17 Burst results for "Thomas Carlyle"

"thomas carlyle" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

02:16 min | 5 months ago

"thomas carlyle" Discussed on Food Psych

"There are others. Including people like Thomas Carlyle in so frequently. What would happen? Is that this lady's book? Which interestingly enough? The editor woman by the name of Sarah Hale? See was not necessarily fond of fashion, but she was a Protestant and she'd been involved in the second grade awakening that was taking place in the United States, and she was also very much about educating women girls, so between being a involved in the great awakening and being an educator. She thought it was her moral responsibility to tell women how they should eat. And, so she would frequently increases like this, but then there would also be other individuals, so many of the writers for Goldies Ladies Book were effect women and they pin pieces themselves and some of these women were more invested in fashion beauty, and so whereas for Sarah Hale the question was always. How do we eat right for God by? We WanNA show temperance at the table by me. Think of temperatures is a term that refers to people who might be prone to alcoholism bright, so not drinking too much, but it was also apply to concerns of over eating in the nineteenth century. So last year was McCain's through these types of claims, other individuals would in their pieces say things like and you know it's important for us to keep in mind that if you WANNA be fat, there are other places we can go for that. You know you can go to Africa. I mean I can't imagine this today, right? Because a voice, no one would say that. No, but yeah the nineteenth century. They were quite clear like well. If you WANNA be a woman of fashion, you know someone who has air of cultivation in particular type of means, then you should maintain a particular body size. If you WANNA be fat, you can go to Africa very clearly. So yeah, I think comedy across a lot of the material that I. EXPLORE IN THE BOOK I was originally. Sort of just amazed is the word. It's like to see these kinds of things in writing. It's like wow, they actually will this and you know not only. Did they write this? But all of this history seems to be largely forgotten..

Sarah Hale Africa Thomas Carlyle McCain editor United States
"thomas carlyle" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

10:14 min | 7 months ago

"thomas carlyle" Discussed on Ideas

"Romanticism was an artistic and intellectual movement that caught on at the end of the eighteenth century. It was a reaction against the rationality of the Enlightenment and emphasized the emotional the natural and artistic genius and the latter is important the emphasis on the artist as a creative genius unshackled by traditions and conventions born not trained William Wordsworth. The great romantic poets said this. What is a poet? He is a man speaking to men a man. It is true in dude with more lively sensibility. More enthusiasm and tenderness who has a greater knowledge of human nature and a more comprehensive soul? That are supposed to be common among mankind. I hate the Romantics so the artist is an exceptional individual rather than say a skilled craftsmen and the idea is very much still with us. The Romantic saw Shakespeare a prototype of themselves the natural genius unfettered by stultifying education and training and by the way just sort of a side. Note the idea that Shakespeare was incredibly. Learned is a relatively new one shakespeare in his time and in the centuries immediately after was celebrated poet of nature and love not learning Shakespeare's Contemporary Ben. Johnson made fun of Shakespeare's lack of learning his small Latin and Greek. John Milton called Shakespeare fancies. Child that has the power of imagination rather than learning who wore his would notes wild so an untutored genius. A natural born genius like the Romantics themselves thrives of Romanticism occurred around the same time is intertwined with the rise of Bardolatry the worship of Shakespeare which reached a peak in the mid to late nineteenth century the Victorian period. There's a number of things that contributed to this. Fueled it the actor and theatrical Impresario. David Garrick promoted the genius of Shakespeare for financial reasons and how the Shakespeare jubilee and stratford-upon-avon in seventeen sixty nine shakespeare was useful because he had written so much he was a source of quotable wisdom. And this made him into sort of a secular moral authority in all sorts of collections of his sayings he had royalist tendencies which in the age of revolution the nineteenth century the British celebrated and exported across their empire and he was long dead so he could stages place for free by eighteen. Forty Thomas Carlyle could write an essay called the King Shakespeare and this is what he says. Shakespeare is the chief of all poets hitherto. The greatest intellect who went our recorded world has left record of himself in the way of literature. Wow this romantic concept of the artist as a great man. A special breed combined with the assumption that Shakespeare was the greatest artists of all time that Nat Shakespeare was the greatest man. Someone who should have left a trail of glory through history. But that's not what the historical record shows. It shows the middle class country. Boy who worked very very hard immersed himself in the world of theatre stuck with the same. Theatrical Company for years was careful with money and retired rich not very romantic especially the idea of writing for money which many found irreconcilable with their image of King Shakespeare the dispenser of Universal troops. The third factor was the rise of autobiography in the nineteenth century. There's no real autobiographical literature in Shakespeare's time. All you will find in terms of autobiography are a handful of spiritual diaries. One of my colleagues now retired Paul Delaney wrote the first big book on the history of autobiographies in English literature and he comes to the same conclusion the age of Shakespeare. There's nothing the word. Autobiography wasn't invented. Until seventeen ninety seven but by the end of the Nineteenth Century Oscar Wilde could say we live in age when men treat art as if it were meant to be a form of autobiography people especially critics came to assume that literature was necessarily autobiographical and many writers were happy to plum their own. Lives for source material. And just think about this for a minute. This would mean that Mario Puzo was a member of the Mafia and that Isaac Asimov had pet robots. And it's ludicrous. But anyway the idea would have been crazy in Shakespeare's time. The plays of the Elizabethan Theatre. The plays of Shakespeare based almost entirely on existing stories not the playwrights lives so you get these movements combined to create a set of preconceptions that the victorians assumed were universal truths about art and artists and some could simply not imagine a different model. Those people could not imagine Shakespeare as diligent middle class craftsmen. They cannot imagine him as uninteresting person. They couldn't imagine him not writing about himself. Their imagination failed failed to accommodate another model of artistic creation so an alternate narrative. One that fit their preconceptions was needed. Shakespeare must have been great man. Obviously who for some reason disguised as identity under the pseudonym? Shakespeare used the real Shakespeare's Patsy. We just have to read his plays and poems to figure out who he is because all literature is auto biographical right. Everyone knows that the first person to make a prolonged case for this idea was one delia. Bacon who argued that Shakespeare's works were in fact written by Sir Francis Bacon no relation. The English philosopher and statesman and this theory was popular for some decades and was propped up by elaborate readings of secret codes and anagrams. Shakespeare's works. The next and most enduring theory was proposed by one. Thomas Looney we. We will pause over his surname. He did not find any recorded facts or historical documents. That suggested that anyone but William Shakespeare stratford-upon-avon had written the plays and poems because there aren't any rather. He took it as an article. Faith that Shakespeare would have had to have been a greater more exciting man and he sat down a road up a list of the attributes. He believed Shakespeare. Must have had you see what he's doing. In other words he's reversing genesis. He created a god in his own image. He then looked into Elizabethan History. To find someone who he thought fit the image he had created and he stumbled upon at the Seventeenth Earl Oxford and said that's my man. The vast number of impossibilities for this attribution. Not The least of which was the death of viewers in sixteen o four Shakespeare still turning plays in sixteen twelve. Sixteen thirteen were dismissed. What was important was looney thought he could trace in. Shakespeare's plays references to the events and circumstances of Veer's own life. His argument and the argument of his followers to follow to this day is that the plays and the poems are autobiography. Which brings me back to spiracy theories of literature the dominant literary device that conspiracy theorists employ is allegory. Now a quick reminder for those of you who have forgotten high school English and allegories a narrative in which characters and events consistently referred to another set of characters and events or ideas the most famous example in Twentieth Century Literature. Would Be George. Orwell's animal farm which tells the story of a group of farm-animals taking control of the farm on which they live but the various animal characters and events refer to characters and events in the Russian revolution the longest allegorical poem in the English Language Edmund. Spenser's the fairy queen which was published in Shakespeare's lifetime in this epic poem nights representing different virtues. Go on a series of adventures. That test them so for example. Red Cross Knight Who Represents Holiness must battle error and pride and other forms of falsehood. Now people right allegories. They want the readers to get it. That's the whole point to teach delight but allegories don't just teach into like there's a long tradition of using allegorical reading to understand the world. You find that tradition. In religion many religions we both are holy texts and human history itself as an allegory certain parts of the Bible especially the more confusing ones such as the book of revelations have been interpreted as allegories for centuries often with the aim of predicting an impending apocalypse and indeed. The Bible is full of allegories. Christ's parables are small allegories. This resorting to allegorical reading is necessary. Because most religions hold their sacred texts to be viable and perfect the word of God or one of his prophets. If there are things that are not clear they must be symbolic or allegorical. Further many believers read history allegorically believing that if we but read human events correctly we will see revealed the plan of God history is sort benign conspiracy an unfolding revelation of God's purpose his plan his preordained narrative. So history is a type of allegory. The religious texts may be read allegorically and they can support each other now. What conspiracy theorists in general argue is the third received narrative of any event? Be At nine eleven or the moon landing. The official story is not the real story the receive narrative points to the real underlying narrative that they as expert critics see. So the reading those events allegorically the Shakespeare conspiracy theorists come close to religions use.

