37 Burst results for "Thirty-Six Percent"

Far fewer California seniors are getting vaccinated in rural counties than urban areas

L.A. Times Morning Briefing

00:37 sec | 3 weeks ago

Far fewer California seniors are getting vaccinated in rural counties than urban areas

"Has only vaccinated about half of it senior population against covid nineteen. That's according to the latest data from the cdc. The sixty five and older group was deemed the most vulnerable to death and serious illness. During the pandemic but overall only around fifty six percent of california seniors have received the full course of a covid nineteen vaccine there are also discrepancies between urban and rural counties. In the more rural conservative shasta county just thirty six percent of seniors are fully vaccinated that compares with other counties like merrin just of san francisco where seventy one percent of seniors are fully vaccinated

CDC Shasta County California Merrin San Francisco
Fresh update on "thirty six percent" discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

00:49 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "thirty six percent" discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

"Produce more short chain fatty acids which protect intestinal barrier regulator immune system controller appetite controller blood sugar produce more beauce race which prevents the growth of cancer cells less secondary by lasts less. Tma oh greater diversity. Rather than focusing on one single food. I would say it's the big picture man. It's all about diversity and abundance you mentioned cancer and that segues nicely to our next question. We have somebody who wrote and said unfortunately cancer does run in my family. But if i eat a plant based diet how much lower is my risk of getting it. Yeah that's a great question. I mean cancer. Digestive concert specifically colorectal cancer or bowel. Cancer is something. that's very close to my heart. Both as a clinician and as a family member of a two family members affected by this condition. Colorectal cancer is incredibly common. Unfortunately affecting about one in fifteen men and one in eighteen women here in the uk similar stotts for the us and we know chuck that among us citizens. If you look at the seventh day adventists right. These are people who place a great emphasis on healthy living not smoking avoiding alcohol exercise community etc but also tend to eat a plant based diet even the adventists who consume animal products consumed very little rise maybe seventeen to eighteen kilos of meat per year compared to the us average over a hundred kilos of meat breer and about one eight atom to completely plant based so they're a great population to look at and among seventh day adventists. They are about thirty to thirty five percent less likely to get collateral cancer among the seventh day. Adventist who don't eat meat at all. They're above thirty six percent less likely to get colorectal cancer and if we go to other countries if we leave the us and if we go to for example rural south africa where people are easing a high fiber and calm almost completely plant. Based diet with you know sixty seventy grams of fiber per day very little saturated fat at all getting seventy percent of their calories from carbohydrates we find the colorectal cancer is almost on heard of there was a nice study that we've spoken about before on.

Seventy Percent South Africa Seventeen Thirty Five Percent Eighteen Kilos UK Both Sixty Seventy Grams Eighteen Women Two Family Members Above Thirty Six Percent Seventh Day About Thirty One Single Food Over A Hundred Kilos Of Meat Fifteen Men DAY Seventh ONE Colorectal Cancer
Institutions still underweight on AAPL despite strong 2020 growth

Mac OS Ken

01:20 min | 2 months ago

Institutions still underweight on AAPL despite strong 2020 growth

"Institutional ownership of apple. Shares is near an all time high according to morgan stanley analyst. Katie huber d but it is nowhere near enough and harassed mation could be helpful at this point to find out what institutional ownership is according to the site investo pedia institutional ownership is the amount of the company's available stock owned by mutual or pension funds insurance companies investment firms private foundations endowments or other large entities that manage funds on behalf of others. The site goes onto. Explain that once those institutions get into a company. They tend to stay there for a while. Not only this pulling shares out of circulation raise the value of shares outstanding. Their decision to get in can lead other investors to do the same despite being near all time highs institutional ship of apple is still under weight according to a note from hubert to clients posted on apple three not. Oh the way she and hers. Apple is likely to see revenue growth of twenty two percent in fiscal year. Twenty twenty one and earnings per share growth of thirty six percent. That's based on a few numbers. That i wish i understood but i sadly do not

Katie Huber Apple Morgan Stanley Hubert
Fresh update on "thirty six percent" discussed on Breaking Biotech

Breaking Biotech

00:56 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "thirty six percent" discussed on Breaking Biotech

"When i looked into it a couple of things stuck out to me which is hypo. Tony is relatively rare in general with any kind of injection in the eye and the reason for this is when you're putting in fluid in the eye. The pressure actually increases so rather than low ocular pressure. Which is what is being seen here in this series adverse reaction five to ten percent of either treatment or the control group in the i league studies. Get an increase in intraocular pressure after fifty two weeks. So that's the first thing. The second thing is that in general there's an increase in inflammation and side effects associated with gene therapy rather than the once monthly. I li injection. So it seems like there's something going on with the actual gene therapy itself rather than the route of administration. Or the number of injections. Because i lee is a once monthly injection and they have less side effects than say advair zero-to-two or rtx three on four. When it's only one injection being given so just to show that here. I pulled up some of the optic phase one data from advanced him and in the studies that had the high dose which is six times ten to the eleven vector genomes per i. We're seeing here that in n. Equals six nine those around at twenty five to thirty percent number of patients that still have some kind of ocular inflammation and have to manage it and in this cohort one. This is around eighty. Six week follow up so well over a year passed the actual treatment date. They are still having inflammation that needs to be managed with steroid eyedrops. So in the lower doses. This doesn't seem to be the case but it is a concern that at these high doses were seeing so much inflammation and the same is true with rg x. Through on four so over one year after therapy. Rtx three and four leads to around seventy percent of patients with post operative conjunctiva hemorrhage thirty six percent of post operative inflammation I pain and post operative visual acuity reduction in seventeen percent of patients..

Seventeen Percent Thirty Percent Five Ten Percent Six Week Thirty Six Percent Tony Second Thing One Injection TEN First Thing Around Seventy Percent Eleven Vector Twenty Five Six Nine TWO Six Times Three Once Monthly Four
Los Angeles Lakers go in short-handed and fall to the Brooklyn Nets

Lakers Nation Podcast

05:44 min | 2 months ago

Los Angeles Lakers go in short-handed and fall to the Brooklyn Nets

"Lakers dropped the game to the Nets got blown out was not pretty wind up losing this one. It was 109 2098. Ouch out not good. We're going to break down exactly what happened and put a little bit of context into it. What does this mean for the Lakers moving forward now that you've lost this was a game that a lot of people look forward to a lot of people had this game marked on their calendars did the Lakers maybe not and there's a lot of different things for us to to get into here the team didn't play. Well, there's no question and we'll talk a little bit about that. But I think where we need to start is that the Lakers were down two starters and yes, it's fair to mention that the Nets were also Down Kevin Durant. That's a giant loss. The Lakers were down Anthony Davis age. A giant loss. They were also down Dennis Schroder and I thought that was a bigger loss than he would be on most nights because the Nets defense is so poor. I think schruder would have had a very good game tonight. Just living in the paint getting to the rim creating Havoc. He would have made a difference out there for the Lakers certainly, but unfortunately was not able to go do to contact tracing with all the cobit stuff going on. So, you know, that was that was definitely unfortunate. We certainly didn't get the kind of finals preview matchup that people have been thinking we would get from this game because you're missing those star players. I don't think we got a very good representation of who the Lakers are as a team. I also don't think we got a great representation of who the Nets are because they're so different with Kevin Durant, but we did find out that the Nets love to shoot lots and lots of threes and make a lot of them tonight. Let's finish the game shooting just 46% from 3, but that doesn't tell the whole story. They were 50% or better for almost the entire game. It was until the end that they dropped off doing a great job generating open Thurs. And the Lakers Defenders were struggling to get out there and get a hand up and they were knocking them down. Joe Harris ridiculous 647 from 3 for 21 points. I said, this is a pregame video game. But one thing that they couldn't do was allow another guy to get going if Kyrie gets his points if James Harden gets his points you're going to live with that you're going to try to make life as difficult as you can on them, but you can't allow another guide to get going in and this game Joe Harris certainly did again dropping 21 points and then you gave up 15 to Timothy Loma Carrboro 2015 points to TLC not great. They're from the Lakers side of things LeBron. James had to pretty much do everything 32.8 board 7 assists 33 minutes glad that he only played 33 minutes. No reason for you to burn him out in this game when it was clearly won. The Nets were going to win especially once they got into the second half LeBron 146 from three three of six from the line, okay? One of the only other guys in double-figures was sixteen and ten. So we got a double-double Montrezl Harrell with ten points. Nobody else really did a whole lot out there. Nobody else did did much on the offensive end. You had nine points from k c p but just 145 from 3 West Matthews who started and played some shooter 144 shooting o of two from deep in 24 minutes Mark assault eight points did shoot for 3:00. So I'd like to see them in four to five threes a night did shoot for hit two of them. So you'll take that but the Lakers on the night shooting just 27% from 3 that slide from behind the three-point line at one point. They were third in the NBA in 3-point percentage and they have dropped dramatically since then and in fact last game they were up just about forty percent from three against the wolves and that was the first game in a while they'd been even better than league-average from deep and that's usually about thirty-five thirty-six percent tonight shooting just 27% That's with me rounding up. That's not good enough that will not get it done 6 a.m. Turnovers on the night as well. That's not a good sign either pretty much everywhere things could have gone wrong for the Lakers. They they really did ten offensive rebounds compared to 8 to the Brooklyn Nets. The brake pads are terrible rebounding team. That was a place where the Lakers needed to dominate 24 free throw attempts for the Nets compared to just 14 for the Lakers each and every spot along the way where the lake she really needed to win that particular area free throw attempts 3-point percentage turnovers, the Nets came out on top and because of that they won the game and wanted thousand Ali so I wouldn't be taking your questions and comments, but I guess before we get into everything. How much do we really take away from this knowing? There's no Anthony Davis knowing there's no Dennis Schroder knowing that the Lakers how many times tonight did we see the Lakers throw out lineups that we've never seen before with five men groups that literally have not played a single minute together yet. Not played a minute. That matters and I know we get some people who say it always but you can't make excuses. You can't you know, you have to go out there and win every single game. I'm just telling you what happened in the game. We saw the Lakers defense breakdown thought that was the Nets offense was really good part of that was the Lakers energy wasn't there part of that was also that they were playing an unfamiliar groupings and defense being something where everybody has to be on the same page. You get defensive breakdowns like this when you throw a line up together add necessity, I don't blame Frank Vogel here. You have no shooter. No Anthony Davis your entire rotation changes and you're winding up throwing out these kind of bizarre lineups out on the court and that's going to create defense of break that breakdowns. It's going to lead to open looks because you guys aren't used to knowing exactly where they're going to switch off their defense of responsibilities are it's a tough situation to be in and so I don't want to make excuses for the Lakers energy. I think they should have played with more energy with more Pace should

Lakers Nets Dennis Schroder Kevin Durant Joe Harris Schruder Anthony Davis Timothy Loma Carrboro Lebron Montrezl Harrell West Matthews James Harden Kyrie Brooklyn Nets James
Student Loan Forgiveness: Democrats Debate How Much To Cancel

