19 Burst results for "Thoma"

"thoma" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

05:25 min | 6 months ago

"thoma" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"Consolidated services buying power for these concentrations of people. And makes a lot of sense. And as you, as you look forward, I heard that excitement come into your voice. So what are you most excited about when you look forward?.

"thoma" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

05:18 min | 6 months ago

"thoma" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"If we can do ten in one spot, all of a sudden there's a lot of efficiency and we can offer lower prices, which is kind of how our model works. But we realize there are only so many high end luxury buildings with that many units. And really, we try to target buildings with 300 plus. I mean, that's what we're kind of ideally looking for. And so our next step is to kind of target a different type of building. And the only way to target is to change our model a little bit. So we are moving from B2B to C exclusively into the B2B space as well. What we're going to try to target buildings that are in that maybe 25 to 50 unit range, but our service will be included as a part or sort of an amenity. So everyone pays for the gym or the pool or the conference room, even if they don't use it, right? And with our service is going to be like, you're going to pay for a carwash and you're going to get it, even if you might not necessarily have opted into it whenever you would have done it. So we kind of want to start becoming an amenity or treat it as an amenity in sort of luxury, smaller and medium sized buildings. And from our research, there is tens, if not hundreds of times more potential business in those buildings, not only because there are so many more of them, but because obviously our penetration rate goes to a 100% with that model and that's a really lucrative way to go about it. Exactly. Very nice. Yeah, and so for the audience, you've just heard what it means when we always talk about product market fit and talks about doing these little experiments..

"thoma" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

05:10 min | 6 months ago

"thoma" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"We just couldn't see it when we were inside. At the time, we thought might be like a deal breaker. It's a classic founder problem of is this the end of it. And we realized if we could just shine enough light on the power while we were in there and flashlights wouldn't really work because you can't be holding something the whole time both of your hands are being used for either spraying or washing down the car. But we realize there are these sort of headlamps that are built for mining and being in caves basically that are that last long enough and are strong enough to be able to illuminate a car bomb if you can see all the streaks and you actually see them pretty easily. It may even be easier than in broad daylight to see any problem with the car. So yeah, we definitely kind of have to purchase some products to supplement what we were doing, but the key was just to try to get light into those garages and we solved that kind of with a high end headlamp. So very nice. So from help me understand the time that we're talking about from when you decided to you started demoing cleaning cars in residential areas to then this whole pivot. How long did that take you to do that pivot? Yeah, I'm guessing what I'm telling the story, it probably sounds like relatively quick, like maybe for a few weeks. We started the idea in August of 2020. We kind of put everything on paper and officially launched with our website September of 2020. And it wasn't until December that we ever even thought about getting into apartments and condos. And our first wash in an apartment building was in the last week of February of 2021, which was a full 6 months after we had the idea of being B2C..

"thoma" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

05:15 min | 6 months ago

"thoma" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"At that as, wow, I bet because they exist, they're super successful, but we started to realize, I bet they're losing a lot of money because it's really hard to do this. Effectively, and we couldn't figure out a way to. Do it profitably. Nice. So the proverbial necessity is the mother of invention. Absolutely. So then if the houses weren't dense enough, you know, your solution was, yeah, find final parking lot where they're all in one place. An apartment building. We had a discussion of how do we, what's the next marketing step? That was our solution. Is there some marketing stuff that will solve our problem of this B2C space? And I said, you know what, I'm just going to go to an apartment building. That we'd ask that they had a car wash before we called a couple of apartments. I'm just going to show up and pretend that I have a scheduled demo with them. And showed up at this really luxury building downtown LA. It's probably 200 units. They have full-time security desk, not just staff, but a desk for all the security people. I walked in at the time all we had was like a bucket of carried around in different stuff now, but I personally showed up with the bucket and I was like, hey, I'm here to do the managers for the manager demo. And they are confused. They're like, okay, we'll go talk to the manager. Manager, of course, have never met me, no idea what I was talking about. Calls the regional manager, they're like, I have this conversation in the back room, come back, and he's like, okay, yeah, I mean, you can go play my car. So we realize, wow, if we're trying to get into this space, all we have to do is show up because everybody loves a free car wash, and it only takes one demo to then reach 200 people all at once and be kind of the exclusive provider for that building..