William Shakespeare King Shakespeare William Wordsworth Thomas Looney Twentieth Century Literature John Milton Thomas Carlyle David Garrick Oscar Wilde Mario Puzo Paul Delaney Isaac Asimov Elizabethan Theatre Theatrical Company official Sir Francis Bacon Elizabethan History Seventeenth Earl Oxford Johnson
"thomas carlyle" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

10:17 min | 8 months ago

"thomas carlyle" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"The job that he's a fellow at the Hoover Institution and an observer of the last two centuries when it comes to the word capitalism and the word socialism much in the news because of the success of Bernie Sanders's campaign so far using the word socialism to attract a feverish attention especially for young voters professor Neil a very good evening to your essays recently have turned on the question of where did socialism come from and that Texas is where capitalism came from and that takes us to a man who is necessary to introduce before we get to Karl Marx the man's name is Yosef Shumpert her who was shot putter and how does he inform the present debate about capitalism and socialism good evening to you good evening journal should pay to see with us pronounce it he was a Harvard professor but originally of Austrian origin and conservatives on on usually amongst Harvard professors who who wrote an extraordinary book published in nineteen forty two with the title capitalism socialism and democracy and he asks two questions in the book number one com capitalism survive the number two cans socialism work and his answers to those questions all respectively no I do not think capitalism can survive and yes socialism can work of course it can note those with no replies that she placed a light kiss because as I said he was a conservative by inclination but at that point in history in nineteen forty two it seemed to him as if capitalism was in big trouble and socialism is likely to win this at these remarks are in a in a new publication that Neil has at the end titles socialism and free market capitalism the human prosperity project you can find it at the Hoover institution's website defining ideas but we're applying ourselves now we're putting it in play because of this word socialism being bandied about I want to start with the word capitalism Neil I learn from you that was invented all of a sudden in nineteen thirty three and no one was happy about it why not in thirty three yes shelter eight eight eight like so many of the words we take for granted it's a productive thought of the British industrial revolution it looks like it first was used in the London newspaper April eighteen thirty three and it was a pejorative term than old enough socialism is a little older phones to use of that word seems to have been in eighteen twenty two and from the outset that was the term of real praised contrasted with the wicked capitalism in the subsequent decades as these two words were taken off and unused by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels to set us an ideology that is communism so I think we've got to trace the origins of these concepts back to industrial Britain and understand that from the outset capitalism was of some of the B. use and and socialism was supposed to be something much nicer Thomas Carlyle comes up with the term that is if it is extremely compelling because it's poetic he says the industrial economy comes to the cash nexus what did you mean by that name kalo lu whose something of a hero of mine Scottish conservative philosopher and writer meant that everything in the capitalist economy in the industrial world was was essentially becoming based on the relationship between people are in the market economy said that instead of traditional relationships based on I suppose the feudal order everything was being boiled down into prices and wages and relationships was he put it being reduced to the cash nexus the relationship between people as a purely market relationship and this was one of a number of ideas that marks basically stole when he started rising and theorizing about socialism and communism another of the ideas he still was from the economist David Ricardo who who argued that there was a kind of R. and Lole of wages that would drive wages down to subsistence level marks is a great burglar vitamins ideas and lots of the arguments in capital about the dialectical process of taking from the German philosopher Hagel and therein lies the next hundred and fifty years except for a twist on the trail of a fall this correctly because Europe in the early part of the nineteenth century came to a revolution eighteen forty eight that was part of the inspiration of Marx and Engels but afterwards there was the question of are these empire is going to continue the Hohenzollern and the Romanov and others they did not because of the introduction of what Neil identifies as hypertrophic nationalism how did that change the debate about socialism versus capitalism car will look at things happened that Marx and Engels didn't expect one was that the phone from going down to subsistence level wages in the most industrial societies particularly in Britain but also in northern Europe where the industrial revolution happened went up and in fact it turned out that the the more skilled workers regal paid Acosta Lopez much better than anybody else engaged in manual labor around the world and this was something Maksud missed it's a kind of clearing the mission and capital that that actually capitalism needs workers to also be consumers and it would work if people have no disposable income capitalism needs the workers to go ice at the weekend and by themselves shirts and of the consumer goods so one of the surprises the wages if I go up unless they go on workers are drawn to a completely different politics from the politics that Marx and Engels had recommended which is a pretty radical Bob principle in which that would be the call middle ownership of the means of production it's not actually walked skilled workers time not to want they just want better terms and conditions they want representation they won't vote and that's of course why they gravitate towards liberalism rather than toward socialism and communism the second thing that they didn't foresee as they were writing the the pieces was that actually nation states would just get better at delivering public services and so the evolution of the nation state which of course produced new forms such as Germany and it's early in the mid nineteen th century meant a lot there was no longer the potential for revolution that had existed in eighteen forty eight by the late eighteen eighteen hundreds and early nineteen hundreds most European and indeed north American states of really providing pretty good public services they starting to raise taxes on the rich and provide some basic services to the poor to the revolutionary potential wants a way to and this is why by nineteen thirteen you could I think reasonably have concluded that marks have been completely wrong in his predictions what you didn't see coming of course was World War one which gave his theory a new lease of life the nationalists the hypertrophic nationalists of World War one you break the case that they were protecting their benefits and in in fact they were protecting the fact that the cities were now a good places to live they were no longer the four horsemen of the apocalypse and all that is the product of capitalism correct right capitalism plus liberal politics in the nationalism that provided some cemented really have put paid to the extreme ideology of of of call marks but then the outbreak of war in nineteen fourteen has two very important effects one is that it greatly expands the role of government in the economy because in order to run the kind of war that was fought between nineteen fourteen to nineteen eighteen and then again in the nineteen forties you get this enormous expansion of the role of government over the entire industrial and agricultural economy which seemed suddenly to validate the claim the Marxists may aid that you couldn't leave production to private interests you had to have public control of the economy and the second thing that the war does is to provide a huge shock in terms of living standards to most of the populations of the competent countries if you get a lot worse off if the war goes on and finally in nineteen seventeen one of the competence of plunges into revolution and you don't need me to tell you that that was the Russian empire advanced suddenly against all the olds the opportunity arises for Marxism to become the basis for a revolutionary regime led by Vladimir Lenin I'm speaking with professor Neil Ferguson of the Stanford University he's a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution we're speaking of an essay he's published socialism and free market capitalism the human prosperity project and when we come back the success of the Soviet Union is horror and that leads to the failure of socialism until I'm John bachelor this is the John Batchelor show.