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:31 min | 2 months ago

Student Loan Forgiveness: Democrats Debate How Much To Cancel

"Five million americans have student debt and president biden has promised to do something about that. He's proposed cancelling up to ten thousand dollars per borrwer. Democrats in congress are pushing for more though fifty thousand dollars per person. Here's npr's listen Joe biden has made it clear one point six trillion dollars in federal student. Debt is a problem but the question of how much of it to cancel is still on the table. Let's take a look at the plan. The president supports cancelling ten thousand dollars in debt per borrower or. Who have the lowest suit deaths are the ones who struggle the most adam. Looney is an economist. At the university of utah he says not all debt is the same borrowers who completed. A bachelor's often have higher debt burdens but are able to pay that debt back. The ones really struggling are the ones in default. When you're in default government can take your tax refund part of your paycheck when you get older. You can even lose part of your social security. Roughly eight million borrowers are in default and most of them have less than ten thousand dollars in debt. The amount that you borrow is largely dependent on how many years you will often students who drop out after a semester or a year or two just on accumulate very much dead. If you never got that degree you can't get a job to help pay off that debt. Looney argues that anything higher than ten thousand cancellation runs. The risk of awarding borrowers. Who don't need help. He points to research that shows thirty. Six percent of student debt is owned by the top twenty percent of income holders but income is different than wealth household was student debt. Tend to have the least amount of wealth. That's the value of all your assets minus debt. Now let's take a look at the plans to cancel fifty thousand dollars in student at senators elizabeth warren and chuck schumer among those behind. This idea. they say a more forgiving cancellation policy is also about racial justice. And would target gaps in wealth especially among black families. Black households are more likely to have student debt and more of it than white or latino families. The debt crisis in is dish. Proportionally impacting borrowers of color and communities of color. Black borrowers in particular ashleigh harrington the senior policy counsel at the center for responsible lending. So when we talk about cancelation we have to start their black borrowers. She says can struggle even if they get their degree. Thanks to racism. In the labor market more debt cancellation would give them a up. You have families were the color who have never been able to build wealth. They don't have intergenerational wealth fender having intergenerational deck many black and latino families missed out on ways to build wealth in the past like homeownership and job training programs due to racist policies researchers who study and talk to student. Loan borrowers say now student. Loan debt is thing. That's holding them back in a forthcoming report. The center for responsible lending black borrowers. Who would have all of their debts. Raced at fifty thousand was forgiven. Have median assets worth just seventy six thousand dollars in most cities. That's not even a house and of course there's the pandemic we are in the list of a crisis it and so we're for the place where count out. Inauguration gonna cut it regardless of the dollar figure most advocates. For cancelling say the thing that makes it so appealing is it can be done by the president through executive action without congress. President biden has long said he'd prefer to use legislation but in early february. The white house signaled it was willing to consider doing it with the flick of a pen.

Looney Joe Biden Biden University Of Utah NPR Ashleigh Harrington Congress Elizabeth Warren Chuck Schumer Adam Center For Responsible Lending Center For Responsible Lending President Biden White House
Murphy, Clark lead No. 9 Virginia past Georgia Tech 57-49

AP News Radio

00:28 sec | 3 months ago

Murphy, Clark lead No. 9 Virginia past Georgia Tech 57-49

"Trey Murphy the third scored eighteen points and ninth ranked Virginia closed on a sixteen five run to beat Georgia tech fifty seven forty nine he A. Clark added fourteen points to help the Cavaliers overcome a forty four forty one deficit in the final six and a half minutes Clark Murphy key to closing run with big three pointers Virginia missing only one of its final nine shots from the field Jose Alvarado scored eighteen points but Georgia tech was held to just thirty six percent from the field on eighteen of fifty shooting I'm Dave Ferrie

Trey Murphy Georgia Tech Clark Murphy A. Clark Virginia Cavaliers Jose Alvarado Dave Ferrie
What Is Your Back Catalogue Worth?

You Are The Media

08:33 min | 3 months ago

What Is Your Back Catalogue Worth?

"What's asiapac. A low worth has an intrinsic value to you as well as the audience. You're creating for go back catalogue is when you create work. This not just focus on what's current but takes account of the longer term. It's content that pertains fairly because there's something universal and perennial about it in this way. Not only is it valuable to others. It also helps manual position in the marketplace. Currently there's a flurry of music. Artists alina back catalogs. The lives of bob dylan new young secure of done it even dolly parton thinking about pissing beat to be head so if you build an audience share content defines. Its home of your audience. Your back catalogue can also become something. That's desirable catholic. A work is your audience can always access. It's worth the grows and evolves alongside your audience. You can become a self replenishing goldman in times of new clients have improved that you'll someone who does the work and potential clients getting comfortable with your approach. A website that shares one or two articles every now and then feta video and if you four-page e books does not come across as high value however one of the back catalogue of regla audio writing and video content posted over a period of time suggests is a place of value to us on a u. at the media online in two thousand and twenty joe pelosi said to everyone but anyone michelle content if it went tomorrow. If not your content you have a problem a back cutler means you invite days that you share today but also track record that shows. You're someone who keeps and has kept on giving me never become irrelevant by choosing to rest for used in the past with touring on home to the ever-growing increase in streaming. We're seeing a trend for music. Artists selling the rights at back. Catalogues artists unrealized by a cashing. In on the value of songs they produce david as uk based rotea fund. Hypnosis is obtaining the rights to artists from blondie to mark ronson in the sky article musical journalist. David sinclair said. If you're talking with the idea if you're a rockstar. If you bob dylan you're thinking to yourself. This might be time. He's getting twenty using comp one year right that in a lump sum in sakir who sold the rights to one hundred. Thirty five songs to hypnosis. I'm humbled that songwriting. And given me the privilege of communicating with others being a part of something bigger than myself autism now handing over the word ridden and shed over the years for fake off certainly does not mean tied in this context. This story of selling bank catholics chimes with how we in the beats a bass bass produce work for an audience. It proves that when you work is relevant to others this more reason to keep going the blog articles you produced back in two thousand nine nineteen. Maybe didn't get many views when they were first published. But that doesn't mean the not value sitting within your overall bank of work similar to music artists. Your job is to keep plane so that you keep developing your audience when people find you they can then join the dots and get a more complete picture of y you share is relevant to them. Those articles that received little traffic into nineteen are important in the context of your overall efforts. A moment in time should not be your only anka booting up a back catalog of which shows in your work over time making it easier for people to make a decision on whether to buy or subscribe. Starting the a space that people can visit but also record of how you've developed in the music industry return longevity. What about you. How will you know wherever you're back catalogue is where something it won't be. The same. ballpark is bob. Dylan's three hundred million pounds. When he sold his six hundred songs universal music for how we find out. If what you share has worth you would. Immediate has been around every week apart from some short breaks since october. Two thousand thirteen almost eight years. Now here's why building a back. Catalog of content provides vani in both the short and long after the first one. Is this over time. People see the value provide be prepared to play. The long game is so important. I wonder where ought be now if i hadn't been producing content every week for you at the median. I reckon it would be somewhere where i am today when people recognize. Your work is something that they can get behind you have a license to develop momentum secondly it can support your wider efforts. Your back catalog makes it easier to introduce for new initiatives. The one thing that has remained constant from me has been my writing. This was the tree. I planted back in twenty thirteen and new branches of grown. It made introducing in person and then online live events easier. Don't think of the word you produce in isolation look at it as a way to connect your intentions and third lake is greater use beyond the immediate space producing a back. Catalog extend your scope by this. I mean what stance a piece of work in one channel can extend into other formats. For instance blogs have become talked topics for other people's podcast. One single article became a webinar in april. Twenty twenty on your first ten email subscribers the next point is that it becomes and it brings people closer or from people. The proof of the work. You've already done helps you by helping them. Make a decision go back catalogue in contrast to say tha that competitors whose output may be more sporadic demonstrates perseverance. Next point is that it contributes to sales while message of this. You the media online. That i'm talking to you now is not around selling your business based on your content. Your work can be indirectly related to revenue for instance. The world you produce can also present a way to sell products and services but in a way that isn't merely emphasizing for instance being a trusted business increases the impact. You can make and this links to one of the aspects of what the month of learning represents a recent podcast looked at the impact of trust. Next is your were becomes a reference and search to your back catalogue can become a place for us to take from an somewhere. Search engines recognize websites. We've over three hundred and eleven index pieces of work c. Two hundred and thirty six percent more traffic than no sign of not too many pages and this is ups ball. What this means. Is that the better. Your ongoing work is indexed. There is more for a search engine to look through and support your search rankings ultimately ultimately want visit us to stick around on your site for that you need to offer work they will enjoy and lastly grow from it. The more you practice delivering something the better you become by learning. How the audio space works. I've become a better speaker by sharing a short video every week for the of the media weekly email. I think become a better presenter by writing every week. I've become a stronger writer. Whilst as an emphasis on creating roughness never forget this contributes to your own personal development. Let's roundup similar to writing and sherry music. You just put all your effort into a once a year christmas. Oh you have to keep introducing new material. That can stand the test of time all comes down to having that ability to keep going is what you're creating talking to be worth. Something is what you're producing contributing to your overall message actions in commercial delivery to give you the freedom to play an experiment. Why if your entire back catalogue disappear tomorrow but people let you know what they show concern. You're back catalogue is your commercial worth directly and indirectly and it's important to keep on playing for the audience as you show up to it

Joe Pelosi Bob Dylan Rotea Fund Sakir Alina Dolly Parton David Sinclair Mark Ronson Goldman Cutler Blondie Michelle Autism Dylan David UK BOB
Cases of Flu Are Down Globally

Quick News Daily Podcast

04:08 min | 3 months ago

Cases of Flu Are Down Globally

"Job. Maybe next time you're here you can present. That would be getting green jobs. So i'm just asking when that happened. Richard trumka who is a friend longtime friend of joe biden says about that day one eastone. He says i wish he. The president has paired that. Were carefully with the thing that he did. second by saying. Here's where we are creating jobs. So there's partial evidence from richard trumka. Well you didn't include all of his interview. Would you like to include. How about this. The international union of north america said the keystone decision will cost one thousand existing union jobs and ten thousand projected construction jobs. Well what mr trump. Also indicated in the same interview was that president biden has proposed a climate plan with transformative investments and infrastructure and laid out a plan that will not only create millions of good union jobs but also helped tackle the climate crisis. That guy was peter doocy from fox news and i always hate his questions because he takes four ever to get to the point he just beats around the bush because his conscience is fighting him the whole time and at least that's what it seems like. It's like that tiny little part of them that still has morals and ethics is trying to tell him. He's being deceiving and a bad journalist. But pete here just wants at fox news money one of the more unexpected biden policies. I would say. Just because. I never thought he would actually do. It is that he announced on friday. That trump wouldn't be eligible to receive intelligence briefings anymore. This is the first time that a former president has been cut out of these briefings. But we've never truly had a president trump have we biden explained in that norah o'donnell interview saying quote. I just think that there's no need for him. To have the intelligence briefings. What value is giving him. An intelligence briefing. What impact does he have at all other than the fact that he might slip and say something and he also said that has shown quote erratic behavior. Well that certainly the polite way to say that. He's been acting crazy honestly if he didn't read them well he was president. Why should he get them now. I mean the way. I imagine it. They practically had to create puppet shows and plays to get him the information that was in those briefings like they probably had to act it out for him. The man doesn't or possibly can't read so the story here as promised is about the flus really bad year sir remember. I talked a couple weeks ago. About how bad well not. How bad how good for us it was that. This year's flu season is almost nonexistent. In that was in new york city as it turns out that sort of the case. Globally this reporting from the atlantic followed a doctor from the mayo clinic in rochester minnesota. And they just sort of talked it over with them. What they're seeing in. Why we might be seeing this really good flu season for us. He said on december first that they began testing all patients with respiratory symptoms for covert and the flu so thousands and thousands of these tests have turned up positive for covid but out of the twenty thousand flu tests that they've run which is ten times. The usual number zero have come back positive for the flu since early fall. Eight hundred thousand flu tests in the. Us have been done and only fifteen hundred have been positive. That's point two percent for context. That's about one hundred times so last year. We had a hundred times more cases at this time when we had done. Eight hundred thousand tests back then. The flu positivity rate was anywhere between twenty and thirty percent twenty and thirty percent a lot of other respiratory viruses have disappeared as well well disappeared in quotes because they're still out there somewhere including ones for the common cold. Obviously the reason for this is the number of restrictions and precautions that we've had to put in place social distancing masks etc and all of those help because the regular flu and covid spread in pretty much the same ways however covert spreads more easily because it can be passed on by people who don't even have symptoms in front example just look at all these super spreader events. That didn't happen before. It's not like if you went to the movie theater and just anyone had the flu. You al- suddenly got the flu. There are also differences at the macroscopic level. Like how it sticks to the particles that we exhale when we breathe or talk like cova sticks more easily so is easier to transmit of course doctors

