkier and a longer time more gnarly, definitely Nardi. In for longtime. Like, I've had this weird much like you when I wanted cook, everything was fucking French, laundry market, pure allied, peer gun year. And then it was Ron and has to Blumenthal. I mean, I'm forty one years old. I've been cooking since I was twenty two the last thing I ever really wanted to learn how to cook was Creon food mainly because of the racist. Implications of all growing up, which is honestly very scarring for me. And I grew to think that it wasn't good. It was in Barrasso. It was smelly. It was too pungent. You know, simple again, I think that it's a little bit different. If you are Creon because like we don't have a robust history of like domination as a country. We've just been sort of crushed by our neighbors. So our food is something that is uniquely independent than the rest of the region. And you know, I just for whatever reason because I wasn't. Rian because I wasn't American. I never really loved the fact that Creon food could be good. I just never understood it. So I wanted to run away from it as far as possible. But if it wasn't going to be French food. I fought my window might be Japanese mania because my grandfather was basically Japanese people don't realize this Korea's been enslaved by Japan Mongolia, China pretty much forever, all the neighbors over neighbors in the Japanese occupation of Korea. They took all the brightest men and women, and then basically made the Japanese so early on I already had sort of a chip on my shoulder against Creon food because my grandfather hated crane food, and I just love Japanese was the truth in the light. Growing up. I thought that if it wasn't going to be French if I was going to be quick French. It was going to be Japanese, and you know, what I don't need to go deeper into this. But for a long time, I spent so much time trying to study Japanese food. The funny thing is is I came out to other end being crane foods, cooler, and everyone has their own journey in the funny thing is I don't necessarily love everything about Korean culture. I don't love everything about American culture. But I I'm Korean when I think about the food. I can't relate to k pop I can't relate to create drama, but the food to me something that I know my ancestors ate the same thing. Eating. Yeah. Yeah. That's the one common out. And in my household. I'm gonna soon maybe similar in your household no-one said, I love you. No one said anything to me. What was so funny about cream culture? Lease in my understanding of it, family and communication only happened over food. It's the one thing that I cringe could call their own. And I think there's more context behind that. We don't have to go into that right now. But I never thought Ivan give a shit about anything. And it's amazing for me to see you on your journey right now in your own self discovery on this in very different. You went down you at some of the greatest restaurants in the world, mostly French time and time again, though, you're like something's not right. I feel like I got another journey to take he traveled through south East Asia. But you could worked anywhere in the world. Yo you literally could worked anywhere in the world wide you choose Korea. It's like right now, I'm trying to find my identity. I always questioned myself as a half growing Korea and a half in America. Like, what am I really like? I'm not Korean nor. I'm not American would you speak Croom way better than I do speak lesson Gersh than you. Hundred percent. I was never hundred to anyone I was always in Degray area. And I wanted to see like what would it be like for me to go back to the country that I grew up with and see like learned cuisine that I never knew before. And it just felt natural. Like, I really felt the connection between the food. And it was like, wow, only Korean food is really cool in. I wanna learn more. Was there a moment when you were looking Crean food, and you're like for me, I felt this was like I'm so dumb. Like comedown is not inferior to show you like everything I thought that was Crean was better in the Japanese version. It's not it's different. When I was in the Buddhist nun monasteries, I could not wrap my head around. The fact that certain dishes couldn't be made unless you had a twenty year old conju or a dang Giang that was like over five years old. And I was like if people can understand the beauty like Moscow Petar has a dish of parmesan five different ways, all different ages. And that can get it three Michelin stars. I was like wait a second. I'm only looking at cream food from a western perspective. No wonder I don't fucking get in its way more beautiful in in and of itself its own thing. And that was my realization that. Yeah. Cali and Bob kimchi, it's all delicious. But I don't know fucking shit about food ninety nine either. But it seems to me that you knew way more about it than I did. Just because I I'm more familiar with it. I ate a lot in Korea my parents restaurant. So they took me out to restaurants and even in states just because we couldn't get it. My parents would make everything in houses. That's why I learned how to make how to main stinky, soybean paste, all from home because we had no resource did the food that new parents made in bucks county, Pennsylvania was it. Offensive hundred percent how you weren't using creating gradients my grandparents were ship found Korea from their farm, so grandparents lived on a farm, and your parents had a restaurant Japanese Korean restaurant. Yeah. For like three years and what where's your grandparents farm? They live two hours from Seoul like very country sign. What are the raise that all the vegetables cabbage beans, corn tomatoes? Did you spend time there? I den is your grandmother amazing cook, she's cook. What is what's go to her will sit kimchi stew? Why two inches to was the difference? She basically saute them very hard with pork fat till they're like half caramelized. And then she makes stew out of it. So continue get that's like dark roast. That sounds delicious. It is his again, I was trying to explain to someone like why why Joe I was like besides her being talented cook. Like does. She know exactly what our food is. My response was no, I don't think she has any idea. But she's going to struggle and fight tooth and nail to find out. What that is the fact that you don't know means you're so much more open to things that to me is the strength. That is the vision is that you don't have the vision. But you're going to work tirelessly to figure out what it is. And I see you in this process right now being like what the fuck is. It me what is Shefrin. I gotta do paperwork. I gotta do fucking financial projections. I gotta do all these things all of these things are relatively meaningless. Because at the core of being a chef it still is if you can't make it delicious doesn't fucking matter. I know you can make things delicious. But this process that you're in. I think even though none of it makes sense in my heart of hearts, I believe that it's all so important. So you can actually decide what is important to you. And India big drive. That's pushing me my now is that. As hard as as it is right now knowing that I've faith it's going to come together. And knowing that I will find my voice that's how I'm trying to enjoy the struggle. So Carina view, please, be brutally honest. It's like how is it so hard like why am I making it so difficult for you? You're trying to open my show that I want to keep it close. What do you mean? If I only thought of it as a is the only way, and I only thought of it as delay. But you came in the, you know, there's actually be to Z where you haven't really thought about it before. And I'm trying to open my brain to think differently. You're very thoughtful person. Why is it so hard to see any other ways? Maybe I'm thinking too much, are you afraid of failing Fisher, I had this conversation with you a lot that I shouldn't be scared. Just go for it. But definitely I do want to do everything. And I want us it it which in reality. That's not true. How did you learn how to become a great cook repetition? And you did everything right now. Then from the mistake that's all on Santa's I make mistakes hurts failure hurts. It's only natural to try to not. Make it happen. And it's something that I've been trying to tell you in. Josh is just to make it happen to fuck it up right now. But wise it still so hard. We don't have a restaurant open. What is the fear that you have from trying to find new avenues for you? I think he just myself as personality that even though it's a process to reach to the certain point that we want. I just to do everything perfect. And it just in my nature like that's the problem. Yeah. It is. And I know is my problem in been putting lot of dishes without trying to think too much. But that's something that I really need to work on. What do you mean by thinking too much like I for my own edification? Like, if you're thinking a lot that means that like the dish probably should be better though. Right. What do you mean by not trying to think at all what I'm trying to say is that editing in my head too much? Like, maybe this one dish is good for me. But now I'm thinking is that good for other guests for not Korean or at the? I'm just calculating how everyone and I want my thing is that I want everyone to like the dish that I make. That's why it's hard. This is so hard to talk about you're doing great really this is fucking so fucking weird and squirrelly to talk about and plus this is not something you've ever done before. Which is why I want you to do this. Because this is I think one of the best ways, you can communicate better is by learning. How to just talk about your feelings about your shortcomings, your insecurities, and so on and so forth. Like, this is I think so important to be transparent with yourself because this is what our industry isn't doing. We're not sharing. Our our deepest darkest secrets about our insecurities about cooking. How the fuck would. You know, Joe you've never done this before why are you acting like you've done this? Yeah. I mean, do you want this kitchen to be set up like a traditional French mission start kitchen now? Now, that's not what they are. What do you mean? That's why you've worked but not a collie. Of course, there's a standard that I will bring from what I learned. But Cali is Kali like I'm not gonna compare it to per se or Danielle why not. It on to be our own thing. Are you competitive? So how can you not compare cow? We your restaurant to pursue or the French laundry. Danielle or even co for that matter like. Let me present this question this way. Do you think that because these restaurants are so establishing their fancy French dining in more expensive means that people are gonna leave with a better meal than eating at your restaurant. I don't think having super high end restaurant at like five hundred dollars per meal. Cannot guarantee you that you're going to have a good meal at Cali I want it to be acceptable to everyone like people might come to celebrate the birthdays coming for drink and a snack at a bar. Maybe Connor seating PDR with Carrie, okay? There's so many things that's happening inside of one restaurant in. I mean, you've been planning this for a long time. I want to bring like humble dishes that people take it for granted in the star out of them example. Got rice kicked shoulda from Korea. And we're gonna make rice cakes in in-house, and they're gonna go throughout various forms shapes the menu next starting in EPA tighter. They're gonna have their own section rice cakes section. And maybe if in desert rose kick desert what she was much you so important to you not much excuse me. The. Dislike eating rice cakes brings me. All these memories that, you know, birthdays, New Year's thanksgiving to me race cake is a happy food. So as a whole, then how do you want this menu to be set up? Right. When you sit down. What do you think people what do you want? I mean, I know that it's gonna change. But what do you want people to get it have chefs counter sitting that looks like a sushi bar, and we're gonna do lot of seafood, they're going gonna be a huge selection of crow crow raw fish, so Sasha me. No. So she me what's the difference? If I say difference between Korean raw fish, which is called in says, she me. So she me is a Roth fish sliced in slobby. In soy, very simple of the biggest thing is fish is aged. Whereas Koreans they love fresh fish. So there might kill it right in front of you might be still alive. And they love that. If you ever just killed fish is actually very textual jury chewy almost crunchy increase love that. And they wrap around it. They put like spicy sauce. A lot of punch Hans like Saracho now coach John base is Korean chili paste season with vinegar and sugar. Are you gonna make your own John's, no? We're gonna use the labs which Joe. Are working on it. What about all the John's we have Banji from the lab, I surely working on measure to I want really wanted to make our own voice loss. So we can use it three years later, but Maja making is really hard, especially in states where the bacteria are different increase. So I've been working on it for pest three months taking a little break. But we'll see how that goes. Are people going to come in look at the menu. Like, where's the blue? You wears a copy? Whereas in Bob what's going to happen? If someone says I want citizen Korean food. It's my version of Triomphant. So it's not traditional any can't be traditional 'cause my background is not all Korean. My only advice is I'll be here to help you out as much as I possibly can the only thing I'm ever going to encourage you to be is just do you in Kim don't worry about. It's gotta be this perfect. Fucking thing. Creon pottery perfect the valuable old school cryonic apply. Gary natural explain to me just because they're made everything is different in some sort. So it's flawed. Yeah. Or they're perfect as it is individuals. What do you mean by that? They're unique and different in their own way. So show let's flush this out a little bit. It's natural because society, or you or pressure, whatever. Sometimes I think you're trying to be the ceramicist that's making the identical copies of every fucking thing. You making anything different? You're like that's not right. I can't do it. But why is cream powdery celebrated so much? So the Japanese fucking stole it. Why? See knee. And they're not all perfect. Perfectly imperfect. That's it guys. That's the first pole to mobile Cowie pre-opening diaries series with undue park. She's a terrific person. And I can't wait to see her really grow into this role of being a chef and understanding that idea that being chef isn't about cooking and being the baddest us person in the kitchen anymore. It's about a more holistic view in learning how to communicate and overcoming your fears and finding your voice and having an opportunity in seizing on that. And I really do believe that there's a a linear thread that goes straight through Jerry Saltz as podcasts, and Jessica Koslow lawless and this is happening right now with Joe, and it's a lot of pressure. But I do believe she's going to be able to to use that pressure to create something. Great. And I'm incredibly proud of her. And I can't wait to see where it all goes. Wishing her the best of luck. And shut up ask Dave at major Domo media questions. I don't have any right now. Because it didn't bring my computer so apologies. We will get back to that. When we get back to our normal podcast release of some of the things we've banked already. So I will leave this alone. Get you out of here. Please give us five stars on I tunes Spotify. Or however you rate in listen to this podcast. Thanks so much. Thank you to your Tango with the intro Altro music. Stay tuned tomorrow for part two of Joe park and the pre-opening dyers collie. Thank you.

Korea Joe Danielle balut Komi Philadelphia Tom executive Las Vegas Lucy John Jerry Saltz Korea Seoul Thomas Keller Dave Chang Olympics bucks county Fisher New York Korea
Big Picture Refocus