LA
"thoma" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

04:30 min | 6 months ago

"thoma" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"Hello and welcome to the savvy founder. I'm your host, Philip topham. I'm very happy to have Trevor toma from ride shine here. How you doing, Trevor? I'm doing well. How about you? I'm doing excellent. Are you also having the windy weather where you're at? Yesterday, I haven't been outside today, but this balloon flew by my window randomly yesterday. And I was like, man, it must be when the outside. Yeah, so I was asking about the weather because your business is cleaning is cleaning cars, right? Right. So cars get dirty when it's this way, right? Yeah, they get dirtier, but when it rains, people like to cancel. So very weather dependent business and we prefer nice sunny days. Excellent. So for the audience, what do you tell people what is rideshare? Sure. So ride, I'll give you kind of the longer version of it. It started out as a mobile B2C subscription car wash service. And our idea was let's come to people's houses before they leave for work, really early in the morning and watch their cars regularly. It was kind of inspired by the trash collection business of like, if we can just come and go house to house, we can just really efficiently. We didn't do very well there. We had to pivot pretty quickly. So we moved into the B2B to C space by kind of working with apartments and condos. And now we are an overnight mobile car wash service for apartments and condos, and we're trying to add on services beyond car washes as well..

Philip topham Trevor toma Trevor
"thoma" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"thoma" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"I don't communities languages really super annoying. okay how about. Another investment pet peeve. The big one is how so many market participants explain the market as if it's true so for example when they say well the reason this time it's not good for p. o.'s although the market is up that's the secondary market but the primary market is struggling right now because we're about to come into the summer and many portfolio managers going to be taking the summer off as if that's true and then it spreads around and people tell the story that absolutely makes no sense. Hetch months don't sleep. They're highly competitive. They'll look at any deal at anytime so do we. It doesn't make any sense but people kind of start talking about this and almost believing it and behaving us if it's true. So what chu people have had the biggest impact on your professional life. We spoke about carl. Thoma marcel bernard allowed. One is antonio artistes. My tennis coach in puerto rico about sports. How close you get to a coach. Especially if you're with them for a long time and he taught me not to take myself seriously and enjoy the journey. I remember we were in this tennis tournament. My first tennis tournament california that he took me too long trip rate. We go to scott. Fourteen hundred hundred national and i had a match at eight. Am the next day and we have just gotten there. And i wanted to go out and have some fun in the pool with a bunch of friends and the tennis thing. And i came to the room sheepishly some motel and i said antonio can i stay out later and he was like. Are you crazy you stay out a long time. That's what you're here to make friends and enjoy the journey and that was nice and i carry that till today. It's good deal or bad deal. Enjoy what you do and and don't take yourself seriously. What teaching from your parents as most stayed with you. Yeah my dad. He had a very small business in my whis and through example i see how hard he worked. I mean he was just always working subtypes. Come see him at the office. And that was the life. And that's an important really important role model for me. And my mom. She always taught me through repetition. She would sit there when i was doing homework. And it's repeated again go through it again again and again and that's tennis was. That's how i still think today hard orlando last one. What life lesson have you learned that you wish you knew a lot earlier in life work life balance. I worked way too hard when i was young. I could've travelled more when i was young. I could have enjoyed college more. When i was young versus just tennis and studying i wish i would have spent more time on the fun aspect of it so he went through life. I didn't have that much work. Life balance until i had to make some changes to that and those changes were so good for the work part of it because the mark put life into it the more i was forced to delegate and the more my partners rose to be the leader say are today. We have the managing partners we have today are just running these incredible sectors and it happened because i needed to back off in order to have even a better career so the work life balance. Yeah that's the one orlando so fascinating and thanks so much for taking the time. Thank you so much. This was great. Thanks for listening to this episode. I hope you found a nugget or to to take away and apply in your best thing and your life. If you'd like what you heard. Please tell a friend. And maybe even writer review on i. Tubes you'll help others discover the show. And i thank you for it. Have a good one and see next.