Richard Trumka FLU International Union Of North A Mr Trump President Biden Peter Doocy Fox News Biden Joe Biden Donnell Norah Pete Bush Mayo Clinic Rochester New York City Atlantic Minnesota
We Finally Know Exactly How Bad The Pandemic Has Been for Airline Pilots

Airplane Geeks Podcast

06:00 min | 3 months ago

We Finally Know Exactly How Bad The Pandemic Has Been for Airline Pilots

"We see in plane and pilot magazine. We finally know exactly how bad the pandemic has been for. Airline pilots and the numbers here are pretty staggering and eliminating max indeed. I was really quite stunned to take a look and see. Just how bad things are. I mean we all know that the airlines have been hit disproportionately hard here during the pandemic that know some pilots have been out of work. This was a survey done by goose. Which is a pilot. Recruitment firm not for birds but for a and they found that nearly half of all pilots worldwide. Either looking for work or on furlough which was shocking to me. They said that thirty percent of the people surveyed were out of work and looking and other seventeen percents that they were furloughed awaiting further news and additional. Six percents said they were still employed with their airline. But we're doing non-flying works pretty stunning. Half half the pilots Basically out of work or looking for work in this comes from a survey of two thousand five hundred ninety eight pilots. This survey was open for four weeks just to kind of set. The timeframe in it closed october thirtieth twenty twenty and it was anonymous survey thirty questions and the survey was designed for pilots of all ranks. First officers second officers and cadets in some of the data in this is just really really fascinating and we'll have a link to the survey report which was done in conjunction with flake global. And a you just peruse some of this and find some really really interesting interesting things but By way of demographics of those almost twenty six hundred pilots forty-three percent of the respondents were in europe. Nineteen percent from the middle east and africa eighteen from asia pacific Twelve percent from north. America six percent from south america and two percent from china. So it's pretty Pretty global in the survey touches on things like pilot retention pilot job security employee engagement even Stress mental health wellbeing things like that so Some really really interesting statistics Couple of the ones that i like. Maybe if you guys saw some things that piqued your interest but one of the questions was when do you think aviation will make a full recovery to pre covid levels and not. Surprisingly only ten percent said up to one year the biggest spike was up to two years. Thirty four percent of the pilots thought up to two years but twenty eight percent up to three years and longer than that twelve percent four years. Ten percent five years and six percent said they thought it would never never be the same So that's the pilot's perspective. No one was. Do you think your mental health has been affected by the pandemic and here there is a direct correlation between the age of the pilot and the pursuit pilots that group in In how many of them thought that their mental health had been a acted for those pilots. Fifty five to sixty four years old thirty. Two percent thought their mental health had been affected for pilots forty five to fifty four years old but younger thirty six percent when we go down to thirty five to forty four year olds forty four percent of them thought. Their mental health has affected in the twenty five to thirty four year old group forty-nine percent and pilots under twenty four years old fifty eight percent of them thought their mental health had been affected by the pandemic so. I thought that was a really interesting result. I wasn't totally surprised by the The differences once. You mentioned the difference. I thought okay but it's the younger folks are having a tougher time. Think about someone who's twenty four years old this may be the first In a bad thing that's happened to them in their in their career folks are in their mid fifty s have probably gone through multiple things in the past and probably a better able to to ride through a downturn whereas you know young folks just not have that cushion of You know savings built up to right through. Its doesn't surprise me but still it's a large large number folks nearly six percent under a twenty-four saying mental health. Been impacted the the demographics of the respondents in terms of gender. Was you know the numbers are kind like the same numbers we've seen for a long time. Almost all male four percent female in one percent preferred not to say. I'm not sure why they would prefer not to say in. An anonymous survey but four percent identified themselves as female Which really kind of hope that that number would be coming up. Ron wouldn't when you're looking at programs With youth today. do you see more. young girls. Becoming interested involve is that number higher than four percent. I hope well Here were making a concerted effort to make sure it's higher than four percent Right now we're preparing for Air venture and we've got A program within the air venture program called girl venture We've also got One for adults named Women's sore And between those two we really want to invite women to get more involved and engaged in aviation and so We see a higher than i would say. Four percent level here

Asia Pacific South America
Harden, Durant help Nets break away late, beat Heat 98-85

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 3 months ago

Harden, Durant help Nets break away late, beat Heat 98-85

"The nets exploded down the stretch and beat the heat ninety eight eighty five strong defense keyed the Brooklyn rally in the fourth quarter they held Miami scoreless on ten consecutive possessions that sparked a fifteen to nothing run as the nets were able to beat the heat twice in three days James harden scored ten of his twenty points in the fourth quarter and talked about his strong finish they want manning a few possessions and you know I got I got loose a little bit so you know my team is no give me confidence to shoot the basketball be aggressive in us that's it he playing shorthanded as Jimmy Butler and Avery Bradley remaining Kobe protocol shot only thirty six percent they were paced by BAM ID bowel who had twenty six points and ten rebounds might make you so

Nets James Harden Brooklyn Miami Jimmy Butler Manning Avery Bradley Basketball Kobe
Do Some Fabrics Make Body Odor Worse?

BrainStuff

05:47 min | 4 months ago

Do Some Fabrics Make Body Odor Worse?

"Of athletic wear and outdoors gear is labeled with claims. That it'll help wick away sweat and keep you spelling as fresh as if you just stepped of the shower in this episode. We look at how those claims can possibly be true and how they can sometimes fall through. Pay their brain steph. Lorraine bogo bomb here. If you're preparing for a hike especially one that involves sleeping under the stars. Every last than you pack should be questioned. Will you need rain gear. One walking stick or two which freeze dried. Snacks are actually tasty enough to eat. One essential rule from experienced hikers is no cotton clothing. Clothes made of cotton can act as a sponge. The material soaks up sweat and holds moisture next to the skin which eliminates the insulating effect of the cotton skin irritation and eventually leads to copious amounts of body odor body odor isn't a personal affront. Temperature becomes high enough to cause certain. Glands secrete fluid onto the surface of the skin is at risk for emanating at least a little bit and it isn't without purpose sweat produced by the akron. Glands that cover most of the body helps regulate body temperature while the milky or fluid released by the epa korean glands. The armpits and groin area is a signal that the body is under stress. African glands are primarily responsible for body odor and although akron. Glands secrete primarily odorless sweat. The smell produced by this sweat changes over time perspiration acts as a magnet tha bacteria on the skin and these bacteria use it as fuel to multiply. When the growing numbers of bacteria metabolize sweat they produce a smelly byproduct commonly called body odor. Clearly cotton isn't the right choice for working up a sweat. Since it can actually make body odor worse. But what about other types of fabrics do all fabrics increase a person's propensity to develop body odor the key to using clothing to prevent or lessen body odor lows in the fabrics ability to release sweat quickly before bacteria can begin to feast on it. There are natural and man-made fabrics that expertly wick moisture away from the skin to the edge of the material where it can evaporate other fabrics however we'll trap moisture in the fabric. And on the skin and make body odor worse a fabrics ability to transmit and released moisture is known as breathe ability. Which is the common term for the moisture vapor transmission rate or mvp tr. The mvp are calculating. How many grams of moisture move through a square meter of fabric in two thousand four hours. Generally the greater the mvp are the less likely the fabric is to absorb and retain odor causing moisture. You may be thinking great. Now all i have to do is find clothing label breathable and be. Oh we'll be a problem of the past not so fast. There's not an industry standard regarding breath ability nearly any label can carry the term usually preceded by words like or extremely. This means you'll need to arm yourself with information about specific fabrics rather than relying on label hype as a guide natural fabrics created from the fibers of animals. Bugs or plants are a good place to start. You'll want to steer clear of one hundred percent cotton fabrics because they take a long time to dry and will allow body odor to bloom. In the meantime this is largely. Because one hundred percent cotton fabrics are composed of fibers that swell with moisture and thereby reduce the pores of the fabric of other natural fabrics absorb and release sweat quickly including hemp fabric woven from these stem fibers of the cannabis. Sativa plant and linen women from flax stems. Well it sounds counter intuitive to wear wool to prevent body odor. This natural fiber is an excellent choice will absorb up to thirty six percent of its weight in moisture without feeling wet and will dry quickly. We'll also releases minute amounts of body heat as it absorbs moisture so it will help keep you cool. Plus we'll is naturally antibacterial which means you can wear it. Sweating it and keep wearing it sometimes. For consecutive days without reading when it comes to making body odor worse synthetic fabrics tend to trap odors at a greater rate the natural fabrics although many of these manmade fabrics like polyester are quick to wick moisture away from the skin and equally quick to dry. Their construction can up the stink quotient within the wave of synthetic moisture waking fabrics are notches designed to pool. Manute amounts of sweat as it. Transfers from the inner layer to the outer layer of the fabric. The concept is a good one as the moisture will generally evaporate once it reaches the fabrics outer layer. The problem is that as sweat collects in the nooks and crannies of the fabric on its way to freedom. It is devoured by bacteria that have themselves made home in those same recesses. This traps body odor. Within the fabric to reduce rowdy odors look for static fabrics that haven't an added antimicrobial ingredient for example the addition of silver polyester or spandex fibers can help prevent body. Odor from accumulating silver nanoparticles. That's particles so small that eighty thousand of them could fit within. The diameter of a human hair can be integrated into synthetic fabric when they get wet. The silver nanoparticles released silver ions that initially slow the growth of odor causing bacteria and eventually kill them off. Altogether some fabrics are infused with a different type of odor inhibiting agent molecules of volcanic ash. The ash molecules have a pore size that similar to that of an odor molecule when the to meet the odor molecule is adsorb and trapped within the ash molecule this prevents the odor molecule from releasing its characteristic smell until the fabric is washed in warm water to prevent body odor. Look for clothing made from fabrics. That will help keep you dry and have the added might of antimicrobial helpers and don't forget the antiperspirant or