Hoover Institution
"thomas carlyle" Discussed on Extraterrestrial

Extraterrestrial

08:00 min | 10 months ago

"thomas carlyle" Discussed on Extraterrestrial

"Are we alone. Have we been alone. Will we be alone. Stories of alien visitation have been engrained rain in human history and yet over the course of forty six episodes. We have yet to confirm the existence of Alien Life Today on our final episode before hiatus that might just change welcome to extraterrestrial apart cast original. I'm Tim and I'm bill. Unfortunately intimately this is the end of our journey for now after countless UFO sightings probings and hypnosis sessions. We're taking a break on producing any episodes codes of extraterrestrial for a while as we wind down. We want to say thanks to you our loyal listeners. We wouldn't have been able to go this far without your support. We truly appreciate appreciate all of the kind words thoughtful reviews encouraging emails and fund suggestions. We've received this year. Extraterrestrial has been a wonderful journey through the galaxy. And we thank you for coming along for the ride. Rest assured all episodes of extraterrestrial all other par- cast originals will remain free on on spotify. Or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream extraterrestrial for free on spotify just open the APP and type extraterrestrial in the search bar. All our cases says will be there. We've had cases that ranged from the obviously fake to the compellingly mysterious. The one thing that certain is that no matter the time time or place humanity longs to know what lies beyond the stars. We're constantly reminded of the classic quote from Scifi Writer. Arthur C Clarke mark. He once said to possibilities exist either. We are alone in the universe. We are not both are equally terrifying and we remain terrified this week as we explore the most iconic alien race the grays they represent the most widely sadly recognized pop culture version of extraterrestrial life and they show up everywhere from science fiction novels to real life UFO sightings while their personalities behaviors and apparent intentions are remarkably varied. Their appearance is always the same today. We'll trace the history history of this strange race and determine whether their persistence in the extraterrestrial record is the result of an incredibly unusual cultural phenomenon. Or if they actually exist to trace our way through the history of the Greys we have to go all the way back to eighteen. Ninety three and the office of British author H G. Wells wells was at twenty-seven-year-old aspiring writer. He had one nonfiction book under his belt. A textbook of biology jeep and was beginning to write short humorous articles for periodicals like the now defunct Pall Mall budget in the fall of eighteen. Ninety three he does it work on one particular story which he would eventually title the man of the year million the peace like most of wells work at the time took casillas tone. It claimed to be a review of great unwritten volume by Professor Holtz cough of Vice Nick University. This work once it was written would detail. The man of the year million per the article's title and Wells Riding took on the task of explaining what this man would look like and and how he would behave now not only is the volume wells purports to be reviewing unwritten but Holtz cough is German for blockhead and and even vice nick volks refers to an imaginary city in Thomas Carlyle satirical eighteen thirty three work SARTORI resources from there. The the city's name became code for more general indefinite unknown or imaginary place as the Merriam Webster. Dictionary defines it today. Wells readers at publications like the Palamau budget would have been accustomed to the thriving tradition of British satire and to these primed readers. All of the above were immediate giveaways that the article was an extended show of wit a joke. The joke being about the bizarre man of the year million described by this imaginary professor in his imaginary book. A being of brain rather than body. The titular man's stature ascher was small while his head was large. His skin was gray and his face was described as follows is large urge. lustrous beautiful soulful above them no longer separated by rugged brow ridges is the top of the head a glistening joining hairless dome to reet and beautiful no craggy knows rises to disturb by its own meaning shadows the symmetry of that calm calm face no vestigial ears project. The mouth is a small perfectly round aperture toothless and Gum Louis joyless Hollis on animal no futile emotions disturbing. It's round nece as it lies. Like the harvest moon or the evening star. In the wide firmament firmament of the face the description presents under irving features as great positives. This future man won't need most of the body parts we hold hold dear such as years or teeth because he relies on intellect alone for survival. He is evolved beyond those animalistic traits that defined the modern biological man such as the need to chew food instead of eating he immerses himself in nutritive fluid paddling about with with his pals instead of sitting down to dinner. No more table manners. Just communal baths the article was accompanied by an illustration of a creature shirt resembling a fetus. Man's future apparently was visually similar to his past as a baby to readers in eighteen ninety. Three the irony of the whole thing was hilarious or meant to be but this portrayal of the man of the year million also present. Something that sounds a whole lot ought like the greys to UFO enthusiasts in the twentieth century the image seems less amusing and more intriguing. uh-huh and what wells did next only increased the intrigue his career accelerated. He went on to author dozens of novels short stories and books of social commentary before he died in nineteen forty six but in generations to come he'd be best known as the father of science. It's fiction one of his most famous Sifi. Texts was the eighteen ninety eight novel. The War of the worlds which documents and alien invasion of earth the main invading race of aliens in the text wasn't the grays but the MARTIANS octopus like creatures made up of a disembodied head. Ed With Sixteen Tentacles clustered next to the beast's mouth but the gres show up in the novel to no longer a description for the evolution of man. Dan Wells transposes his man of the year million into a subjugated alien race that act as food for the dominant Martians in in eighteen ninety eight the grays became aliens interesting late in the novel. Wells referred back to his article on the man of the year million as a prophecy without mentioning that he himself had written it in the context of the book. The article or prophecy was a real world taxed published in eighteen ninety three periodical..

Dan Wells Wells H G. Wells spotify Professor Holtz Tim Arthur C Clarke reet Merriam Webster Vice Nick University Pall Mall Writer Thomas Carlyle professor Gum Louis casillas nick volks writer irving
"thomas carlyle" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"thomas carlyle" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"It's not a religious war between Catholics and Protestants are between Muslims and Christians or anything like that. It's a religious war between the religious those who have traditional religion and this neo pagan leftism. It's a religious war between those people who go to church and those people who worship up at the altar of the Sun Monster and climate change. It's it's the Kooky materialists religions of the left versus traditional religion. That's the broad political point when it comes to the kids what to do about these shrieking crazy wacky uneducated kids it reminds me of John Stewart Mills description of the difference difference between a conservative and a radical so the philosopher John Stuart Mill says the radical the rationalist the follower of Jeremy Bentham mm-hmm looks at a received opinion and he asks is it true. That's all he asks. Is it true the conservative like Thomas Carlyle looks at a received opinion and says what does it mean and I think that's that's a helpful way to look at the kids. I mean we should laugh and make fun of the hysterics but but we should also ask the question. What does it mean. What does it mean that these students who are very privileged to are materially very well off even the ones who are well off are very well off their at expensive schools in the richest country in the history of the world. What does it mean that they are losing their minds. I was I was talking to a friend of mine last night after the speech. UW and she's very insightful on these matters and she said it's easy enough to say hey that these kids are totally lunatics to be upset but maybe their right to be upset. They're just upset about the wrong things and and that really struck me very much that conservative response. What does it mean. These students really are upset have been enough of these campuses of talked enough these students to now. They are genuinely genuinely. Irate furious maddened and losing it and a lot of them are unhappy pills and a lot of them are have have real problems. What does it mean. What are the kids so upset about. I think the answer is before us and it's an answer. Conservatives really can get behind. We'll get to that in just one second but I I. I've gotTA think my friends over at Daniel's. NYC You know how much I love Daniels NYC DANIELS NYC makes extremely high quality.

NYC John Stuart Mill Thomas Carlyle Jeremy Bentham UW Daniel one second Mill
"thomas carlyle" Discussed on Racing Post

Racing Post

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"thomas carlyle" Discussed on Racing Post

"Welcome to the rice in post post. It's bruce winston steve palmer and star all-sports glenn die. It's the culmination of the u. S. tour season the torch <unk> takes place thirty runners ace like complicated because his his handicap we will come to that and we'll go a european tour event in swayed and hope for the lights of full of confidence like both tips extremely well last week steve. You must be coca who with the way justin thomas went ahead and won the whatever it was what what was it b._m._w. B._m._w. championship first and second in that because patrick patrick conway was <hes> was in the stake in plan so yeah the b._m._w. Champs you went absolutely perfectly. The czech masters went disastrously gets thomas pizzas. <hes> the last name of shortly spent two hours to paint whatever mischief selection a won that tournament so yeah on sunday oh i was i was in in mood for all of sunday <hes> especially when and thomas carlyle obama wobble in the middle of his round thought so there was danger that we weren't gonna get success there but sir thomas stabilize things connie finished second so yeah we mustn't grumble. Did you go to bed in a in a mood on on a wednesday bed and a 'cock-a-hoop mood stabilizing because during the day thomas peters was just ripping. My soul on a eh thomas pay is he's one of those wins you can afford to lose. If i win in apps wasn't it i went through mystery years yeah the money at one on that coast before and he was he was second on that calls the following year. You know he's a world class talent. He's just massive underachiever. Seven you still only twenty seven said of young man. I think you think go into bigger and better things but when you spend two hours on monday with a straight yes no question of whether you're going to have him and he's taking planning on you know and then he got in with you. I mean it really does mess with you on this guy. Stop it relaxed. Only see my this bigger. Things gone on the world you must you must be so up about it so much enjoy loyd successes and done done <hes> lindgren on stuff that happens <hes> glenn you in could form you happy enough with loss weight went. Yes they had numbers dates that we gory buha's again off their weight held on for its is seven applied radio again. I said nothing a he's <hes> he's dying. Pisces begin with the big boys as you alluded served only come on. I just nacer otniel yeah. That's arrayed discovery though isn't it. I guess for both of you one of the joys of of what you do when you full of gopher immerse ourselves in it's the extent you do is discovering a corey cohnreznick. Isn't it glenn i mean it must be great so bay head of the game with him because he's gone places his name yes last night..