Coffee Podcast by Cat & Cloud

54:51 min | 11 months ago

Big Picture Refocus

"Can Cloud podcast is sponsored by steep coffee steeped coffee as new brewing method that combines specialty craft coffee into a single serving back. You don't Anita machine you don't have to make a mess no matter where you are. All you have to do is add hot water. Each steep pack is individually sealed nitrogen flesh so it stays fresh and it's got this special immersion filter and the filter is ultrasonic sealed which means it's sealed together with no glue no staples so. There's no weird stuff jeff floating around in your coffee. Steeped is a benefit B. Corp the ethically sourced all their copy. They're packing fully compostable and they believe that business should should be done without compromise. You can get your hands on Steve. GUPPY AT STEEP COPIED DOT COM said S. T. E. P. D. copy dot com asking your local retail stores to start carrying steeped or having your favorite roaster reach out and get in touch. If you happen to be in Santa Cruz come on by any any of the cloud locations. We have it there for you basically. They're just doing their best to change the copy industry and make your life more convenient with their pre portioned and tell all your friends. What kind of a lot of focus a lot of fun lot of excitement if you listen listen to the crown? podcast was just came out. Did you listen to it not yet here. It's really really good. I've actually got some feedback that it's very interesting to. You'll hit me up on instagram. Graham said specifically. I'm listening to a second time through slowly because I'm digesting so much info which to hear slowly like unhappy there We decided to create the culture was always you operate in play wanted to yesterday but then I got scared. Okay I might listen. Listen to it on the drive. If Jenny wants to listen to it she listened to it. She's down. Yeah go into the going to the MO and figuring that thing out on let me go and I I think there are some cool little will gets in there. I like it. I actually invited Carol. I was like you should come to some of the PODCASTS. And just be kind of like this probe like ask some questions shins. Yeah because I told her about our format which is well jared comes over and then we have really good conversation for like an hour right. And then we'd take out the podcast gear and we're kind of in this. What are we talking about on so it'd be helpful to have someone else who is just interested in some of the things that we talk about right just prompting us? I mean she shit Shit. She'd be really great at that. I noticed that a lot of the better podcasts. Have somebody in there who does that. Homeboy Dak Shepherds got back gallon. There who fact checks one when she started to do but like she'll just like probes and ask questions if there's something interesting that he might Miss Scoot over. Yeah I think that could be super helpful. Also someone tight Google Shit on the fly. Yeah Carol Google who is it Jerry on the stuff you should know. There's always someone in the I mean even the altitude. He's got a secret person in never talks almost ever. who like you're like? Oh there is another person in their engineer. Yeah Engel Haydn also for efficiency efficiency I think it would up the game too. Because since she edits and uploads she listens to the whole podcast right so she takes the notes to make sure that we have all the links and the show notes shooting the new Martin of that in real time. She'd be like okay. This is going to go is going to go. Yeah you'd have the notes pre-game so that's interesting theory. Yeah that's good. I like that idea. Oh Carol you're officially invited from me as well looking looking forward to getting carol into the mix to spark that convoyed. Yeah just take it to the frigging sparking. The combos been really fun. I mean go back. Listen to the crown. Listen to our last week episodes. We've kind of just been alluding and talking about the expedited expedited growth in the struggles in the monies and the things and so being able to kind of like work on the focuses in terms of balancing everything out in stabilizing stabilising. Our Company is actually really energizing for me because it it's tangible even though it's big and I I feel like my personality thrives I was on stuff like that. Yeah I was thinking about you the other day and you are Very active and your imagination is very active active. Sometimes she'll be in his own like let's do this. Let's do this. Let's do this and I was like. I wonder if sometimes jared like causes problems so he could solve them later purpose. uh-huh definitely not on parade just seeing how you responded to this. I was like Oh Jerry Jones loving this right now because he you can put rubber the road and he asked someone to take control of this and and I'm GonNa help over here right. I'M GONNA push this in this way and it's it's really interesting to see the different times where different people really really come in. Come into the zone I'd actually argue not even argue now. I think what I'm realizing too is. We did a little bit cart before horse stuff which we realized right. It's like we let the people with who are freaking amazing but just to have like a quarter of the experience of you and I like try to take over problem solving figuring things out which is just inefficient right. It's not that they're not capable but it's like the amount of time it might take to walk through problem solving something. For any of these amazing individuals could be hours where we would have been like like. Whoa I've seen this twenty times? We could do five things like right. Now it's make the best decision as a team in the simplest way of like this is way more complex but being able to recognize that sometimes like my ace should have been sticking around instead of trying these different things. It's almost like we got bored right so without it's not literally that it kind of is though in a way it's like we tried to put people in the places where we do our best work and therefore you kind of become boards. You're not doing your best work. You're trying to like show other like other people. Do your best work for you. Well that makes sense. It does so let me go down this road. Let's do We're with you. So let's if I'm inside your head and year kind of this got a ton of experience in retail coffee. You've been head of retail operations for for different companies managing these kinds of things and then we opened our own company. And you're kind of taking on that same role. There comes a time when maybe you're not board of the people that you're interacting with but there's something inside you that it's like okay. I've been doing this for a long long time right. And then what are some other things that are on my mind. I think would benefit the organization and I think the three of us just kind of all had those things in our respective respective areas and were we kind of made some big jumps early on because I was feeling the same kind of way with coffee roasting and the wholesale thing and now there's just like dude okay. I really want this to be my day to day for the next one in two three years. How do we get out of it? So some ways you know. There's there's only a certain amount one of the biggest things you can do to help. People learn is give of them some sort of freedom autonomy to problems offer themselves figure out solutions but there's levels too that each step like every person is only only ready for so much at any given time And for us I think we saw the built in talent to a lot of the people that we work with. And we're like they're super fucking smart. It's all good so there was some peeling a little bit too early and not all of the knowledge that could be imparted was imparted. A completely agree. I also think I've become more and more kind of a believer in the idea of some form of not literal sabbatical. But it's like if I were to look at myself. I actually love doing a lot of what I'm kind of stepping back into which is not literally a head of retail but just taking on some of the mentor ship for my in our retail team in that stuff actually love but when you've been so close to it and you kind of read up on how the best businesses work. Your job is to replace yourself to move on in order for the greater good of the company and so you're right like a little bit cart before the Horse. I jumped too far away and the other part is it. M- IT probably if we've had thought about it to take some form of Sabbatical from that job where it's like. I don't even worry about about that which we sort of did by throwing chuck head of Operations of the whole company for a little while. We didn't why we did it right if we were to like. If I were to backtrack Iraq is like actually. I'm probably just GONNA take on very few projects like move myself away from these things for a little bit and then re-engage to help because is I'm noticing that I'm really do love that stuff and I love to see this experience in retail grow and I was more like kind of in the fricken isthmus in the middle doing nothing Nice Panama over here. Two bodies of water recognized. Thank you fucking. Hey I was there. Though and I wasn't able able to get engaged fully anywhere I could just engage a little bit everywhere and so I almost felt like I was. I was kind of a non factor. You're like this. I felt like I needed everywhere. But I'm unable to fully help anybody anywhere and I'm just like a non factor the end and it wasn't exactly that's how it felt to me for a long time. Yeah no I totally relate to that feeling. It's interesting super interesting. It's ahead a really great conversation with todd yesterday. Yeah he used to work for tailor-made yeah but now he is the head of coffee which is a position that he just kind of created for the French laundry right so woods Barista in Canada. Yeah three names altogether. He's a good human being in the same zone. Yeah Super Nice Guy and he. I hadn't really talked to him about his experience in the restaurant. And how Oh that worked and kind of his relationship with Thomas Keller and what he does on the day to day and so they were talking about different ways to to kind of manifest his his mission Thomas Keller's mission which is to remember the exact wording but it's something like create memories. Well Oh that's my dog which is pretty good equal. And if you don't know Thomas Keller is he's like a world renowned chef. French laundries probably most favorite restaurant are most famous restaurants. The three Michelin Star Restaurant. And he's one of the early like the earlier pioneers of that. Stuff Ermera Yeah. He's been in the game like that level of Food Movement for a long time and now apparently has fifteen restaurants under that. Thomas Keller Group In mostly Northern California French laundries in Ville. I've still that's one of my a dream places to go eat. Yeah I've never gone. It's it's been a dream since I was in high school so we should talk about this more because he was really forthcoming and he was saying well. Do you know what is yeah. Yeah so you can. Stodgy if you're in the industry and you can kind of go work in a restaurant. It's kind of like a working working test shift or something. Yeah so he said they have periods of time that they do observational staging. Where you are? I someone who doesn't really have kitchen in heavy kitchen skills can come and be in the kitchen and just observe the way everything works. Oh It'd be like that. Sounds fucking fantastic fantastic. I just eat that up. Yes that's amazing. I immediately thought of you and we were talking about the you know. Thomas Keller's role so in the company now which he is not the head chef at any one of his restaurants but his focus is one part visionary looking towards towards the future like how do we create the best experience as possible and make these memories and then on the other end. He's like this kind of energy ball so he'll he'll show up in the kitchen in. He's not necessarily. You know doing the head chef duties right but it's kind of neat like part of the the end of some of the dinners is like ooh Thomas is in the kitchen. Would you like to go meet him. Yeah and in the vein of knowing exactly what he wants to do creating a a memory not being able to meet a world renowned three Michelin Star Chef. At the end of your meal is kind of fucking special bananas. So I'm always curious about those people I was talking to him forever as Star for the questions is just so curious to me when you have someone who is known for doing this one thing And for him. That one thing is cooking really amazing food right and for somebody like us for a long time. We were known for making really awesome. Coffee really awesome guest experience. What are those roles transition into when the person is no longer doing that thing that made them come up in the game and you know what thinking about what is what are there relationships relationships like me hungry? How do they interact so he was and he was such a nerd about it like in the best way to our? He's really really into working at the laundry. Three and I would want to. Yeah I mean he loves his WHO's really forthcoming about because coffee's end of the meal thing yeah and most most places is like that don't have someone who heads up the coffee program t program or whatever and he's like I love it. I get creativity in doing the things that I do. Most of my day is pretty much. Were buffing and polishing everwhere picked and. That's totally fine. Because the the proximity like he gets to work work in close quarters with chef on certain occasions and has a lot of freedom in his little thing and he's just like yeah. I got some pretty big ideas and I. It's going really well so that's really exciting. It was it was cool to hear about listening. Yeah I hope you're listening what that would be. I mean I know you know. There's the they have a sister restaurant next door and garden and apparently you know. Obviously you might know more but a lot of the time you see more. Thomas Keller like through the garden and just kind of looking at things like that and like I don't know if that's true or not but I think the next place does pizza if I'm not mistaken I don't like Brad related things The laundry and then Bu Shan there the Yankari sorry but that might actually be the literal attachment might be more. Yeah I think French long laundry and Bruce on our side by side and then I don't know I don't know any of the the other restaurants but it was it was it was such a cool conversation for so many different reasons One was the intention analogy on on on every level so he purchases accessories for the coffee and tea program to to to make this little concoction Alexander Presentation Look Nice. One of the things is like he's like you know I have to buy this Bushel of of mint and this meant is however much money and and it's really expensive but it's Super Rad. Because one of the one of the vendors that we use or someone who grows this thing that's in the dish also grows the mint. So there's these things that trigger your imagination and memory lick the whole time that the the meal is happening. The explanation of everything things like ties through the whole building towards making that really awesome memory and then talking with him in the context of doing the coffee program and and being where he's at he's like. Yeah there's there's a ton of opportunity for me to move quote unquote up in these different areas in the restaurant but the the things that I'm learning where I'm at and being in close proximity to the things that I'm into like I can make more money as a runner simply roaring food out at the Al.. Yeah you get a you get a big bump. He's like I could have that job. But I'm specifically holding off because I get to work on these really interesting projects and interact with chefs more often and to me that learning experience and the potential of that is way higher than just simply making more money which I think is really cool especially in in our industry when people are just going up and up and up and up and up and don't really have the thought process of what's going to make you awesome awesome in like five or six years because I was like dude. It's so refreshing to talk to you because I talk to these really well intentioned people who can coffee and like like what do you want to do what. What's your perfect job? What's your perfect vision of the world is like I just really love coffee? And I'm like cool what you WANNA do that. I WanNa Make Coffee Mike Right eight METOO. Let's keep going pal expand on that because at some point you're going to run into this this wall so imagine how we feel when we're talking about we've been in this industry for a very long time. We open this business and the desire for us when we have a ton of freedom as is business owners to even get away from some of these traditional roles that we've fallen into because we see like a bigger vision. That's even a little painful for us. Imagine how it's GonNa feel when you've been a Barista the for six years. There's no there's nowhere to go up and then you start feeling the stress of like is there anything else more. No one's really paying me enough to do what what I'm doing right now. I didn't think about it until now. It's interesting oh it was just it was A. I'm totally off topic but it was precision. I mean it kind of transitions into this thought. Words like if money is your main indicator of what you're looking forward to essentially answer that question you've already gone too so far down unhappiness trail and money will never make you happy anyway. So you can kind of self analyze if you're at the place where here like well. I need to get paid more. You've either disconnected from the sole of your job or you have stopped growing and oftentimes stopping growing is two parts. It's not being challenged By your leaders around you or people around you and also just being fully like maybe not as self observant and or disciplined with yourself and your day to day. Ah I think about that too. With the exception of those people who like literally can't pay their bills right so let's move them off the table if you can pay your bills and you might have more ambition but like in your moment if you're paying bills and you're able to survive in each have a few lives luxuries that let's be honest. Most of this can do even at our quote unquote porous so far. It seems like you have just not maybe been surrounded rounded by those people that make you feel challenged alive and I would say that's a big opportunity for you and I just a circle it all the way back right if we removed ourselves in order to try to grow this thing too fast which we did. We pretty much openly talked about that. We've missed the opportunity to essentially challenge. Orange give perspective and even if it's not it doesn't go exactly our way with all of our experience. We will save a lot of mistakes and help people to grow a shit ton faster. Then they'll feel feel good about their lives even if they're not going to new position so it kind of takes this whole idea. We started off this conversation with and it means to me like Kendall to add Preston Kendall. What's his real name and non? Todd they instagram. Got Hot West Kendall exactly it sounds like he has understood. That growth comes from being able to be in proximity to those people that make you feel feel like a live in some ways that you can literally see the growth or you can. You're the kind of person who would observe them as you and I. We'd be observing that whole kitchen and bringing a shit ton of ideas whether we follow through with them in our cafe or not take a few of them a few nuggets. Yeah and so those seeing something doesn't mean you have to replicate kid. You could see something that inspires something. Yes completely totally tangential like. Oh I just had this idea. I'm going to do this thing. which is I think maybe why I feel so alive in the face of what seems like a big task to pull off this year is that I think there's some opening of the mines that can happen? And some perspective shifting that can allow people to stress less on the wrong things and focus more on the things that move the needle and I love the idea of home. You'll have less stressful lives and be more successful in our positions where we currently are you. You know forty five to sixty people somewhere in there for retail. There's a lot of people to work with and helping our current leaders subbiah like open the perspective and Is is just an exciting exciting prospects there for me as a prospect prospect bomb jump in there and a little get some gold nuggets out of there. What I want to ask you a question? I know you do your question. What is what are some of your interview? Go To's for people who are inside inside the company moving into a different position. ooh What I was just thinking about these and I didn't write. It was yesterday because there are some questions that were like. We've missed a few things that okay because we were also having this this conversation he and you know this was with myself and Carol and Sam Girls admirals she tight. I mean I often I want I often wanted to probe their mindset and so I think part of why this is weird is I've been thinking about about not fully new but like slightly newer approaches to asking questions in terms of interview than we did in launching our company because there's been so much growth growth in my opinion in the last three years so a lot of the questions would have to do with. Maybe the person's perspective and how they could how they believe they could have of impact or even just seeing if they can see the big enough the big picture and have critical thoughts over it. You Know How is Your Current Department Store Department apartment store. How's your how's it? How's it look? What are the opportunities? What are the places where you know? It's potentially missing. Whoa what are the magic things that potentially aren't magic right? Now that we started this company with like one of the things that you came here with argue and your team like in that zone owner is their opportunity to grow and change and influence questions along those lines. Right now. Seem to be the most prominent and I've gotten to the understanding that people are literally me you. Everybody were made to kind of get get comfortable really really fast. So like the status quo could be very very special when you get somewhere and six months later. It's not special anymore because you're used to do it. And the body like the human adapts quickly to their environment so you know people often forget that like paid vacation and trips and all these things are like a huge part wire company special. They're also huge part of why sometimes we have been able to just like give raises all the time because it costs a lot to do those things and so like just looking at all these perspectives. I like to believe that. If you're going to move up in our company you have to have a good understanding of like a bigger perspective perspective of how all of our values and our business ethics how they work together to grow so that you can actually like support growth for people who have questions nations. Yeah I like yeah. That's that's the. That's the overarching theme right. So I have a lot of questions I get into that. But that's where I'm going right. I I like that approach to I. Didn't we were kind of kicking around things like man. I'm I'm just so curious to have these conversations in just ask people why did you. What made you WANNA come to work here? And what are the things that you're looking for an employer and just kind of tap into the cultural barrels zeitgeist of what like. Hey what is on people's minds around when they're looking through this sea of potential employers all yours. What makes them choose one or other? What is like what get ads? The most value to their life and their existence at work and just kind of listening to that and then contrasting that with some of those bigger questions like you know what something that's going on a cat and cloud. Nobody dares talk about like what's what's in the mix it is on everybody's mind but no one wants to say And what do we do about that right. And where does that fall in line. 