Lorraine Bogo Akron EPA
Small Loans, Large Cost

After The Fact

05:16 min | 4 months ago

Small Loans, Large Cost

"This season. we're going to be telling you about states of innovation literally stories about states that are taking new and creative approaches to problems and finding solutions make lives better in this episode. We look at ohio. Many people live paycheck to paycheck and sometimes accumulated bills. Outstrip that paycheck. For twelve million americans. This episodes data point. The answer is to turn to payday loans. But sometimes a small loan turns into a problem. The notion of giving somebody is super high cost loan but then forcing them to repay it. Really quickly is actually the biggest part of the problem. A three hundred dollar loan with a fifty dollars in fees that comes due in two weeks that takes more than one. Third of a typical borrowers paycheck. Even before you account for taxes. Nick bork directs spews work to inform effective consumer finance protections. Those fees. He mentioned add up quickly altogether. An average annual percentage rate of three hundred ninety one percent. That's a far cry from the national average for a personal loan today at nine point three percent. But that's not the only issue something that people don't always understand. Is that people who use payday. Loans are actually banked. You have to have a checking account to pay loan because that's how the blender secures the repayment. The payday lender has access to your checking account. So they get paid first. Then you can't pay your mortgage than you can't pay your rent then you can't pay your car payment and so what do you do you go back to the payday lender and get another one. That's how the cycle starts. Nick explains how these loans came into existence. Haiti loans have been around for about a generation and about thirty years ago. Lawmaker said well. We wanna find a way to get credit to people who are living paycheck to paycheck. And we've got usery rates baked into our legal code. Almost every state has usury laws on the books. We're going to give an exception to payday. Loans to allow them to go higher than that but in exchange were going to force these loans to be really short so people. Don't get into trouble if you're in the situation of having to get paid alone in the first place and then two weeks later you lose a third of your paycheck. Well it creates what a lot of people refer to as the cycle of debt and this is how something that is supposedly a two week. Short term loan for the typical borrower ends up being a three to four month experience often five or six months by the time they get out of that debt. They've effectively borrowed. Say three or four hundred dollars which is typical. But they've paid five hundred dollars or more in fees more fees than the amount of the original loan. A number of states are starting to look at ways to make these loans to safer for consumers. Can you talk a little bit about what's been happening. And what makes some of these new approaches a little innovative in this area ever since payday loans came onto the market. It's been sort of like an experiment. And how do we make short term. Loans liquidity loans available to people who have damaged credit. Scores are living paycheck to paycheck. It hasn't worked very well and until recently the states that allowed payday loans haven't really figured out how to make it work better by trying to protect people from getting into too much trouble and make them short term loans. We're actually harming them. So let's change the law and let's give people more time to repay. Let's change the pricing structure. A little bit so yeah. It's going to cost more than a credit card. But it's not going to be four hundred percent and add a few more protections and you know now three states have done it and it's worked out really well well. Let's talk a little bit about the hallmark of what makes good change in this world. What are some of the hallmarks of of a successful innovative way of fixing this. That we've seen work in. Colorado or ohio were numbered. I can talk about this all day and the details really matter but fundamentally it's simple the state's law has to be changed so that a payday loan must be an installment loan that people pay off over several months and every payment that you make pays down part of the principal. It's it's calm analyzing installment loan. It's the way that installment loans usually work and on top of that you have to change the pricing structure. What we've seen in the states work really well. Is you limit the interest on the loan to thirty six percent or less but you also allow a reasonable monthly fee to help the lender cover their costs and continue making credit even to people with very damaged credit histories. The typical payday loan borrower has a five seventeen credit score. But if you have interest up to thirty six percent and a reasonable monthly fee colorado ohio virginia. They've shown that you can still make credit available and then third you just need. A couple of simple safeguards prevent lenders from enticing borrowers to refinance their loans. And that sort of thing so in two thousand eighteen when ohio past reform law. They did the things. I just mentioned. They required the payday loans to amortizing installment loans and they implemented a twenty eight percent interest rate cap plus a reasonable monthly fee.

Nick Bork Ohio Haiti Nick Colorado Virginia
Sweats Are Beating the Pants Off Office Wear

Business Wars Daily

04:56 min | 4 months ago

Sweats Are Beating the Pants Off Office Wear

"More than six months ago producer. Gwen moran wrote this story about the new fashioned way that swept the country early in the pandemic admit it you succumbed as well to the sweatpants craze what we didn't know back in may's how long lasting that trend would be although as you'll hear some sartorial pundits predicted. Then that sweats were here to stay now. Whether that's a good or bad thing we'll leave that up to you. Take a listen back to this story about the rivalry between champion and lululemon. The late great fashion designer. Karl lagerfeld once sneered sweatpants. Or a sign of defeat with apologies to mr lagerfeld. He never had to do as seven. Am zoom meeting as stay at home. Orders have stretched well beyond their original end dates. Our work lives are increasingly blending with her home lives nowhere. Is that shift. More apparent than in our pero dressing down has become the norm as a result sales of apparel and accessories dropped nearly eighty percent between march and april but there is one bright spot on the otherwise dismal retail horizon. Sales of active wear or at leisure are soaring in particular sweat pants or having a moment in april g kua. We are living in the age of sweat pants and never going back. Even the devil is traded product. For more downscale duds folks editor-in-chief in style icon. Anna wintour posted an instagram shot of herself working at home in tracksuit bottoms this despite once swearing she would never wear them. Just how much growth are we talking about well. Data from tracking firm edited found that sales of sweat pants are up a whopping thirty six percent over the same period. Last year it makes sense. A recent harris poll found that more than half of employed. Americans are working from home. At the same time videoconferencing has skyrocketed as meetings and interviews have gone remote. You may need to be picture. Perfect from the shoulders up but down below. All bets are off sweats. Yoga pants were tracked bottoms. Call them what you will. They're stretchy comfortable and exceedingly forgiving of those late night. Pandemic sour dough bread and butter benches wall street is betting on the trend at least for now analysts susan anderson from be riley. Fdr told fortune that what selling is casual active in lounge wear last week. Shares of lululemon athletic inc rose more than ninety percent hitting a record high. The brand is credited with kicking off the athol leisure segment and simeon seal from b. m. o. capital markets call lululemon an at home kobe winner while the luxury leading may be the it brand of the moment. Lou may have some competition from classic competitor. Hanes brands champion during a call with analysts early. May hanes brand. Ceo gerald evans said the champion dot com sales had tripled. He said volumes. Were at black friday or cyber monday levels. Champion success lies. In the brand's cool factor. Being on the upswing recently and company has been smart about partnerships to in march hanes. Brands unveiled an exclusive multi year agreement with amazon to carry its popular c nine champion line which had previously been sold at target in april. The company announced a new partnership with sesame street for the un's but for those who don't care about cool or if you stop carrying when you stopped going outside champion has a significant leg up in another arena and that's price while some lululemon bottoms will set you back more than one hundred. Twenty five bucks. You can score a pair of champions for less than a third of that price. If sweatpants newfound social status is making you think about tossing all your old suits and ties. You might just want to wait a bit. It seems a backlash has already begun the los angeles times. Deputy fashion editor admonished readers. Dress like the adults are getting paid to be and recent articles like thirteen stylish ways to dress up sweat pants on business insider indicate that even the work from home crowd may wanna feel a bit more put together as leisure brands battle to get people in their pants. Some questions remain record. High unemployment will continue to affect consumer spending and more companies announced. That remote work is here to stay casual everyday. May also be here to stay with no nosy co workers around judge fashion choices workers to fault more minimalist wardrobes after all as long as they pass the sniff test how many pairs of stretchy pants does anyone really need. The answers will come as more businesses open and people go back to work. We'll traditional dress code stand or will homebody style find its way into the office while athletes. Your manufacturers are pulling up. They're not so big kid pants and making the most of the moment. Employees may be hedging their bets over memorial day weekend data from edited showed shape wear one of the top five apparel categories. Selling out so maybe all that sour dough bread can't be ignored after all

Gwen Moran Mr Lagerfeld Lululemon Athletic Inc Karl Lagerfeld Hanes Brands Ceo Gerald Evans Anna Wintour Susan Anderson Lululemon FDR Harris Riley LOU Brands Amazon UN Los Angeles Times
Counties with worst virus surges overwhelmingly voted Trump

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 6 months ago

Counties with worst virus surges overwhelmingly voted Trump

"The counties with the worst coronavirus surges overwhelmingly voted for president Donald Trump an AP analysis looked at three hundred seventy six counties with the highest number of coronavirus cases per capita ninety three percent of those counties backed the president most were in rural areas in Montana the Dakotas Nebraska Kansas Iowa and Wisconsin in a nationwide survey by AP vote cast thirty six percent of trump voters described the pandemic as completely or mostly under control another forty seven percent said it was somewhat under control they considered the economy and jobs top priorities eighty two percent of Joe Biden supporters nationwide said the virus was not under control I'm a Donahue

AP Donald Trump Dakotas Montana Nebraska Iowa Kansas Wisconsin Joe Biden Donahue
Survey: LeBron James, Taylor Swift, Tom Hanks among the Most Influential People In The Election

Mojo In The Morning

01:02 min | 6 months ago

Survey: LeBron James, Taylor Swift, Tom Hanks among the Most Influential People In The Election

"Speaking of the election Tom Hanks Dwayne the Rock Johnson Oprah and Lebron James have the most trusted opinions on political and social issues according to a new survey of American voters. We're all twelve percent of voters reported that a celebrity or athlete absolutely influence their decision regarding the election down the party line. Democratic voters are more likely to be influenced by CELEBS or athletes rather than Republican voters. Voters thirty six percent said that Lebron had done the most to motivate people regarding voting Taylor swift came in second than the rock followed by. B. Beyond say also making that list asked to name the person who's opinion trusted the most regarding political or social issues in America Tom Hanks won by a landslide forty, nine percent kid rock who was obviously a very vocal supporter of president trump ranked as the most influential voice for. Republican. Voters

Tom Hanks Lebron James Taylor Swift Oprah President Trump
A tale of two direct listings