justin thomas bruce winston steve palmer thomas carlyle thomas peters patrick patrick conway corey cohnreznick loyd obama two hours
"thomas carlyle" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"thomas carlyle" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"What's going on here, folks? When we come back. We're going to talk about how important the financial threesome is to you social security, planning reports retirement income plan and reviews and learning about the proper index strategies. We'll be right back after this. No, someone who retired or looked up retiring in two thousand eight market uncertainty can do to retirement blueprint, the uncertainties haven't gone away. Are we at the cusp of a bond market bubble bursting? Well, the euro zone. Find its footing will the US debt via drag on our economic vitality over a thirty year period. Uncertainties may have operate or resolve themselves, but new ones historically have emerged. This means understanding the solutions for one set of economic circumstances may not be appropriate for a new set of circumstances. Scottish philosopher Thomas, Carlyle said who could foresee affairs three days in advance could be rich for thousands of years, preparing for uncertainties this less about knowing what the future holds as it is about being able to respond to changes. Mistakes. The name Rockefeller is synonymous with the oil business and big money. John D was the country's first billionaire and was considered the wealthiest American of all time and the richest person in modern history. But it didn't start that way. He was born into a large family and upstate New York. And he was shaped by his father and religious mother, his family moved several times before eventually settling in Cleveland, Ohio and Rockefeller became assistant bookkeeper the age of sixteen and then went into business partnership with MAURICE be and company brothers at the age of Rockefeller, formerly founded the standard oil company in eighteen seventy and he ran it until eighteen ninety seven as kerosene and gasoline grew in importance Rockefeller's wealth soared as he became the richest person in the country controlling ninety percent of the oil in the United States. At its peak. The US supreme court ruled in one thousand nine hundred eleven that standard oil must be dismantled for violation of federal antitrust laws. It was broken up into thirty four separate entities that included companies that would become Exxon Mobil, Chevron and others, individual pieces of the company were worth more than the whole. And as shares of these tumbled and tripled in value of their early years. Rockefeller became the country's first billionaire what a fortune worth nearly two percent of the national economy. His peak net worth in inflation. Adjusted dollars was estimated at three hundred thirty six billion dollars in nineteen thirteen America's first billionaire was one of the reasons for the creation of the estate tax, which now took seventy percent of his death, his heir still had a few bucks left considering his estate was worth twenty four billion in place. Adjusted dollars in the depths of the great depression. Rockefeller was also quite the philanthropists as he was giving away millions of dollars over the course of his life this generosity began with his first job when he was sixteen when his diary shows that he donated six percent of his salary, then to his church the giving continued his entire life. He would give primarily to educational and public health vases, but also for basic science and the arts he had health problems beginning in the fifties. Rockefeller, ultimately died of arteriosclerosis on may twenty third nineteen thirty seven less than two months of his ninety eighth birthday. Forbes magazine reports that the Rockefellers are still worth an estimated eleven billion dollars today. Another reason why it's important to meet with a true financial. Coach who listens to your goals for retirement and legacy planning and can implement a total retirement income plan taking into account all necessary to. This has been absolutely fantastic show. We've covered a lot of really great topics. So far on the show. There's something that I think we need to get in front of our listeners, and that's the total retirement plan. I was hoping we could pick your brain open up this topic and really get it in front of people. Because I think a lot of folks struggled with this area. Got in front of me. I wanted to talk about sixteen questions. You should always ask when choosing a real or two so who can get to that. Okay. But you know, my one of my favorite commercials growing up. I don't know why just sticks out in my head was the Mikey commercial for a certain cereal. Oh that was so way before was it live. I'm not gonna try you try. It Mikey, Mikey, Mikey. Kentucky believe anything. So we see this a lot of times in the financial world a lot of people just keep doing the same thing because they're fry afraid to try something different or could be better for him, by the way because life Syria was a part of your balanced breakfast. But here's the mentality. People take Meister. Might be dangerous. You go. So a lot of people don't want to be the pioneer so to speak in in the financial world. You're not a pioneer anymore. If you get left behind you are basically one of the people that get left behind. So we have to make sure we get the right plan in place. And that's why I designed the total retirement plan you asking. Okay. Yeah. And which is twenty two different steps that are mainly done behind the scenes for our clients or for the radio listener and in a series of two to three appointments, we accomplished the total retirement plan, which is a living breathing document,.

Rockefeller United States standard oil Mikey Forbes magazine Exxon Mobil New York Cleveland John D America Ohio Chevron Thomas Meister Syria MAURICE
"thomas carlyle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:39 min | 2 years ago