tennis Thoma marcel bernard antonio chu puerto rico carl scott california orlando
"thoma" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"thoma" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"It's a lot of operational talk if we say that. That's one of the keys to our value. Add that's what people should be talking about in the office. They shouldn't be talking about financings and financial engineering. And that could happen. So i think that's a key one. I think when we were getting started when we became thoma bravo in two thousand eight. Our numbers where are liquid numbers. Were good but they were not enough. Liquidity events software to establish a track record but we saw gp clearly how the portfolio was absolutely amazing in terms of future returns. An i think that most lp's given how many choices they have. They didn't wanna look at that. They didn't have the time or maybe they have better choices. Or what have you and the few that did because we ended up. We tried to raise a billion. We ended up raising eight twenty two point five. That tells you we're looking for every penny. Every five hundred thousand. We would the few that did that. Fund return four net and then it gave about a one x multiple and cohen best. That was great economics and produce great returns and it helped many of them establish other programs. That were great. I think really really understanding the portfolio. And how it's doing is important. Work what do you think thoma bravo. Looks like five or ten years from now in five years. we're going to double the size. We have eighty billion dollars center management and we can tell how portfolios going to do. We have it on the ground. We see where space is going. We see that we're creating some white space in the large software deals and we actually need the capital because the industry needs it for us to buy these number number. Two players are growing at twenty percent compounded. So we're going to be double the size. We are going to grow us an investment team but not commensurate with that growth with the philosophy of providing people full opportunity to be future leaders and we will be forming other products that aligned to what is the best financing alternative for these companies. What do you think some of those products will be could be longer dated or permanent capital vehicles. Which is becoming more popular more interesting now. Giving the conversation we had about exits. And how do you do that. And we have some in the industry that we can emulate in terms of what they've done learned from that and see what fits our culture. It could be regional products whether in europe or in asia as asia is maturing in tech and now there will be opportunities to buy companies that have enough an operating history that fits our our framework and it can be other forms of financing as well doe. I wanna take a second and talk a bit about some of your philanthropic activities. I know this always comes from a personal place. And at what point in time did you decide that it was important for you to take some of the success. You've had and find ways to give it back. I started in philanthropy. I like to think relatively early with us. Our personal to me. That's right. are you go about these things. The catalyst for starting the bravo family foundation was hurricane maria. Puerto rico and i had just come back with jennifer james our coo from a fundraising trip in asia and the hurricane hit. When i was in tokyo the last day. I was there when i got back. I couldn't reach any friends any family completely. There's no communication and a day. After i.

thoma bravo asia bravo family foundation europe hurricane maria jennifer james Puerto rico hurricane tokyo
"thoma" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"thoma" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"We have is the prevailing market multiples public multiples software companies. The challenge that we have is not competition right now. And it's worked. You can look at the negatives put also positives and the fact that valuations have been high. Some claim to high actually is very to entry. It keeps big players that could be new players or no entrance out of this market. There should be twenty or thirty private equity firms to enlarge buyouts software. A great place to be but if you have to pay ten times forward revenue for a company that does five percent margin at scale. And you don't have a track record of having delivered. Forty fifty percent margin law growing that business and investment committee is not going to take that risk. They shouldn't take that risk. We were lucky that we started our first equity check was twenty five million dollars to do this kind of work but now that you prove that you can keep moving forward. Then how do we deal with. Their prevailing. valuations is two ways one. Is we buy growth. That's going back to our prior point. We have not bought a five percent grower vertical market software company in a long time. And that's what we always to twenty years ago. We're buying the more innovative number. One number two higher growth companies. The second way we deal with it is we have had to improve the margin that we deliver our best in class metrics before twenty five percent. Adum argest that we're getting up to fifty to sixty percent so both trying to get better and buying the right thing for today as well as you look across the competitive landscape in the industry there are a fair number of the original founders. That are let's just say a little more like carls vintage than yours. And i'm curious as you think about the next five or ten years for thoma bravo. How do you position yourselves when you see the potential for some of the other private equity firms to have to have significant succession transitions. I i really like the if you can call it a prior- earlier generation. Many of them are my mentors. Just out of the goodness of their hearts really. I have an incredible appreciation for what they meant at the time they invented the private equity industry. Sometimes i see them go by. Thank you for inventing the private equity industry. I really appreciate it. And it's true and our role. Is i see it. As what kind of next generation private equity firm are we and how we adapt to society. That way it's more with times so we have a lot of young people. We run a much flatter organisation. We don't have an org chart because everybody knows what their job as we look to transfer ownership over time. I think that's consistent with how the world is working now on how people want it to work as well which is a totally different world than in the eighties when you had to break up these huge corporations that were potentially abusing their power over their shareholders and you had to break up these divisions and and run a differently from all the experience you've had over the years with lots of different. Lp's your funds and then some of the work you've done on investment committees yourself. What are some of the key. Their lessons or subtle insights. That you've picked up that you think would help. Lp's to understand from your perspective. I think the most important thing is understanding the culture of firm. So i really respect those. Lp's when in an at work environment in the office environment that would spend the time walking around the office and having some impromptu meetings hearing what people are talking about on phone calls in the office is key. If you walk around thoma bravo most of our colleagues we'll be talking to companies about sales plans and quotas and they may be on aboard call..