Equity

11:11 min | 7 months ago

A tale of two direct listings

"Hello, and welcome to equity shot are quick hit on breaking news I'm Natasha Mascarenas and today joining me to talk about a tale of not one. But two direct listings on the same Damn Day is Danny Creighton. How are you Danny doing? All right this is exciting. You know we went from a world of no direct listings to an occasional direct listening to multiple direct listings in the same day. So it's an exciting exciting morning. We can finally stop breaking up spotify in slack whenever we say the L word and reinvention Asana, and pollen tear, which are the two news heads we got today it's zoo of curiosities. But lots of great stuff to talk about where where do you WanNa start you WANNA. Start with Asana or palate here. What's more interesting to you I think I have to start with pollen tear and my big question is you've been tracking it through every. You know crazy filing, your high level thought was this a successful debut on the Stock Market for? Today I think it's a definitely a success. You know the stock from January two, thousand, nineteen onwards trading at around five to five, fifty, a share, and then in the last two or three months that price jumped to about nine dollars and sixteen cents as of September first, and so you know when when the reference price came out yesterday from the New York Stock. Exchange which was quoted at seven dollars and twenty five cents. A lot of people were like, wow, that's like a significant drop from nine sixteen like what happened particularly also last week we had the Wall Street Journal reporting they were looking for a ten dollar referenced price. You know none of those numbers were really good but look it's trading. Now it's live as we're. Doing the show, it's ten dollars and sixty one cents a share I'm. So it's better than all the numbers we heard before and it's up fifty percent on day one. So so part of me feels like this reference value was actually chosen precisely to give it a pop on day one you know if they were targeting ten bucks on Day One, this is sort of what they got and so a little bit of a lower reference price might have given them a little bit more of A. Psychological boost on on day one. So I, I think overall to success. Do you. Can you talk me a little bit about how we're trying to value the company right now I feel like I'm seeing a bunch of different numbers out there. Do we have an understanding of its fully diluted market value? We do there's still a little bit abate mostly because Peletier gives multiple numbers for the number of care. So it gives us one point six, billion shares outstanding two point one fully diluted two point one billion fully diluted than two point five billion fully fully fully diluted and so. I would say that its current share price, we would call it around twenty, four, billion in evaluation, which is an uptick from its its last rounds. Again at you know for a seventeen year old company to have the sort of strong debut on Wall Street I think it's pretty good. All things considered. Okay. Cool. I'll put a pin in Pailin tear, but I do want to talk about their lock-up period later, run me through Asana numbers I. saw it opened at a five point two billion value. Yes it's on a similar story. So yesterday, The New York Stock Exchange released a reference value of twenty one bucks per share. It zoomed straight out onto the public market. So it debuted, it's currently sitting at twenty eight dollars a share up thirty three percent on day one so far it's up to about I. Think it peaked at five point, two billion, and as of now is more like three point five, three point seven, five, billion market CAP. But again, that's actually significantly higher than his last valuation, which was an inlet late twenty, eighteen around one and A. Half billion dollars so either oke across the board I think both of these issues you know there's always a lot of risk drake listings. As you pointed out Natasha there haven't been that many is this sort of a novel mechanism. They're still a little bit unclear and exactly how they work, and so it's great to see again similar to slack spotify you know these are two enterprise. Companies to again totally different from the more consumer is random companies particularly spotify, which has tens of millions of consumers who might be retail investors buying into the stock. Most people haven't used the Sauna and certainly must people haven't used Pailin tear and so to see the kind of strength on the markets and the first day is is enticing for other companies considering the direct listing model. Right There I feel like pollen tears total customer base was what one? Hundred Fifty, company, hundred, twenty-five customers. That's a lot of customers Doing Gospel distanced. Something it's probably my favorite statistic about the company and I think I saw Dan Prime tweeting the other day that you know it's no longer going to be a secret of company. So we can stop calling it as such. This is the end of that right that confrontation about pollen tear for. So long we've been having well I, I will say. This about an hour ago. So may not be true today. A ASANA has an investor relations page like a standard like every company who publicly trades Peletier does not like it actually does not have as as of an hour ago that I looked up I could not find an investor relations page for here, which which tells you everything you need to know about the company I, feel like that is like in a beautiful one sentence or describes his relationship with investors, but but I think you're absolutely right you. Know despite the fact that only one, hundred, twenty, five customers despite the fact that took seventeen years three hundred grew it's growing from seven hundred, forty, three, million in revenue last year in fiscal year twenty, nineteen, it gave a revenue projection for twenty twenty about one point, five, billion to it's a growth company. It's SAS more and more SAS today than it was in the past where it was more services driven. So again, it's a positive story despite all the kerfuffle around its governance the last couple weeks do you Do you feel like the direct listing method might now take on more popularity. I. Mean. Maybe in some way, but can we even is? Is it enough of a success? You'd think that other companies might follow suit now that it's not just spotify that that did this. I think the more the merrier right I think Palentinian particular raised capital round back in. July right which was sort of what I was told from some insiders essentially the IPO that was the IPO and then direct listings just the actual market exchange. So I think we're GONNA see more companies taking this approach of bifurcating the capital, raise the float that you would normally do a IPO and just the actual just GonNa Start. Trading today and you know I think that that allows you more time to create the right narrative the right story of and also separates what is a a pretty intense kind of crisis driven process the road show getting the company ready the SEC filings separating out at out you don't put all your eggs in one basket. You can do it in stages and I think more and more companies undertake that approach going forward. My question to is and I'm sure our listeners are curious is with all direct listings. There's no shares offered by the company when the when it debuts and so when we see these prices I, guess how much of them are they vanity metrics much of their HABITA- goals, how important are they for us to care about and think about? I wanted to be precise. So there are no new shares offered by the company. So there's no dilutive in an IPO generally have fifteen, maybe twenty percent new shares offered to the public. There are no new shares but many of the insiders have to pay taxes capital gains they actually do have to sell shares. So you know so far this morning already thirty five, million shares of have already been traded and We have on Pailin tear thirty, two, hundred, and thirty million. Shares sold today, right? So already, there's a market, there's clearly tens of millions of shares being sold. So these prices are real or Israel as any other IPO in which people are you know figuring out what's going to happen? You know the next checkpoint for both of these companies is gonNA come in a couple of weeks when they report their next quarterly earnings and I think by then you'll start to see the analysts get comfortable the companies understand the next steps and what's happening after. And you're speaking with Dustin Moskovitz later today the founder of Asana. So any questions on that? You can kind of tease out right now. Well, I was told. The pure folks. About our stock imagery because apparently no longer has sideburns to. Join, the Line of people that complain but it's like you know there's the old line about taking a haircut. Up Thirty, five percents of they actually gained hair on the market today speak. Clearly. sideburns maybe somewhere else. But? No I. THINK WE'RE GONNA be really interested because some unique company in which its founders, Dustin Moskovitz who Justin Rosenstein, who both met each other at facebook actually majority of the company outright right. We just never see or very rarely see tech companies where the founding to CEO's and and COO own like outright majority like not just a majority of the voting because of class, a class B shares but they just outright own about thirty two percent of the company I believe doesn't owns thirty six. Percent of the company outright and just knowns around sixteen point, one percent and so to me like I'm just curious because it's just a different path for a company it was a slower growth company capital much more efficiently grew much more methodically and the founders sort of maintained ownership over time in a way that most other founders do not think the other. The other thing to put out here is Asana has no lockup though the similar to spotify Ed to black as listing all the shares are available for trade to anyone. Who any insider anyone who owns a share of on this morning can put it on the market and sell it Here is the complete opposite pallares pioneering this new kind of fusion of the IPO and the direct listing one would argue maybe the worst of both of those processes but actually a direct listing with a lockup and so only roughly twenty eight to twenty nine percent of pollen. Tear shares are even available for sale at all with the rest in lockup and market standoff agreements that will expire over. The next calendar year. So you know there's a lot more to wait on right. There's not as much liquidity with Pallares could actually harm the stock price. They might be a little bit inflated right now because there's limited number of shares available for trade, we'll have to watch and see but again, it'll be interesting to see if other companies start to do a directing the lockup because clearly Palin tear has not suffered tremendously using this model. So again, another tool in the tool chest and uber do something similar with lock-up period. mean. They did like all IPO's. Underwriter from a bank, they have lockups in place mostly to make sure that there's not a mass rush to the exit. They don't want hundreds of millions of shares at any price willing to be sold. They WANNA, kinda manager coming out because they're putting oftentimes their own money up through the green shoe at stake, and so again, that's what made direct listings unique is that there wasn't this lockup employees are free to do on day one through whatever they don't have to wait six months as is customary. So again, we'll see kind of where the the system lies in the future. As you know, the New York Stock Exchange also got approval to do a direct. Listening with a capital fundraise so we've gone from this world of like there's an IPO and that's the only way to go public to. You can do a direct listing, a direct listening with a lockup, a direct listening without lockup address listening lock-up in a capital fundraise like you can do anything you want. You know it's it's the it's the Netflix of going public. So to speak I, see the headline now airbnb goes public through a through a pollen tear style direct listing. It's just going to happen and it's going to be horrible but we will be back here to talk about it as always every shareholder gets a free party house for one night so. That'll be the new innovation going on there, but but that's a sonnet that is Pelham Tear Ford they an and we'll have more to come in the next week.

Spotify Natasha Mascarenas Pailin Dustin Moskovitz Danny Creighton Founder New York Stock Wall Street Journal Airbnb Peletier SEC Dan Prime New York
Snowflake's Stock Price Soars in IPO

CNBC's Fast Money

05:53 min | 8 months ago

Snowflake's Stock Price Soars in IPO

"Welcome to pass money a blockbuster debut for the biggest. IPO. Of the year cloud companies snowflake pricing. It's public offering at one hundred, twenty dollars a share closing at two hundred and fifty three dollars a share that is a gain of one hundred and eleven percent. But this isn't the first time. We've seen a monster move in public debut. Let's get to Bop Bassani with more on that Bob. Hello Melissa see you. So you think snowflake over one hundred percent of its first day is a big deal. Not really there's been plenty of companies that have had I ate POPs bigger than that this year loan and they include just take a look here. Biotech firm cure back was up two hundred and forty percent on its first day of trading software as a service firm big commerce up to one hundred percent biotech firm. Berkeley light of nearly two hundred cloud company and Seino up one hundred, ninety, six, percent insurance fintech firm lemonade up. Thirty nine percent on their first day of trading what they have in common is there either tech or biotech firms are they outliers marginally but the first day pop for IPO's this year is notably higher than usual. So the historic first they pop for an IPO usually about fourteen percent. That's. Historically but not this year the average I stay pop in two, thousand, twenty, thirty, six, percent. What's going on? It's not stocks are cheap. The multiple of tech stocks are historically high people are willing to pay more protect because there's just a higher degree of risk appetite out there, and if you're suddenly inspired to start buying these high flying IPO. Cautious. About this look after the first day the post first day returns of other high fliers is not encouraging. So there's been eleven IPO's this year that have popped more than one hundred percent. On the first day they have average a minus, one percent return from the first day closed forward. So be very careful Melissa here big pop on the first day for some of these. But after that very difficult to maintain continued momentum most about you bob thank you good to see you Bob Cassani and who is holding the bag in the aftermarket when these Ip has declined from the first day pop guy probably the retail investor this has been the story of the issue markets. Began though and it continues today. So. You wonder why people get exercise when they see things like this is exactly that I mean I'll say it I'm not. I'm not a banker I never was a banker and I'm sure to upset some people by saying this but. There's no way to put it other than the fact that this was completely misplaced. Now I'm sure the great bankers are J. P. Morgan and Goldman and whoever a city I think was on this deal and company will say, no, we price it right. You can't tell me that a company that has a seventy billion dollar market CAP, which was open it you know price at one twenty and tripled almost in price and had to be halted its some point today for price volatility was priced right and the people watching saying, how is this not a game I? Get it it it upsets me as well but that's the way the business works in that to me is problematic mill. Why does it upset me? WHAT'S THE PROBLEM Tim i? Think they thought it was valued at something investors in the market. Thought it was something else I mean that's the way the markets work right? Again, though it's it's it's terrible price discovery because you have some sense and bankers WANNA price and the companies want a price that deal that leaves him upside for investors but but to be clear this is three times more at least the guide from last week and so the the question really is, how can they be so far off environment where we know people are paying almost anything for growth and actually wear and cloud services but but ultimately, I think the real question is who gets access to this. IPO and the thing that's troubling is that this is not a fair game. And the allocation process is one that makes sense that there are plenty of opportunities for people who did not deserve big allocations to get them and I realized this ultimately. The dynamic of a company. First of all will say I want a certain institutional investor base on my cap stack and those are the people. I want my deal. I. Don't want certain people. Read investors typically are not the group that companies want There's a perception that they're going to be in their flipping those stocks faster. The reality is that there's a lot of hedge funds. They'd probably flip this thing aggressively today. So again to me, my issue is with the allocation process and that it's not. It's it's not a fair process maybe it's not supposed to be asked the bankers that because I think that's what this comes down to to be fair. There are some companies that actually say in the allocation that they want a certain amount to go to retail trading firms like a td Ameritrade for those firms. So then Dole out to retail investors but gosh, I think to brings up a good point in terms of the average per se popping thirty six percent this year that really shows you what this market is these days the search for growth and what investors are willing to pay for that growth. Yeah, and also you got to you have to factor in we're in a different environment. So the offering price is different than the opening price, and all of that is based on interactions with institutions trying to figure out supply demand while everyone is filming from podcast or from an ipad in their home. So it's very different than last year. Very different. The whole IPO process having said that it really speaks to the reach for growth. So, if you have the price action that we saw today. Think about it. It's Tim said you want to have if you're coming out as a public company, you WanNa, put your stock in institutions hands where they're less likely to flip out of that stock on the day of the. IPO. And that's where the whole system. Might be flawed, but it's worked this way for a tremendous amount of time, and there's always going to be a problem with any system anywhere.