'cause I agree with you. It's it's funny because anybody we're having this conversation. It's like chirp anybody. Anybody could do any of the jobs that we have. But that doesn't make any of those people the right person for that job. Yeah or the right person that you WANNA work with. I mean I literally wrote down for like reference. The best person from the jaw for the job is not necessarily early the most qualified internally or the you know the best person for the job isn't always going to be like your highest performer. And and that there's depth to that in my mind where you have to look at the way they process information the way they're gonNA lead. It's like you could be amazing on paper and not be the right person for the job in. That's interesting thing to consider and your value might not be directly tied to make metrics and Alpha world businesses tie your worth two metrics only and. I don't think we'd like to run a business that way. I know he'd like not to run a business that way. And so it's Yeah those perspectives are really interesting to me. They're also going to take some time to kick around with like upper leadership team to work into middle leadership team. And you know that stuff is is entertaining to me though and I think so so valuable and creating a culture. That's not just cookie cutter because I mean it's funny to me but it's like we could just not do all those things that people talk about for and maybe pay you a little a little more money then you just have a job where you make coffee maybe you know. Yeah it's I mean. It's I removed when when Carol and I were working on. The were having a fulltime person to work in marketing time. Park Person In marketing aside from Carol so I took her job description and we were looking at it together and we're looking at all the duties which are duties and then we were looking at all the metrics of success and they were all all numbers. They're all this much year-over-year x percent increase this many and does this feel a little weird to you. Oh she's a can't just feels like it doesn't really feel like us. Like yeah. This shit fucking suck so we just got rid of all of those things and you use metrics of success that we feel better represent a marketing persons contribution so one of those things internally would be The like the Cat and cloud can cut. Employees have a better understanding of cat and cloud culture right and and and the stories of where where like all the things that are special to us all the reasons why we built this thing. They know those gathering much more so key and our future like Instead of you know ten percent web growth year-over-year whatever it's something along the lines of you know telling like how do you be of service to someone who's on the other side of the screen right people could people could buy coffee you wherever they want. It's not really a big deal. What tapping into like what it makes it feel special for them? You know going back to that at that. Thomas Keller thing he's legendary and food is amazing. There's probably other foods that good but if you have one meal where you eat the food and leave versus one meal where you eat the food then go into the kitchen and meet the chef. They redesigned the kitchen to have have a X.. Many feet of extra space just for guests to be able to stand there nice and they could observe and talk to the people really quickly move on. So we've been spending just the bulk of our time feeling like what's version of meeting the chef. Yeah and those are the things that are going to continually move that financial needle for you because if you start with the financial it's like we need to grow ten thousand units year-over-year we start thinking about. Okay okay. How do we move more units and figuring out how you move more? Units is not the same. How do you serve the people who've trusted you like put you in their care? It's completely different. Conversation really is and it was really interesting. It's funny how all these conversations together but that restaurant's been open for for a long time and I was just like how is the growth who say oh it's growing and growing and growing because with every step of the remodel we integrate new things. It's always he's thinking about. How do we make that memory? How do we create that stronger memory and it's not about? How can we turn twice as many tables? No because like even though creating the memory will get you turning twice as many tables. The process is different. and Lindsey towards different things the differences that people crave in remember and tell others and then they'll want wanted experience at two versus like food super good and fast right and also it's just. It's not that fun to work on. Things that you know are just to serve this new new miracle purpose ratio. Like how cool is it to work on an art project where what's the purposes project was all. I have to sell seventy five percent more than I did last year. That is the purpose of this project. Every day you come into work and you're just like yeah so more it's just not inspired it's not inspiring at all versus. I'm creating things that tell story of our culture. That is the reason that art project exists. Yeah and yeah we're GONNA sell some and we'll see what happens but it's not coming to work every day being like number number number number number. Yeah and I think I felt that stretch. I've been feeling that stress for the past year. Yeah probably and all the financial conversations lately don't help and it's so hard to have the restraint to not go into super overdrive mode and make all these make money corny little things that are just right stupid and probably aren't going to resonate with people anyway and they'll just be more wheelspin and to just hold onto that longer play okay. Let's be really really thoughtful. About what got us into this situation in the best way to get out of the situation because the situation is a result of making decisions on the fly looking enough at the bigger picture. What we're actually doing so the best way to reverse is to settle in become look at the bigger picture? What needs to be plugged in an and then plug those things in like really methodically? It's like it's like fucking going to the gym right. It's a you're not gonna go to cross it once and be jacked. You go hurt enough. Yeah you're going to be hurt. You're going to be perfect. Yeah you're going to be in pain you're GONNA be like fucking hate my life but if you just keep going over and over and over and over you're going to get in shape at some point and and then you're going to be a healthier happier human being as it turns out you're GonNa wear your band and you're gonNA be like I work rate is through roof. Recovers Good my recovery. I was your sleep. Last week was great. Got Two years it was not good. Don't mind is fucking phenomenal. I had really great dreams. I got eighty two percents sleep recovery really sick so you know I actually. I was in bed at nine but yeah it's getting you know I got a lot of disturbances that just means you roll over. My Room. Sleep was a little low but add people have. Did you get up. Where where's the say that Because it got up it goes boom so six fifty two I think especially to rally. Yeah Yeah I did that on purpose. Seven hours forty three minutes which is twenty minutes more than wait. You said you've got embiid at nine. I didn't go to sleep though. Like literally can see like when Your Heart Rate's sinks into sleep. It's kind of weird but it's totally. It's it's weirdly accurate kinda surprising all lay down. Look at the clock. And I'll I'll look at that one on the side and then all whenever I fall asleep him like a cool calculated. They'd like the ten minutes or so. They concert Lindsey. That's what they call it. which is the amount of time before you into sleep between like bed and sleep right there? Yeah it's like when you go into your bed versus when you fall all sleep so I've been pretty actually pretty efficient when I sleep as you can see ninety percent but yeah anyway I talk on. Ah Yes it's weird so I've noticed that I've been kind of going to bed at ten thirty years some real time and then Santon thirty. I think ten is so weird. How much difference these little chunks can make because ten or ten fifteen? I sleep way better than ten thirty and I don't know what it is it. It doesn't even seem like it would make that much of a difference. I found out that normal people there melatonin starts releasing around nine thirty so sometimes the longer you wait sometime between nine thirty so like sometimes we nine thirty and ten thirty where it goes starts kicking in and then people with Haiti. It tends to start getting ten thirty or later so you can kind of like start to train yourself. Would you let them deal right same thing but that might just be like your Melatonin might kick in like right around. Ten o'clock P tone. Yeah like Oh and and then he likes set your Circadian Right. Yeah it's weird so if I go to bed at like say go to bed at ten issues in between ten and fifteen ten fifteen. I wake up alarm clock like every time before before my alarm goes off to bed at ten thirty which probably means I fall asleep at ten forty. I hope you'll find I. The alarm alarm clock wakes me up. yeah yeah. I don't know what it is. Yeah it's interesting. I mean here's assistant. And you have your stuff that you'll be more consistent in your sleep categories to kind of tripping me out I'm like okay cool that's what it is for for the Geeky and you let me transition to something that I 'cause I was sick like feeling good at all. Oh yesterday so I did a lot of watching stuff in bed. Brittany went to Yoga at seven thirty so basically for like seven thirty two. When I went to sleep I watched the cartoon clone wars? Oh yeah it was pretty good. Well well yeah but I finished the last thing. I basically skipped a lot of it. Went to last season is like yeah. It's really interesting so sorry I'm GonNa a yell at myself for a second. I notice that I ask. These questions is a good. It's like what the fuck is supposed to say. Yes or no. It's like the dumbest question. Could not be good. It is. It's like it's not for kids. Yeah I've heard that and more so than it's not for kids it tells a lot of stories and it makes like it fills in a lot of stuff stuff that a lot of people arguably are annoyed at in the series. It's weird that you have to watch cartoon. But they're six seasons of it and the last season is like so much information about Mace. Windu how it came to be that Yoda like can be a ghost like all that stuff. The stories are all there and I'm like Whoa. WHOA this is crazy? And it's serious and people it's like it's like not for kids it's like a legitimate thing obi-wan stuff in there somewhere oh tons. Ob One and it's like they're a lot of them. I think are the same voices if they're not voices their voice actors that sound exactly like Samuel L. McGregor wishes yeah. Whoever these people are like voices really good so I'm GonNa just like if you're interested in the history basically it's like between episode one and like the start of the actual movie the clone wars number two? There is six seasons of story Geez that is like apparently like legitimate cool like locked onto whatever whatever the Canon and the lower just as we had stars before. And you're kinda getting into this world. I was like Oh now you can see window. Mace windu being a bad ass in yoga being yoga. Yoga OUGHTA BE YOGA. Flame Yoga Fire. So anyway I was I. There was some pretty bad ass episodes. There's a two parter that kind of just basically allows me to be sweet and he goes on a mission by himself jargons. Yeah I thought they under under sold him in the actual movies for sure they just Kinda did and it really wasn't great acting by either naught but they're all. They're all kind of pretty semi week except for sort of Yoda year. Did that come out. What year did episode one come out? I think ninety nine Carol I think ninety nine we got to this the other day. It's like ninety nine to two thousand three cents a phony because it's dude directing is just a it's pulp fiction versus what he doesn't. They're totally totally. He's so amazing. Yeah and pulp fiction. It's just next level shit. The acting is better than the cartoon than it is in the movies. I saw the coolest fucking thing that I want to hear that In terms of just really appreciating the process. In loving. What you're doing it's this thing? That Quentin Tarantino. Does I guess on a regular basis but I saw a a clip of it live and they'll do a take and the take isn't quite right or not perfect and he goes. Let's do a one more time. Why and everyone on casts shouts back to them because we love making making movies like a call and response thing that is built into their culture when they're making films and I'm just like it's fucking sick? That's so it's so yeah. Let's do you remember why we're here at the lovemaking mood right. It's like you can but you love making we get the fucking make movies. It's insane right and it's just I duNno. It's kind of bananas in like most jobs have their little little things like that. I mean they have when they're they're making movies. They have a way harder job and they make a lot of money but they like they have a really hard job long hours. You have to be perfect. No matter how you feel in those moments you have to work really really hard to be a professional actor actress. Yeah and you're working mostly actress with someone you have your skill but but then there is the director who's charged with pulling the very best performance out of you so you kind of have someone breathing down your neck all day right giving in your little minutia to be like just maybe a little bit more like this do that but this do better basically so interesting thing restaurant in La called incognito. It's going to a Japanese inspired thing but they have a two kitchens is one of them is like floating in the middle of the restaurants. got this weird crazy grill on it. Maybe it's their only kitchen anyway. They have a similar thing that the head chef does throughout dinner. He does this call and response. I don't even know what they say. Japanese right has one thing and then everybody else replies. It's like it it just cool right. You know what I mean. That's just it just feels dope like builds camaraderie. Yeah it's like we're all we're all together. We're all here together. We're all doing this job. And even even I I feel like even if the night fucking sucks. Because let's say you're having a worse day your cooking in this open open kitchen. Everybody who probably makes more money than you is just looking at you cook. They're nice food. You're going to eat and you're just having a funky time mm-hmm some sort of call and response like that everyone's together you're just like yeah. I'm not alone in this experience. There's there's other people here. Were all doing this job. WORST-CASE SCENARIO I'm part of a of a team and we feel bonded together and I I fucking love that that is I think it's so don't that is something being that with. All these new people is like a big. I think a big goal is to help all these new people feel connected to what we're about in being outnumbered as leaders. Recently you know like we felt that and reinforcing all that is so key to all of this right. I mean if marketing if you're going to help people feel connected to our culture. There's so many things that I mean as an individual if you're trying to teach everybody train everybody and lead everybody. It's just you're overwhelmed so there as we all come together. It's such a good opportunity to twenty twenty four to five this motherfucker. I'm super inspired by and I'm I'm really inspired by looking at some of these things that that other people are doing and kind of how how those things like turning to reality and it all comes through conversation and observation and and a lot of reading. It's cool when you just open having a kristen you and I were talking about orientation at the Rosary the other day and we were talking about information. Where should we do this? And what should we do that. And then for some reason I thought of the minorities secret menu or whatever which is a picture of Caesar Manati on the back. There's a fancy menu that you only know about if you pick up the menu as what if we had like everything that's special in our culture little hidden gems Built around it. So maybe there's a little frame picture that lives on the bottom side of the road. St Roaster that's a picture of the roster and you pick that up and you flip it over and it's like this is the first roster that we bought like when we started in this year and it used to live in Portola and just like really interesting facts that happens whatever whatever yes yeah and then even history before that yeah well Same exact name different. Yeah and then before we had frankie we used to drive four hours to go roast coffee at our friends. Coffee Roaster package everything and then take in empty green coffee bags to the to the post office ourselves today right. Yeah it was a little pictures and stuff like that and what if those things were everywhere. So what if there is a picture. It's just hanging up as art in Abbott Square. And you flip it over and it's like do you see the rap on the Espresso machine. All of the signatures are people who donate it to our kickstarter campaign which helped us finish the funding the money that we got from our SBA loan ran out right along with our opening staff along with their opening. Everybody who is original all staff is on that machine so when you see that machine that's what those signatures are and that stuff has been like. I'm just I'm logging all of these things because I wanNA WANNA make a big part of the year because it's just really really exciting to me and just being being present talking to people telling stories with each other has spent they kind of sparked all these ideas or so then like if I look at myself last year it was like I was really digesting a lot of this podcast stuff like this winter stuff and it's fun and some of it helps me knowledge wise but nothing has been as powerful for me is just one reading to talking to people having experiences and paying attention in real life to what makes your heart sing thing when you see it right you know. What makes you get like those Fuzzy Butterfly feelings? Are What makes you Uncontrollably smile when when you don't even want to and I like like paying attention to those things are helping me to identify how I won't work to go and what things we can do right to help the culture and move the organization down a huge little of revelation for me. I guess I find that is dead. That's deep I feel that it's it's down to simple sometimes. It's so many of those things that a lot of people might consider the basics are actually what end up making. I would assume you to like in our retail experience smile. It's like you come in and you get in just perfect shot of coffee fi espresso and you like. That's what I'm talking about. That's why I got into this business originally and it's it's not that simple and it is that simple at times to deliver me a perfect coffee and honestly recently shut out to the team. The last like four shot at least four shots. At the truth. I've had have been better than probably the last six months like you guys have been working on it and it makes me feel so good just because I already knew. Our coffee is good but that care and that focus in your ability to grow and tastes coffee. It's those those little things that people are like. Oh Yeah it's that much better. And they don't necessarily walk away being like that. That's so much better than starbucks. There's so much better than any other especially coffee I go to. They just walk away feeling. A certain way and memories are big part of what we do a great job in our culture you will create memories for people every single day at Cat and cloud is built to do that and I think helping to recognize that is part of the GIG and I do get hyped on that too. It's every day it's fucking dope. I don't know if I have anything else to say. At this point I feel like with hunger except for we should talk about. Our friend does a lot of hunger. Oh you mean Tom. I mean my friend Thomas. Santa Cruz Chai. I wonder what people think when we transitioned into this little Tom Session. You know what they should think. How can I get my hands on some of that Juicy Karimi spicy nuggets? You can get a job at QVC. Man I know I could but I don't want one because that doesn't make my heart sing as much as this numb. numbs the creamy. Try Joey on staff today. Got Herself in China or break. She's new and I said how. Do you like that creamy Beige. And she's like what I'm like your tasty Chai and she said it's actually one of the best jobs I've ever had and I was like I'm really glad you said that because we like it a lot too and now I can honestly talk about it on our podcast. Thanks for the plug. Thanks for the plug. Here come back and just film you doing that. Say That again and make it feel real just sip on your is Chai. I know you're saying it for the second time but just pretend like it was the first time and and yeah and just you know anyway. Everybody should know. Oh that it's the truth. It's delightful and some. It's great service. Wise you can't beat him anyway. The Dude is down he cares. Don't sleep on Chai. I don't sleep on shot. He will want it. Guess what if you're the kind of company that only serves DECAF. Just kidding you don't serve DECAF and you don't serve anything espresso copy. Only I'll all be there. You're missing out. You gotta diversify that menu because not all people wanNA come only coffee. That's my opinion. I believe I'm right on that. So integrate yourself a fine chai him up Lincoln. Show notes doing today me after this. We're going to record the news for our company. I am also eleven o'clock where I'll eat because I get all my calories between gene eleven and seven. I got a great surprise for you. Cool and they'll go the west side. We don't have to record the news today because we already did on Tuesday. Yeah I forgot forgot. We've changed their program crazy. So yeah I'm in diesel bonus for you. Yeah we did that on Tuesday so then after that. There's kind of a ton of planning okay. So I mean I shot. I shot you and chuck a bunch of Shenanigans today or like over the last year so place to stay. Hey in place to stay right. I reached out to a couple is to plant a seed like Llamas L. M. USA and art presto just to be like. Hey I'm interested in volunteering because as you know 'cause going up there and help out and the sea and then And then it's over to swift street to talk through. ooh opening that place with Levi Nicole which I had a great meeting yesterday all in and listened to tenderly the meeting and Kinda got to like. Tell them why. I'm going to sit in the meetings I was going to. I don't know this is probably bad for me to say who knows. I'm going to say it anyway because I love making bad decisions I love the gold chair legs is like I know they were apparently supposed to be black or something but I think they look great eight. I'm fully down to keep them. I've these these are some of the things. Actually that have been mulling over just because you said something like this right. The the positive intentions that a lot of our people utilize are often on so misdirected to me. Because it's it's like on the the legs and like I understand though the want and the need of like the threat and the consistency and a space. But I'm like if it ain't broke don't fix it sometimes so like I appreciate the want for perfection but sometimes the the mental focus of like. What are we going to do to fix all these legs? Yeah when the store's not even open and we could be focusing on hiring. It's not even something that makes me mad. I'm just like man. This is the stuff where I have not been helping to keep the focus and maybe you have missed those opportunities and rainy. Chuck 'cause like you might be right but guess what they could get away with it even a whole year. 'cause those those legs serve their purpose which is keep chair up chairs on them. Yeah or even down to like yes just stuff like that so if you hear this and that was on your mind and you're the person or persons who brought me know that I'm not judging you in like a negative way but just is so easy to get hung up in details like that. That actually don't allow us to move forward and be successful and or your business if you're sitting there and can you put like twenty five percent of your energy into like a negative employees because you kind of like them but the all these other employees sitting right next to you like dying to help Your Business Business and all you're trying to do is make one happy not giving these other when the energy these are also opportunities and I'm not saying that in the context of our business but these are things that people don't they get so close to their jobs that they forget to look at the big picture and that's the perspective that I think is there I've I like actually don't like dislike them or or even like them. I think they're cool and Godley looking. I'll tell you why I love them. William Z and this space is actually really whimsical. I sorry for individuals on the podcast but you walk in the door. The floor is really amazing. Because it's got this multicolored like thirteen going on your part of its blue. Part of it's gray feels really alive. The wallpaper to the left is almost like this. Cloudy blue like how posted mirror the floor. Lorde has to be like the floor runs up the wall and in a way it's got like a it's not a solid color. It's got this motion to it. And then I straight in the back are. Are those that cat wallpaper and the cat wallpaper kind of look. It's got this like vintage it's totally like says as as far as you can go without being like a kid all cheesy. Yeah You know reminds me of Dolores umbrage his office in Harry Potter which has got all the cat things on her wall. And that's got like these brown tones to it. And then there's some Brentwood going in there trellis over that and and it's it's really it. It's the gold legs like I feel like fit in that vibe hop right because it's there's is no like the consistency is that there is like this kind of motion to the room right whereas black legs. I don't think they would look bad. They would just look a little little bit more modern in some way colder and and I I like the goal that it's got like some shine to it. You don't really notice it. It's it's just like a a energy. I guess that's just my sense. I'm not in charge of anything. So if you're listening to this like you don't have to listen to me. Whoever you are in charge of Obama Care Eleven David fucking loves him too for is worth? I also think. Yeah like the things that tie that together just like little color POPs in so for that that gold to kind of be dislike the one accent that kind of stands its own like hold. His own ground is great because the cushions are going to basically match the blue and the cat. Deleo the a picture like they're framed all these cats like framed in their little mini windows in the blue behind their relatively matches. The floor relatively matches the wall. It's like the ties are essentially some hexagons and that little blue that goes throughout the whole line and your little wall. Is there a color blocking the wall. Yeah so it's like I'm I'm actually totally. It's not broken and it doesn't look bad at all. It looks pretty cool. I think it's cool. Yeah and those chairs are supposed to kind of look old school like slightly a little gaudy without being kitschy right because the fabric on them's got that like I don't WANNA say Berber. But it's got like a puff to it or so it's it's got like a couple of vintage throwbacks to mix with modern and that was kind of like a cozy. Yes you could sit in it because if for sure and that's what I wanted I was like I wanNA cozy chair cozy chair to go with your like cushioning back on the other side anyway. That was great. I'm down with all these tangents. We're killing it. I don't even know what to do. She's getting shipped tend to go out their mothers