"thomas carlyle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Books that Bram Stoker used to research Dracula in those books, you'll see all the history and folklore that Bram Stoker wove into his story. You'll even find notes he scribbled in the margins giving you a little insight into the creative mind behind this character that would haunt readers for the next hundred years a character that I think we spent a lotta time going how did he come up with this? I'm happy to say Philip spending joins me now from London. Hi, phillip. Hello. I wanna point out that Bram Stoker was making notes in library books. Isn't that normally frowned upon? It is. You wouldn't encourage any Bram Stoker of the future followed suit and the books are reading today. Fortunately, he did do it in pencil. So we can raise them. The the key thing is it's the mocks it enabled us to discover the books that are on our shelves. So on the one hand, we wish you hadn't. But on the other hand, rather grateful. He did. So some context brand Stoker was a member of the London library. He spent seven years researching while he was writing Dracula, how did you figure out which specific books he was reading at the time. Fortunately, he made a lot of notes and after he died in nineteen twelve he's widow auctioned off the best bits of his book collection, including these notes, they ended up in a library in Philadelphia called the Rosenbach. And there's people that seem them. But it wasn't until two Canadians Amankwah Robert eighteen sang and Elizabeth Miller transcribed the notes, and that was quite a toss 'cause stoke handwriting is just appalling. They transcribe them all and published the results of their efforts in two thousand eight we've got a copy of that book on our shelves. And I a couple months ago. I took it off the shelves and started to look at it and those list of books he was interested in. So I then went into the library shelves in that underlie. It's a remarkable thing was founded one hundred and seventy seven years go by writer Thomas Carlyle, and it's a lending library. We now have over a million books on our shelves, and we've never really got rid of a book once it's come in. So we have a loss of weird and wonderful stop sitting in the -mongst are other books. And so I went into shows with eighteen things transcription and started to pull off the books. The Soka says he read and he made notes from them. And I opened the books. I started to find marks against the passages that Stokes can noted when he was doing his research, and it was quite good morning and more and more books. I took off the shelves sometimes executive, right? Mocks the lines or cross oral or turned down a page. But the key moment was was I was one book that's an off safe from sixteen seventy two. And I asked one of our courageous to bring it to me, and she didn't and she brought it in this pencil marks. And how can raise them for you? If you don't do that. And exactly the same mocks in exactly the right places westover made his notes, but what makes this book interesting is it was donated to the library in one thousand nine hundred five by Bram Stoker's, son. Here we have a book from his own collection that had all the right marks in it. And from that we can surmise that the other books with similar marks were probably all make by him. What what exactly was? I mean. I guess this is the question. What kind of books were they what was brand Stoker reading while? He wrote Dracula the libraries and all the curious calf transportation system, we don't use anything. We we categorize according to subject matter and the areas I was looking at folklore superstitions. All cult science is all for the the folklore and then Transylvania Europe, Romania, Germany. He never went to Transylvania. So all his knowledge of that country came from the books, he was reading. At the library. Do you? Do you understand Dracula a little bit better or? Straggler sort of this prototypical vampire story. Do you? See it coming together through the books that he was reading suddenly you can see that. He took it very seriously. And it's been pointed out to me, the one of the the strengths of this book is he very much rooted in reality of the time. So the folklore that he was using the I mean the first line of the book is about a train running late and by routing it in in stuff that was known at the time. He made it a much more readable book. The trouble is the rest of his books are more or less unreadable and he tended to dash those off without doing much research. But so this seven years research, he actually wasn't a writer by by trade. He was the business manager for the great actor manager, Henry Irving and would often be traveling off setting up tools for going to America or Canada or wherever and it was because we were lending library that he could borrow these books for his travels and do his research whilst he was going around the world. World, and he just took it very very seriously. And I think it's a it's a good test for anyone who's going to write fantastical fiction is how can you rooted in reality to enable the reader to to buy into the the unreal by dint of the real that your wrapping it around. So even able to trace the footsteps of this book through notes scrolled in the margins over a century ago that sounds very romantic these days because I think the internet has changed so much about a writers process that perhaps writers wouldn't have the same experience with the lending library now crew. I mean bless all members. There are still marking books despite. Them to the library is is we we received public money. It's a subscription library people have to pay a fee, and I think many people like Soka field. It is it is their collection in a way. So they he'll still mocking books. But Sunday, it's true that with the rise of of the computer, many people obviously drafting books on computers there is less margin. Alia that's been written. What we all funding? How rich people putting post it notes in book, and in many ways, those are creating just as much damage as as a pencil and in some more damage because the residue they leave behind much more difficult to get off a piece of pencil mocking. People still mocking. I can't imagine what that must have felt like for you to realize you're holding the books that inspired because I think Drexler is is not just a novel dragon has not just a book Dracula is part of our culture now. And to know that you're a holding the books that inspired. It can't imagine. How that felt it was quite a morning. I I can tell you to put off each book and to find in almost all of them are quite all of them. But almost all of them the right marks in the right places. You you sort of? When I was doing it on getting increasingly excited by what I was coming across all I could think of all the great literary hoaxes that have been perpetrated before. Now, I think he has someone later this trap for some unassuming. So like me to come along and put two and two together. But because some of the books that the so-called red have never been borrowed from the library because of the one that was in our safe Snuffle couldn't have been mocked up by someone else. I began to believe what I thought was potentially the unbelievable that I'd actually found these very books as I say it was quite good morning. I can tell you. It's almost almost supernatural. And and and if you look if anyone looks out, but librarian internet, you'll see we have these Muslim thing, and we have seventeen miles of bookshelves. We have these amazing cost I on flaws in which the bookshelves the store, and it's quite an atmospheric building. So to go through all these undefined the stuff in those spaces was was quite wonderful. The not the space is it still would've used the library was remodeled in the eighteen ninety. But we do know this the rooms that he probably was in those rooms still exist next job again to do a two hundred version of Dracula play in the spaces, west Africa was probably finding the books that inspired him. So if anyone's coming over to London next year on February do come and take a look at the library and come and see the play bring some garlic with you do bring some garlic's wildflowers and the old crucifix. I'm sure that would help those spending. Thanks for talking to us about this. You'll very welcome, Tom. Phillips spending is the development director at the London library where he just discovered twenty six books. Bram Stoker studied when he wrote his famous novel Dracula, and by the way, Elizabeth Miller who he mentioned there is one of the people who helped verify that this was a Bram Stoker's work. Anything lender..

Bram Stoker Dracula London library London writer Elizabeth Miller Stokes Philip spending Transylvania Thomas Carlyle Philadelphia executive westover Soka field west Africa Tom Henry Irving Transylvania Europe Alia Drexler
"thomas carlyle" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"thomas carlyle" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"I wanted to select the ones that I knew the best ABRAHAM LINCOLN Kennedy, and Franklin Roosevelt and LBJ all of whom did lead the times of turbulence. But since I was going to be looking at them in a new way through leadership. I think it I'd better know them well enough because I'm gonna be asking a whole new questions out them almost as if I were talking to them for the first time that I think what happened is that each time. I might move from one president to the next I felt a little guilty. When I was deciding what to do next as if I were. Having an old boyfriend behind so I decided five years ago instead of leaving my guys for new boyfriend. I would keep them together through this leadership a subject, I've really been interested in since my days in graduate school when we'd sums house stay up all night lease much tonight. Debating big questions are leaders. Born are made some Bishen come from now to the times make the man the man makes the time. So it was really clear that in the bigger sprawling biographies. I had their families or colleagues, you know, all the parts of their president's state, and this time I just wanted to zero in China's spotlight on questions I hadn't thought deeply enough before turned out to be a big adventure. Well, let's talk about some of those big big picture questions. You talk about this idea of ambition and drive in you, take a look at these these four presidents young life when they were young did all these men have IMB issues to be great men like quote, unquote, like Thomas, Carlyle, grit, men, all you know, it's interesting. I'm going to think that all. All had a drive for success, which has ambition without which I suppose success is really hard for anybody to achieve in any field. But not all of them at the beginning had an ambition in for the greater good. But rather just something for themselves. I mean Lincoln is is the outlier in this respect. Because even when he's twenty three years old and he runs for office for the first time, he talks about ambition. I mean in the handbill that he had to give out to the public explaining why he was running for the state legislature from this little town of new Salem, the first time, it only been there for six months, and he says every man has his peculiar ambition mine is to be esteemed of by my fellow man in a sense to be worthy of that esteem. So ready he was looking in different way now. And then I'm young on known as the good people don't see fit to bring me into this. I will be disappointed, but I've been so much disappointed. I won't be very much a grand than the great thing. He says is but failure will stop me. I will try five or six times until it's too. Humiliating? Then I promise I won't try again. So he for some reason, I think had this inborn sense that he wanted to be something deeper than what he was. But for the other three it was different. I'm intending about admitted that when he ran for office the first time that he simply went because it was an agenda thought, it'd be fun to be in politics. It didn't have any sense that he was going in he conceded to make lives of people better. But then as he came involved in politics, and he began to see tenements that would decrepit and people working a little kids in factories when police Commissioner he began to see the conditions of lives that he wanted to change and would make a difference. And then his became deeper ambition for the greater good an FDR too. I think when he first went into politics, he had not very distinguished in sort of ambitious career up until that point not a great student in any of the schools he'd been in. He was a clerk in a Wall Street law firm, and then a somebody came to him. Said would you like to run for a safe democratic seat in the duchess county area? Immediately said, yes, I love to showing that he wanted something more broad than his insulated privileged world that led up till that time and then once he got into optics. You know, he realized it was his natural vocation..

Thomas president ABRAHAM LINCOLN Kennedy Carlyle Franklin Roosevelt Lincoln China FDR IMB Salem twenty three years five years six months
"thomas carlyle" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