Bob Cassani Tim I Melissa Bop Bassani Berkeley Seino Dole J. P. Morgan Goldman
Joe Biden leads President Trump in national poll

The Daily Dive

05:14 min | 9 months ago

Joe Biden leads President Trump in national poll

"His past week the Democratic National Convention took place this coming week Republican convention will be happening as well and with both of these happening, we are firmly into the general election. But what do the polls show about the state of the Presidential Race Joe Biden continues to maintain lead but that is narrowing and while Biden, has his supporters. Voters are really more united opposition against President trump for more on what all the polls are saying right now, we'll speak to Stephen Shepherd politics editor. At politico. We got a boatload of polling over the past few days leading into the two conventions here and but it shows is some slight tightening from earlier in the summer when Joe Biden was up routinely around ten or twelve points in the polls over president trump that now averages out just seven or eight points in a number of those polls tightening slightly one poll tightened a lot more. But that looks like more of an out wire a couple of polls actually showed Biden's lead. Widening those look a little bit like out lighters overall, it shows a slightly tighter raising. You're absolutely right about this being the kickoff really for the general election, we have the two party conventions. By the following week you first absentee ballots and a swing state North Carolina, go out to voters in the mail the week after the Republican convention. So we're talking about really the election is as we are going to know it in this sort of pinned era really being on our once we. Get through these conventions and it's GonNa be interesting to see because usually when we have a convention that party gets a bump and with the Democrats Convention being virtual and who knows how exactly how the Republican convention is GonNa play out are those bumps going to be comparable? Another thing that we're seeing is that or Joe Biden it's not necessarily hey, we support Joe. Biden. We Love Joe Biden. There's some of that but most of his vote is coming in as opposition to president trump. This is something that I think. We've looked at over the course of the past few months where you see a relative enthusiasm gap when you ask people how enthusiastic they are to don't folded ended it president trump's supporters and. Whether it's in parentheses or on social media are very active here his rallies or about him horror. So Biden, it is more about for his voters seems to be more about kicking out the incumbent president and NBC News Wall Street Journal poll out on Sunday Fifty, eight percent Biden supporters said there was more about opposing trump just thirty six percents that it was about voting for Biden for. Trump voters, seventy four percents they were voting for trump because they meant it as a vote for trump only twenty percent of trump voters they meant more as against Joe by. So you have this kind of asymmetry where go Biden's voters are enthusiastic about voting. They're just a disaster about voting against president trump not necessarily copilot and it'll be his challenge over the next couple of months to keep. Those voters in the fold one point I wanNA make on Convention bounces is Democrats as may recall or initially supposed to hold their convention in the middle of July five weeks ago. The idea was having an earlier convention would give them momentum through the summer carry through the Olympic Games would have been in the early part of this month would be ending right around now and that would set. Their nominee up well, even going into the Republican convention. In late August, obviously, they put back hoping that they could buy some time and still have an inverse invention with that didn't happen. We're stuck with these back to back virtual conventions and I think that's going to blunt both the virtual nature of the conventions, and also the timing factor Republican convention begins just four days after the Democrats conclude. Limit what kind of momentum each party I think can get out of this four-day infomercial that part looking to put on over the next couple of weeks. What kind of bump did the naming of Kama Harris as the running mate for Joe Biden? What kind of bump did that provide I know and the first forty eight hours they got forty, eight, million dollars. So the fundraising part of it was kind of their but polls, what were they saying about it? Well we see only a few polls conducted after Joe Biden named his running mate and they're pretty consistent with the polls that were conducted right before earlier last week. So I don't know that it changed the race a lot but what we saw is overall voters telling pollsters that they approve of the choice Joe Biden made arguably a safe choice choosing an experienced candidate who has exposure on the national stage voters got to know her during her presidential campaign in twenty nineteen CBS News of a Washington. Post. CNN. SRS sound maturities practices choice to that's not uncommon majorities approved of John. McCain's choice of Sarah Palin in two thousand eight in the first days. Obviously. Whereas well with voters over the closing couple of months of that campaign. So it's not unusual for there to be enthusiasm around the right after it's made the Salads or Democrats and for Kamo houses to keep that going the her momentum going through the convention this week, and obviously the other key moment for her and for Vice President Mike Pence Day or debate in early October

Joe Biden President Trump Donald Trump Politico Vice President Mike Pence Stephen Shepherd North Carolina Editor NBC CNN Kamo Sarah Palin Kama Harris Mccain
Echo Auto on Sale for First Time

Voice in Canada

01:33 min | 9 months ago

Echo Auto on Sale for First Time

"Hello. Terry Fisher here with your fashion for today today actually have a sale to tell you about yesterday was talking about how you should be waiting until prime day to get the biggest sales. But the problem is we don't know when Prime Day is. Well today got some other news for you and that is i. did discover that there are some sales going on right now and they're pretty good I can't promise it. They're going to be the same as. Prime Day, in fact on prime they usually sales are quite a bit better than anything that we see during the year. However, what is interesting about the sale is that if you've been looking to get the echo auto, the brand new echo device that is available in Canada. For the first time it is on sale it's normally seventy dollars and you can get it now for forty five dollars forty, four, ninety, nine, twenty, five dollars off or thirty, six percent off. To grab that if you want to simply use this link, A. L. E. X. in Canada dot ca slash echo auto that will take you directly to the Amazon site where you can grab that and I during the commission as I mentioned before it isn't affiliate link. There are other devices on sale as well at the time of this recording. So you can get an echo show five, four, seventy, five bucks an echo show eight for one, hundred and fifteen. The ECHO show is not on sale but. The Echo plus is on sale for one hundred, which is actually a really good deal not one and there you go. So I can't promise along the cells are going to be on for. But if you just like I said, go do. In Canada dot ca slash Amazon or slash echo it'll take you directly there and you can check those sales.

Echo Canada Amazon Terry Fisher
"thirty six percent" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:44 min | 2 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Polling is out since the government shutdown began twenty four days ago to break it down for us and a disgust several other big developments. I'm joined by our politics Monday. Do oh that's Amy Walter of the cook political report and tamra Keith NPR. Hello to you both and happy Monday. So let's talk about this poll, we have Tam both the Washington Post and Quinnipiac university did some polling wrapping up just in the last few days, and as you can see in the post poll fifty three percent of the public is saying the president and Republicans are to blame. Only twenty nine percent say the Democrats in the Quinnipiac it's fifty six percent blaming the president and Republicans thirty six percent, the Democrats what does that say to us if anything about where the chips are falling after this shutdown is in its twenty fourth day. I think it's not entirely surprising. That this is where the numbers are it somewhat aligns with the way peop-. View the president generally. And also, it's. The president before the shutdown. Started said that he meet proud to shut the government down to get his border wall. He has done absolutely nothing to change that narrative. The only thing that is possibly working in his favor. And this is a a small thing it's a sliver, but under the hood on the Quinnipiac poll there were a couple of areas where the public opinion has shifted slightly now the minority of people it's still a significant minority, but more people now support building a wall along the Mexican border then did year and a half ago. It's still only forty four percent, but that's up a fair bit from a year and a half ago. Similarly, whether they believe that undocumented immigrants contribute to crime more than American citizens, which is not true. But it was twenty two percent in April of two thousand eighteen and now it's up to twenty nine percent. So the president is. Shifting at least a little bit though. It's a small amount of people toward his viewpoint is that contradictory. Emmy now, I think he's what's happening is Republicans are shifting the most on those issues. But overall, if you think about what what strategies going into this debate would the president likes to see happen, right? What would he like to come out of this battle over the border wall one that the wall would become more popular? And while there has been some shifting. That's true. And the Washington Post poll showed the same thing. It's still at best gets about forty two percent approval rating. So the walls not really much more popular than it's ever been you ask voters who's to blame. They blame the president. You would think that they would he if are in the White House, you want to see the blame shifted to Democrats even making the case about whether this is a crisis. Some Quinnipiac also asked that question about do you see this as a crisis and about forty five percent of voters thought it was a crisis. But even among those who saw it as a crisis only a third of the. Those said building a border wall is gonna fix it. So your whole strategy behind shutting the government down was to make the wall. More popular popular, make the Democrats take the blame and get folks concerned that there is a real crisis on the border that needs to be solved. He has done. None of those things. Republicans are still with him. That's basically what he's always what he's got. All right. Let's talk about the other big story. We're grappling with today. And that is a disclosures that the president whether he was taking information paper away from the interpreters questions inside are the government about whether the president might have been working for the Russians on top of everything else. What are the political repercussions of this? So the the difference between these articles coming out four months ago. And these articles coming out today is now in the house. There are committees that can act on it can can use their subpoena power to try to get this information. They're exploring the Democrats are exploring how they might be able to gain access to these interpreters who were there at the meetings with Putin unclear whether they'll they'll make it very far. But this is now the ground has shifted for the president. Now these stories come out, and he can go out on TV and stand on the lawn and shout over that helicopter and say I. I had nothing to do with Russia. But then Democrats in congress in the house will follow up, right? And they've already noted as such Eliot Engel, the new chair of the foreign affairs committee saying we're definitely going to hold hearings looking at the Putin Trump relationship, Adam Schiff this weekend also tweeting suggesting that yes, we're going to try to get testimony from this interpreter in Helsinki. So we've always had three elements here. One was the news reports and leaks that have been part of the sort of Milia here for a long time about Russia and the president the investigation Muller's always been there. But we don't know anything that's going on there. So the new thing now is congress, and that changes, the dynamics about this story, it makes it harder to kind of push it away by just blaming it on on the fake news. What happened in November matters. It's it's changing the landscape. So very quickly. You mentioned tweets, Amy. The president was in the White House this weekend. There was a snowstorm in Washington. He did a lot of tweeting. I'm not gonna I wasn't gonna. To use the term tweet storm. But I could I will say that. But what I want to ask you about is some of the language in the president's and singling out at one point Nancy and cryan Chuck can end the shutdown in fifteen minutes. If Elizabeth Warren offered referred to me by as as polka. Did this commercial lease referring to a commercial she'd get around her announcing looking at running for president. And then finally he talks about lion James Comey here lumping together all the stories that we're following lion. James Comey and on and on. I guess we're accustomed to this these labels these names, but. What seems different now in this. I think started in the two thousand eighteen campaign is that Democrats are no longer taking the bait on these. They don't feel any need to respond to the president doing this. You saw every candidate in the Twenty-eight campaign focus on healthcare. They didn't react to the president Elizabeth Warren in her opening video never mentioned the president one time she's been on the road. Now going to Iowa New Hampshire doesn't talk about the president unless she's asked about the president. She didn't respond to this tweet. And and what the president wants and what he's done in the past with those tweets as to engage in that battle. And then the media's focus is all about right? It's it's this. He says this this side says that and then we we move off the bigger topics. That's right. And if it's only one sided it's less of a few and each one of these candidates has to calculate how they're going to deal with the other thing that's come up late today. And that is the Senate majority leader Tam. Mitch McConnell has issued a statement. I wanted to come from high levels of Republicans in congress condemning what Steve king, the Republican congressman from Iowa who got a lot of attention last week when he had made a statement about white supremacists. In an essence said how how how could something like this be offensive some Republicans have made mild statements, but now to have Mitch McConnell saying this is unwelcome worthy. And he said anybody if he doesn't understand why white supremacy is offensive he should find another one at work and in the house, they are discussing possible censure or other ways of rebuking the statements. It's remarkable in some ways because Steve king has been saying things like this for years and years and years and years, and and then he would just sort of continue on this seems a little different this time. But Republicans haven't been they've they've said it's wrong, Amy, but they haven't been full-throated in their willingness to. I do. A sort of this fringe character for so long. Let's Steve king. He says these crazy things, but it doesn't matter. Well, now, it does because we talk a lot now about white, nationalist and white supremacists. And we saw the reality of that in Charlottesville. This is no longer. Just a cookie fringe thing. This is very very serious and should be taken very seriously. Walter tamra, Keith. Thank you both here. Welcome. And now to our news. Our share.