Carol Thomas Keller jared Jerry Jones Todd Chuck Google head of retail Santa Cruz Anita jeff B. Corp Dak Shepherds Steve Jenny Graham Engel Haydn engineer
Ep 123: Soul Care with Jen Hatmaker

Forever35

1:09:46 hr | 6 months ago

Ep 123: Soul Care with Jen Hatmaker

"Hello and welcome to forever. Thirty five a podcast about the things we do to take care of ourselves. I'm Doria for your and I'm Kate Spencer. And we're not experts but are two friends who like to talk a lot about serums and you can talk about serums et with us by calling us at seventy one five nine one zero three nine zero or email us at. Feber thirty five. Podcast GINO DOT COM. You don't have to talk to us about here to talk about other things too and you can text us at that number and the texts are coming in exciting. I just need to figure out how to organize them. But I'm getting texts. That's fun it's a treat. Yeah I should say. I'm getting texts. We are getting texts but I. The phone number is attached to my email account for various reasons. We don't need to bore you with. That's why I'm seeing text messages. Oh making a podcast listeners. Also we have a really fund facebook group. It's www dot facebook dot com slash groups slash forever thirty-five podcast there's a wonderful world of spinoff groups just waiting for you regional groups everything you could imagine. Is there so please join us on the facebook? The password is serums. Oh also we've linked to this in the show notes but we talked about the facebook group on a alive. Zoom show called the digital download and we will post the link to the Youtube. Video of it was really fun and also somebody MODs from the facebook group or in there. Yeah actually one of the MODs from the Ferber thirty-five Chicago Group was there too. It was really cool. It was really cool so we will. We will link to that yeah And just a reminder that all the products and everything else we mention on the show or always on our website forever thirty five podcast Dot Com and you can follow us on Instagram at forever. Thirty podcast and on twitter at forever. Thirty-five pod those things are all true. Okay I want to hear Dory about you. Reorganizing your skincare and makeup. Because just yesterday I looked at this. Nour's orgasm blush have. It's gotta be at least five years old I still use it and I. The LID is broken off. I mean it is and I looked at it and I was like oh I need to go through my makeup and you did well so full disclosure. I had gone through my makeup in a major way a few months ago because we moved and I got rid of a lot of stuff before we moved so things were already pretty pared down and I didn't actually get rid of that much but I reorganized things. I realized that I had some Great Wall space that I was not taking advantage of and so I got these acrylic shelves. That I mentioned on a previous episode came my husband. Put them up there across from my jewelry organizer. Look you I know and I was able to fit all of my serums all of my oils and then my niece layer water. Mike Toner missed all that stuff on the shelf. Is it's two shelves so those are all in one shelf and then the serums and the wheels are on another shelf. And then down. On the countertop I have moisturizers sunscreens eye creams lip. Balms deodorants and makeup still sounds like a lot of stuff it a lot or is it. Very thinned down. It's thin but it is. It is still a lot of stuff probably more than I need to be. Honest and I specially feel like I need to go through my makeup again. I feel like my skin care. Stuff is pretty under control. Although there are a couple of things that I was like I could probably get rid of this but the makeup I just like especially it also feels so weird especially now because I'm not wearing makeup hardly ever To have all this makeup but for example I have probably six or seven foundations and even in non-core times. I kind of stopped wearing foundation. Unless I'm going somewhere where I'm going to be like photographed. Which rarely happens even when. We're not in lockdown and when we're locked out net literally never happens Sounds like I could probably get rid of some of these foundations. I don't need all of these I also have a lot of lipsticks shades that I never wear so some of those could probably go. Yeah there's some. There's some editing. I could do now. That I'm thinking about it but it it. It did feel really good. It felt so good to get all of that stuff up onto the wall and like I can see I can see it better then I could when it was like all on the counter and now I'm thinking another shelf. I'm just going wild with these shelves. Look you look up shellfishing away but another really big thing happened this week. I need to share with you in particular which I started playing animal crossing on my head. Mike How's your island well on the IPAD version? It's a campsite. Oh the free the free version which you can play on the IPAD and the iphone is a campsite. It's not an island. Have other people living at your campsite. Tom nook there. I have a golden retriever. It's all animals. Oh yes I know Joan I know I think his name is Goldie. He's hanging out there. Okay yeah early. Stages brought him some fruit. He seemed to like that. Oh my gosh I am. I am decide to do this. You know I was suddenly just like I think I wanNA play a couple more games so I also downloaded the New York Times crosswords APP which I feel like I had never like. I've been hearing about this APP for years. You don't do the near Times Crossword. I just assumed that was something way exactly so you know. I used to do it in print when I would get the paper but I just kind of stopped doing it. I never downloaded the APP and I was just like and then Lo and behold a few nights ago I was like let me just see what all the fuss is about and then I was like. Oh boy. I'm obsessed. They had these mini crosswords. That you can finish like thirty seconds or less that. I'm just like I do those tearing through really enjoying those. Do you do this? Spelling Bee game. I haven't done the spelling bee game yet. Should I do it? Yes so this this Abbas. My husband's self care. Every morning he gets up and he sits with his IPAD and his coffee and he does the Crossword he does the spelling bee game. He does he does all of it like it is his thing. I think that's why I just assumed you also were this person. I don't know but yeah he's so into it and he loves it he will talk to you about it anytime. Oh my gosh. So they're very different and we'll crossing in the New York Times gossip so me and my husband but you know I contain multitudes and I'm I'm loving both but those were just like fun ways to get your brain onto something else like this. I like this for you. Thank you K- I think. I'm just into games now. Like last Friday night I played Bingo with some some people on Zoom. And to the fun it was really fun and I won twice. Wow I know a game of complete chance but I still want twice And tonight I'm I'm playing Mahjong with a couple of friends. I'm so excited to have really really WANNA learn really. It's really going to be just kind of a lesson. Like one of my friends. Friends knows how to play and is teaching us so excited about that. I just was like anyone else feel like coir is making them more interested in quote hobbies and I know this is a controversial topic because people don't have a lot of especially for various reasons people have kids be demanding jobs people. There's just a lot of reasons why people don't have hobbies but I also feel like for a lot of people who maybe went out every night or were going to an office. How to commute like you do have some more time in the day. I know I do and I feel like it's making me more interested in hobbies. Do you feel this way. Kate. Yes and no I feel. I feel a little some gratitude in that I have. I have slowed down a little bit and that is really has been healthy for me. I can feel just. There's a little bit because my day was like rushing to get my kids to school rushing to pick them up rushing do homework. There was a lot of that my own work stuff too so that has been you know something that I am grateful for I have. I think I've mentioned this on this podcast. The thing I have really gotten easel with during this time is cooking and I'm feeling more comfortable and like more. I'm getting more pleasure out of it and I tried to make pasta last night And I kind of want this to be my hobby okay. A little learning about Italian culture and Italian food because I am a little bit Italian American and for some reason. I'm just that's just really resonating with me so I had bought this pasta maker and I took it out and I tried to make pasta and it was such a fucking disaster. It was but it was okay. But it's okay like it was it was also like good for it to go poorly because like one. I'm the kind of person who have things aren't like. Don't go perfectly right away. Then I like. I don't WanNa do this anymore. I never WANNA learn this like I sucked at this. The first time I tried so I'm done and it was like like Dory I made the dough and then I did made a like a little pile of Fettuccini and that came out. Okay then I tried to make spaghetti and it just it just clumped like it was it was like comically hilarious but also like I have been trying to do this and the kids were around and then they went to bed and then I kept doing. It was just kind of a bad idea but it was also like very meditative to work with the dough and like feel it come together and work with my hands and it was also just a great practice to be like well. That's I sucked at that. I'm going to try again. I'll throw this dough away and try again next time. That's awesome yeah. I don't feel it giving up. I feel like I'm I'm learning like Whoa. What does it mean to learn like? It's such a long process. So that's where I'm at learning pasta. And and so I also dory can I? I'm sorry I'm just rambling. I was working out of my cookbook. One of my Marcella Hussan cookbooks. But I have a really hard time following written directions which we've talked about so I'm going to next time. Make it along with the master class that I'm taking which is Thomas. Keller Cooking Class He has a pasta making on masterclass that I have been watching. Okay a he of Bouche Schon and French lawn. Hurry and that's who Thomas Keller is fancy stuff man and I've been enjoying his masterclass so I'm GonNa do that. I'M GONNA make my pasta along with him and also looking for an online Italian cooking class. Who Am I literally? Who Are you? Who are who? Am I say that in Italian? I don't know yet. I also just want to point out. Masterclass is advertising on this episode. This week of episodes look at that. This was not planned. No but I use my masterclass very quickly. Masterclasses awesome and you can use code forever. Thirty five for fifteen percent off. Yeah I have to say like especially right now. It's very digestible soothing. And it comes. You can download a little workbook that comes with cooking anyway. If anyone wants to do the Thomas Keller cooking class with me hit me up on the Graham and I want to do it with you. Let's do it make pasta with me. Dory okay will maybe I will. I have a pie. Have a manual pasta maker. That's what I want. I have one no one. I have one that you actually like crank like not okay. I think I've told this story that like a few years ago. I got matte all this manual stuff. For making his own Cava tally including a cavalier stamp. Cool order on Ebay. He has never made CAVA tally from scratch. You could but I could. So maybe I will this. Also this doesn't exactly qualify as a hobby. But I just wanted to shout out something that I learned in the forever thirty five facebook group and Kate. Maybe you're familiar with this and I'm like the last to know but I've seen people do this but I didn't know that had a name. Have you heard about stripping laundry? Yeah is that where people like? Soak it and yes yes. Yeah I haven't tried it but I'm obsessed with looking at pictures of it. I am fascinated and I wanna do it and so I think this might be a new activity for me. I also want to do it. So the the mixture that seems to be the most popular in this thread that that I looked at in the facebook group is a quarter cup of Borax a Quarter Cup of Baking Soda and a scoop of tied powder and then not oxy clean. No Okay tied powder okay. I mean I think you can use oxy clean but this is this is a mixture that like a few people recommended and they put in hot water for four hours. You put in your bathtub or if you're the top loading washing machine you can do it in the washing machine. I unfortunately have a front loading washing machine. Which by the way I feel like we were all hoodwinked into believing that front loading washing machines. Were better that's what I have to. I don't think they are and I think they're harder to keep clean. They get Moldy Anyway. Very Moldy. We had to a whole episode about that. Yeah so anyway top loaders. Why did we all fall for the scam of front loading washing machine and then you stir it every hour and then you run it through a normal wash cycle at the end another thing? I learned this. Thread is that powder is better than liquid detergent for keeping your clothes clean. I also didn't know that. Yeah so this is. This is making me reconsider. My seventh generation liquid detergent. I might have to go back to tide free and gentle or whatever it's called. I use drought story. Oh okay all right. Us dropped skits delivered and a little cardboard box and I put a use the dishwasher stuff and I use the laundry stuff. All right thank you drops I can I? Can I share product? Yes I would love you to share product. Okay on a whim a whim called board and anxious during this quarantine time. I purchased the all of and June studio box manicure kit. Are you familiar with the story? Yes because I'm constantly getting facebook ads for it totally and it worked. This was one of those things where I was like fine instagram. I will buy and I did and I love it. It's great really great. Yes I'm going to do a video on her instagram stories about it and just kind of walk through what was in it because I shared that I had purchased it on there and so many people were like Ooh. I almost have bought this so many times. It is really great and I say this as someone who one doesn't like their hands to has never been able to at home manicure and three is working on learning to love their hands. It's just great. The tools are great. The Polish lasted forever the poppy. Which is there Bob Polish bottle? Handle that you put on you can take it on and off different bottles Was fantastic and the Polish lasted way longer. Like it lasted for almost five days. Without chipping. Wow I was really. I was really shocked. Actually at how much I liked it because I was Kinda like whatever you know. This'll be something I buy and use once and not only did I like it. But I'm like eager to use it again. The Nail Polish remover pot is really wonderful and easy to use. And then they give you a cleanup like a really hard brush that you can dip in the remover to touch up your manicure and like my nails looked really good and I kept getting compliments on them. Wow why it was. It was like really one of those purchases where I like went into it expecting nothing and received everything so. Thank you to this box that I spent money on. I mean I bought it. How much is it okay? So the One I bought was the studio box. Okay got it was fifty dollars and you get to choose one Polish color. And I'll be honest. I was so pleasantly surprised by the Polish the lasting power of this Polish that I might go in and buy more all of June nail polishes. Wow I've never used any of their products I have. I don't know I honestly don't know anything about them other than I think. They have like real manicure shops. Here in La. Do Yeah. I've gone to one. Yeah but I was everything in the box. The only thing. I don't think I've tried is the cuticle oil because I have some already opens. I haven't tried that. I should say but I loved it. I loved it highly. Recommend I will go on her instagram in some some point and kind of walk through everything that's in it but I think it's really. It's like a good investment. I'm looking at their site now and they have a few different boxes that you can get one of them comes with a bunch of different. Nail polishes. Yeah I know and I almost. I'm not a big like Polish. My nails did not get that and I think it depends on your level of commitment and I can tell you. The color I bought is was called. Be He and it is like a a really pretty very pale. Most like a Robin's egg blue I'm kind of tempted. I'M NOT GONNA Lie Story. I gotTa Tell You you should you? Should you should bite the bullet in this one. It's really good. Wow Okay it's really. Yeah I've never felt the straw. I have felt this strongly about a product in a long. I know you're you're like very emphatic. Almost like sweating. Oh this is this is what I'm like one hundred percent behind okay. Good to know and I'm looking at their site now. It looks like they're nail polishes. The regular nail polishes cost eight dollars. So you could buy a kit and then like add on some polishes if you wanted to. Yes they have they have. They do have lots of options. I mean you can also just by the Polish. Got All the tools at home right right right look that that. Poppy Nail Polish thing. Me Polish bottle handles well. It's called it made my life like I. It made it so much better like I'm I'm left handed and so painting my left hand is always a disaster. Left hand looked good. Wow I mean it was a confusing i. Yeah it was a lot all right. I think you might have been selling me think you might have gone through if you want to hear semantic yours at home that can be for you. What if I became like a nail artist Tori? We're GONNA re reemerge from this time of having not seen each other and be like we're not going to recognize each other. You're you're you're you're gonNA have like jewels on your nails. Done yourself your your hair. Your hair is getting so long and I'm having it it is longer. I am like almost back to like nineteen ninety seven me. I'm little little gallon. Her Patchwork Corduroy Pants and her eyebrow ring one more all of June note. They sell little nail art stickers. You could always get those if you kind of want to put on some nail art on your nails Saying that that would that would be taking me back to approximately nineteen ninety seven so you had naylor in one thousand nine hundred seven. I had I had stickers really. That's so cool. Yeah okay okay. Definitely by the late nineties. I was like full into putting things on my nails stickers and such great memories should we should we take a short break before we hear from our guest today. Yes let's take a pause and when we come back we will be chatting with JEN hanker. We will all right. You're right back. Our guest today is a gen hat maker. Jen Welcome to forever thirty five. Oh my gosh well. I am just delighted to be her girls. Thank you for having me. We'RE GONNA kick off with your biogen. Is the author of twelve books. That's a lot of books most recently beers and full of fire the guide to be inglorious you jen is also the Creator and happy host. The award winning four the love podcast with John Hat maker. Delighted curator the Jed hat maker Book Club and sought after Speaker who tours the country year speaking to women and she and her husband Brandon founded the legacy collective and they also starred in the very popular series. My big family renovation and your big family renovation. Tv is a mom to five and a resident of Austin Texas where she and her family are helping to keep Austin weird there. It is that there is you got it so go ahead hit a sorry this is this is our talking over each other moment. Doing the podcast remotely. Well Jen worth. Were thrilled to have you. Your book was very timely and touching read it also very funny man there. There were a lot of flagged in folded pages for me personally From and you know we have a question a kick things off with about radical empathy and care because right now especially in our communities things are. There's so much upheaval. So what what does that look like? Do you think within our families and also our communities with people who we may not actually no. It's just such a weird time right now and I one thing that we're sort of figuring out over here at our household is that just living through such an unprecedented moment. Where all of our most of our regular tools are not at our disposal in our communities are activities school. Tra- all the things that we normally do that apart our regular rhythms which keeps his kind of healthy and connected and was virtually all of those guys. You know it's occurred to us that we have to. We can't use the old program in this in this current day and so these times are kind of calling for different measures kind of extraordinary measures when it comes to like mental care and soul care in And so we are. We kind of said in our family guys. Let's get really serious and really specific about what is hard right now. What is hurting? What are we disappointed about? Let's name it. Let's put on the table. Let's not start burying this and then try to just shellac over it and then let's really figure out. How can we meet that? Need in a different way How can we address that pain in the ways that we can address that pain right now and so you know rather than just kind of hoping that somehow soul care and mental care are despoiling? Landon our labs. We're dialing in really hard to every member of the family because we're all really different. You know we've got just so many people here you guys just so many people and and we are all enormous personalities like nobody is quiet in this family. Everybody has huge feelings tons of emotions. Billions of words And so a lot of emotional labor right now not just to figure out what I need a what everybody in the house days is just what it isn't. It's the strangest time in the world. Yes yes and you think you said on a podcast you you live in a small house and you have four kids at home. Yes somebody helped me like who will help me like we live in. A house was built in nineteen eight. So first of all it's just a little old rambling thing and yes We also have to seniors in the house right now. So we've got in college in a senior in high school and so our senior in college packed for five days to come home for spring break and he has not left five days for the staff and so he's here and which is shoved everybody like in every corner right now and in many just managing all those disappointments all those rites of passages that both seniors or missing out on such a bummer. Such a bummer. And this is one thing I told my kids and I'm telling the women in my community to which is jest. I love how my girlfriend? Kristen Howard She's like this is not a good time to sign ourselves up as competitors in the hardship Olympics. Lying really mean like coups hard is harder who status sadder It's just a terrible gain because you know we've got friends with people in a hospital with Kovin but then I've got a senior who doesn't have a prom and their book. It's all sad sad the person so I don't like the competition of who actually gets to say that they're disappointed or sad or afraid or they feel cheated. I also don't like the audible. A picks who is crushing Corentin. Best can't like I'm losing both of those games and I just don't think I don't think they serve US right now. And so I'm really just drawn to superhuman people right. Now that I find vulnerability in and honesty and truth telling trying to be that person to neither rustling people through their pain or fear or diminishing it and also not You heading on display. Like the highlight. Reel of everything. That's right because we're working hard on those things too. I think let's just find this really deeply human path through this together and I think that's really good for everybody. What are some of the specific? Tools your toolbox that you are using right now and what tools can you recommend for others? Who are struggling her. So do you know how sometimes your friends go to therapy and they tell you what therapists said so you got like free therapy you for paying for that little bit of them that I now get for free. One of my friends therapists told her something last year that she told me it's really stuck with me And it's this idea that we can choose to believe because it's true for every single person. This is like absolutely ubiquitous So we can choose to believe that we are every one of us a very powerful creator that literally. In any scenario we can create something new. We can create some hope. We can create connection. We can create joy We are not victims circumstances all the time. We are not just sitting around waiting for life to happen to US right. We're not just people at the end of somebody else's rope but we're creators in our own life and at any moment we can apply that power and so it. It's it's helpful to me right now to reimagined myself as a very powerful Creator That I can create what I'm needing right now. So I'm we can create community. It is weird and it doesn't look like what we're used to and we're having to use all kinds of strange platforms for it at new rules of engagement but we still can create connection connection thing that I think most of us are starving for the most. That's that's what is collectively hurting so deeply our lack of connection to one another and to our neighbors into our friends and our colleagues family members. It sucks it really does and so creators can create connection And we have to just do it inventively. We have to do it with a lot of we have to be clever And we have to innovate. And so I'm telling my kids that a lot too like you guys are powerful creators to because they feel so cheated they just like they're out of control like everybody else's in control and then it's all just happening to them you know. They're teenagers almost all of them there. This is not a good time to be disconnected from your friends. That's kind of their lifeforce. And so I keep telling them no. No that is true although circumstances are true. But what can you create inside of it? What can you do and so we brainstorm a lot like that? What is what sort of. How can we apply our own Creative Energy and our own powerful energy really to what is hard in hurting right now. That's possible for everybody makes me feel very inspired because there have been dazed through this that I had been very down on this happening and then I and then I do kind of the the like well. I should feel grateful that I'm have this and I have that so it's really helpful to remember. Yeah totally I wanted to ask you And this is kind of twofold. But you know you you write about body image in the book and it's a really really powerful chapter and talking about how women especially have always been kind of advised to be small. What I find interesting is one thing that's coming up a lot with our community of ferber thirty five. Listeners is the struggle with body image. During this time of self isolation And it's the struggle that I think we've all had. I would love to kind of what your journey has been with body image and self acceptance overall. And how? You're feeling right now as well. That chapter was some real heavy lifting to right I I don't think there is. There's hardly a woman that hasn't been deeply deeply impacted by all the cultural messaging around our bodies. I mean Y- We all knew we. I know what girls were supposed to look like. Fry got up first grade. You know I knew which body types we're going to be rewarded. I knew which body types we're going to be punished You