06:36 min | 2 years ago

"thomas carlyle" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"You know, someone who retired or retiring in two thousand eight you know, what market uncertainty can do to retirement blueprint uncertainties haven't gone away. Are we at the cusp of a bond market bubble bursting while the euro zone. Find its footing will the US debt drag on our economic vitality over a thirty year period uncertainties may operate or resolve themselves, but new ones historically have emerged. This means understanding that the solutions for one set of economic circumstances may not be appropriate for a new set of circumstances. Scottish philosopher Thomas, Carlyle said he who could foresee affairs three days in advance could be rich for thousands of years, preparing for uncertainties is less about knowing what the future holds as it is about being able to respond to changes as they unfold. And we are back on the tax planning. Our consumer advocate. Steve's at all. And a with me in studio. Of course, we have got Richard. Columbus is a CPA one of the top tax lawyers listed by the national law journal, and we have Dave wrong. Oxford PHD, former CEO of a number of companies, and we are talking about how to save business owners closely held business owners, hundreds if not thousands of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of dollars in their taxes or the life of the business, and one of the things that we're talking about is, you know, we were saying that if you're CPA if your accountant has is saying, well, we've doing all we can do I think it's time that you get a second opinion. What do you think is absolutely? In fact, if you don't get a second opinion, you're missing an opportunity to find out. He is there anything else that my business or myself personally can do legally reduce my tax obligation, which will then of course. Reducing tax increases flow more money in the business. More money in your pocket and help someone to reach their financial goals. Absolutely. It's quite surprising to me, Steve that people don't pay more attention to their tax planning than they actually do ignored until April fourteenth year after. A year has already closed the taxes Vardi become certain at that point time. And then it's often nothing left to do except complain about your taxes. Get out in front of this get a second opinion change the numbers that appear on your tax return before the year even start and change your lifestyle. Absolutely. So David, Richard. We've been getting some calls along the way here folks are asking questions, by the way that number you can call six seven eight tax help six seven eight eight two nine four three five seven. Now. Here's a question just came in this business owner if I'm if I'm simply deferring taxes rather than permanently reducing them. Why should I pay you anything for those strategies because it hasn't actually saved me any tax dollars that seems a little over my head? But I'm sure it's something that you guys have heard. Well, Jeff, panhandle. Richard is a CPA have a stronger answer. I bet. There's several different ways you can address your taxes. The best ways a permanent reduction finding a way to permanently reduce your taxes. And there are many ways to do that. Deferring taxes, however, is and can be an effective strategy. It is the fallback strategy for us. We look I for permanent shifts permanent changes patex now too low rate and get it over with. And in some cases, they're variety of strategies that actually don't produce any taxable income that's a permanent difference. That's the preferred route and those are where we always go first. Okay. Now another question, I've we're seeing a number of the saying, how do I know that I'm not gonna get audited? I mean, again, I think we all sort of have that fear of the IRS. And but Richard you say that you're digging into that cold. You're seeing it in ways that people don't normally see it and probably seeing things that people have never seen. Well, I believe in her firm believes dance true Steve to the audit question. Everyone has an audit risk in the more income one makes the higher ones audit risk now. The real question, I think people should be asking is will your strategies increase at all or seek -nificant increase my audit risk. And the fact is no they won't we've been doing this very long time. And statistically our clients. Do not have a greater audit risk from following our tax planning core structures, Dan clients that do not utilize our services. In fact, we found statistically eight minute difference of a slight decrease in audit risk isn't. But it isn't statistically significant. But it is below what the rates are that the? IRS publishes? So there is no significant increase of water at risk in. Statistically, there's even the potential of a nominal decrease. So back to your question. Well, listen, increase, my wrist. The answer is no I mean, that's going to happen. If it's going to happen, right? Yes. If someone's going to be audited, they're going to be audited. And there's different reasons. Why people get audited, for example, the IRS uses what's called the diff Scorza differential between your tax return or your company's tax return compared to other people within your industry in within your revenue rage. So if all of your deductions are pretty much in line with everybody else's then your audit risk from a differential basis is very nominal. However, statistically, a percentage of very small percentage of people do get audited because the IRS has to non really keep statistics. But they have to determine and make sure the compliances being followed. Of course, another way that people get audited is if they have something that's significantly different on their tax return versus other people within the same range might be perfectly normal. There might have been. Unfortunately. A loss one incurred in a year was a true deductible loss. But it was a really big dumper. Well, statistically that'll put you outside the norms. Maybe it'll get looked at. But if it does being audited doesn't mean you've done something wrong..

IRS Steve Richard business owner US national law journal Thomas Columbus Carlyle David panhandle Jeff Dave CEO accountant Dan eight minute thirty year three days
"thomas carlyle" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

11:22 min | 2 years ago

"thomas carlyle" Discussed on talkRADIO

"We'll get you talking in book club. If you love a big old factual book Oscar alive is I can safely say, it's the definitive biography of Oscar Wilde Matthew Sturgis is in good morning to you. I'm assuming you this often a couple of after noons a couple of Africans and six years of this hard researching and writing six years of hard graft, it is about eight hundred pages, and then there's even a sizable a sizable piece the back, which is all about abbreviations and notes and addendums, and and all the kind of information that you could possibly want. I suppose the first question a new onset funding of right at the beginning of the book, I looked at this. And I thought I've seen biographies of Oscar Wilde before what more can you possibly find? Then you go on say loads. Well, I think there are many many books written about Oscar. I mean every year sees some sort of fresh harvest off. But the hasn't really been a a proper biography of him of fool biography of him. For thirty years. I mean thirty s was stunned by an American. Academic called Richard Elba, wonderful biographer, but that did come out in the in the late eighties. Inevitably perhaps I mean in the intervening years an enormous amount. Of new information has come to light. There's been sort of new scholarship on particular areas of one's life. Found a whole lot of lettuce have been never be. They were they were an accidental discovery. Were scattered sort of? Hither and yon relative sort of. But this new letters do come to light the whole time and appear in the order that he had written to various he'd written to friends and. Benton relationship relations, strangers even. And of course, it was always a huge excitement menu stumbled upon a new one sometimes I mean, they're even unknown letters in the in the British library. Hadn't been. And I suppose the point about Oscar Wilde is that everybody knows a, quote, they might not think that they know quite, but for example. You you talk right at the beginning about how Oscar Wilde is part of our world, you were in New York and do pasta chalkboard which had work is the curse of the drinking classes, which was one of them. Then you were on the uptown subway. And there was a goal with mobile phone case to live is the rarest thing in the world. And then you had a T shirt somebody wearing a tee shirt saying genius is born not paid. And also now I funny enough. I thought genius is born not paid was not by Oscar Wilde because quite often people quote, and then they say, that's Oscar Wilde it isn't. Yes. That's very true. And I must say I had by dodge. But then. I discovered the the the source for it. I mean, in fact, it's it was in reply to a. To something somebody had said to him. And and he replied merging. This is. Exactly, not pay. But I think the most popular squad was not said by him. Be yourself. Everyone else has taken which you see often in on t shirts and things, but but he did say that the in the sale of man under socialism, the the the sort of. The true message of Christ. Jesus he thought was b b yourself. I mean that was the, and it's very difficult to summarize. But how why is Oscar still such a fascinating subject because I remember recently going to see was it Rufa Everett's film about the later years of the very, you know, Princess, but why is it that we are still so fascinated by? I mean, it is extraordinarily if you think of how that Victorian world was full of great minds great thing 'cause Ruskin pater Thomas Carlyle, number huge names who really dwindled away over the last one hundred years. I mean, people don't read them. They don't. Their ideas. Yes. Well, I think that is a huge estimate in it. But but Oscar has grown more and more with the he's now one of the key figures in life. And I think the humor is a huge part of the glove of language, the playfulness with language he delivers his ideas were drafted him. Borough Rashad with some of these other thinkers like William Morris Ruskin and also he did plays. And the point is still I think that the importance of being earnest one of them is definitely on his running. It's been a year long own. Now, we all know. To this. That's the tragedy of his life as well. It mixed with with as you say, this is sort of essential humor that we've you know, we've all been brought up with. Yes. I mean, this is very potent mix in that. There is an actual achievement is not just about the drama of his of his life. The all these wonderful place that is the picture of Dorian gray the release glorious epigrams, but then that sort of framed within this very memorable dramatic for of his life from sort of early success extraordinary achievement in his middle years with his players, and then this cataclysmic four at the at the end when he really brings destruction upon himself. Exactly. And for those who don't know. Of course, he ended up in in prison. So that was an eight gone to court and to defend to defend what what was going on. Well, he well he had. Sued the Marquis of green spring who was the father of his his lover and friend road. Alfred Douglas and. And he was told not to. He was advised by some people who use goaded on by others. But by others. He he of. Came more and more parents as the court case evolved that that it was self destructive, of course. But I think one of the interesting things in just following the chronology of events through very carefully, which is what I tried to do in. That portion of the book is to show you how in the early stages of the action he thought he was going to win. He's he he he. And the other thing about your book is you've set out very clearly not to try to put portend as it were on everything that happens. So you go from his childhood and then right through and no state. Do you almost throw a head to the tragedy to come? So you've made it very clear. This is what happened there? This is what happened then? And there's no kind of almost through narrative of later on this was to become the so you've been very clear on doing that. Yes. I mean, I think that's portent because it's very tempting, of course, to read Oscars life and also his wit back into the early part of his life. You know, he said very amusing things about childhood, rebound parenthood, or whatever. And you have to restrain yourself from. As soon as you mentioned his mother saying that all women become like their mothers day, man. Does that his because of course, Oscar when he was growing up when he was living his life. He didn't know how it was going to turn out to the people around him didn't know how it was going to turn out and to give a sense of his experience of his life. As he lived it. I thought that was very important to keep that barrier that there's so much information is such a massively big book just wanted to bring out a few few little tidbits that his brother nicknamed him lawn. Tennessean tennis Oviedo. About of the unexpected things is the about Oscar's life was during his youth and early manhood. He was an enthusiastic devotee of lawn tennis, which was a new invention at the time. And he was rather proud of his palaces. I know and that he wished that he had blond. Yes. That was another revelation that he confessed above his dumps in partners of an Oxford commend, well, like the element of also Royal intervention now because he said he regretted that he had dark has. Perhaps he wanted. I think given his love of people with blond hair. I I think it was a two time this last one that I that have picked out which is perhaps not quite so surprising given that he was very dapper and always liked to turn out. Nice. He advocated finely, spun woolen underwear. Yes. That was interesting. I mean, he lectured on dress reform, his his great bugbear ugliness of the stove pipe hat, which is he's all the Victorians could do away with. But he he was interested in health undressed. And it was a time when Dr Giga was introducing the idea that woolen clothes, particularly Bullen undergarments, but for healthful for because they let the body breeze and Bernard shore another William Morris was sort of devotees of that. But they were amazed to discover that obstacles enthusiast for it. Yeah. And the same many other so many other incredible tales and stories, and of course, all the pictures and just my goodness. What an incredible what an incredible life. Well, that's right. Story that a. In a way that it's safe substantial. But it's, but I think it's because it is is crowded with with incident and drama. Indeed, I think long drive because I tried to make it shorter RAV longer. Historians approach rather than a than a biographers. Is that right? Well, sort of historical approach to biography. Perhaps. I mean, I think because Oscar is a great writer. I think often he he is sort of. Dopers whereby the the literary. The crowd or whatever. And. His life is revealed through his work played through his obviously, his work is an important part of life. But I wanted to approach it from the historical side of his life into his work from his work into his life. Well, it's cracking. We different awfully long raid. And. It's just as I said, I keep on bring bring it back to how how large but it kinda whipped through kind of whip street. Thank you so much for coming in Matthew Sturges, Oscar life. The time is nine forty to a final book in book club is blood ties by Benjamin cry..