thoma bravo
"thoma" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"thoma" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"Average holding period has remained at three point. Three years even asked deals have a larger and valuations have gone up. It just hasn't changed one of the reasons for that. And one of our really smart limited partners about fifteen years ago when he we weren't an advisory meeting he mentioned. this said. Your value added approach. Happens very quickly. You can tell quickly how much value will be added to each company. And i thought that was so insightful. Because when you're backing existing management you can go to work before you close the deal in that period between signing close when you have to change people people need to learn the business you need to recruit him. They recruited people that they like and it takes a while to come together. That's a key reason for our children here. We can accomplish. These three things are whatever. Priorities are very very quickly at a company. Now in hindsight based on where software has gone. We should've held all the companies. And if we would have done that we would have been much larger than sap and to return the multiples of money would have been just so much greater. We had to prove it and we had to sell to continue to deliver money back so that people could invest more with us. We continue to reiterate on that. Now are bias as well give you. Another one has been as follows. When a strategic approaches you look to sell because they want approaching again they'll build the product internally or by somebody else and by backing existing management if you can get the changes done early. You're more ready for that. Approach ellie mae. We sold that eighteen months after we bought it put. It was a different company. Eighteen months after we bought it and the buyer had a great deal of. We got a great deal. It's really working for the buyer. Sonic well we also sold. After eighteen months since cyber security the company was a different company. How do you stay in touch with the businesses. The management teams of portfolio companies that you then exit afterwards given that you're really still in the same ecosystem. It's such another great insightful question because we have noticed is when we sell these businesses if they are sold to private equity we can track them. Whatever we did together they continue to do for a very long period of time so all that initial work that went into it we have almost set these companies up to become private equity assets for long periods of time. We see them trading from one private equity firm to another and everybody does well in with the same team we keep in touch with them as friends. We may by a competitor. We may by company that partnered with that most likely and at some point in their career we actually get many of them to be operating partners toma problem and that's the best candidate because they've implemented our plan. We've made money together. They know us. And we're not taking risks with anybody new. Imagine this has come up in the past. And i'm just kind of curious. Have you ever had a business that you owned bought and sold and then looked at down the road again. We've done that. We had an have.

ellie mae sap toma
"thoma" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"thoma" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"Management team at thoma bravo. And they're thinking of investing. You mentioned they wanna win. How do you test that degree to wish. Someone wants to win. It goes back to a sense of purpose and emission. Why do they care. And why do they care so much. Is it something that they owe their organization and the people that have helped him in the next generation. Leadership is that it. That's a big one. That's a big one for me personally. Is it something in their background that they have something to prove all the time to themselves is it that they need external reaffirmation from their community of competitors and pierce. What is it about it. That really drives them. And if you can get to the bottom of that and people are doing something for a deeper reason while you're in a great place curious when you bring these factors together. How does your team make decisions. We worked so collaboratively me give you an example. We bought a great business from a private equity firm six years ago. And i'm friends with the chairman of the private equity firm. After we signed a deal. He gave me one of the best accolades that i passed onto my team. And they're great firm. What he said he said. Your team is like a pack of wolves. You surrounded my company. You were talking in me trying to inspire me to sign it and not talk to anybody else and you know exactly what was going on your partner. The ceo all over the ceo your principles and bp's were all over the banker and you are all like a coordinated effort of surrounding us this asset and you didn't let us go anywhere else. He said i told my team that. I want you to be like a pack of wolves. That's collaboration that was coordination. He was so nice to say that they're just a great firm but we make decisions by constant communication. So i may get a call from one of my partners. Usually the secondary on deals and he may just tell me something that he learned when an hour call with cr management and then we kind of review that think about it begin to make some judgments and then continue that process. It's a very iterative small decision making process within the firm. How do you structure that pack of wolves on each deal. It's so great. We are lucky to be structured by many verticals. So we work. Our philosophy is to work in very small project teams. Because when you do that you give the associate on the deal the vp on the deal all the participants a very broad job and when you have brought jobs you become a lot more creative. We believe that individuals should see everything on the investment the financing because of the financing's coming out of certain way the price may not be working or if the price is not working many to reduce the cost more. Or you're taking more operating risk or there's there's creative solutions said you need to be figuring out all the time maybe canoe model in an out aquisition. Can you signed that before the deals happening. So you kind of are trying to solve this problem of. How do you price or win this deal by looking at everything around and we structure ourselves to get to the point by the small project teams are structured by software sub-sector so we have managing partners that run the big vertical applications infrastructure cybersecurity. But within those we have teams that run healthcare software financial technology software individual identity in cyber those teams are responsible.