know we've been. We've been breathing that air since we were born and they're just enormous industries. Whose entire bottom line is predicated on the the hope the fact that we are simply going to hate ourselves we are going to absolutely hate our bodies that we're going to consider them defective that. They're just such clunky containers that we're constantly trying to shrink diminish and fix and it's just awful it's just awful Fierce is pretty heavily researched and I when I did some of the research around this conversation. It was just devastating devastating. This watch it pass onto the next generation right now You know like by the time girls are thirteen like sixty percent of them hate their bodies thirteen. Just I'm so mad. They got another generation. Like it's happened again on our watch and so I'm just sick of it. I'm forty five and I'm over it like I'm over it. I'm absolutely over hating myself. I'm Ashley over trying to squeeze myself in some size and shape. My body is like never ever going to be. It's not made to be that way. And so like maybe two years ago I had a guest on my podcast. Her name is Dr Hillary McBride and this is kind of her primary work. This is this is her emphasis and she said something. Me On podcast. That look fundamentally changed me and you'll see it's imprint. All over the chapter on bodies that I wrote but you know she said maybe a good first step is to admit and acknowledge that the way we typically talk about our bodies as we call it in it. You know it. Our Body isn't it and we hate it and we're angry at it. We despite that we resent it we punish it. Do we ever. I mean We talk so and she what if what if just as a starting place. We begin to imagine our body as a she as a her as a absolutely integral part of who we are. Not just like this unfortunate container but our body is this is who I am and our body has allowed us to experience literally every good thing that has ever happened to every good memory. Every wonderful sensual thing every everything we've ever touched or seen or tasted heard every every wonderful experience in the world has been delivered through our bodies and she is good to us and she is on our side and sh- like my body is entirely change in her. Her whole job is to protect me and keeping safe and so I mean that like flat me in my chair and I just thought I can't because I hate my body too much. I don't know if I can make this mental switch but that was a step for me and I just started trying it out like she her. I started seeing how it would feel to thank her for what she did that day. Thank you for getting me through another day and thank you for sending me alarm signals today when when you knew this was like a dangerous situation. Thank you for keeping me say. Thank you for loving my family. Well and it just changed me like and so this this is how I am. I'm so wanting to break the cycle. I do not WANNA pass on body hatred to the next generation. I'm so mad that we're doing it And so that's what I'm working on right now and so in. Quarantine. I'm finding practice to be an incredible tool To say to my body you have gotten us through another day and you did it well. And here's what you did well today. You another freaking mail. Everybody like with loving hands. Oh my God make it. Stop You You scratched your son's back and gave him like five minutes of connection in palm and you made out with your husband on the couch and you did a great job today and thank you for serving our lives beautifully and it it means something it matters. It's changing the way. I think it also is interesting to me in that chapter. How you kind of connect that becoming empowered in our physical space to raising our voices and speaking out in social environments helping to undo so many social practices and I thought that was a really interesting correlation that you made. I found that in the research found that in a data I used a had an incredible research assistant. She's got her PhD Ecology so. She brought her immense body of knowledge to bear on this work and it was so interesting to see the data which shows US pretty unambiguously. It's pretty clear. The League between social empowerment or disempowerment and our body image that the more socially empowered connected. We feel the more likely we are to be kinder to our bodies and the reverse is true. The more we feel disempowered socially when we are marginalized when we're disenfranchised when we're Nord in a room When we are harmed or abused when we are isolated or rejected Our body image syncs with it and we tend to blame our bodies for the bad behavior of others and this is we didn't invent this story. I mean I every single movie. We grew up watching. The beginning of the social reversal is always a makeover right like the ugly duckling is off to the side but then she gets this. Incredible makeover takes her glasses off essentially and the cool kids like her then. Then she's popular than she she special important And so we've internalized that big time And so it is very interesting. It's an interesting idea to state one way. We can begin to improve our relationship with our bodies is to pay attention to how empowered we are socially like do week'll silenced a lot arena career where we are second place or we are sidelined. We're having to concede the microphone to less qualified people to keep their egos attack. Are We Empowered inside of our marriages inside of our families do our voices count there Do we agency in ownership of our own life our own opinions our own needs are owned boundaries. Our own wants desires. Because if we do if we can pay attention to those levels we might be shocked to discover that we are beginning to feel kinder toward our bodies. That's really powerful. I really like what you say about. How your body is like is always there for you. I know I my relationship with my body changed after I got pregnant and yeah I feel like I'm still kind of still still out. It's still evolving. Sure you know to to touch on something perhaps a little more superficial related to the body. I'm wondering are you doing your hair right now. Oh my gosh you guys. You should just see me right now. I mean you should just see it I am. I'm just I knew I had gray hair. Like Hello I pay a lot of money to to public right and it's just it is in full display so no. I'm not doing it and I'm thinking you know what it's just almost time for the seven dollar box Loria. We're almost there you know I just. I'm about to be at that place in my journey. Are you guys doing your hair? No I just have highlights. And they're just sort of by Allah and it's just kind of growing out but my hair is way too long and stringy by. Oh my gosh same sadness. Very grateful that I grew up my bangs. I will say that. Oh Yeah a oh good on you I I. I was on the today show this week and of course it's all remote and so we. I was recording it from my house. But you know it's the Today Show on National Television Sunken fix my hair and I put on makeup and I'm not wearing make hardly ever and I promise you that I cannot hardly remember how to put my makeup on and when I look back at the video. I'm like Jen. Like super heavy handed with the shadow seventh grade girl putting on makeup for the First Time. I couldn't remember I have too much on and I'm like well I can't have that one back that's too bad. I mean I don't remember anything. I remember Admi grooming chips yeah. I had a similar experience recently. 'cause my son's birthday and we did a zoom and. I put on makeup and I was looking at the pictures and I was like. I don't know know how I used to put on makeup. Okay it's great. It's freeing in a way I feel like actually the this time to get to know we're we're fortunate to be healthy and at home link you you kind of get to know yourself in a different way. Yup You're right and it'll be interesting to see what happens when we come out of this moment in time when quarantine us what we decide not to put back into rotation you know in a lot of ways both how we how much time we're spending time and energy were spinning on you know hair makeup ball bat an interest a host of other things where. I think I might want to evaluate several things Is that's really something I want to return to. Is that something? I WANNA put back a rotation. I really think it's GonNa be interesting to see how many people have discovered that they are super productive. Or there's a possibility at least from a working from home or working from home partially where they were forced to do it and realized I waste a lot less time or I'm actually more productive at than office so I think this is GonNa be interesting And have some long term effects on probably every strata of culture When we get out of here what are some of the things that you think? You will keep that you've been doing during this time. So one thing that I really fired up into high gear Is a more consistent and transparent and vulnerable connection with the community that lead online. Was We all just kind of hungry for each other spaces for Pete's sake and travel a lot so I don't all my of course. All my travel was cancelled. So I'm no longer in big rooms full of women which is so energizing in so meaningful to me and so I really put a lot of gas in the tank of just hopping on videos and not even wearing one. Second what I. I don't think I've had on makeup in five percent of any of them So I just put that all aside like that used to be the thing that I would do like. I'm not going to recording for my community because at my hair's dirty or I don't have makeup on an really putting it on so I kind of said I don't care about that. So this deeper connection with my online community has been so special a really really meaningful for me and helping me feel more connected helping us feel like it's helping us. I'll tell the truth to each other more because it's it's stripped of any of its like Polish and so I'm GONNA keep that. I think I'M GONNA keep adding rotation and That that for sure is one thing and then I just you know my kids. I'm teasing I'm laughing. That they're here all the time with other words but it's been really Special to me to have some pretty concentrated time with my young adults. I've got two in college. So they're they're they're grown and so kind of being around them right now and having these long talks and we don't normally have their lives are so full and busy about who they are right now. What they're dreaming where they're going really great and so Those are just going to have to stay and I guess we're going to have to talk on the phone like it's nineteen eighty-four because that's what's that's our only play there but So I see these long talks staying up on the docket for sure. I love that you know it's interesting because you have a chapter in your book which is titled I believe in this cause and it's it's about your advocacy work and there's you talk about your experience your recent experience with marches with with like on the ground advocacy and and being present. How how are you seeing it? Or how are you participating in activism and Social Justice Activism Online right? Now how how can your were and transitioned at their right totally That is one area where activism is alive and well. That's that's you know this. The Internet age has a lot of pros and cons. And there's a course. We don't even know the half of the the underside. A dark side of the Internet. Use at the level we all experience it but the upside is that it has never been easier to mobilize to come together around An injustice to come together around a cause or a people group To be honest with you we did most of our advocacy work online to begin with and so for us right now specifically my husband and I run a foundation in it's called legacy collective in. It's just a giving community of super ordinary people. We borrowed the idea from something mega millionaire stew and they they've for for decades. They've run these little small collectives where three or four or five of them band together because they have to get rid of so much money for taxes. And so they'd say since we have to give this much money away feasibly. Why don't we put our money together and really make a dent somewhere and so it's a really like altruistic idea so we thought what have regular people to that like just ordinary people who have little amounts to get so if we put it all together and said let's combine our regular people's resources and give it away so legacy right now is in high gear? We find initiatives all around the world. We've given millions of dollars and then we have people who give ten dollars a month so I'm really talking about ordinary amounts And so we are paying attention to how we can serve right now so we gave a twenty five thousand dollar grant to an organization called the store and it's in East Nashville and they serve. It's an incredible organization But they serve Children and the elderly who are deeply food insecure and of course they were just hit those Tornados. I don't remember that. And so the tornadoes hit and then quarantine hit and so we just gave them a twenty five thousand dollar grant to feed their community and then just yesterday we gave another twenty five thousand grant to An organization Hollywood I just forgot. Let me just look What's IT called Bright Horizons? That's what it's called Which is Childcare Organization? And they Have Initiative called first responders? I in which they are providing free childcare for healthcare workers on the frontlines so it's amazing resource so we gave them twenty five thousand dollars to keep one of their Detroit. Childcare centers open About a mile away from their main hospital where seventy the workers work so So sometimes advocacy looks like giving sometimes advocacy. Looks like our language? Sometimes it looks like ally ship Sometimes it looks like marching Sometimes it looks like voting and so it all counts it all matters I Every single drop in the bucket is an important job and so I. I commend everybody. Who is finding a way To serve to give and to advocate even now so in April two thousand sixteen you call for the full inclusion of Lgbtq people in the Christian community which caused a bit of a stir in the evangelical world. And I'm curious how taking the stand publicly changed your relationship to Christianity That's a great question I don't know so just to sort of book in that what that meant for me. And I built a career in that space kind of that evangelical subculture of women as very good at it as that was my first language. I know all the rules of that community. I know how to hit the marks Brinkley. Pretty much groomed to succeed there And I did. And so however one of the rules it well belonging as the currency over there and so. That's the actually true of a lot of subcultures. Not just that when that what you get when you behave and follow the the group norms is you get to belong but when you don't when you step out of line that's the first thing that's revoked. Is Your your inclusion? You're standing and that was definitely the case for me and I knew it. I knew that calling for full affirmation of the Lgbtq community would that would revoke my standing and so it wasn't just my inclusion there as my career So my books were pulled off all the shelves and one of my books was put out of print and I mean it was it was financially punitive and it was emotionally devastating and so. I don't know that it changed my relationship with Christianity that exist in a different zip code for me which is why for me the way I understand. God now is so expensive in so wide so differently than the way I was taught. I see that I see faith just love and only love and everybody's but it definitely changed my relationship with evangelical which I don't identify with at all anymore. I don't identify that anymore and It changed my relationship with organized religion. And I've just I've just discovered that love of God and love of religion or not at all the same thing and they don't even necessarily operate out of the same two buckets In so that looks really different for me now and And I feel actually like that sort of integration for me of telling the truth owning my own convictions and then standing by a community that I felt incredibly Convicted to stand with that actually gave me my faith back on the church in the evangelical subculture was stealing it like stripping away just dignity dignity and so I actually like. It was returned to me so I will not return to that subculture It it just it broke. My heart breaks to many people's hearts. It's still very steeped in Patriarchy and white supremacy misogyny and spiritual abuse and And you just can't see that from the inside of seems very clear to me from the outside And so I. I'm that in that way. In that portion of my life actually feel free. I feel very free. I feel very liberated. That's great yeah well to switch gears completely. We WanNA talk about paper. Calendars where you stand. I don't know if I don't know if this is a safe we know you're Fan God and okay me like we. We go both ways. We'd love to know We know you're a loyalist to paper. Calendars loyalist had you. Tell us your favorite. What is your like paper? Calendar routine how do you see yourself give alone? Oh my gosh. You're just really in my world. Right now like your. This is my love language. My favorite paper calendar which I have bought every single year for as many years as I can think is the simplified planner. And that's my friend. Emily lays company. And it's just it's it's all my dreams come true you know. It's exactly what I need in a paper system Now I don't know how you grow smell about this but I. It's really important for me that I can see my entire month at once. Unlike any of these daily pages that is upsetting to me. I don't even like a weekly page. I like give me my full month. Need look at the month of May and see beginning to end on these little squares and so this is my favorite one and its companion for me is my very very favorite pin. Which is the blue BIC CRISTAL SUPER IMPORTANT? I mean I probably have. I'm always afraid they're gonNA stop making them and so I buy them like three hundred at a time and I'm not kidding so everywhere they are. If you came to my house I would pay you a million dollars if you could go five feet without running into a blue bic cristal pen. So that's my journey. That's my that's my journey. What what are yours. What are what's your paper calendar. Yeah what's your paper calendar journey? I'll be honest. This is kate on this show. I feel like we've talked so much about. I still don't know who I am. When it comes to how I schedule myself I waffle back and forth maybe landed in a Google calendar space. But then time I do. I'm drawn back to paper. I respect noodles hallander. I respect it. I mean very reluctantly have been married for twenty six years Very reluctantly I put about thirty percent of my things on our shared calendar just to keep my marriage going like literally just for that reason alone But I don't look at. It doesn't help me doesn't help you if you don't look at it and so it's just that's just a fake efforts that I'm putting into the marriage I just I need a ride. It and so. What's so funny as if I if I'm traveling or whatever or I'm just not at my house and my assistant texts me are you. I'm wanting to schedule a thing for you to have something here. One hundred percent of the time. I have to say you're GONNA have to wait at home because I'm going to have to look look with my eyes at the paper calendar because I can't even look it up on my phone. It doesn't live there. I know it doesn't. I know I didn't put it there so anyway. That's I just feel like this is how it's going to be. Can I tell you something else? And maybe this'll help it make sense to you I also still ironically. This is not ironic use. Aol Email address. Does that bring into focus? Like I just am really vintage about things like this and so when I a shame when people are like. What's your email address? I just like I don't want to say it like so I can't say it. It's so embarrassing and yet here we are and I am not going to change is my first dress. I ever have so anyway. Just keep it real over the AOL and those seem like lovely things that our generation you know this kind of general generation X. World like that we are the last to kind of hold onto you know like Mexico. The millennials and the generations ease like. They're they're not keeping not maybe some of them. I don't WanNa make sweeping judgments. But it's it's a lost art the paper calendar and the AL email address so right re to hold onto them. You're right this is why someday it's going to be our turn to be called the greatest generation because we hold onto these really precious things and so I do want to say it is possible to brainwash like all my kids are paper. Calendar kids because I just let them know this is our family value. This is what we do Until I don't even know if they know another way and so it is possible to reverse progress with the next generation. If you're intentional right I'm going to keep that in mind. Do you also use a paper address? Book I'm curious I don't see look see. That's that's a progress for me. I I for sure. Don't everything now is in my phone and I don't know anybody's anything I don't. I don't know my mom's number I don't know I cannot tell you one single phone number of child of mine from memory you know all those all that fabulous information is easier actually in phones so that's where that all lives just wondering I used to did you guys have those. Of course she did. Oh Yeah I mean back. The also had kept the the list of friends phone numbers on the wall and the wall. Yeah can you guys name your phone number from your childhood phone that was like attachment wall yet? One hundred decided to. I think I can't to. I think it's three one six six eight three nine hundred and sixty eight. I think that's what it is. Oh I'm an end. I built my siblings. Do some friends childhood phone numbers to those are. Those are just in there. But then I don't know like a new friend I couldn't even tell you the first three digits of their phone. Yeah same yeah same. Well Jen feel like we could talk to you for days. This has been so so wonderful and we really appreciate you coming on. The show was fine. And if you ever want to have another riveting discussion about calendars or being old fashioned. You've got my phone number now now you know also my very favorite show in the world is CBS Sunday morning. I just watch the grandparents all the grandparents in the United States of America. It's such a comforting show. There's yeah and we you know we talk a lot about this kind of soothing. Self Care Practices on our unfettered thirty five and I feel like CBS. Sunday morning is the perfect epitome of self care. Say it's so low production like it looks like I could just throw together that studio set in my backyard in about ten minutes and my husband doesn't understand it. He's like are they doing that on purpose. Unlike just enjoy it. Just enjoy the peaceful set with us Jane Pauley and just let her voice wash over you you know. I don't understand my obsession but I'm just saying I think I might be seventy four years old in a forty five year olds body and that sounds great. I feel like that's a great way to be. Yeah I agree I agree. Thanks for having me on today. You guys love talking to you same. I'm Jen where can people find you on the Internet? Well I'm on the Internet and as you might imagine I am the only had maker in in town so if you look up maker that's me. There's just there aren't any others And then all my other staffer can find Jin Hammer dot com books. Podcast all the fun things amazing. Well thanks again. Yeah thank you so much excellently. My pleasure so we are best friends with Jen Baker. Now right sure. I'm moving to Texas. Just hang out with her. I mean she was. She was real fun. She was real fun and I also really enjoyed reading her book. Yeah didn't kind of know what to expect walking into it and and I think we had originally been approached by publisher to have her on and it was actually. It was a read that I really connected with an a lot of ways and so I'm I'm glad that we were able to talk to her about it. Same same same Well Kate intentions. Let's talk about intentions? Let's get intentional. Did you get some quiet some alone quiet time last week this week this past week? What am I talking about I? I don't know if I did okay but I do feel like I have expressed to my partner my need for it and I'm going to work on making some like making time for it for me but also recognizing that he also needs it. You know what I mean like. We both have to figure out ways to both work but also like have some time just to mentally unwind. That isn't work so I think we're getting there hope this summer. You know one thing. I'm trying to reframe as like this. Might be the only time I get to have this time with my immediate family You know like just we're all around each other and that's it these. Are My people going anywhere? We're not doing a lot so I'm trying to really find the Find the joy in that and and know that like you know appreciate that. We're all healthy and safe right now on that we get this this weird time to get to really get to know each other vedic. Oh that's so nice and also scream at each other so much. It probably scares all my neighbors. But you know sure but like it's a journey it's a dirty dory and what am I doing this week? I didn't even ask. I mean I didn't even ask myself. I didn't even say say I have lake so many piles in my house that and like their mind. They're not anybody else's mind miles so I've got a I've got a they stress me out but then I don't deal with them like what's Yep would take two seconds been there right. You know what I mean right like right now. I'm looking at a pile of clothes that I wore didn't put away pile of books. Weird leg muscle roller. Like what. What am I doing? So that's it door. Put those piles away. Okay I'm into that for you. All right how is your bedroom? Did you clean it? Because that was your intention. It wasn't intention so it's not one hundred percent clean but progress has been made. I cleaned off the chair. That had a huge pile of clothes on it. I also vacuumed up. Some dust bunnies so like things are happening. It's not there yet. But but but we're getting there and then who this week. I have a similar intention. I want to stay ahead of the cleaning in my house. I talked about this on an episode of here for a couple of days ago But like we just sort of fallen down on the job in terms of keeping the house clean and I would like to stay ahead of it and not wait till things get so bad that we're like oh my God the houses so dirty. That's what I you to where it's like you wait until it's so overwhelming that you can't handle it anymore rather than plucking away at it day in and day out totally totally so well sure some listeners can relieve some listeners are like wow you're a slob. So anyone is saying that. Maybe they're thinking it. Okay that's okay. Yeah well this brings us to the end. What a treat it is to get to talk to You. Dorian everyone else out there. Yeah likewise We will talk to you on Monday. Which will be a mini episode in the style of here for you and then with us as we find our footing who knew vibe. New Sketch schedule. You sched- Let's say a dory shall we yep but forever I was just GonNa say for all right. I want you to say it okay. Never thirty five forever. Truer words have been spoken forever. Thirty five is hosted and produced by Dory Chiffre and Kate Spencer and produced and edited by Sami. And Sam. Rita's our project manager and we will talk to you next week bye.