president Republicans Amy Walter White House Steve king Washington Quinnipiac university Elizabeth Warren Tam Keith NPR Washington Post congress Putin James Comey Emmy Russia Mitch McConnell Iowa Eliot Engel
"thirty six percent" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"These video with you on Thursday. Forty two degrees at Radio City nine twenty three. Talk about mid term grades for the president right now on Twitter. My live show poll which every day. So here's what here's what I do every day in the morning before the show. I post my show poll of the day show poll question today's question, but less than two weeks, the midterm elections. What grade would you give President Donald Trump? Right now. Leading number is leading grants. I did it this way AB is one category. Cd is a second f wanted incomplete incomplete zero everybody has an opinion, which is good. Forty two percent say a or b twenty two percents C C or D And thirty six percent say f. Now's a Republican conservative. I thought about this when I wrote this question. And I give the president a b. Mainly on policy. If I was going to ground communication. I give him a d. He communicates. So he doesn't get enough. But he gets a D And how he does it but for policy. Are you going to be there's still work to be done? And he's a perfect by any stretch imagination. And he and he has a lot of work to do. I think to understand one the dynamics of working with the congress, which is something. He's I think struggled with in his first year. Plus. Mowing up on some occasions. His own message, which is not helpful especially when you talk about midterm elections, which is coming one of the texture says, I give them enough. You can weigh in there as well. From the nine to none of this stuff existed until Trump. My grandkids asked me, why talks about people the way he does they say, it's wrong. I don't agree with a poor communicator. Now, I will tell you having talked to a lot of diehard Trump supporters. They love it. They like the in your face no-holds-barred, take-no-prisoners style. And I think if you look at his his core base of supports a lot of it is those kind of people, they're not bad people. They just they they've had enough of Washington DC. Here's the here's the thing. When you've seen Washington DC. Struggle to to -ccomplish anything with a tax reform package was such a significant Bill because it actually got something done. That's so rare. And that's why you have to give the I think the president some credit, but on so many other issues, it's all partisan nonsense. That's why the elections are. So frustrating for me, and I'm going to kind of tease ahead to nine thirty five. After the news this recent poll on Bupe mirror Baldwin suggesting Tammy Baldwin has a double digit lead. I gotta ask the voters in Wisconsin. What are you thinking about? I gotta take a quick break. More on that when I return right here in WTMJ. This is Bob and Mike and guy from brillo home improvements. So we had a guy. Call him looking for help about a year ago. He started out on a project putting in a bathroom down in his basement. Well, long story short. He told us the job down. There was never completed and at that point it.

president Donald Trump Twitter Trump Tammy Baldwin Washington Radio City congress Wisconsin Bob WTMJ brillo Mike thirty six percent Forty two degrees Forty two percent two weeks
"thirty six percent" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Even less than thirty six percent. The last two years they might have been more, but you were taking risk. So this is an exceptional risk adjusted return because had the market tanked. There wouldn't have been a loss yet. The index did well, you participated and the product did very, very well for the policyholder. So you could have made thirty six percent and already lock in the gains the first two years. I know people that did that were very, very happy. Now. Obviously, there's no guarantee that any index knew what he's gonna make a lot of interest depends on the index, right? If he doesn't do well or have some periods, you won't make money. Now, what's great about what I just said. I didn't say the index has to go up. It just has to have some periods. So if you have a two year reset in any index goes down, thirty percent the first few years, and then it resets you haven't lost money the first two years. You have the same amount that you started with, but now the next two years it goes back to where it started and it goes up forty percent. Let's say you participate in. Those gains, without having to get back to the original index, level so a reset on. On the markets up when the index is up lock in your gains. A reset when the index is down. Get you a start, over at a low point and Abel's, you to rebound and participate. In that index rebound without having lost any money without having to recover losses so great rebound is. Even better to rebound without having lost don't, you agree. So. That's, what's nice about index annuities a major market correction won't hurt us it might even help us if it, causes? A nice bounce in subsequent years now also remember, that all annuities are. Subject, to the claims paying ability of insurance. Company so use a strong company and there may. Be charges if you try to take. More money out of your contract then is allowed in any one year, for instance a lot of index, nudity he's the most you can take out in any one year. At least in the beginning or the first few, years is ten percent a year have you take out more there could be charged but if you think. About it if you have Investment account at? Fidelity or swab or whatever and. You, have a million dollars saved up and. That's your retirement account are you really going to spend more than ten percent. A, year if you do that you're going to be running out of money pretty quickly. So there's plenty of liquidity for most people's needs unless you tell me hey I'm gonna need this money in two, or three years to buy a boat. Or by, plane or by house or. Do something then. It won't be suitable for something that's a, longer term investment but if you money's for your life and creating a lifestyle and. Income it can be a? Very very good place. To be very good part of, your portfolio so.

Abel two years thirty six percent ten percent one year million dollars thirty percent forty percent three years two year
"thirty six percent" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"The market determines the real value of something and that's where it gets priced so one of the ways that he looks evaluation there's two basic ways he looks at the thai entire size of the stock market and gauges it against the economy and there's a simple brilliance to that in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine two thousand peak of the tech bubble the total valuation of stock market capitalisation in the united states got up to one hundred thirty six percent of the size of the economy so it was thirty six percent larger than the size of the economy and you don't have to be a statistician to see that stat or here that stat and go why it's kind of obvious how can the market possibly be thirty six percent more valuable than the entire size of the economy right something's gotta be wrong and that was a record at the time until the last six months middle of two thousand seventeen that ratio of mark total market capitalization so all the values of publicly traded stocks measured against the entire size of the economy hit one thirty eight one thirty nine it's backed off a little bit since then but it's hovering right around that record set in one thousand nine hundred nine so on that basis we're right at record high valuations that's the number that's the number one most common what we refer to as the buffet valuation metric the second valuation metric he's got it's called the buffet yardstick and what this tracks is tenure returns of the market so looking at what the market averaged over a ten year period of time and averaging that together and the relationship to the valuation of stocks and other investable assets over the next ten years and what we've seen going clear back into the late forties is this very very tight correlation between current market valuations having to relate to the next ten years evaluations now it sounds a little walk is but on the outbreak you down even further and it's pretty simple to understand the higher current valuations are the less stock returns will be in the next ten years right because we used to know this that trees didn't grow to the.

united states ten years thirty six percent one hundred thirty six percent six months ten year
"thirty six percent" Discussed on The HT Guys

The HT Guys

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on The HT Guys

"So they already sell their own webcams or or connected yeah cameras right amazon clipping i saw here is siren i wish apple would create something like that for their home kit i don't see anything like that i had z wave siren that you could just trip if you wanna do security now i have no way of making noise if somebody were to break into my house when i was away from home the most i can do turn all the lights on and that's a pretty big deterrent to it's like three in the morning and also an all the lights inside and out go off in my house looks all lit up like a christmas tree i think that could draw some attention and they if somebody's in the house a probably wanna leave the next thing i think we just have some lights flashing cameras and i think even if you don't have a camera people thinking ono my pictures been taken and that might also get them to leave and you know you maybe you could play some sort of siren noise out of an echo or echo dot instead of obviously sirens going to be louder but yet make some sort of loud siren noise out of the echo dot in the system all right so along these lines smart home device sales are projected derives thirty six percent over twenty seventeen sales reaching four point five billion overall and many companies such as intel are struggling to find out how products fit into this market the mark van reports in a forbes post that until now well positioned for success in smart home and consumers will directly benefit from it over the next several years and you know what until i read this article i didn't even realize intel has not been involved in any of the smart home stuff what intel products are there for smart home they may sell some components which they may or may not i don't know but they're not making any devices for smart home.

apple intel mark van thirty six percent
"thirty six percent" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The sanctions were imposed last month the ruble has fallen eight percent and metals markets have been robbed mnuchin tells folks he still wouldn't rule out further sanctions global news twenty four hours a day on an tech talk on twitter palace by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries i'm leon currents this is bloomberg caroline thank you so much leeann now mario draghi will take longer to lay out the european central banks plan to exit stimulus that is according to economists in a brand new bloomberg survey they don't expect any change to policy or language in the meeting that takes place on the twenty sixth of april of course just next week saying that protectionism and global trade and the conflict around global trade is weighing on the central bank the more let's bring in bloomberg's editor for central banks paul gordon he joins me now live from frankfurt really good to have you on the program this is very timely of course survey of economists by bloomberg ahead of the meeting next week economists though still expect the asset purchase program to end this year yes that's right that's still on track for that the short typo with about thirty five billion euros in the final quarter of the year the key thing here is most economists now seeing the taking even more time to actually communicate that decision than previously i'm most sadie and die for bond buying will be announced either in july or even september which is the month from buying purchase actually ends at least thirty six percent of see that happening in june forty six percent on the previous survey basically say happening next week also interesting that most of these economists see the potential for global trade conflicts in the coming months actually more of a concern than the economic slowdown although we've seen some weakened numbers for europe and also worth noting macro are merckel of course are in washington dc next week to speak to president donald trump i'm thinking of the steel and aluminium taras own ear got to be quite a dominant topic of the imf meetings it again because the areas quite a dramatic economic slowdown in the first quarter as you note but most economists see multiple reasons for that that'd be quite clear the.

bloomberg editor frankfurt donald trump mnuchin twitter mario draghi europe washington president imf thirty six percent forty six percent twenty four hours eight percent
"thirty six percent" Discussed on Lights, Camera, Podcast

Lights, Camera, Podcast

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on Lights, Camera, Podcast

"Prince no no that one was critically panned i'm thinking what can you tell me the lower distribution of the top five is like thirty five percent or forty percent so number only six of them have above a forty percent prince persia was number six at thirty six percent no one of them was a recent movie with jason hankins oh damn jason diggers video game movie see this one you're going to over think this one because you're gonna say oh yeah that is video game but you're probably thinking too much along the lines of like doom tomb raider like ram now an atari game or something like that now now it's recent it's recent and it's based off a recent game one other hand yeah mobile game oh angry birds yeah angry bird yeah and you're right i didn't i didn't consider that one i didn't i didn't hate the angry birds every i was i was at best buy last night looking for in oleg oh led tv which i didn't realize you're still so expensive and this dude was some best buys have that magnolia like side center which is like their premium tv and sound products near the tv set up and then they had the chair set up some dude would just sitting there in chair watching the dvd intro loop to angry birds over and over sounds like horror they can't even like press play for the six thousand dollars tv i guess the lead tv's do look great man i'm trying to convince my wife she was like hey let's get a new tv doesn't have to be that expensive and i'm like at this point there's no point not buying led tv because look how black the blacks are it just looks phenomenal and then like three thousand dollars so i don't know guys anyway back to the video game it's not need for speed in the top five because that one was shit on pretty hard with aaron paul screed.

Prince persia jason hankins aaron paul screed forty percent three thousand dollars six thousand dollars thirty five percent thirty six percent
"thirty six percent" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"But did you hear the numbers half accepted services thirty six percent declined and then fifteen percent left so that's like half and half half the people want nothing to do with all this by time you buy time they ran through their motel stay it was half eventually half of them rejected help and that's why people have to rewire their brains stop feeling sorry for these people stop feeling empathetic they want this life they're choosing this life they can't be helped they don't watch your help so you have to do is make sure they don't camp by you they're going to camp somewhere just not by you don't feed them don't feel sorry for them this is what they've decided to do with their existence so here's the exact numbers of the seven hundred three hundred and thirty eight ended up in shelters or other services including a partly three people ended up in prison according to the story ended up in jail they went to places like another shelter someone for mental health help some went to transitional housing then there was two hundred and fifty one people that were assessed and said no one hundred eleven declined all services seventy one didn't show up or left on their own thirty nine we're.

thirty six percent fifteen percent
"thirty six percent" Discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

CNBC's Fast Money

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

"Fan pede wounds thirty six percent of like long like that according to filings to filings at sixty seven percent down i won't say because i won't stampede and see i i'll come into the looking at us percent of twenty seven somebody's wrong did you not wrong because you can see my ten k filings see i'm just right i was on the nasdaq flawed even nasdag you free float of six million from your you got i asked him like in from third party i said the inflammations liquidity there are seventy six million shares when we got list thirty million shares are not listed on nasdaq nasdaq only classic on ships are listed mike thirty million class b common stock which is not listed at all so i would have seventy six million my cfo because i asked him to move back to the united states he said i must act on oddball because i have my obligations then said after the view these inova near going he agreed to return his two million shares because obviously view the ships for the future performance so my lord is forty four million ships and forty four million shares i didn't feel one point one five million shifts and there is an independent consultant we have given two million shares since september eleventh singer freely let me consult is there an independent consultant for you see we are there on record there's a quote are not timing being on that i'm just sitting on september eleventh shaves or issued on march levin six months for anyone but sociology.

cfo united states independent consultant levin sixty seven percent thirty six percent six months ten k
"thirty six percent" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on WDRC