thoma bravo pierce
"thoma" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"thoma" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"Quarter location model and with those tools and visibility by management. They could see where they were going and it worked. And how do you think about this question of keeping a management that maybe underperforming and delivering them these types of tools compared to deciding that the management team might not be the right one to take the business where you want it to go. Our philosophy is to really stay with the existing management because we highly value the knowledge of the business of they have that we don't have even if we do a great diligence. We will never come up to speed fully on where they're at secondly they do have the following of their employees so whatever leadership actions they take they have that trust and third they have the history and knowledge their customers if we can marry that with our analytical approach to decision making and our cultural approach of inspiring them to do some things differently. That's the best. Now we say and you asked me about the art of the business here. We say that as long as people are making positive progress. You stay the course. Even it's progress may not be fast enough for your investment case because people move at different speeds there's a management teams that struggle for six months to join the partnership. And then you get a step puncture in terms of how they're doing things others slowly ramp up over two years and then they do it. Sometimes you need an event that a catalyst for example sometimes you need an ad on acquisition. That really worked where it was integrated properly and would they appreciate. It will be brought to the table as well. 'cause we need they're buying also sometimes it takes them to miss numbers to realign their business with reality so sometimes it's good that they miss numbers because it gives us an opening to have them listen to us and become more open minded in each of those paths. You can imagine a different type of interaction right. Things are going well you bring in a successful acquisition. Things are going well. They missed numbers. You mentioned culture. And i know that that's something that's incredibly important to you both within thoma bravo and your portfolio companies. Can you talk me through. What do you mean by that. And how do you bring that into both your firm and your investments. What i mean by that is what is the shared mission and sense of purpose that creates a community in a company. It's what is it that holds these individuals together. Why do they do things. A certain way and culture. I know people are talking a lot about culture. It's really everything because technologies will change ways of doing deals will change the tactics of private equity the tactics of operations. That'll change but have you have a strong identifiable culture that gives you a core competency. That is very difficult to copy because it comes from culture. You have it all. I think for organizational thoma bravo. What holds us together is our passion for doing innovation right meaning profitably by measure man by hitting numbers by when an lp comes to visit us what companies are unplanned and not unplanned. Were really focused on that. And we feel almost embarrassed toward defending companies. That are not planning why that is the way we talk to. People is very similar reopen. We say it how it as and that serves us well when you think about innovation you started by saying you like these recurring revenue software businesses embedded customers. It's the antithesis of innovation.