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Leadership  What Every Senior Executive Can Learn From Top Chefs

flavors unknown podcast

41:24 min | 5 months ago

Leadership What Every Senior Executive Can Learn From Top Chefs

"Behind every amazing flavor is an amazing human who has perfected their craft. Welcome to flavors unknown. Behind the scenes look at new flavors and the chefs, pastry, chefs and bartenders who create them with your hosts Emmanuel who they're welcome to another episode of flavors, unknown, the series of conversations with trending chefs, pastry chefs and makes gist around the country. Today is a special episode on the leadership with the executive chef from the Famines Hotel in Austin Andrea Tara I. Am Your Host Amanullah Roche? I have been in the food industry for more than fifteen years, both in Europe and US and every other week my guests share their path to success their creative approach, and how the think of a dish or drink and their relationships with vendors and farmers you can listen to these podcasts on any PODCAST APPS and access to the episode. Show notes on the website levers, unknown dot com. com, the previous episodes with a panel discussion with two chefs from New Jersey, who pivoted their business a few days after the pennock hit the hospitality industry. Let's talk about today's episode back in. March, I was supposed to be at South by southwest in Austin and have a conversation. We Chef Andrea Tara the Clubhouse, if conclusively for Senior Marketing Executives, the theme was leadership. What every senior marketing executives can learn from top chefs. Thank to the CMO club Andrew and I were able to record remote the conversation back in March and I am pleased to share it with. You might podcast today you know. Conversation Chef, Andrew, in a Tara shares, is thoughts about implementing discipline and consistency in the kitchen, coaching and mentoring, managing creative people and developing the next generation of leaders. High Chef. How are you? I'm doing great Emmanuel. How are you? I'm pretty good. Thank you so welcome to another episode of. Flavors unknown. Thank you. It's always a pleasure to be on your show, and it's always a pleasure to stick you. Thank you very much like whereas year. So as you know today, we should have been the CMO clubhouse in Austin. During south by southwest bets with a situation of the coronavirus. Obviously, we are recording this conversation remotely Thank God for technology. Yes, so before we go into the topic of leadership, which is the focus of outcomes are stationed today. Be Different from the previous episodes that I have done I mean. Do you mind say a few words about your car year and that led you to join responsibly to? Do you have a family? I've been cooking for I I keep saying twenty five years, but now I think I would say it's over twenty five years. And I've been an executive chef in many different aspects of of of food and beverage organization so everything from hotels, resorts worked in California I've worked Alvarado. Up I've been a taskforce opening chef by work in small restaurants. I've been a restaurant partner with the restaurant group and open restaurants and. I've been a regional ship for chip or other organizations most recent Leah was. In Dallas, I think probably with Fairmont Vermont in Dallas left. That organization opened up a couple of restaurants in Dallas and. Most people when you open restaurants something those restaurants. That closure led me to Austin Texas, and then most my most recent position for the last four years I've been the executive chef by running the culinary program or the fairmont Boston which is the largest luxury hotel in Texas where we have many kitchens, a diverse restaurant Oleo on everything from fine dining to casual dining, and a couple of restaurants grew service and everything. So as you said. It's kind of large structure that you have and that you oversee you know. Monte in, Austin, so how how many people spot of your anti teen? People that I manage directly or indirectly kind of under under my umbrella, but about one hundred, fifty hundred and fifty people, so if I, see you in the hallways, and ice Q.. How are you today chef? What will be your answer, not just my answer, but that everyone that works in the kitchen with me. We always say awakened ready, and that is so. Can you explain to us what what's behind it? Yeah, absolutely so the idea behind a wakened ready was when we're in the middle of action were in the middle of service. We WanNA. Convey to the person that's asking. Is that I'm present focused I'm awake and I'm ready for whatever's coming out today. So whether that's a that's. Service Super Wash dishes and purtzer guests. Whatever the case may be, we know on that. It's a competent dancer. That I'm fully present. Whatever's going on? Whether it! Be Outside distractions those are the volumes turned down. Those and I'm only here in the moment we say awaken ready, and that's not to say that it's not important. What's going on outside of work because obviously that is, that is important. You know we really we really care about our aims employs and what's going on, but. I think those conversations need to be held in different locations that a good example I like to give. Is You're in the middle of service in your shopping? You have rail of tickets and. Everything's coming at you and you ask someone how you doing. And they say awaken ready. You're fully confident that they're under ready swoop. Maybe say, how are you? They said well. You know having a bad day today flat fire. Does a chef you start. Little bit like wait a minute. Are you focused on what's going on right now? So the idea awakened ready. Just it's just that that were here. We're focused and we have a job. so you industry in the idea? Is that leave your personal stuff? Vino at the door. Be Confident and be present. Be Present, right focused, and be ready for whatever's going to match it if I can expand upon that a little bit not only does instill confidence in the person that hears it starts to instill confidence in yourself, so it starts to bring a certain sense of discipline consistency to the rest of the team, so they everyone knows when you're that, we're all we all have A. A common purpose in we're all any from. Everyone is awakened ready, so you have confidence in the rest of the team right up. We're all on the same page. Though it it does give everyone a common for so you're talking about discipline and consistency so when it comes to leadership indication in starts with those two elements, but first we have be clear that when we say discipline, we are not talking about like the fear that culturally this is something from the past from the the the kitchens. And consistency because it relates to building trusts with your customer, creating a reputation and directing Pakistan. Oh, hazardous making on the on the bottom line. So can you explain what disappeared? Consistency means to you and why it is so important in your industry I would say when we talk about discipline that we're talking about the discipline to do something consistently, and it's the right thing to do so. It's like a good example. You have to work out in the morning. That's not punishment, but it does require disciplined to wake up early in the morning and go gopher your morning runner, or does that do to stay on a healthy diet? This is something good for you, but it requires discipline. Stand that L. P. by so when we talk about discipline in the workplace. It's the discipline to do the right things that are good for you. You that are good for the customer that are good for the rest of your team. That's the discipline that were that were looking for. When it comes to consistency, the reason we implemented a lot of standards and consistency is I think first of all people want structure, and they want parameter. They want to understand the rules of the game. They could be better players. And that's where the real freaky. Comes in so when you think about. If you understand the rules, you could work with them and find freedom of solutions within the rules, and you don't have to think about all the variables. If there were no right that SORTA. So we talk about distance defining those. So you would say that for you let. Everyone wants to be led everyone's needs. Leadership correct I would say everyone needs leadership. Everyone parameters, but I wouldn't say necessarily that I wants to be lead where I would say that some people need to be leaders in some people. Some, but everyone needs their set of rules to play the game that makes us. So people love challenges. How do you motivate your team and offer them? Opportunities, said goals and give them a sense of purpose. So creating challenges for people is probably one of the most difficult things that you could do so you have to think of it like this is. How do you strive for perfection or excellence? In something that you're doing so those challenges come from the leadership team to provide, but it also comes from the individuals, but we need to do is educate them on what are appropriate challenges. Or their specific discipline and what they're working on so for example if I was looking at. was looking at someone with knife skills. If I just walk up to someone and say hey, great job on on that on dicing that onion and don't give them any feedback where they could get better, if might not mean as much however if they've gone weeks and weeks and weeks, and you consistently work with them and say okay, you can do this a little bit better. Let me give you a little tip here and there and then. Let's say a month goes by, and you come to them, and you say Oh my God you have perfect water, perfect dice on your on your onion or your care or whatever the case may be. They're going to remember that much more because they earned. There's there's a sense of pride in. Just being given because they might walk around with their chest, popped up a little bit, and say while the chef for months and months he was telling me I couldn't do a perfectly diced onion and kept giving me feedback that one day. He told me it was perfect. That was the day that I felt so proud, so we have to understand that part of. The human connection to the task at hand is that if something is very easy to attain, or or the feedback isn't isn't earned while it loses its sense of value, however, when something has worked on over the course of time, and you've worked hard at it finally achieved that that is much more meaningful individ, so it's not about constant feedback, but he's about. Feedback that he's earned Greg. That's what you'll when you want to so positive feedback that it's all positive feedback I think it's. It's you can do this better. You can do that better. Idea is the continual refinement of the task at hand or the technique, or whatever it is that you're working on, but when someone does achieve it creating the standard of what is excellence, so it's achieved that they know while they could. They could see a difference from where they started to where they are now whether if on day one you accept sub standard products, and you just say that's good enough well, that then becomes the benchmark good enough. Is this and so that's as far as I'm going to push right, but I think about I think about the you know my my kids or something like that and I say I look at my parenting style. Maybe I made a mistake when I said well. You want to be when you grow up and I used to say you know what whatever makes you happy. You know whereas my dad's that you're GonNa do this this when you grow up. Because you have a purpose right so having this purpose and now when I told my kids, you can do whatever you want they. Had like this doing nothing and playing video games. So if you telling me I, get to do whatever I want to like I like this. And so instilling a sense of purpose and people I think is also important. Everyone needs a purpose at work and they need. They need parameters and goals in which distrustful. So, what kind of you know, -tunities. Do you give you know to let to your team? When I think about the opportunities, we have mentorship opportunities. We have continuing education opportunities whether it's an online culinary school program that we offer called Ruby. We do demos every Saturday at three PM. We do it our weekly Culinary Demo. We do internal technique videos to our staff, so they could get on and see. How do certain things? We have a one on one mentoring. Mentoring programs where they sign up with the shop and meet weekly or biweekly to discuss all sorts of things, so I'm a firm believer in doing everything, we possibly can to promote the different different of education mentorship so that so that someone could grow I was very fortunate. My career that I've had great mentors around me and people learned form so i WanNa make sure that I have the opportunity to give back to others. Because there's nothing to me, that's more important. When it comes to leadership than than helping the generation that's coming up because that's that's how given the opportunity, so that's something that I stand by. What did you learn from from? You'll mentor you know all sorts of things he'd ivory. Mentor was a little bit different some of them how to. Whether it was how to how to think creatively. Others taught me how to be the exception to the rule. Others taught me how to look at finances differently, so all of them played a different role, and I took a little bit from all of them. I think of one mentor. Particularly, his thing was always distinct differently MP the exceptions. And I think that's something that's done well for me in my rear. Is that I look at things differently? Don't WanNa look at the answer the same way everyone else does I want to think a little bit abstract. And see if I can come up with different volts, so I think thinking differently. allows people to be successful. When you think about in my particular industry, some of the chefs that think differently that are the trendsetters like Audra? Like Rene Words Up, you'd like a skeleton you know they. They start these macro trends that everyone's soon soon followed and everyone follows them, but those the reason everyone follows them is because they are the exception to the rule. They're the ones that were thinking differently. And then after a while you know new, Trent will come along, but I think there's a lot to be said for those people that are innovators so when it's coming to a mentoring youself wyant. Let's pull Filo of individual. Do you mentor in your organization or even like outside of your organization? Because I'm I'm guessing that you are having those mentorship program you know with. A different level into more responsibility diesel functions yes, so right now I think I have four or five men teas that I work with directly that that that I work with that right now at work, and we meet weekly or biweekly a nice sign them and they have to come back and and give me feedback on the homework that I've assigned to them additionally. Always say you can't come back and reschedule the mentor meeting with me until you completed your homework and you need to always show with five questions, and so that we could discuss the questions that they that they want to get through to get feedback on their homework, and then I always provide them with new homework and the homework that them with a little bit challenging, because what I'm really, after is not necessarily increasing very specific skill set, but more of a bigger picture so like I will say you need to learn how to be more confident. Ask for what you want, so the homework might. Might be you need to go around and ask people for discounts? You'd need to learn how to negotiate or are. Some people might get stepped on a little bit too much. Say You know your homework is to figuratively speaking. Go confront someone. Go confronted bully in your particular world, so that might be a boss that might be a subordinate that might be your someone in your personal life, but it's have have a confrontation with them, so I could I could push them out of their comfort zone, so everything is designed to push them out of their comfort zone. A little bit and help them. Some of the obstacles that they're facing their rear. The reason I tell people to ask for something. Whether it! Be a discount or negotiate negotiate onto the price of the watch, or whatever the case may be is because if you can't ask for something then when the time is tough, you're not going to be able to ask for something so when that time comes for razor. That time comes for a new job or you're GONNA think you're worth it I think that was valuable. Lesson that I learned early on in my career is that people aren't GonNa? Give you something if you don't ask for, because people will assume you're not interested if you don't speak up and I know a lot of people that have. Been held back a little bit because they think that someone's going to tap them on the shoulder and tell them okay I. You're ready for it, but that sometimes happens, but it doesn't always happen and I think the people that ask for the opportunities would be surprised about how many doors open for them, simply by simply by asking so building up the confidence to ask for something, so you're saying that your meant to come back to you and to session with five different questions you know to you any type of questions, or are you looking for something in particular? No I because I don't know specifically what it is. That they need at that moment so based on the questions that they ask I'll start to decide on on the homework that have them so a lot of their questions are like. Hey, how do I deal with this difficult person? Or How do I? Manage that person or whatever the case may be if I start to notice that? Okay, they're issue seems to be the confrontation than some of the homework that I assigned revolves around. Our to overcome some. Outside of the Mons you pod as well an of another organization, which is a mentoring a organization for chefs. Yes so the organization has mentor became, and it was founded by drug goes Thomas Keller, and Daniel Balut, and what this organization does. Is it it it it binds it recruits an funds, a competitor for boost your, but it's. It's grown much larger than that. There's a young chef competition which Identifies young up and coming talent. gives them the platform beat. Me Competition which does a similar thing. There's grant and scholarship opportunities that are put out by mentor. Where if you apply for this mentor grant, you have the opportunity to go and work in A. Kitchen of your choice, a world class kitchen around the world, so for example, if you WANNA go work at Noma, you know you get a paid sabbatical to go over there and spent time in that kitchen. Assuming they're willing to accept you such A. It's a great organization that really helps promote young up and coming chefs as well as support. Someone to compete represents a country of the United States in New York. York and what is your role in the organization? So my role is on the Culinary Council, so it sometimes, my role is wherever they tell me they need me so whether that's judging. Burn event or sometimes being involved in a fundraiser or you're helping select sponsors, or whatever the case may be up providing hotel rooms. Where possible so all sorts of things you know, I've done. Four five mentor dinners I've I've. been a judge the USA because your finals in Las Vegas. I got to carry the platter one year where I was very nervous. Because I'm thinking Geez, I have to carry the ladder in front of. All the chefs and the chefs put all his blood sweat and tears into something. What if I triple or Maybe. One of the more nerve racking moments that I have, but so all sorts of things that I do with that meant Gabi, but in addition to that also encourage my own team to apply for the scholarship grants because I know if they get selected, it's life changing opportunity for them to go work in a Michelin Star Kitchen, our restaurant, that's all the world's best of not only the they get to go over there and work to get to bring something of value back whether it's something part of the culture in these great restaurants or technique or something innovative that they're doing so. The idea of sending cooks over there one of our chefs. Something that I always I linked them. So if you're looking back in an annual car year, what would you have liked? You Know One of your maybe mentor or a maybe one of their shift that you work for told you in term of guidance and something that you know would have been very positive for you for for the for your future. You know something that I wish I had learned a little bit earlier in my career was to plan a little bit further I've been a shopper longtime and I think I think always looked at it as like. I'm going to be a chef forever, but it, but eventually what's next and you get to a certain where you think what is next and I love being a shopping in is my passion. It's right now. It's not a problem, but you know maybe one day it will become a problem where it is. What's next night and I don't know if I've strategically in my own mind. You know the next couple of years. Maybe it'll be your sidekick on on a podcast or something. Okay I'll give you some advice there. So in general how you doing, how do you inspire others? You know it's a difficult question I think what I do is I could give them the framework in an environment where they can be inspired. We talked earlier about reading a disciplined environment with very specific workplace culture. That's the most important thing for me when you think about all the different distractions that we have going on is like I want to turn down the noise. I WANNA turn down the noise and have so much consistency that they could really focus on. What's important but my. My case that's boot, so if we have standards for all these other things, they could really put a laser like focus on what's in front of them, and that may allow them simply by turning down all the referee noise. Allow them to focus on free on. What's on the plate as that's my word so I? Think you've got to provide the setting for someone to be great. inspired. That's really something that's important is i. need to make sure that that all the tools are there all the resources? Are there for someone to be inspired? So you're talking about creativity, and obviously there's a lot of leaders that are going to listen to these podcast in various industries, the managing in house creative teams, so we know in that situation, the importance of obviously giving constant feedback, but you direct reports are amusing, very creative people. So what advice would you give when it comes to leading creative teams I think you have to allow them to be creative, and sometimes you got allow them to fail. Sometimes, a dish will come up. That I know is not necessarily for me, and it gets presented. Be Put on the menu and I might not be one hundred percent sold on it, but the chef putting in front of me is very passionate about this dish by May. Give him some feedback. If it's an absolute, no, sometimes it is an absolute, no, but a lot of times. It's just a personal preference on my partner I don't. Don't think it's GonNa work, but I need to allow them the opportunities to still try it, and either prove me wrong where young opportunity to learn from them or allow them to understand why it wasn't a good decision, so it's about allowing certain amount of failure in a young up and coming chefs or industry people just so that they have the opportunity to learn from their state as learning from mistakes, sometimes is the best edgy. And sometime you it's an absolutely, no, so what? I like those situations that it is an absolute, no linked to it doesn't fit maybe like the Brian of you know one of your food program within the Philmont's or because it's lacking over a technique Koren's. What's those situations, so I think that's. I think you hit the nail on the head. Is that what we're trying to do in all? These restaurants stay on brand support example. One of our restaurants in Asian concept, so someone comes up to you. Know has something that's very far off, and it's not on on concept than Yup. We're going through a very traditional Asian style food, and they come to me with something that's French, Asian influenced. Might. That's that's Kinda, not on brand of what we're doing good idea, but maybe you put that in your pocket for the future for this concept it's very a traditional Asian or if it's Italian and they say they want to put the making this up. They WANNA. Do a Hamas pizza and say well. That's not what we're going for right. We want to work there still neapolitan style pizza. That's the direction we need to go so sometimes it's it's just about redirecting them and helping them understand that it's it's not on brander. Doesn't those are the absolute? No. Let's focus on the hiring process, so hiring good people seems to be a challenge in your industry especially with the new generation. So how do you make sure you place at people in the right position and position for Dafydd success while I think they need to be aligned with the values that we have for formal, so you know that you could figure that out through good interview questions, and and Kinda dig in a little bit. See how they answer, so I learned for. For you I have my set of interview questions I. Like Your Your Your Your fastball questions at the end. That I asked you know the rapid fire. I said you know there's no right or wrong answer, but yeah, what's your favorite restaurant? You can invite three people over or dinner. Who who are they? which that's? What are you making for dinner? What's the worst day you've ever had in a restaurant with the best? You've ever had a restaurant outage. Overcome the bed day. No. What do you do better than anyone else? I start to poke a little bit. And, see how they answer and I. WanNa see you know kind of where their mind is that because simply based on their answers I'll start to understand. Yeah, they think like most people in this kitchen. I think like most people in back in so it allows me to know where to place them personal, or if they think way further advanced than any of us are thinking. That I? I know that so I. Start to ask that I start to just. I've succumbed to to falling for my own tricks before I think the best. The question if you can buy three people to dinner, who would it be? Shafts and Interview, said I would invite Thomas Keller I'd invite renamed Zippy and I'd invite you. I knew exactly what they were doing I was like. We just even by me, I knew exactly what they're doing, but I felt like. That's the dancer so so simply by I heard that person. You're hired. That's a that's a good answer, but. A. New. Trick was and I totally fell for it. So! This is reading interviewing beyond the skill sets, but. Re about like matching the culture of the of the company Correct Yeah I. WanNa, I wanna get to know them a little bit as much as I can, and how they think about whatever you know my case I. Want I want to understand how they think about food I want to understand how they think about leadership I want to understand how they think about. Who Trans I want to know where they get their inspiration because I've been around long enough to know where people are looking at how people are thinking so I, I wanNA probe them a little bit and see how it is that they're thinking and every now and again you find some really incredible answers, and it's like wow I never thought of that, but for the most part I noticed. People sort of answered the same. It's what I'm looking for is. Where where do they fit. The commonalities amongst the and when you're talking about making sure that you're going to position for success. What do you mean by that? Well, give you example I asked the question of named three chefs that you would like to have dinner right, and if I'm hiring for my fine dining restaurant, most of the common answers are people in the high world. Fine dining people with renege or deputy Keller Ran. ACT GETS. Soper Daniel. And she started to pick up. Okay. They're in tune with the top restaurants. And that's who they would grab it for gravitate, or and who they would become inspired by our effort, their answers are. Just making this up, but their answers are chef. Joe, who I worked next door to me on my neighbor. Who's a home cook and My best friend WHO's in culinary school then I know they're not thinking on the same level of some of these other people. That's probably an extreme example, but I have had answers like that were if someone's applying for a certain job, and maybe I noticed that they just don't think about food the same way that the others in that group think about now that doesn't mean. Mean that they're not a good fit. They just might be a bit for that kitchen. Where everyone is laser like focused on food, they might be more suited towards an entry level kitchen, which we have different levels of kitchens and entry level kitchen where okay you could start kind of just immerse yourself in that environment where the conversations began. Then you start to grow into that. So. What are the key on the keys to developing the next generation of leaders in the world? I think the most report thing. I think you need to be a good example for leaders right so that they could look at you and say okay. I want to be like that person, or while that person was in a difficult situation, and they made a good leadership position, so I think first of all providing a good example of the next generation of leaders is first and foremost second of all you need to develop. Need a mentor them. You need to spend five than we needed coach them and you also need to give them room to make mistakes and learn from their mistakes, and then the third thing is i. think you need to push them. Challenge them and hold them accountable. Allowed them to fail old accountable for their failures. Make sure they're learning. Their failures pushed them out of their comfort zone, and continue to develop them, and not allow them to become complacent, and then outside I know I, said I had three, but I would just add one more is allow them to lead. Allow them to get in front of people. Push them to speak. Publicly pushed them to make tough decisions. Allow them to just get out there and do it a burst themselves even when they're not ready, but sometimes just doing it will start to build their confidence. Depend, a mental has silos is seen as growing painful most organization of all sizes. of the executive leaders to prepare an equipped. You know that team with a proper mindset to break down those silos. So can you share with us a little bit the way you know how you encourage you know collaborations so I. I think in order to break down silos. There's everyone needs to have a common purpose, right? All for a common purpose than we all understand the bigger picture that's the unifying front for everybody is what is the purpose that everyone needs to have? And how do they pay? Play a role in that in the bigger picture, so I think what you start to illustrate that for everybody in the everyone understands that we have one common goal, then they could come together and break down those silos to understand how all these different parts play into that common goal, but that common purpose needs to be there the second thing that I think needs to be. There's a sense of belonging. They need to feel like they belong to the team that there are part of the. Review if people have a sense of belonging and a sense of purpose, I think that's going to allow them to flourish on the team and a break down those silos, but once you start to remove that sense of belonging or that purpose, then people are going to figure it out for their own. If you don't give me a purpose, I'll find one for myself and if you don't give me a sense of belonging than I, don't belong and I'm operating out here in aside, so I think developing those two things and understanding that everyone has a goal. Everyone has a common purpose, and we all have have a sense of belonging. And that's created by the workplace culture. That's going to be great about the leaders at pop, but you have to identify that and you have to know that a it's our number one priority to create this team or out. We have no direction in which way we're going and the team is not on board. So. This is like creating the setup. For breaking down those silos, and after that's went on like the the steps that you are putting together and they'll go to foster that collaboration. Once the sense of belonging Aspera and everyone has a purpose. Then we need a grace intangible goals that we're all working for, and then we need to be able to measure those goals, and when we when we're not hitting the mark, we need to be able to go back and identify. Why objectively. What did we do wrong? What could we have done better and make sure everyone understands that this is a common Wynonna common failure, so we? We either went together, or we fell together, and it's not one individual that would ause that it's the leadership's responsibility to make sure that. Were those goals in when we don't meet the mark. Why under? The why I think that's the next step is is really understanding the why, but making sure that in order to understand why you need to have very specific intangible goals that you need to be working for. They don't need to be biggles, but they should be something that you can measure that you can see that you work in progress and Burmese. Specifically I don't WanNa. WanNa see a steep increase in the result in metric so I I'd rather see a slow steady increase because I know that that's a lot more. It's GONNA maintain a lot longer than than a than a spike, because sometimes, that's hard to maintain because you wonder already have spikes for trending in the right direction I? I would prefer to see a continual incline. So chef. We've been talking about leadership for about thirty minutes. Also, and I would like to finish the conversation with a series of rapid fire questions inadequate me. you know outside the leadership? We have to be lighter in conversation now so when I say social media. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? It's a good thing I think right now. It allows people to develop their own brand. Figure out who they are at a lot. It gives you a platform. Everyone now has a voice. Everyone could market themselves. You don't need a higher a big yard firm that does help, but everyone now could be their own marketer and you know with the Internet. figure out how to do. Sort of media. So I think social media is a good thing. Is it dangerous Yester- The I like to have fun with my own personal social media. On my arm I always funny location that that is You know hopefully tidied up. Made Up. Into the into the instagram post I always put a hip hop vote from a rap song. That's hopefully tighten the location or tied into the picture. Sometimes? You got to pay attention to what I'm doing. Sometimes it sneaky, but I like to have fun with. And I try to be consistent with it so that people that that know me know. I'm going to have a different location. A lot of people are on the lookout or always get private messages on. It's a great song or a ha the location. I like to have fun with 'cause. I know it's funny. You'll see me eating caviar all the time on my instagram I. I really don't have your all the time i. just think it's funny so i. Tried to position yourself yeah. Decision, myself, as that guy you. Want people to know what to expect when they're looking at my page that that's kind of who I am and I want to put that up. Okay, do you hate restaurant? Critics don't hate restaurant critics. I would ask them to be just a little bit bore responsible at times. You know there's some very good restaurant. Critics out there and I think that there's other restaurants predicts that sometimes have agenda. That they're pushing board and I think that we have to understand as a restaurant critic that there's a lot of effort on the restaurant part chef that the team they're. Trying to make a living and. You have a lot of power and what you write, that could bring down the whole system. which is a lot of families a lot of a lot of money, a lot of people's way of living. Until, you you, you have A. Moral responsibility with what you're writing so it's it's dangerous to have an agenda to know that it's impacting people's lives I would say that is probably the biggest concern I have with restaurant critics, but sometimes you want to read it for fun. I WANNA know how. Restaurant is as long as the restaurant critic is very objective into feedback is insistent. I think that's I. think that's good, but when it's when it's a deliberate ten to hurt the business. That's that's that that's kind of not something. I enjoy restaurant. Okay. What is your most important pet peeves in the kitchen? They change all the time. They change all the time. I think right now it's. When people we have containers like plastic containers or metal containers and we if you label something with tape, and then you don't take the tape off. Back to the to the dish station I think that's one of my pet peeves. Right now is just people that aren't considerate of the person that's going to have to take care of what you didn't take care so right now. That's a pep you'd so. And I have lots of them sometimes, not picky, but right now. That's that's that's on the list. Okay what all you the most proud of. I think the people that have worked with the past and currently in the present to a lot of my chefs. Have Gone on to become very successful chefs themselves. A gone on to win many awards whether it's a a rising star chef, award or chef of the year award, or whatever the case may be James Beard nomination I've had so many people that I've worked with that have gone on to be very successful on. It's no that I played a little part in that I hope, and hopefully was a good role model for them provided. A good example of a thing ellsberg mental, if nothing else that a I inspired them a little bit, but more importantly. I hope I allow them to see some of the greatness that they haven't felt that. They could also do it that they could that they could go out and be successful south so. Maybe still in that I would say that's the most proud of right now I got a team. A lot of lot of chefs around me and. We do a lot of events and because I have so many chefs around me, it's there's always a different member at bat that we're going to get behind. So yes, sometimes it's the chef from Garissa restaurant will rally behind MC him succeed or Chef from another restaurant for. From Review and I try to a role in my operation where I'm kind of behind the scenes and when? I'm talking to you know the people. Austin put a winding. They say they come to me. They say okay Andre Who's up next MSA. Okay, right now. It's shot Jordan for garrison. That's I want to vote him. Let's put him out there. They come to me and say okay. WHO's next? Who's going on TV next? I would say it's GonNa? Be Our pastry shop. I'm GONNA put up Benjamin. It's his turn at Bat. Let's all get behind him, so I try to take the role behind the scenes right now in in my Rosa. I've had my moment. Where I've been on TV or had had the opportunity to be. The face of the event were just take it back. Step and say. Let's let this one shine for the moment for less. Let that one China for the moment and I think it allows them the opportunity to grow and develop. Their own regard I'm a NASCAR import is do not It's not be the spotlight on, so I'm always looking for opportunities to prop my team. So what is the Canary Trend? You wish would die of a slow and painful death well. I think if you look at food, a Weinstein's. There was all about luxury ingredients going twenty twenty I think the trend Midyear. RECALIBRATION is to be comfort so. True let's see. Let's see what happened myth the into die. Yes, you know obviously the concentration, yeah? Situation we might need to reevaluate our food trends I. Don't know what's what's on its way in, and was on its way out, but I would say boy. I like luxury ingredients. I like I like dining well, so I hope that the that the caviar truffle luxury brand continued. Yeah, let's I that that's what I enjoy eating I I enjoy simple things in life liquor. Great cigars a caviar. I'm very simple. That should be I think that would be the words of the end of the interview. That's a great. Thank you so much for your time. Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts about leadership i. hope the people listening you know got some interesting insights and definitely folded people listening next time you on Austin Goto hotel, having Harrison You know fine dining restaurants saw go to review as well or one of the. You know one of the bar. It's a it's a great place know to have. Their An interesting I would say dining experience. Thank you so much. It's always a pleasure to be on your show. Thank you appreciate it. I hope you enjoy this episode about leadership with Chef Tara. If you did please share it with friends or colleague. Two minutes, and he will help spread the word as word of mouth best way to add more listeners to the show. You can find the show notes of these AP's and all previous episodes on the website. Flavors are known that come peaceful. Lois on social media had flavors unknown on Instagram facebook and twitter make sure to subscribe to the podcast as you do not want to miss any upcoming episode in two weeks. My guess will be chef Michael Lotta from New Orleans Michael just cut the Best Chef South James Award twenty. Twenty with these restaurant may pop. We will discuss about the revival of the southern cuisine, and he's Southeast Asian inspired cuisine utilizing Louisiana Pantry. Is You in two weeks? And until then remember that people who love it are always the best people. You've enjoyed another delicious episode of Flavors Unknown Hungry for more. Subscribe. 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120| Healthy Brain, Happy Life - Discussing Memory and Brain Enrichment with Professor Wendy Suzuki Part 1