"Hi thanks for being here this morning impalas outs rask misin reports all americans blamed government more than guns for the florida massacre uh more americans think the government that government errors more responsible than lack of gun control for the valentine's day massacre at a florida high school the latest two rasmussen reports national telephone and online survey finds at fifty four percent of american adults believed the failure of government agencies to respond to numerous warnings signs from the perspective killer is more to blame for the mass shooting 33 percent attribute the deaths more to lack of adequate guncontrol 11 percent opera something else now this is interesting among americans who have children of elementary or secondary school age sixty one percent think the government is more to blame just 23 percent of these adults fault a lack of adequate gun control more than ninety percent of americans sentiment following the news reports from florida at least somewhat uh closely uh v those rubin following the news very closely she the failure of government agencies as more to blame for the florida killings fifty four to thirty five percent middle voters were most likely to view the government as more to blame married adults and those with children in the home are even more likely to blame the government than those who are not married and don't have children living with them 75 percent of republicans fifty five percent of adults not affiliated with either either major political parties should the government failure as more to blame than guncontrol thirty six percent of democrats agree fifty percent of democrats say a lack of sufficient gun control is more fault the interesting thing is that means democrats are split 5050 on the issue that's a that's a bit surprising in that been at pole break down i think that's one of the more surprising uh elements but one element that is not surprising is that those with children it a when we talk about this this idea and and we always a we go back to san bernardino and and we or or any shooting and we ask ourselves more and more as a society what would happen because it's it's so horrific you you think to yourself.

florida high school rubin republicans san bernardino florida rasmussen thirty five percent fifty five percent fifty four percent thirty six percent sixty one percent ninety percent fifty percent 11 percent 23 percent 33 percent 75 percent
"thirty six percent" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"For being here this morning new paul is outs rasmussen reports all americans blamed government more than guns for the florida massacre more americans think the government that government is more responsible than a lack of guncontrol for the valentine's day massacre at a florida high school the latest two rasmussen reports national telephone and online survey finds at fifty four percent of american adults believed the failure of government agencies to respond to numerous warning signs from the perspective killer is more to blame for the mass shooting 33 percent attribute the deaths more to lack of adequate guncontrol 11 percent opera something else now this is interesting among americans who have children of elementary or secondary school age sixty one percent think the government is more to blame just twenty three percent of these adults fault a lack of adequate gun control more than ninety percent of americans said have been following the news reports from florida at least somewhat uh closely uh v those who following the news very closely see the failure of government agencies as more to blame for the florida killings fifty four to thirty five percent middle aged voters were most likely to view the government as more to blame married adults and those with children in the home are even more likely to blame the government than those who are not married and don't have children living with them 75 percent of republicans fifty five percent of adults not affiliated with these either major political parties to the government failure as more to blame than guncontrol thirty six percent of democrats agree fifty percent of democrats say a lack of sufficient gun control is more fault the interesting thing is that means democrats are split 5050 on the issue that's a that's a bit surprising in that been at pole breakdown i think that's one of the more surprising uh elements but one element that is not surprising is that those with children in a when we talk about this this idea and and we always a we go back to san bernardino and and we or or any shooting and we ask ourselves more and more as a society what would happen because it's it's so horrific you you think to yourself you know.

florida high school republicans san bernardino rasmussen florida twenty three percent thirty five percent fifty five percent fifty four percent thirty six percent sixty one percent ninety percent fifty percent 11 percent 33 percent 75 percent
"thirty six percent" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Percent attribute the deaths more to lack of adequate guncontrol 11 percent off for something else now this is it foreseen among americans who have children of elementary or secondary school age sixty one percent think the government is more to blame just twenty three percent of these adults fault a lack of adequate gun control more than ninety percent of americans sediment following the news reports from florida at least somewhat uh closely uh the those rubin following the news very closely see the failure of government agencies as more to blame for the florida killings fifty four to 35 percent middle aged voters were most likely to view the government as more to blame married adults and those with children in the home are even more likely to blame the government than those who are not married and don't have children living with them 75 percent of republicans 55 percent of adults not affiliated with these either major political parties should the government failure as more to blame than guncontrol thirty six percent of democrats agree fifty percent of democrats say a lack of sufficient guncontrol was more fault the interesting thing is that means democrats are split 5050 on the issue that's a that's a bit surprising in that bin at pole break down i think that's one of the more surprising uh elements but one element that is not surprising is that those with children you know when we talk about this this idea in and we always a we go back to san bernardino and and we or or any shooting and we ask ourselves more and more as a society what would happen because it's it's so horrific you you think to yourself you know.

rubin republicans san bernardino florida twenty three percent thirty six percent sixty one percent ninety percent fifty percent 11 percent 35 percent 55 percent 75 percent
"thirty six percent" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Percent attribute the deaths more to lack of adequate guncontrol 11 percent off something else now this is interesting among americans who have children of elementary or secondary school age sixty one percent think the government is more to blame just twenty three percent of these adults fault a lack of adequate gun control more than ninety percent of americans said them and following the news reports from florida at least somewhat uh closely uh the those rubin following the news very closely see the failure of government agencies as more to blame for the florida killings fifty four to 35 percent middle aged voters are most likely to view the government as more to blame married adults and those with children in the home are even more likely to blame the government than those who are not married and don't have children living with them 75 percent of republicans 55 percent of adults not affiliated with eads either major political parties should the government failure as more to blame than guncontrol thirty six percent of democrats agree fifty percent of democrats say a lack of sufficient guncontrol was more fault the interesting thing is that means democrats are split 5050 on the issue that's a that's a bit surprising in that in that poll break down i think that's one of the more surprising uh elements but one element that is not surprising is that those with children you know when we talk about this this idea in and we always a we go back to san bernardino and and we or or any shooting and we ask ourselves more and more as a society what would happen because it's it's so horrific you think to yourself you know.

rubin republicans eads san bernardino florida twenty three percent thirty six percent sixty one percent ninety percent fifty percent 11 percent 35 percent 55 percent 75 percent
"thirty six percent" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"By four percent or process for the next season winter 2017 2018 up by five percent until he says is now sold thirty six percent of what it kohl's it's winter program and she updates on a couple of markets the uk can customer numbers a continuing stable it says despite the impact of a weaker pounds but france so he says is very competitive and that's putting pressure on margins i'd love myself a little bit of winter sun us postal but went to just yet were still in the autumn but i'd love some light rain sean reina also at this is another company that's sort of an hopes each rarely as its cancelled further flights also regulators getting in on the action of this point yes they me the holiday fame the uk's civil aviation authority that's the regulator here in the uk is launching enforcement action against rhianna company course europe's biggest budget airline the the caa is investigating whether the company failed to give customers accurate information about their rights following that wave of flight cancellations meanwhile reina also today saying that gun to extend the flight cancellations into next year while dropping plans to bid for bankrupt alitalia is seeking course to get to grips with this ongoing pilot shortage all right uh looking at reina stock so this morning they are off by one point three percent in london trading into shares of by seven tenths of one percent so both of those companies taking a little bit of a hit this morning you impulse thank you very much indeed for talking is through the stocks to watch this morning now when it comes to our top story said donald trump's tax plan very much in focus president trump promising the largest tax cuts in american history hoping that it's something that the whole country can get behind bloomberg's nathan hager reports now from washington in a major speech in indianapolis president trump said his tax reform framework would cut rates for the middle class and bring back jobs from overseas these i really believe will going to have numerous democrats come over and signed because it's the right thing to do but the.

uk sean reina europe caa donald trump bloomberg washington france reina president nathan hager indianapolis thirty six percent three percent five percent four percent one percent
"thirty six percent" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Is a thirty six percent chance if you're white others have 56 percent chance if you're hispanic and there's a seventy six percent chance i would have same prison test scores as a block can i just also say that every listening because if they have an applied to having taken the m cat having apply to med school don't have family who have done those things one of the reasons why this is such an interesting way to look at the issue of affirmative action is that the m cat fur med school which is a standardized test like the sats from medical school everyone that's a huge component of admissions and so you can look look and see really how much of an advantage it is for different racial groups because the undergraduate oh it's just a holistic approach is much less applicable in medical school i can also say it's much less applause applicable in law schools well where the lsat is a huge component at the elite schools at least of admission yeah i mean you know i i use that example but it's true everywhere uh i just use the data could where the data is available in every kind of collagen graduate school it most difficult to get it as an asian american and in fact it's almost like twice as hard to get in as as a as a white person never what people to you on by we're speaking of vdh chuckle in gombe he's an affirmative action activist and he's also the author of a book almost black vj what are people see what a progressives in leftists and because i'm sure there's been a lot of a lot of fury directed at you from the progressive left as a result of this don't like when people learned the truth about their social angie nearing programs but wh what do they say to you what do you say back when when they tell you what you're supposed to just as a as a south asian american right amir from south asia repay their parents are from south asia are you just supposed to be sacrificed on the altar of diversity in political correctness because you you don't have the things that usually the progressive left uses to justify these policies white privilege be benefiting from a society that was built because of slavery in on all those do that doesn't apply to you so what do they say to.

south asia seventy six percent thirty six percent 56 percent
"thirty six percent" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on WDRC

"And i and i have my in and unfortunately my heart bigoted my brain so a lot of times use your heart and steady brain i've learnt issues my brain and i'll be a lot better off yes i still have a higher but the at but at the end of the day when you stop 350 foreclosures and you find that people will not as appreciative not only could not pay with and who has to pay for eight months until so you get paid so the plate paying is that's why i say we lies the billion dollars i do it again for the second time is there's no way when allow big bags the world will the people and that's what they do i describe it every day give asean on a tower road you sick and tired of hearing me say this but they put down that todd that big rolla comes by compresses the tar that's what they're doing the human beings jobcreation index was up thirty six percent great washington dc on this article by arch swift gallup poll dot com washington dc gallup's job creation index was virtually unchanged at up thirty six percent in june down one point from last month's recordhigh wise microsoft laying off thousand people they lay off thousand people because they concentrating on cloud but this and thousand people that are being laid off and emily he allow you have whole foods high of fifty nine hundred people so that saw the like a wash we need to create jobs in this country and 1950 in nineteen excuse me in two thousand fifteen i apologize in two thousand fifteen about allows worth the sleep of anyone's on sleep apnea with someone give me the tip of what machine works because igf through a dozen of them and we still have the same issues so i been fighting sleep apnea for many many years but when i got scared is when the.

asean todd microsoft washington gallup poll emily thirty six percent billion dollars eight months
"thirty six percent" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"The the red state said being the ones that are actually you gunning it in the worst the instagram using the safety net more soul then the blue states right well disproportionately trump voters are received the benefits of the social safety net in fact my understanding the voters for hillary clinton if you looked at the counties that voted for hillary sixty four percent of all the united states economic activity supported hillary clinton the thirty six percent especially of the world bread counties those are your trump on well here's here's my man those are the people that are currently on the medicaid and are currently dealing with what but when you say you all this not just in that the dams and into genies point the to describe it as genocide maybe a little harsh but i guess we're talking about killing in the short term a air quickly you're killing long in the longterm we're all gonna die at some point but certainly republicans a are are are are disabled republicans are poor ther main these are yet on all trumpers man i mean the donald trump had a lot of poor republicans voting for him did he not will they not be impacted by this legislation only if it allows us village villageowned inform sure it will affect all americans tom might have no doubt that trump voters will be equal we harmed by this bad legislation should have moved forward and become law but ultimately dumb look at the the people in charge there is a complete disconnect that me donald trump made big grandiose promises universal health care at one point graham insurance forever but it won't be no cuts the medicaid matter medicare and alan caravels luhan's i votes except that's not what he's proposing that's not what he's endorsing the little kager they had down at the white house after the e e e psiay past damn well that was to support what he now calls amine bill and now it's not like the senate bill is substantially better i've not seen it i've not read it it's only bid on the.

red state hillary clinton united states donald trump white house tom graham alan caravels luhan senate sixty four percent thirty six percent