thoma bravo
"thoma" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"thoma" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"Lots of opportunity for young people lots of creativity. It just felt good from that standpoint. Any gave me a white space to be able to work it. Where we were lucky was when the docomo burst. Our theory was well. I went to the partnership you can buy recurring revenues and software less expensively than in any other category that thoma cressey or thome has looked at transaction processing media radio in the days outdoor advertising and they said yeah that seems right so that part of it. I had a lot of backing for what was your first big success. The first software deal. And i remember that like it was yesterday because it wasn't the financial success of it. It's how hard we worked on. How meaningful from a personal standpoint it was. We were able to take a company private in yardley. Pennsylvania prophet twenty. One was the name. It's a software company that ran the business of distributors so they did all the customer entry warehousing logistics bracing of a small mid market distributor using their technology. We took it private and we back. The existing management team of the company chuck boyle was cecilio. And this team had never really made much margin in their business so they had never been profitable but they had good values they were never big money loses either. That two thousand customers have the time. And i remember our last diligence meeting. We were looking for some coinvestors in the deal and we were there with one of our co investors and we asked the head of sales. You miss numbers this year. How did you do last year. Cadillac around said we missed those bookings as well as well. How did you do the year before that. We miss those numbers as well. And finally i asked him his name. Is doug levin duck. Have you made your numbers and there. Was this awkward pause in the meeting. He looked around like he was counting the years and he said nope never never and there was a silence in the room is like the most depressing thing can. We went outside and my partner. Carl thoma was with me at the meetings. That's not fade. It's this deal still alive. We met marcel bernard because now we needed to help from the company and marcel worked so closely with the same team as had never made numbers before from top light standpoint and they made it not only to a really profitable company that six hundred acquisitions but consistent bookings performance can what we sold the deal and rick realized a great writer return. It was how appreciative chuck doug and management where that we gave him a chance. And we put him in a position to succeed and marcel. Bernard always taught me remember. Everybody always needs somebody else to learn from and that was that really started are investing philosophy in software. What were the key lessons simmer. Sober bernard brought to them. So that a team that had never been able to make their targets. All the sudden could perform. I define it as or summarize it into an analytical approach to decision making he was able to take the company and help split it into its component parts assign.

thoma cressey chuck boyle cecilio docomo thome doug levin yardley Carl thoma marcel bernard Pennsylvania marcel chuck doug Sober bernard rick Bernard
"thoma" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"thoma" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"Three deals in the three of them failed. They didn't well all three. It was a back to back to back. And it's almost like you know if you're making bets. That's pretty unlucky. Anybody else could do better than that. And i thought that was gonna be the end of. It wasn't any good at it. I wasn't taking the right risks. Maybe i wasn't understanding something and carl. Thoma gimme another chance. He said you can make lots of mistakes. Just still make the same once again while we were doing what i was doing that was wrong. Is i was trying to chase the venture community into doing really venture type investing which it's not in my makeup and certainly was not the type of risk that the firm a buyout firm would take so we changed and i got another chance and then we got into software so if you had all that autonomy at a relatively early age how did you start to learn the right way to do deals on the one hand. I feel that. I haven't done anything by myself. And i'm very clear on that. I had to key mentors carl thoma who really started working with me teaching me values of what's a good business. What's good management. What's a good partnership. How do you talk to people. How do you do a deal. How open are you great business ethics and then at the same time i had probably the best operational mentor. Anybody could have. Marcel bernard who did the first software deal with me as the chairman of the company and then became the chairman of our operating committee. What i credit with doing right is that i really listened to them. I took it all. They would tell me something on. It's not like well. I'm gonna kinda do it my way. And that may be what happened in the seventies or sixty s and. That's not the world anymore. No i really really listened. I would listen the more time spent with me. That's the thing about managing up as well. The more mentorship. I would get because they're there to help people you started doing. These tech service deals and then you work your way obviously into software how did that inflection take place with a lot of help mentorship. I went to do the opposite of what i was doing. Investing wise right instead of investing. In how many employees can you add and how quickly because that's where these businesses were valued some of them. Before the bubble burst i went to do value. Investing in established companies rather than new companies with existing management instead of taking new management and putting them in adventure situation it was literally the opposite investing philosophy from what i just described where we were fortunate as i did want to stay in tech and one of the reasons i wanted to be in tech necessarily the passion for technology or the engineering. Because i'm not an engineer. Is i thought the space was not taken. I thought there was a lot of opportunity in the space..