Oscar Wilde Richard Elba British library dodge William Morris Ruskin Ruskin pater Thomas Carlyle tennis New York Alfred Douglas Matthew Sturges Benton Matthew Sturgis Rashad Dorian Rufa Everett Benjamin writer Oviedo Dr Giga
"thomas carlyle" Discussed on Tara Brach

Tara Brach

07:15 min | 2 years ago

"thomas carlyle" Discussed on Tara Brach

"The title of this is don't lie to your mother. So we cover over in our different ways and what that creates. You know, whether it's by being busy or trying to have power over misrepresenting ourselves is it creates a false self creates a temporary kind of safety, but the the deep vulnerability is still there and what we're not bringing into awareness has tremendous power. That's like my friend. Dan Gottlieb says that when we bury feelings there buried alive. They're alive. They're just buried. So there's a longing in each of us to discover a quality of presence and openness where we're not at the mercy of not identified as the Volmer -able self, where the currents can move through us, but it doesn't tightness in it doesn't block our connections with each other. So the pathways as I've been describing his opening two and also the courage to open to with others other words, the. The willingness to be more real. And in that spirit, lecturers short versus Thomas Carlyle. He says. It's good to use the best China, the most genuine Goblets the oldest lace tablecloth. There's a risk. Of course, anytime we use anything or anyone shares an intimate moment, our fragile Cup of revelation, but not to touch not to handle the artifacts of being human is the quiet crash, the deadly catastrophe where nothing is enjoyed, our broken are spilled, are spoken are stained, are mended where nothing is ever lived, loved leftover weap- Dover or nothing is ever lost are found. So the first step in. Easing ourselves into deepening. The truce we share is our motivation. Our intention and one man described it really well. He got a a mantra from his twelve step mentor, and the mantra was not my will, but my heart swell. He found that my will when he lived in my will. My will got him to keep on being defended in armored and powering over people and so on. But his heart swell reminded him to soften so it's, you might not have that exact mantra, but it said intention, it's the intention when you see yourself as defending our judging or being busy, or in some way, misleading to pause and say, wait a minute, is it what's my heart's longing hair? Maybe I can take a chance that's step number one. The step number two is that we have to in order to share deepening truce. We have to be in touch with them ourselves. So after we've said, okay, let's put down the scale. So we have to feel ourselves. What is the vulnerability that's year? What is happening inside me? Can I be with this those two questions that step two is this inner listening where we meet our edge and soften inwardly where we stay with what's there. And then the third step is when we can and whatever way as possible to begin in relationships that are conscious relationship, swear it, where it feels like it's a wholesome thing to share our truce. So I'll give you an example. We know when we're in conflict, you know what? It's like when you're in an argument and in the middle of the argument you all of a sudden realize that actually you're wrong. You know how hard it is. It's an awful feeling. Well, we know what that's like. It's very hard when there's when there's tension with another person. That's one, it's hardest in a way. And yet it's the very naming of the vulnerability that's there that actually can begin to soften hearts and begin to open up things and have a deeper understanding. There's a couple years ago. This is years ago I worked with and they'd come to me when I was still it's like therapy act, active therapists because their marriage is going downhill. He was a fine carpenter and he had contracted limes when they were on vacation and many of, you know, limes- can be horrific and what it does to body and for him, his fatigue and aches got increasingly bad as fingers got swollen and stiffened. He couldn't do his work. And so you know, he felt like. He just dropped into this depression chain because as a man in this culture, he was supposed to be providing and being able to do as work dues work, and so really got locked in and his wife Margot do what she could. And she ended up working overtime and making meals and cleaning the house. But she her feeling was among appreciated. I'm never enough. So there she was doing. He was feeling incredibly vulnerable in shamed, and he felt like her attitude. Some I was deepening shame like she was reinforcing that he wasn't being the manic could be, and she was feeling like, doesn't matter how much I do. I'm still not enough. So they were locked into their experiences. So I had them do what we do in couples work was begin to name their truce to each other, and he let her know how much shame and frustration he felt about being sick that he felt he. Said, I felt like I feel like I'm a wimp who can't be counted on for anything. So he he, he was living in a very small vulnerable place and that allowed her to begin to share. She started out sharing about feeling unappreciated, but then his real nece dropped her deeper and she blurted out. I've just felt so helpless. You've been plagued by sickness, you the person I love and I can't make you feel better. And I don't know when it's going to end and so she expressed death of her feelings of deficiency. I can't help you. I'm helpless.