Remove the Guesswork: Health, Fitness and Wellbeing for Busy Professionals

37:46 min | 1 year ago

120| Healthy Brain, Happy Life - Discussing Memory and Brain Enrichment with Professor Wendy Suzuki Part 1

"Hi, I'm Leon Spencer, founder of body. Shop performance limited bestselling author. Ted speaker and your host. This is the remove the guesswork podcast the show interview. Influential people in the health, fitness and wellbeing space to bring you the latest ideas on how to optimize your mind body and wellbeing. My guest this week is professor Wendy Suzuki. We met in New York a couple years ago now and we recorded a podcast episode about eighteen months ago. So we'll leaks that under show notes. Do jump back and listen to that. After the listen to this episode. Ideally, a little bit more about I Wendy Suzuki. She a professor of neuroscience and psychology at New York University. She's over a couple of books. Good anxiety batterings Archie on the one that I've got in my hand, healthy brain happy life, a website, which is Wendy Suzuki dot com. Contains lots of pair reviewed articles that she's had published joins an interactive lab, but New York University, I believe studying primarily the effects of exercise on the brain. Yes, there's much we don't know. But as much you're discovering well talk about some of that you're gonna major research interest in brain plasticity studying the memory ineffective exercise on the brain, your tedtalk, the brain changing affects exercises viewed over six point two million times. She's extraordinarily. Naved or more than one headaches talk. And in amongst all of that you somehow find time to do a lot of exercise yourself. Yeah. Yes. That really well big. You've got to be one of the professors. You're actually teaches their own exercise class on campus. I think I might be the only one in the world. Yes. I did it a research and couldn't find anyone else. You also fairly. You're a lover of classical music. Professor, Wendy Suzuki. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much. It's such a pleasure to be here. Yeah, brilliant. Well, listen, welcome back. We've got so much. She gets through a for we should jump right in the books that I'm going to refer she quite a bit. It's the healthy brain happy life. But which is out in paperback, which is a fantastic book. We were just talking about before we went on air about how it's described it, so semi graphical. You said it's very autobiographical. Why did you decide to do that? What did you such bring a lot of you into that book? Yeah. I mean, I think this book like a science memoir. It was going to be a more tradition. Channel. Here are the studies that you should know about. But it was really my book. Asian was very very convincing that I had a lot of personal stories, and that that is going to make this folk unique and make the science much more memorable and understandable. If I couch it in the real life reasons why I study memory why steady exercise and why the breed matters. And she was right. Yeah. It made it unique at made it much more fun to write or actually much more challenging to ride because I was very much used to the more academic and factual emphasis, but basically writing this book made me storyteller. And so in the process, I started doing mall talk on a no you if you have that in the, but the most destroy telling our, and I've done story collider, which is a talk about storytelling for science, topics. Science and I found love doing that. So it's kinda opened up a whole new way of communication for me. Well, it made the very memorable. And of course. Yeah. You could see where I'm going with this. The book is about memory about memory. Anyway, certainly the first part of the book, and I really like start soaking about that there's sort of a personal connection to levels for me. One is by father, no has outside of just back about a month ago from a big fundraiser trip to the optic where we took part in the Arctic circle race. And we did that raise funds for out summits. Research says a very strong personal interest. I also have in the past a very heavy drinker of alcohol, and I haven't for the last seven days had a drop. And I wonder I'm interested in what face that's had on my memory if any so as a kind of two strands to my personal interest. But tell me I what tennis I about. How you discovered a lot more about how the brain both stores memories converts memories holds onto memories. And so well, it was really my great luck that I ended up in graduate school at university of California San Diego, and it was this wonderful wonderful place to focus on the brain mechanisms of long term memory. They were just fantastic scientists they're not just one, but a whole group of them. And so I was able to do my doctoral dissertation with three very famous. Scientists of. Of memory studying the anatomy of the structures. How would they connected how the together and also the function of these structures? What is unique about this key brand structure that I focused on the hippocampus because it turns out the lots of brain areas help you remember things, but hippocampus is critical for height of what we all think of memory memory of our childhood memory of our, grandma and grandpa, we call that declared memory memory for facts and events memory that describes the events and the personal histories of our lives. That is what the hippocampus is critical for first of all it's a beautiful structure, it kind of looks like a jelly roll. And so it's kind of this intertwined area. So for the anatomist in me that likes to understand and analyze interesting mysterious structures. It's beautiful once I'm a little bit biased. But I just was always fascinated with the structure that would allow us to, you know, former memory that could last a lifetime a lifetime could be eighty hundred over one hundred years, and that event might have only lasted a moment your first kiss or the first time that you held your baby in your arms. Those are memories that lasts for whole lifetime. And so for me as a young student of science and neuroscience that was kind of the ultimate question. How does that work, and how can we understand that more deeply, and so it was that fascination together with this group of scientists that happened to be is is d where I happen to get into graduate school that those just clear what I wanted to study. What was it you? Discover it specifically about memory on the human brain. So I would say that the most important discovery that I made were kind of two steps the first was the work that it didn't graduate school easiest do with this amazing group of scientists was really a let's colder we discovery of key brain areas that before this work that I did with them. We really didn't understand how critical they were memory. But what this worked did was highlight. How important these he areas were it's not just the hippocampus, but it's hippocampus together with the quarter areas that surround it, and they're not just of feeding information end or not just kind of way stations. They are doing something unique and very special with memory together with him campus. So we did that through toggle studies showing that I that they're providing massive. Amount of input to these areas. But then also looking at effects of damage to these areas. And so, you know, my gosh, she causes terrible memory loss. That was stage one stage two was figuring out. Okay. Well, how do they work because it's one thing to say because you damage this area you've a memory deficit? Okay. Must be important for memory. You know, it's important for me. But how is it contributed marriage? And so the work in my lab at NYU asked a more difficult question. We wanted to understand happens of neural activity, and the signaling that these individual brain areas did to help us form you memories to do that we can record the activity of individual brain cells as subjects were learning. Something new. And so what we discovered was. There are unique contributions of these individual areas. The hippocampus is particularly important for timing. And this part wasn't in the book because I was in the middle of discovering it as wrote the book critical for our ability to process. Information over time because think of a story that is part of our personal history. It has a beginning a middle and an end one of these areas going into visual memory campus binds together into that beginning middle and end and another key area in there. That was part of the discovery in graduate school is important for spatial layout of that memory word. Did it take place who was standing where? And so those are some of the details that we were able to uncover, and it's just it's not the end, you know. Okay. We did it. It's done. There's still so much to understanding thousands of neuroscientists can choose to be fascinated with memory. So that's just a little flavor Britain stations on that discovery. So what does it mean? Impractical times for how we how we look off to our memory few like we can we do to it haunts memories to hold on from for longer. Yeah. Yeah. Telephone thing in regard to that. So the answer is that the fines of questions that. I was asking in science was really they're called basic science questions. How does it really work? You know, what is it doing? What is that core function? And it also gives you a flavor that either big questions in the brain. We still don't understand. So we're going for those big basic answers. But it doesn't tell you how to keep it. I figured out. Okay. Tempus port for tiny by studies. There told me nothing about how to keep it. I was just trying out. What are those signals happening by to get to that question, which is critical? This is where the shift to my newer research defensive physical activity on brain function calm because I switched this area. When I noticed how much regular physical activity was enhancing my brain function, including by long. Remember that form of him? I knew was dependent on the hippocampus these surrounding structures. And so this work is much more directly able to address not just enhancement, but longevity of memory and longevity of memory comes with a discovery that one of the things that exercise does for the hippocampus. It makes the birth of brand new brain cells that has called it but Campbell neuro Genesis new Burton neurogenesis and this discovered in rodents. It was shown that humans also have new birth of him Campbell cells in adulthood, there's currently a controversy over that. But I'll address that in second but studies in animals clear locks of hippie Campbell neurogenesis, you give animals access to exercise and there is increase in Campbell function. There's many more of these new Kimball cells and these new hip akimbo cells work better than the old hippocampus cells because they are more excitable. They're kind of like, I call them teenage Campbell cells there, they get into trouble. They get into maybe join lots of different memory circuits. And so you want a lot of these cells, and the more cells that you have none of the stronger, the hippocampus that is more EPA Campbell. Better work that Campbell sell else means a better hippocampus that is the core of why helps with longevity because this exercise in Genesis is not going to cure any neuro degenerative disease. It's not going to cure, Alzheimer's Parkinson's. But what it does is it strengthens of rain area that is very susceptible normal AGM susceptible to dementia and susceptible to Alzheimer's disease to basically make him susceptible area as strong as you can with law fall exercise. So that by just naturally it lasts longer. And even if you do have Alzheimer's in your heritage as I do you can stave off because you have a strong been campus to start with when you get into those overages motivation for daily my daily exercise do for sigma morning now, I wanna come back to that whole prince motive exercising. As a way of imaging the brain in staving off memory issues. Yeah. We actually have a client. We bought with. You has an early onset Alzheimer's. She didn't have fifties. Yeah. And the exercise she's been doing with us. So my company has held off the disease a little it slowed the progression of it, which is know, he's an incredible story. And she's done that see physical movement the benefits we get from that. Can you talk just bit? I so about what is the mechanism of action, but something out Siamese with dementia. What exactly is happening in the brain? So with Alzheimer's dementia. It is basically I mean, the easiest would describe it is a mucking up of normal brain function. You get everybody's heard of plaques and tangles it's gone that build up in the brain that I kind of choke the cells and then kill the cells. And where do I kill these cells with your plaques and tangles in the hippocampus and these surrounding quarter CLE areas, right? But then what the progression? Which is why the first. Signs of dementia. Alzheimer's are always these memory long term declarative memory impairments. You no longer have the ability to form these memories that form your personal histories, but as the disease progresses and today, there's still no no good treatment for Alzheimer's to get at those plaques and tangles. What happens is the plastic tangles that start in the campus towards the middle part of the temporal lobe, then spread out all through the brains. And when they reached the key centers of the brain that control your grieving in your heart rate. That's when you pass away of outside resources. What causes this lexin tangles? Yeah. That's a great question. So the current thinking is that there's lots of different possible causes part of it is genetic part of it could be environmental with Knox ins causing these things. And that's part of the unknown. If we knew what caused it would be easier to block it, but it's a very very complicated disease in getting more complicated with the fact that even if you don't show signs of Alzheimer's disease. Everybody gets some blacks tangles towards the end of your life. So how do we how do we shift that balance from even if you have plaques and tangles that you jump into Alzheimer's or not he's questions were still trying trying to answer? And there's still no satisfactory answer at the moment. I'm sure you've read the work of professor Matthew Walker on sleep. Yes. And his theory that I'm gonna scientists this consent awful. This is my understanding of it during the nights if we get a good night's sleep so enough hours of sleep and the right composition, sleep Graham and deepen lights, we can affectively flush out the brains at the classic system, which is a flashing of the brain which fleshes out the theory goes these plots tangles and therefore mitigating or trucks preventing. We think the onset of outside is because of the build up of the plaques the tangles what what do you think about Siri? So I mean, I think it's an interesting theory. I think it has a long way to go before we actually have direct evidence for it would. I am sure of is that an I'm sure Matthew would agree that sleep is essential for healthy brain functioning, so lack of sleep causes more stress on the brain. And stress is terrible for the brain stress is something that causes not necessarily black class tangles, but lots of other stresses on the brain. So I consider sleep similar to exercise in the sense that it is two of the most healthy things that you can do for your brain for. I think of what's happening with exercise during the day as have providing this wonderful bubble bath of good, neuro, chemicals and growth factors for your brain. So you're giving your brain this little bubble back every single time you work out and the sleep is kind of flushing all that. Good stuff down the drain in the lead up with with mites. Nice clean water. A can't be precise enough. How critical good normal sleep and regular normal sleep is for your brain. So and both of them are decreased in stress levels, different kinds of stress levels in your brain in wonderful way. So I think they're both very important again. I think there's a way to go. Prove specific theory. He has right now. I certainly agree that it's critical. And I think that for people that want to focus on having a healthy brain it must include not just regular exercise. But good sleep patterns. And of course, good eating as well. You can't do both those things and have lots of sugar and high fat and no vegetables and expect to have a healthy body Embry. So all these things are playing a all. Yeah. Absolutely agree to helps very interconnected, isn't it? Now, you tell the story in the book about Chuck Thomas cata who I believe is a are in New York. Yes. Just repeating that story because it highlighted to you didn't it the importance of memories. And where I'm going with this is how can we help to solidify memory? So that we can cool on them older I monitor spending that anecdote about Thomas cover. Sure. So I was reading the Wednesday food section of New York Times. And there was an article about Thomas Keller who's a very famous. Chef he owns the French laundry in. Young Ville, California and per se in New York, so I love those restaurants and a big foodie, and I love reading about special shops in how they create all their amazing foods, and so is looking for in an article to an article like that, but it was actually a very autobiographical article is about his relationship with his father that he lost contact with. But then got reconnected with later in life. And so his father moved to Yountville to be with him to live with him. So they could have more of a interaction, which was a lovely story. But but sadly relatively soon too soon after that that happened that wonderful reunion happened is father was in a terrible car accident and HAMAs Keller took care of him nursed him, but he he passed away, and it was a very moving story. But the thing that really struck me was at the end of the story Thomas Keller was quoted as saying. You know, in the end all we really have is our memories, and you can just feel that you know, he held those memories later in life to finally be reconnected with your own father. And it didn't matter how much money he had or you know, how much money the follow less that was irrelevant. It was those memories of sharing food and sharing his life with his father at the end that was so precious, and I thought yeah, that says it right there that in the end is our most precious commodity is our memories. And that is that is part of the reason why I have been fascinated with memories all our life. In a does define we are as people defines our personal histories know. Who would I be if I didn't have my memories of high school my memories of college in my memories of growing up and spending weekends with? My favorite aunt and all these things make us up and it just brought home. How critical memory is? And we often we don't think about that unin everyday level. But as a neuroscientist who studies memories, I loved that story because it really brought it home in a beautiful way. When it definitely did free. 'cause you talk in the book about how it changed you relationship with your parents. He started to say I love you the end of conversations which had been such a cultural. No, no, yes. Yes. It's changed the way that you interacted in a number a lot of different reveal personal relationships as you talk about in the book. Yeah. But may connection is a huge part of being alive and being human made him shared memories is a big connections while making them loose trolling on the medical friendships that I've known for just about half my life now for some of them some of them adapted it MU and the Bank of shared memories that we have. And I want to hold onto those might go the hundred and Woking moving and I'm being able to make my own decisions to being charged for my faculties and certain each vote of a cool. Those memories is a full one. I should add onto that you talking to book about how we can use emotion. Mowatt amongst other things to strengthen memories tubs bit more about that. Yeah. Yeah. So right next to the hippocampus on the brain right in front of it is a small structure called the Gillette. Make Tila means all meant it's it's all men shaped, and we know that it's critical for emotional memory, both negative emotional, memory and positive emotional memory. And that kind of charge of emotion is very important to help the longevity of memory. Why do we know this? We remember the happiest Cima satis moments of our lives, and that does not happen in the same way unless we have the amid Hewlett intact. And so I mean just to continue on with the Thomas Keller story, I had inspired by this. I had this revelation or just realization. When my father developed terrible memory loss from dementia. He went from just normal. Dad was dad to I can't remember how to get to the seven eleven that he used to drive to every afternoon to get his afternoon Cup of coffee and is very scary situation. And I got him the best neurologists that I could find. But I realized as you mentioned that, you know, in my culture, so I'm Japanese-American my parents were born in the United States, but we still have carry on the traditions from the Japanese culture, and what is that? We never say emotional stuff to each other. And it meant that as adults my parents, and I had never said, I love you. We said it when I was young, but never as adults because that was kind of to to emotional in too mushy, and when my father started having this dementia, and I know a lot about it. And it was eventually diagnosed as Alzheimer's dementia. I thought wait a second. I I don't think I liked this tradition. And so I I decided I wanted to start saying I love you. But I was living in New York and California. And I couldn't just start saying it, I blew that would feel too to weird after never seen it as an adult. So I decided to ask permission to say, I love you. So I had this conversation on the phone where I I asked my mom said, you know, hey, you know, we give notice we never said, I love you. And would you think about starting to say a left you at the end of these telephone calls, and that was met with a huge gap of silence. Because she didn't know what I was asking. And then finally she said, and this is I was scared of riches can say no, I don't really want to. She said. Yeah, I've been busy great idea. And so we said very awkward. I love us. Add then I talked to my dad, and I asked him the same thing. And of course, he said, yes, I was less worried about my dad, but the thing that happened the following week when I called back, you know, I talk to my mom, and we said, I love you. And that was just a little bit less awkward, which was great. And then my dad, and I was ready to remind him because a week is a long time for somebody with dementia. A bet that is that is a long term memory. And I was all ready to remind him. You know, dad remember last week? We have the conversation. We're going to start saying I love you. But, but he he's I at the end of that conversation and really surprised me. A new always remembered it for several years before he has to way, he always. I he he always remembered, and that's my best example of the power of an emotional memory and the power of of emotional resonance. It was very rare for his child to ask permission to say. I love you. It was very emotional and memorable thing and that allowed him to pretty long term memory when his hippocampus was not working very well. And that is my best example for why situations with emotional resonance are memorable for us in how we can use that to help. Remember the things that are important to us. And it's enough that story it says a great on. I'm really proves the point. Thank let let's move on to other ways in which we can which have brain and therefore memory at I know that the main thrust of your work is around physical exercise, and you're wearing journeyings now Afo people batch of our previous podcast or your book ago. Both because we talked about your journey. I think three words used in the book your words of fits fats and fearful, but that was halfway through your journey of it definitely coaching on that. You're looking at me as if. They all your will. We feel your journey wasn't it because you fits at the very outset. You did nothing at all. But I'll let people read the book to hear that that aspect of your story. Yes. But I know that exercise is a huge of have you enrich your brain. And everything you've discovered about physical exercise, and let's stop at that point there. Now, what do we know about the effects of exercise on the brain? And and therefore memory. Yeah. So there are so many positive things that exercise does. And that's the wonderful thing about exercise, but it makes it harder for scientists like me to study them and keep track of all of them because there are so many things happening. So let me start with probably the thing that the people that are part of a regular exercise routine notice the mood effects. You feel good after work out in Our Lady. Just probably yourself. Yeah. I did it. But there is a happiness a better mood, and that is because physical activities stimulates the release of dopamine serotonin noradrenaline endorphins. And in Kefelas lesser known. But probably doing what we thought endorphins were doing, but it might be in Kevin's doing it. Anyway, you get the idea. This is where I created this image of the brain's bubble bath that these things are being stimulated and secreted by the brain after every single workout such that you not only feel better, but a regular physical aerobic activity has been shown to be as effective as the most commonly used enter to present to treat major depressive disorder. Now, I do not have major depressive disorder, but after every single worker, I do notice that burst of energy and better mood. But that's not all it's doing is. Also, stimulating what's called growth factors. Growth. Factors are factors. That are helping the rain grow and create connections or synapses, a key growth factors. Not the only one. But it's the one we know most about so let's people talk about it. It's called brain derived nor trophy. Factor. And that is the factor. It is stimulating the birth of those hypica- Campbell neurons. You cannot get those new mckendall neurons to grow unless you have beating around and one of the best ways to stimulate that is exercise. It's going up together with the dopamine, and the serotonin other growth factors are likely as or more important than beating in the prefrontal cortex, which is also highly sensitive in a positive way to every single workout that you do there's improvement prefrontal function. There's no evidence for new brain cells being grown there. But evidence for the accidents to be strengthened as you exercise in the prefrontal cortex and more synapses in the prefrontal cortex and certainly better prefrontal function. So you're able the shift in focus your attention better. You're working memory that memory that keeps things in mind as you. We're having a conversation that is also improved. So we've hit grief the cortex when teddy but campus, we've hit the. Nor transmitter systems and the other thing that is improved is the circulatory system so with regular aerobic exercise. You get stimulation of brand new blood vessels in the brain that has called and yo-. Genesis whiteside. Good. It's good because the brain is the number one user of oxygen in the entire body and the more blood vessels. You have the better that that oxygenated blood camp refuse the entire break. So now, we have something with exercise that's global. It is helping the whole brain get better oxygen and think about this. As you age, we become more and more susceptible to strokes, which are bursting blood vessels in the brain the best thing to have in your brain. If a blood vessel burst is more blood vessels. And so imagine yourself you're getting more and more blood vessels as you are exercising. So as you get more and more susceptible to strokes. You. Have lots of blood vessels there to help recovery. Go on plus just more blood vessels. Again means better profusion for your entire rain. So there's also metabolic and finally the last one metabolic changes. So your brain has improved metabolism. Basically with regular exercise were hidden in it on all levels. We have mood boost we have structual strengthening and the hippocampus refundable cortex. We have overall better circulatory function, and we have improved metabolism in the brain. So the brain is processing its transmitters and kind of getting rid of the waste products that Matthew Walker's talking about the gets flushed out at night. Well, it's it's actually being flushed out all the time. And so exercise helps Abbas well. Okay. So the next questions won't type of exercise. Do we know? Yeah. So we know the most about aerobic exercise Aurora exercise that gets your heart rate up. Yep. Why? Because the vast majority of the exercise steady so focused on a robotic activity now fewer studies have looked at strength training activities weightlifting things like that. And the results were mixed. Some find good results on fine. No results. And it's unclear whether that is because the right formula has not been found or it's not as effective as Roby exercise, my best guess, my hypothesis for this is that there will be positive effects of all kinds of exercise, and we just need a little bit more time to find that her fix exercise prescription and match it with the right brain function. So that's part of what I'm doing in my lap. Okay. Trying to figure out what those mapping are. Yeah. Okay. That would be interesting. And how do we know how long you need to exercise to get these benefits? Yeah. So lifelong benefits can start with as lit. Little as regular walking, which can be a robot. I mean, if you're a fit Olympic athlete, no walking's, not gonna do it. But most of us are not most of us are on the other end of the spectrum. So walking can be aerobics. And this is what I like to emphasize. Don't get discourage. You think oh, I I really don't have an exercise program as well. Because if you are on that other end of the spectrum and takes less for you to get to an aerobic level of activity, which is great, you know, the rest like I have to work for a longer time yet my heart rate up because I've built my aerobics Hassi up. But now means that if you get just getting started a walk is good. And it does how do not compare yourself to a triathlete or your neighbor who goes to the gym five days a week. You are getting especially if you're not a regular gym goer can get a great workout with a good power walk walk every day and regular walks five times a week have. Been shown to be effective to decrease your chances of getting dementia by thirty percent nothing to sneeze at. But then a recent study in twenty teen in Swedish women suggested that high fit women in middle age. If you get yourself a high fit in middle age forty years later when you're older you are ninety percent less likely to get dementia. No not issue. That's a correlation. That's not causation. Yeah. But it is one of the most striking findings in it gives a nice range you can snort with walking. But guess what? The more you work out and make this part of your regular life. The more chances you have a decreasing your ability of getting dementia by massive amount. I'm not a huge fan of walking as a fan of active transport. That's the way of getting base. It will be able to foundation of fitness. So I am very fit. We recently come back from the wolves tough ski race while it was someone else's about our training. But we didn't go back and someone else about training quite surprised by minus chalance. A wish we built out. We already had a very good level of base, fitness. And what really underpins that is a notable king. Yeah. Yeah. We did some specific fitness stuff in a cross country skiing and CLYDE hills. But actually, what underpins my fitness is just ahead of an audible king. I do wear it apple watch. 'cause it's linked to my vote right, Tillerson health insurance predominantly, but I did between food. In fifteen sixty thousand steps that's not just giving about my business, so active. You don't make sure stunned and all this other stuff. Yeah. Is a significant part of people's fitness. It shouldn't be you've just backed out with a couple of excellent studies in standards. Yes, absolutely Zili, and that is such an important message. Maybe the most important message from this podcast is every step does count. You've got illustrated with your own personal fitness regime, and we see it in the studies that walking is a great baseline and people get discouraged so quickly before they even walk into the gym. They don't even make it to the gym. But you don't have to go to the gym. You can add walking in to your day. And I just did a PBS special based on this book, healthy brain, happy life. And so I had a whole bunch of even new brain hack, so healthy brain happy is filled with rain hats in my neighbor, you one that I'll share with your audience is called. The MRs Doubtfire air rain hat, if you saw the movie MRs Doubtfire, you remember that there's a great scene with Robin Williams as misstep fire vacuuming to music by it is the most aerobic vacuuming that you ever can imagine. And it's all about making those those tourists house cleaning, you gotta do it. Sometimes you could make a pretty darn aerobic. You go to I don't know if you have Costco. Do you have Costco? We do. Yeah. Okay. So the huge thing going to Costco. Go do a few rounds around the whole store before you go. Do the shopping that is a great way to get an even more steps into regiment, but I'm also a big fan of dance. One of my new research partners is the desert Julianne Hough from dancing with the stars. And she started eating dance program. And it is just infectious you get good music and pick your music that you like and just start moving and do it like nobody's watching and do it when nobody's watching. So. So you're even less inhibited. But it is a great way. And you don't need special close. You don't need a gym membership. You need an ipod or just a computer and an open space and everybody has so Kip Nova. I I agree offering us when the most difficult domestic pool message. They'll slow as web. Interested in finding out what you'll helpful Q? It's jump on our website, WWW dot body shorts performance dot com and click on take the test. It'll take you to a short two to three minutes test. And at the end of that, you'll get a school called and a free thirty nine patriot pool based on I six signals sleep, mental health, energy, body, composition, digestion, and fitness. And if even -joyed this episode, please think of someone you could really benefit from the content and hit not share by and send it across to them. And of course, don't forget subscribe and Nevis a rating and review. Thank you very much for listening.

Alzheimer New York professor New York University Thomas Keller Wendy Suzuki Alzheimer's disease California Matthew Walker physical exercise Campbell Costco headaches Leon Spencer Ted speaker New York Times Archie
Introducing Tom Brown's Body

Murder Book

04:22 min | 2 months ago

Introducing Tom Brown's Body

"Hi. This is Michael Connelly and we have a new season of murder book launching October Fifth. It's called the women who Stop Sam Little so tell your friends to listen and subscribe on Apple podcasts in the meantime I wanNa tell you about another true crime podcast from journalists skip Hollandsworth and our friends at Texas monthly. Is called Tom Brown's body and rather than having me explain it I'll just let you listen to the trailer. Let me tell you what criminal laws not about. Disproving. Evidence proves the case. So at some point. In respect for Tom. We have to say. Even though the result is not what we want, we're going to respect the evidence that the rings. You remember Tom Sized. Yard that autopart phys life great football player. Ray. Family Switch Church. In the tiny panhandle town of Canadian Texas, there are two identical signs they're planet on an empty lot on main street just up the road from a handful of century old red brick buildings. Each one is four feet tall and eight feet wide. At the very top of each sign and bold red letters is the phrase justice for Tom. Beneath data two sentences. There is a killer among us. Please pray that Thomas Keller is found and brought to justice. In the fall of two, thousand, Sixteen Tom Brown was one of the most popular kids in town the president of his senior class, a standout in the schools drama club and an offensive. Lineman on the team. But on the night of November twenty third. Two. Thousand Sixteen. The night before Thanksgiving. He vanished. For two years and two months the residents of Canadian searched for him. Finally in January two thousand nineteen. A sheriff's deputy made a discovery. Breaking. Tonight. The eighteen year old was last seen November two, thousand, sixteen investigators from multiple different law enforcement agencies confirm his remains have been found. Tom's disappearance and death has now been investigated by four law enforcement agencies. They've given lie detector tests to Canadians on sheriff to a globe-trotting private investigator hired to work on the case even the members of Tom Zone family. Nearly, everyone involved in the case has fallen under suspicion. The first way to jump in just put on. Early. Really. High. Incident? Asti. It's an ask is. conspiracies. I'm going to kill him. I put him in a wood. Chipper. I had gay sex with. Some guys call me at the football field that night and killed calling football I. got there not covered it up a bird. They kept telling me that I had talked to Thomas and what happened I knew where he was at I had found him that Ni- I, moved his body. And it's hard to know a lot of. Those pieces of this I don't know who's line lying or just misinformation based on the wrong evidence. I don't know. Why in pretty little Canadian Tom. Brown suddenly disappear. And what happens when a whole town gets obsessed with the single tragic story? A town that to this day remains swamped with suspicion. finger-pointing. Sensational allegations. In one dark rumor after enough. I'm Scott Pollens, and for more than thirty years, I've written true crime stories for Texas monthly magazine. But. I've never come across a story like this. From Texas monthly. This is Tom Brown's body. Coming September, twenty-ninth have known me.