Thoma gimme carl thoma Marcel bernard carl
"thoma" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"thoma" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"And why don't you take me through that part of your life man. That part of my life was really hard. And i'm so grateful for it because to me. It was what gave me every opportunity that i have now. I started playing tennis young. And the reason i started playing. I grew up in a small town in puerto rico meyrowitz and when i was about eight years old on a mini vacation. My mom took me to watch this exhibition. Match in san juan. And it will be to sterilize was playing in it. All right i sure you remember him. And my mom and i thought this is so what a beautiful sport and next weekend i started taking lessons. They were two courts in my hometown. And i started taking us started playing and went over to play my first tournament in san juan and one of the most influential people in my life. My tennis coach antonio t's a phenomenal player. He played georgia got to the finals of the orange bowl. When he was young he took me under his wing and started teaching me on the weekends. And that's when i started traveling went to venezuela. I was the first place i went to outside put. A rica played this incredible tournament. There met jim courier bring tennis tournament in miami where he killed me in the finals but you know it taught me adventure. Travel learning how to lose and cope with it and correlating really hard work with having a chance at success and it was a great part of my life. Why don't we fast forward through your coming out of school. How did you first get interested. In what became private equity. It's so funny. Tennis gave me the chance to then go college to go to brown. And then get into what i call this community of people that do investing in our in private equity but a brown i didn't know what investment banking was and certainly had no idea what private equity was and my senior year actually towards the end of the year. I was going to go to law school. That's what you do. I guess if if you're not sure of a job opportunity and i had this really worldly friend that told may the investment banks are here the recruiting and i put your name down on a list. Right there's no internet no phone so you had to sign up your member. That ted from yale you literally put it on the on the door and your time slot is two pm and i go. What what is this. What do i need to explain. What i must banking was and he told me just by some wingtip shoes so he and i went and bought in a secondhand stores from wingtip. Shoes wore tie and i got a job and i was thinking about it and it's like well i get to work on wall street and make money live in new york city. Let's do it. And then when i was there joining that community i got to come in close touch with some private equity firms on a deal that i was the junior person on and i was really early on fascinated by the fact that two or three people in an office could by multinational corporation. That didn't even have company. Didn't have anything and they seem smarter. Better negotiators an incredibly entrepreneurial. And i said wow i'm gonna look into this. How would you compare the time in hard work from your tennessee as to the notorious time and hard work as an investment banker. Wow i would say that the tennis work is much harder in really prepares you for that you feel like you can take anything on the workfront by what investment banking that those all nighters and getting assignments really late is kind of a it mean. Tennis is harder but investment banker was meaner as an analyst so take me through to your early experiences in private equity look byron experiences in private equity. Were not good. I joined my partner now and my mentor. Carl thoma when he formed his own firm. Thoma cressey of the time and i was based in the san francisco office three people in the office and he gave me very early..

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"thoma" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"thoma" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Of Heartland play to Ocana Thoma. Has shelter Lita period out. Shaka Laka Gondo. Who's been the heart dreadlock roughly in Woodland, and they had faded Dorina combination in Russia hasn't played on They even Elena Atlanta. Spending hub. Amanda Yeah, just get angry. Same written there. Here there, Marie. Tom Moody after near Chapel, La que gano Hassle to Go, Dolly! Any job long maroon, the common man and Caron wa wa er Penick. That outside the watch How have your bacala subpoena but that cool summoned then? El Assad. Dorina Yeni anally when l. A video to NATO, Lacob Dorina And in Bern, ASHA, Dorina Litton. Anna used to selfishness letting go to harm myself. Uh, Left, I think this night or jobless Murdered again after he was shook like that sometime are more than to Europe in an Africa, Doc in government and Madeira. Have to get Maduro Cotton, but burn ASHA couple. Anna, you take away that how we're different. Nana began actually, Sunfish Exchange began. Editori. Lot of couple lot. Oh, Indiana, par, So Pyatt, Italy. And a testament between me and I could an area at onto the national. It's Robin National supplier actually gone. Oh, heck, my guy burn. ASHA B. Y Yeah. There while the car to Suk. I am on my ambitions. I appreciate, uh made national supply is gone. Oh, Okay, A a lot more in the ambition. National has been despite financial extra weight. Pagano, Lhasa. How come they hope I just loved to have faltered, Shinohara Danny Byrne. Ashen fired family you to widen the way the show Arana Pagano. Lhasa, Osborn ASHA in a short time in gobble. Look at the.