Dan Gottlieb Thomas Carlyle weap- Dover China Margot
"thomas carlyle" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"thomas carlyle" Discussed on Talking Politics

"Nineteenth century, and distribution was very much seen as a part of economic sore as it was called once upon a time political economy, and there's something quite interesting about the way. Economics or political economy approached these questions, which people sometimes don't always expand, which is that economics has baked into it quite a powerful formula Galateri in his own, which is to say, economics is the science of what happens when people make exchanges when people buy them sale as equals, they have to have broadly similar legal entitlements in order to meet as equals in a marketplace, governed by rules, governed by law, takes us into one of the dismissive labels used about economists, even down to the present. You'll sometimes hear people saying that economic is the dismal science. It's a label from nineteenth century that caught on. If you look at the context of that remark, it's very, very interesting. It's Thomas Carlyle, getting angry about the political economists because they tend to be opposed to slavery. And he says that he can is the dismal science because people think that Jamaican workers should be free and slavery as bad. And so through the eighteenth and nineteenth century have all kinds of these people. Still had basically radically hierarchical vision of how human beings should engage with one another. Some people should come on some should become on dead. As the nineteenth century goes on that often gets racial is in a story about superior and inferior races or one of the interesting things about the economists is the, they do have a certain kind gala -tarian is in their DNA, which is the world that they want to think about in the world that they want to model is one of legally free and equal producers and consumers who are looking to make exchanges that will work to the advantage of both of them. Obviously, in lots of other ways, lots of economists have been highly tolerant to the status quo and highly tolerant, and even supportive of great economic inequalities. But there is something interesting about what we might call the DNA of political economy that don't push in a certain kind of egalitarian direction. Is it true? Now has ever been true that there is a fundamental choice to be made in thinking about distributive Justice between the state as the primary deliver of this. Justice and the market is sometimes cooled. The free market is politics ever about choosing between those two vehicles of delivering Justice. Again, this is a story with a historical angle to it, which is up until the first part of the twentieth century. The idea that the state could control of act or plan lost. Modern economy was basically absurd. I mean, lots of people down to the prison think that Adam Smith's wealth of nations is the great big book that warns against interference with the market. But the wealth of nations was published in seventeen seventy six. And there's no way that the state in seventeen seventy six could interfere with control or plan the market in anything like a socialist or social, democratic fashion Smith is talking about other things over the course of the nineteenth century. Stay capacity does grow lots of stories about what a decent economy would look like. Focus on the Volga cooperatives might play. So this is one of the things that just. The gravy Tory and liberal is interested in and optimistic about. He thinks the cleft of the devices calls will tend to out compete privately held firms which is not of you. That tends to be especially widely held today. But I think the turning point in some ways is the period of the first World War that's to say, the imperialist powers of Europe. Bill these von I bam bama's these vast leviathans to use an old fashioned word in the history of political thought to fight total war against one another. And it's those enormous bureaucratic machines that people realize the kinds of machines that can be used to dominate an entire Konomi or planning entire Konomi. And so that's when the debate changes. You get people like auto noy, who's better known as a philosopher science as a member of the Vienna circle, but he's directing the war museum in like, say, I think during the first World War that he thinks that the way you build socialism in Germany is just by continuing and deepening the system of wartime controls into into peacetime..

Adam Smith Thomas Carlyle Galateri Europe Vienna bama Volga Germany Konomi
"thomas carlyle" Discussed on WWL

WWL

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"thomas carlyle" Discussed on WWL

"You know so many texts of is in about the thailand soccer team somebody died trying to rescue these people as well that's true so you would think at some point somebody's got to be accountable for how these kids got there you understand what i'm saying i don't know if you can play it off as just an accident that they wandered into the wrong spot the water came up they'll do some kind of investigation but i can tell you this you know who's flocking to the rescue site who hollywood producers body trying to learn as much as they can because they got an idea that this could be a big box office film it certainly could wait too long you got to crank it out tim and timid ohi presume you and talk about the supreme court justice sure tommy look i've seen it both ways and it was much caterwauling the other way it's going to happen naturally nobody's going to be satisfied until they get a man or whatever but i would remind you again of what thomas carlyle said about it and that that's very simple i do not believe in the collective wisdom of individual ignorance and you got a lot of them roaming around right now what exactly does that mean tim when are you trying to say that means that a lot of people are starting things that they really don't have the background to assert in the first place there presuming that this this nominee is going to react in a certain way when they know darn well that did not happen with the previous justice you know you can't guarantee anything the fact that he is historic construction list may many as more tendencies and he certainly been research well by you know the heritage people and all of that that was a i you know that trump got all of that done ahead of time but you know again it's going to be you know they're gonna raise hell about it and they've got an impact for years and years on this one yet thank you tim but you know what i don't get is that it's the end of the world as we know it right well no the president obama appointed two justices is president trump's second one if you don't want the senate to confirm him get off your rear end and vote don't vote in senator of the party that you doesn't mirror that of or that would improve the justice that doesn't mirror your beliefs but don't just sit back and complain about it plus again you never know how it's gonna turn out we'll come back talk about traffic cameras in new orleans tommy tucker.

tim obama trump senate senator new orleans tommy tucker thailand soccer thomas carlyle president
"thomas carlyle" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"thomas carlyle" Discussed on WGN Radio

"In kind of despotic manner i think it's time to read look at this notion of what we mean by great leader and we're not even mentioning our president we'll we'll mentioned him as well because he fits into this mole absolutely absolutely and you wonder how much and before we get into the posturing about the actual current events in halle obsolete as of today let's talk about this theory what is the theory what is the great man theory where does it come from who's thomas carlyle do my research for me google do google that's a wonderful way to look at you know he's the nineteenth century great commentator andy is an historian a great thinker and a philosopher depends what capi is worrying at the time when he talked about the notion that the history of the world is about the biography of great men and that great men not great movements not demographics not not ecconomic forces change the course of history and what a man has accomplished in the world is the sum total of the history of world and that's how we live in the world and what's special about these great men is history comes out of the fact that these guys are winners and there because they come to come to reality because there's a crisis and that's an existential crisis rather crises that can change the course the pattern the structure of a society of a country of a nature of a world and so the great man theory comes in that individuals come in and disrupt that change that resolve that re rehabilitate that reform that redefine that in a way that the crises fits their talents their capacity and their character and they're the right person at the right time so important about this is in some very real sense that the arabian theories crises specific kind of ability you can be a great man at the wrong time in the wrong place and you're joe schmo from idaho okay the reality is the.

president halle thomas carlyle andy joe schmo idaho google
"thomas carlyle" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"thomas carlyle" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"And she'd gladly show them these people included william bullock and sir joseph banks famous naturalists and scientists of the time as the years went on the hughes daughter finally was tired of carrying the severed head with no takers from us em's she finally sold it to desire henry wilkinson in eighteen fifteen the head remained in the wilkinson family's possession for more than one hundred forty years pretty soon the head took on a new name the wilkinson head during that time the authenticity of the head was called into question the first was in eighteen forty five when writer and historian of the time thomas carlyle called the head a hoax carlisle had never actually seen the head however and pass judgment entirely upon a friend's firsthand account but by this point few people cared enough about the head in fact most assumed the head was probably a fake can't say i blame them there's really no hard evidence to say otherwise what do you think i agree we really have nothing concrete to go on at this point but things did change for the skull in eighteen seventy five when another contender rose up to challenge the authenticity of cromwell's head this skull was called the shmole in skull the name shmole incomes from the museum where the skull was housed the ash million museum of oxford like the skull owned by wilkinson it had a pipe through its head leading many to believe it was really cromwell's at first the ash mullion head was declared that january article it has competition between the two heads grew demand check the authenticity of wilkinson's head did also so in eighteen seventy five famed zoologist and physician george rolleston examined both skulls to his surprise he found that wilkinson's head was not only authentic but even closer to the description of cromwell's head than the ash molin skull it boiled down to how the head was piked according to historical accounts cromwell's head was piked from the bottom to top the shmole in had had been stabbed starting from the top thus the.

william bullock henry wilkinson writer cromwell george rolleston hughes thomas carlyle museum of oxford one hundred forty years
"thomas carlyle" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"thomas carlyle" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Someone who retired four to retire in two thousand eight you know what market uncertainty can do to a retirement blueprint the uncertainties haven't gone away are we at the cost of a bond market bubble bursting the euro zone find its footing us data be a drag on our economic vitality a thirty year period uncertainties may evaporate all resolved themselves but new ones historically have emerged this means understanding that the solutions for ones that of economic circumstances may not be appropriate for a new set of circumstances scottish philosopher thomas carlyle said could foresee affairs three days in advance rich for thousands of years going for uncertainties is less about knowing what the future holds as it is about being able to respond to changes as they unfold coach this has been absolutely fantastic show we covered water really great topics so far on the show there's something that i think we need to get in front of our listeners and us the total retirement plan our i would i was hoping we could pick your brain open up this topic and really get in front of people because i think a lot of folks struggle with this area have done in front of me i want to talk about sixteen questions you should always ask when choosing a real tour to the holy okay but you know what my one of my favorite commercials growing up on the why sticks out my head was the mikey commercial for a certain cereal.

thomas carlyle thirty year three days