Tom Brown Tom Texas Tom Sized Thomas Keller football Tom Zone Michael Connelly Texas monthly magazine Sam Little murder Family Switch Church Apple Scott Pollens Hollandsworth Ray investigator president
Seabourn Cruises Must-Knows and Watch-Outs

Tips for Travellers Podcast

11:50 min | 1 year ago

Seabourn Cruises Must-Knows and Watch-Outs

"What are the four things that you absolutely need to know about Seib on cruises before cruising with them? I'm Gary this is another Meta Travis. I'm here their onboard seaborn encore. It'd be a great opportunity to share with you. The things that I think you need to know about seaborn cruisers starting with WHO exactly is seaborn. SEABOURN cruises seabourn cruise is part of the huge carnival. Cruise Corporations Carnival also have brands. Like Princess Cunard Aida Kosta And see what is their ultra luxury cruise line seabourn cruises at the time of according either has announced seven ships in their fleet they have a classic cruising fleet and have now an expedition fleet so the classic cruising they have three older ships which are called the Odyssey class the ships and this is seaborn sojourn seabourn Odyssey and seabourn quest. These ships hold out about four hundred fifty passages and ninety percent of them have balconies. Then you have the uncle class which is Siebel non-core and its sister ship ovation and they have three hundred suites and they. I hold six hundred guests about thirty percent more guests. They also have to expedition vessels the first which is called seaborn venture and they're going to focus on expedition cruises particularly in the polar regions Arctic and Ourika. So what is it that does that's different to the other. Ultra luxury cruise slants. I think there's probably three buckets of things that they do do very differently. The first of these is one of their big flagships which seaborn square. It's where people go meet us. Where all of the a key functions are? So you have services here you have your excursions. Hey of a renaissance coffee shop which is open all. The time has very snacks. You haven't a library Aubrey here. You have complimentary newspapers download onto device or they print out. There's also some shops nearby here. It's a really big important hub. And they've made really integral to the hull cruising experience. The second thing is they have a whole lot of partnerships. They brought on board different experts to fine tune what they do first of all in entertainment that Aparna ship with September rice. He is created. Show an evening with Tim Rice when it comes to dining they have a partnership with a US based based celebrity chef. Called Thomas Keller. They have a very specific restaurant called the grill. Was Thomas Cata. Which is a fifties sixties steakhouse in across the other dining venues venues that have various Thomas Kella dishes when it comes to the whole area of fitness and wellness? They have a relationship and Aparna ship with a American expert called talk to Andrew Wheel and he's a real expert in mindfulness meditation. And he's a whole program which involve lectures meditation Donovan Yoga Depending on the destination they also might have some very specific excursions when it comes to drink to have a relationship with the. US based mixologist. Called Brian Van van Flan done and what he sees relooked the hookup. Tom and new so they have a whole range of cocktails. Which is specifically created and trained all the bar staff to make in the cabins cabins? They have a relationship with molten browns. All the toiletries are multi Brown toiletries and have very specific seaborn fragrance one of the most significant relationships they have is. They are the official cruise part of UNESCO and what they've done is create a whole series of excursions around World Heritage sites or sites sites of significance related to UNESCO. So you'll find on all the different cruises you go on. If you go into sites which are UNESCO World Heritage sites or Sites of interest there are UNESCO nominated excursions. What's very interesting? For example the cruiser was on one of the UNESCO tours in Minorca some of the very ancient sites there and addition to the normal guide. We also had an expert archeologist who is associated one of the universities who came along that UNESCO to the next area which I think they do differently as in the whole area of service now all outer luxury lines have phenomenal service. I think one of the things. That's interesting about seaborn. They have a slightly more informed. Approach said still incredibly good service but they go out of their way to make sure they learn your name and of course your preferences but as a slightly more relaxed informal chatty kind of service so it's less stuffy less formal that you might find on some other lines if you like luxury but you like it to be a little more informal you you might actually find it on seaborne that slightly more relaxed very respectful and very high quality of service is more to your taste because it's a little bit less stuffy little bit less formal so those are things that I think seaborn do that slightly different slightly unique. The thing that I can really understand is what is and isn't included in their fares ultra luxury lines tend to be largely all inclusive. There's always slight quirks differences. See what is comparable with most of the ultra luxury lines. Whether there are some ultra luxury lines of will include some of the things that seaborne does. Let's take a look at the inclusions. First of all not surprising you've caught your accommodation. Asian is included and on the ships. You can have very large suites through to on the Odyssey class. You have some ocean view cabins on uncle animation. It's or balcony suites. Secondly all of your food is included and this a very wide choice on ovation. Have Starting Johnnie Moore Choice. Because it's bigger so they have more space and let me give you an example of what you can expect. You have the restaurant. Which is the main dining venue? You then have. The colonnade which is is the more informal dining you then have already spoken about grew was Thomas. Keller which is the steakhouse with the grows. Thomas Keller you can go once during a weeklong cruise and you have to make reservations for that. Probably one of my favorite places on board. It's Sushi which is on boarded here on uncle. It goes often as you want to the rest and is no need for reservations. It doesn't more than full dining out on the PUDIG. You can have an informal lunch sort of hot dogs hamburgers that kind of stuff every afternoon at a roundabout four o'clock often T.. On uncle that was up in the observation Baugh and then there is twenty four hour room service so huge amounts of dining options included within the fair onboard. Seaborn is your drink included so wines beers spirits much the premium brands that you would love an expect act are included within your fares so you have an inr many bar which is included within the fair and et stocked with whatever you want also included in the fare as you would expect is all the entertainment so you have a knock your show in the Grand Salon. which could include that evening with? SA- Tim Rice show it could be guest entertainers or the seaborne vocalists style perform different variety. Shows there's also very activities on Boise you'll have a daily program with utilities you'd expect on cruise you then also have have the seaborne compensations which is where they on cruises will have against speak or speakers talking about the destination and the history of the culture. That's all include dude. And then they'll be often a whole range of different parties with the captains welcome party. Politics Party said away party. All those kind of events and activities are included. -cluded within the fair you'll get access to pretty much all of the facilities on board with one key exception and that is the retreat. Hold up to thirty the people they have a series of Cabanas. You pay a fee to go there and they you will be able to relax quite as hot tub. You can have a message up there for an extra fee if you want the other thing. That is a big plus. That isn't is not is even. If you go to the SPA gratuities are included. So that's a big plus knowing that that's it's all covered so those are all key things that are covered so what's not covered. Wifi is not included but you can buy different packages of Wi fi the cruiser which is a seven day cruise. It was about two hundred forty dollars for wi fi unobserved wifi across the whole cruise excursions are also an additional cost. Looking at the brochure on the cruise I was on probably the cheapest excursion you get which some of the most simple walking tours roundabout eighty nine dollars per person. Some of the ones that I did for example the four UNESCO excursion that cost a hundred fifty nine dollars the five hour bike tour that went on one hundred and eighty nine dollars list in porter Venero a there was a boat and walking tall which was around about two hundred dollars. But they're going to be spending sort of between one hundred and two hundred dollars per person per excursion I would say to budget full then. Of course there's things that are more discretion is if you buy stuff in the shops if you go to the SPA if you want to because the casino and gamble then of course laundry if you want to send laundry away whether you can do your own laundry in the guest laundries on board the ships so who in my opinion seaborn most suited for first of all the passengers. You're gonNA find a board because it's an ultra luxury line will tend to be. Yeah well traveled and of course have the money to be on ultra luxury line. So you're gonNA find lots of professional people lawyers or doctors or had run companies or from academic world so really interesting group of people with lots of interesting stories opinions in terms of H. Profile. You're gonNA find that you mostly seeing people in their sixties and above cost yoga find younger people particularly in the more summer destinations. Like the Caribbean could find people coming on their honeymoons. You're not gonNA find many any families coming on board now. In the key summer holiday months you will find some kids on board the oldest because there aren't kids clubs shows excursions excursions and dining catering four kids as such. The whole experience is done in English. It's quite North American focused. So you'll find a lot of the quizzes and the way things are done is quite American. Because that's the real bulk of passages some Borgen of normally find a big slug of people from from North America. Now I've seen of the years that I've been involved with Obetsebz- increases that it's really evolving so on this cruise for example there were probably about fifty sixty percent where from North America from the US and from Canada there were a big representation as you'd have to find on cruises particularly tickly. I was in the magic farther from the UK from Australia from New Zealand. But there was a big representation of other nationalities with something like twenty different nationalities on on board most of the charters on board travelling in couples. There are some cabins which to have space for three people but couples predominantly thing. You're gonNA find out what's if you're a solar traveler Adler is see bond for you. Although there are no solo cabins on board the ships during the course of the year they normally run special offers four different Timorese. He's for people travelling alone and they basically slash down the surcharge pay for single occupancy of a double cabin also. They're very good looking at travis because they do get quite a few on board so at the beginning of the cruise they will host an event for Solo travelers. So you get to meet the set of travelers. They can introduce Each Other and then also they host lots of tables so the crude different members of the crew with its singers or the cruise director or the engineers they host tables ask Senator Travis too though so I was traveling on cruises by myself announced many nights to go to various hosted tables so the focus on helping charters. Hope you found this helpful. I have many more videos about cruising about CBO and so if you wanted to watch another one right now.

UNESCO US seaborn venture Thomas Keller SEABOURN Tim Rice Siebel Princess Cunard Aida Kosta UNESCO World Heritage Seib Senator Travis Gary Wi Thomas Cata Thomas Kella Brian Van van Flan Aparna Aparna Aubrey North America
Millions put mortgage payments on hold

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

08:08 min | 8 months ago

Millions put mortgage payments on hold

"What happens when millions can't pay the note on their house? I'm David Brancaccio. Good Morning. More Americans are putting their mortgage payments on hold given the locations of the pandemic. An industry group is out with a new survey showing that about two million loans. Were in what is called forbearance. The first week of April. Meaning barbers have asked for a temporary break on the payment due. Marketplace's Amy Scott has more the emergency aid package. Congress passed last month allows many homeowners to delay their mortgage payments for up to a year and job losses grow more. Americans are requesting that option. The Mortgage Bankers Association says about three point seven percent of home loans were in forbearance as of April fifth up. One percentage point from the week before chief economist. Mike Fratton Tony expects that number to grow at a rapid pace this is putting a real strain on some mortgage servicers. Servicers are the companies that collect loan payments from borrowers and they still have to pay. The investors who owned securities backed by those mortgages. The industry is asking the Federal Reserve for emergency loans to help cover those payments. There was a speck of good news. In the survey average hold times for homeowners calling to get relief fell from thirteen minutes to just over ten. I'm Amy Scott for marketplace. There are some optimistic optimistic assumptions built into a new forecast for what cove nineteen will do to the world economy this year. Lindsay pegues is the chief economist at the Investment Company. Stifled Nicholas. Good morning to you. I mean you'd think this would be one of these. Stop the presses business reporting moment but it's fairly obvious. The International Monetary Fund has new outlook. And it says there's going to be recession this year and that global gross domestic products going to shrink by three percent instead of growing more than three percent to be expected. I guess absolutely at this point. The market is very clearly pricing in a recession. But the question is how the according to the IMF. It's not going to be quite that bad. They're looking for just over. Three percent contraction growth in twenty. And they're looking for a near six percent rebound in growth by twenty twenty what now of course the IMF did say downside. Risks to their forecasts remain as they are assuming a near term containment of the virus. And they're not assuming a second round flare up in the fall so pretty optimistic assumptions but nevertheless painting a positive rosie pathway for the potential recovery of the global economy Lindsey Piazza at the Investment Company steeple necklace. Thank you so much. Thank him. The season for quarterly corporate results has begun in the biggest of Banks J. P. Morgan. Chase reported this morning that it's prophet was down about seventy percent January to March given the challenges of Gerona virus. The bank says it's setting aside a lot of money. Nearly seven billion dollars to cover possible defaults on loans by businesses and consumers. It was also the quarter Wednesday. Oj Me Diamond was out for a month. Following emergency heart surgery the banks still made two point nine billion dollars but might not pay dividends to shareholders so as to preserve its reserves. We also have wells. Fargo today setting aside. Three eight billion dollars for when people can't pay them back in early trading. The Dow is up five hundred twenty eight. I should make that five hundred seventy eight points. That is two point. Five percent a similar percentage rise for the S. and P. Five hundred. The Nasdaq is up. Two point. Nine percent Toyota said today it's going to do a limited reopening of its car factories in France and in Poland a week from tomorrow. North and South American plans Asian facilities stay closed for now Johnson and Johnson. Prophets rose for last quarter with sales up for its consumer products at a time. Many were stocking up for sheltering in the company's lowering its profit guidance for the rest of the year Big media companies continue to fight for the attention of so many people holed up at home this week. Nbc Universal get serious with its new streaming video service called Peacock available free starting tomorrow to people who pay for comcast xfinity Internet or TV. Everyone else who's interested can pay to join in July marketplace's Megan McCarthy Carino has more peacock will pack a vast library of NBC universal content from shows like the office to movies like Jurassic Park users will also get early access to late night shows with Jimmy Fallon and Seth Meyers but when it comes to original content back the matter is is right now. Peacock does not have many new feathers. Dominic Patent is senior editor and chief critic for deadline. He says due to production delays caused by the corona virus. Some show launches have been pushed back. The service will also be lacking. What would have been a major selling point this summer with the postponement of the Olympics but peacock could be on to something by bundling the streaming service with traditional cable? Package says Michael Packer. An analyst with Wedbush Securities GonNa Migrate Back to cable with one subscription. That's what we all really want because juggling all those subscriptions and passwords really cuts into binge-watching time. I Megan mccurdy Carino for marketplace. Now to business interruption insurance many firms have been paying for that coverage and given covert nineteen they would like their checks but many of those policies have specific exclusions for pandemics and some insurance companies. Say other policies just can't cover this marketplace's Nova Sophos on the line from southern California. What are the insurance companies saying? Nova ABOUT WHY? They can't won't or shouldn't pay out claims right so the insurance position is that these policies were generally not meant for pandemics. They were supposed to cover. Events like say restaurants building is damaged and it has to close for a while so interruption insurance pays out then in fact a lot of these policies have exemptions for communicable diseases and these are exemptions put in place after the SARS outbreak in the early two thousand so ensure say if they have to cover all the business interruption losses now many would go out of business and for proprietors who had their businesses shockingly interrupted by the virus shutdowns. What is their strategy well? Some are suing including celebrity chef. Thomas Keller whose California restaurant the French laundry has had to close his lawyer John Hoult Tailing told me this morning that Keller's policy actually includes coverage for virus related incidents. And he's still not getting paid by his insurer. Hoteling has been organizing some twelve hundred restaurants and related organizations to turn up the heat on insurers. Here's what he says they want. I'm Queen on the policies that you if you don't have enough money. Lots of different story of go to the government and try to find a solution to that right so now a handful of states are considering legislation to force insurers to pay. Washington is getting involved. Both Republican and Democratic members of Congress sent a letter to insurance industry executives. Asking them to pay up all right. That is marketplace's oversaw. Thank you very much. You can get more stories like this in our daily newsletter to help unpack what's happening in the Kovic. Nineteen economy right now and what it could mean for you. Subscribe for Free Marketplace Dot Org slash newsletters checking markets again in early trading. The Dow is up nearly six hundred points. Two point six percent now is up two and a half percent. The Nasdaq up three percent. I'm David Brancaccio. This is the marketplace morning report we are from APM American public media.

International Monetary Fund David Brancaccio Peacock Amy Scott chief economist Megan McCarthy Carino Congress California Mortgage Bankers Association Nbc Thomas Keller Federal Reserve Mike Fratton Tony Johnson twenty twenty Investment Company
Takeout Outtake Especial: Glen Johnson

The Takeout

09:30 min | 1 year ago

Takeout Outtake Especial: Glen Johnson

"From C._B._S.. News this is the takeout with Major Garrett. Welcome to your Tuesday takeout out. Take Special I M Major Garrett host and Creator this amazing program our guest this week Glen Johnson Known Glenn for many years. He was a reporter then he joined the government went to work for Secretary of State. John Kerry's written a book about that experience window seat on the world. Yes I know this is the fun and Games portion of our program. We will get to the fun and games in just a moment but a little bit of business because we didn't get to the main show so I wanNA play two Soundbites Glenn I one Sarah is number eleven and then number ten. Please run those back to back eleven and then ten. I'll have a very good conversation with what I said. Is None of your for business realm okay. That was the recognizable voice of the forty fifth President States Donald Trump. I on June twenty six south lawn of the White House. I'll have a very good conversation with them. Meeting Vladimir Putin what I say to him is none of Your Business <hes> then in Osaka at the g twenty they're sitting next to each each other a reporter says will you tell Russia not to meddle and then you saw the president's voice you heard with his voice with his mannerisms a little. I think fair to describe lack of seriousness Glen Johnson your reaction to both. The first time that he said don't meddle in our election he said that to the President President Putin and then when he reiterated it he lives looking at the Russian foreign minister when he said so these are the two key interlocutors that he deals with for foreign in policy in terms of US Russian relations and he was almost making light of that and this is just an issue that all of our intelligence intelligence agencies have confirmed armed was was generated from Russia at the direction of high level officials their high levels highest levels until the mullet report and and for some reason the president's still doesn't take it seriously and I played that other sound byte about none of your <unk> business because this president unlike other presidents wants to have private deeply private conversations with Vladimir Putin in which not even those who are and historically have been assigned the task of taking notes for a permanent record are present right. I mean he did a one on one with him. In Helsinki Finland where the only person there was the translator and and so you know the rest of the government has to function with some insight into the president's posture posture on issues as someone who was a reporter I <hes> and then someone who was schooled in the methodology of government as a reporter would be naturally curious about learning those things and being steeped in both. What's your reaction to that phenomenon? Phenomenon of this president and these private meetings with the Russian leader. I don't know to what end you do that because especially this time when there is very high tension over something as fundamentals an attack on the front of our democracy stability of our elections and the way they're conducted you want other people in the room to understand your position. You want them to be aware of what you are saying or not. Saying you want your national security advisor to know where you stand you want your secretary of state to know your position on something and you can't rely on as a second hand reiteration from the president of something that he said when you weren't in the room you know that's why you have note takers in there. That's why you have these people in there and and it creates in the thing is the Russians come out of these meetings and I write about this in the book. It's IT'S A it's a peril of our system where we have this inner agency process where you run WANNA run any press commentary by people with equities in the Defense Department or the Intelligence Central Intelligence Agency so that slows down our whole process Sergei Lavrov the Russian foreign minister used to write notes by hand on the back of a card and walk out and deliver his remarks because he only had a constituency of one please and so the Russians are going to go out and spin anything that they want to coming out of these meanings in if the president doesn't do that forcefully enough himself in other people. In the administration don't know what really happened. The Russians end up winning that P._R.. Battle I want to shift focus just for a second because there's another task I wanted to do with which is China. I covered many American presidents starting with Bill Clinton trying to wrestle with the question of China and and I would say I want to ask you. Do you think that this administration has gotten China's attention in way previous. Administrations have not certainly. I think that they've gotten their tension. In the Economic Realm <hes> the tariff issue certainly affects the Chinese economy. The question is at what expense to the U._S.. Economy obviously the stock market is strong and all that but if you talked to farmers if you talk to others around the country they're feeling the impact of this trade war is well not just the Chinese. There is a domestic in the sense that on these underlying issues which every president I've covered since Bill Clinton. Although it was President Clinton it was more or less about normalization of trade status and things like this things on intellectual property in join ownership had become his difficult an issue but they were beginning to become an issue for Bush President George W Bush President Obama that trying to sorta slough to that off and now it doesn't it what how are you negotiating. We don't know but it seems like they are attentive in ways that they hadn't been before that the tariff calling that question puts this in a different category in into your. Prior Point about if you take out the trump name away from some of these diplomatic engagements would people support them again credit to him here. I think that this is something that's important. I write in the book about you know the vast inequity in the dealings between the two countries where our countries our companies basically have to science technology transfer agreements. They have to let the Chinese have all sorts of access to their intellectual property or they they have stolen from them and we we have no reciprocal sort of situation when they wanNA come and do business in the U._S.. Those kind of inequities have to be addressed. One of the things I write about at the end of the book is is conclusion of we have these unique assets in our country where we have these great universities cities we have this beautiful real estate. You know apartments in New York and things like that. Chinese Russians and others can come in and buy as much of this property and send their kids to these schools ad nauseam and and if you're an American and you want to go oh to China and buy a house you can buy one house that you have to live in yourself and that's it here on the way in from an airport. A Chinese citizen can buy as much real estate in the United States that they want. There's an end are doing so and is a sixty story apartment building condo a building in Boston. That's almost the vast majority of it is owned by absentee Chinese landlords nothing wrong with that except that there's no similar sort of access to that market for U._S.. Buyers over in Beijing Okay Fun Games now little. A little abbreviated my fault my fault my fault all right three threshold questions glad I think you're familiar with them. One of the most are the most influential book in Your Life All time favorite movie or one of your all time favorite movies long fighter a long drive. What kind of music artist or genre are you most likely to listen to so movie <hes> having wanted to one point my life consider being a naval aviator would have to be top gun there you go? You must be psyched about the remake. This summer folks. Not this summer kids next this summer. I'm ready for it music. I get some grief from my kids for but I still cold play <hes> seen that I understand that grief I've seen that them in concert a couple times book that's difficult and I actually into cooking and I love reading cooking books and there's one that Thomas Keller wrote called Boo Sean which is a great restaurant cookbook and it's a little high end but accessible and I enjoy that I went back and read present at the creation creation before I wrote this book and that's a book about diplomacy by Dean Atchison and I just found that to be a wonderful book too so there's lots out there my shelf. When I try to read running over leisure I try and skewed towards the foodie world very good the voice of Glen Johnson our special guests great pleasure to have you made your can't thank you enough Kevin Milano spinner host excellent lunch will be back? I certainly hope so. I majored. You've been listening to you. The takeout this your Tuesday takeout outtake ESPEC- I we'll see next week new episodes of takeout or available Friday mornings. rever you get your podcasts takeout is produced by Ardent Ferrari Cop Deanna Crescendo and Jamie Benson C._B._S. and production by Alexander Element and Eric Su sonnet follow us on facebook twitter and instagram.

president President Clinton President Putin Glen Johnson reporter China Major Garrett John Kerry United States White House Donald Trump Russia Sarah Osaka Thomas Keller Beijing New York Sergei Lavrov