Marie Dorina Litton Amanda Tom Moody El Assad Caron wa wa er Penick Bern Ocana Thoma Dorina Russia Anna Indiana Sunfish Exchange Dorina Yeni Africa Europe Elena Atlanta Madeira Dolly Shinohara
"thoma" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"thoma" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"It's threatening a second tropical strike on Central American countries recently ransacked by Category four Hurricane Ada 120 People were killed West Virginia's governor telling people in his state to wear masks, Governor Jim Justice is ordering the wearing of masks at all times and businesses. The Republican says. It's silly to be in a public building with strangers walking around without a mask on even if you have this macho belief Businesses will need to post signs notifying entrance of the mask requirement. Under his executive order, the governor is urging businesses that encounter violators to call the police. There were 563 cases reported Friday. Bring in West Virginia's pandemic total to more than 28,000. State added. 11 deaths to reach 565 Thoma Gotti Fox News. More people have been banned by airlines for refusing to wear facemasks. Nearly 550 people have been banned from Delta flights for refusing to comply with mask orders that, according to a company memo that shows hundreds of people have also been placed on Delta's no fly list. After airlines implemented a mask wearing mandates and all flights for employees and customers, United confirmed this week. It Least 350 passengers and its no fly list. American Airlines couldn't confirm if any passengers violated its mask Wearing policy. Southwest Airlines tells Fox News It doesn't track mask order issues for public release but that the airline expects compliance. Jeff Manasso Fox News Doctors in Germany, are calling for hospitals to postpone non urgent surgeries in areas with high rates of Corona virus infections so that medical personnel can concentrate on critically ill Covad patients. German hospitals Resisted putting off planet bone elective procedures, arguing they would risk financial ruin by doing so, without further government support. I'm Joe tear Fox News..

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"thoma" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"thoma" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Stands. Jose's boost number would be honored to handle the cooking and Margarita making even Lim family clean up for you. Tonight, Call in your order will bring your feet a bar Taco Bar Canada's maybe fresh fish meals, complete with chips and salsa, rice and beans, cheese, lettuce, sour cream and tortillas all to your car or come relax with the people you love in our casa as we handcraft with love. The museum. You'll love with big extras like hand squeezed juice infused and spice craft cocktails, including the most effervescent, flavorful margaritas ever made. And the freshest Thoma teals onions, peppers, garlic, cilantro and tomatoes prepared into three unique sensory, stimulating sauces or handcrafted table side to your tastes freshest of fresh guacamole, your next party or event we'd love to deliver and set up a little happier, tastier Better. Norma's police Masa Brosa, Mahorn, Camila. Or Casa at Jose's Loosen Burrow. Tosa Brookfield, Racine Fox point Exceeding Expectations. Jose's bosom burrow dot com That's Jose's loosen borrowed. That count follows florins cutting edge finished systems proved beauty is more than skin deep Scratches, gorges and discoloration are no match against flawless floor rings were finished crafts people living with carpet upgrade the hardwood or luxury vinyl plank that's living baby sensory under load. Flawless flooring. Flawless flooring LC dot com I'm Warshawsky trial attorney Frank Crivello for most lawyers at trial in court is where they would rather not be. Lawyers don't like Variables they can't control for them. There's an easier, safer way to influence litigation outcome that's negotiating settlements. Fortunately for real trial attorneys at Warshavsky that same fear of trial is Justus pervasive with insurers and their lawyers to recognize Warshavsky trial attorney Victor Harding's booming voice. The intellect backed confidence. Victor projects examining witnesses, influences judges and jurors and where Shafi client's favor. Victor Harding became a member of the Warshawsky team after representing insurance companies against personal injury claims. We hired Victor Harding because he was uniquely an attorney We didn't like.

Thoma Bravo, Mcafee And CNBC discussed on 0 Show

0 Show

00:14 sec | 3 years ago

Thoma Bravo, Mcafee And CNBC discussed on 0 Show

"Story Thoma Bravo said to be an early discussions to acquire McAfee from teepee g and Intel for a significant premium over the company's 2016 valuation of four point two billion dollars. According to CNBC,

Thoma Bravo Mcafee Cnbc Intel Two Billion Dollars
Apttus Begin a New Chapter Under Thoma Bravo

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

04:36 min | 4 years ago

Apttus Begin a New Chapter Under Thoma Bravo