35 Burst results for "Thirty-Four-Year"

Storytellers: Lorraine Hansberry

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:27 min | 3 d ago

Storytellers: Lorraine Hansberry

"Today's storyteller was a playwright and activist. Who stories centered. African american working class families despite tragically short career. She became the first black woman to have a play produced on broadway half a century later her work remains one of the most celebrated snapshots of black struggles and black joy. Here's the story of lorraine hands berry lorraine hands berry was born on may nineteenth nineteen thirty on the south side of chicago. Her father carl. Augustus was a prominent figure. Within the city's black community having founded one of the first african american banks growing up lorraine and her three older siblings played host to a number of famous people including langston hughes. Wabc boys duke ellington and olympic gold. Medalist jesse owens. Despite their middle class status and cultural connections the hands berries were still subject to chicago's deeply ingrained. Housing segregation agreements known as restrictive covenants were widespread throughout the city. White property owners could collectively agree not to sell to african americans. This practice created a ghetto known as the black belt which ran through the south side when lorraine was eight years old. Her father secretly bought a home. In one of the so-called restricted heads in nineteen thirty seven when the family moved in a white mob attacked a brick was thrown through the window narrowly missing lorraine the local homeowners association filed an injunction for the hands berries to vacate lorraine her siblings were chased spat and beaten during their walks to and from school the supreme court of illinois doubled down on the legality of the restrictive covenant. And the hands. Berries were forced out of their home eventually the. Us supreme court overruled this ruling on a technicality. Thirty blocks subsequently opened up to black families across the south side while this ruling and the hands fight did not outlaw restrictive covenants. It did signal. The beginning of the end for the practice lorraine attended. Chicago's englewood high school where she became interested in theatre. She initially attended the university of wisconsin. Where she cut her teeth with the communist party but left after two years in one thousand nine hundred fifty lorraine moved to new york to be a writer by nineteen fifty one lorraine had found a home in harlem and began socializing with many of the great thinkers who had once visited her family back in chicago. She started writing for paul robeson freedom a progressive newspaper at a protest against racial discrimination at new york university lorraine met robert number off a jewish writer. They married at her family home in chicago. In nineteen fifty three in nineteen. Six robert co wrote the hit song. Cindy oh cindy it's prophets allowed lorraine to stop working to focus on writing. She began developing a play that she initially called. The crystal stair langston hughes poem mother to son she would later changed the name to a raisin in the sun. This too was from a langston hughes poem called harlem. What happens to a dream deferred. Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun or faster like a sore and then run a raisin in the sun centers on a black working class family in chicago south side as they try to improve their financial situation. The patriarch of the family has died and a ten thousand dollar insurance payout is imminent they the money to buy a house in the cheaper all white neighborhood nearby to they use it to invest in a liquor store and education lorraine based many of the characters on the families who rented from her father and with whom she attended high school the cast safer one character was entirely black lorraine was in her twenties and the play itself dealt with racism life in chicago's black belt and the pain of assimilation into white culture topics that were considered risky for the predominantly white theater. Going crowd it took over a year to raise enough money to put the play up. When it debuted in nineteen fifty-nine a raisin in the sun was the first play written by a black woman to be produced on broadway and the first to be led by an african american director lorraine was twenty nine years old. The play was an almost instant. Hit the new york drama critics circle named it. The best play of the year just five months after its broadway debut arisen in the son of in london's west end in nineteen sixty one. A film starring much of the original cast was released and several of the actors received golden globe. Nominations perhaps the most important element of the play success was that entailing box stories. Lorraine also make theater accessible and previously unimaginable ways as the writer. James baldwin noted. I had never in my life seen so many black people in the theater and the reason was that never before in the entire history of the american theatre had so much of the truth of black people's lives and seen on the stage. Black people had ignored the theatre because the theatre had always ignored them lorraine would go on to finish in stage. Just one other. Play the sign in sidney bruce. Deans window about a jewish intellectual the play which explored themes of homosexuality and the bohemian lifestyle. Debuted to mixed reviews in nineteen sixty four. It ran for just over one hundred performances closing on january twelfth. Nineteen sixty five. That's same day. Lorraine hanbury died of pancreatic cancer. She was thirty four years old. After lorraine's death. Her ex husband robert had several of her plays produced posthumously to be young gifted and black became an autobiographical work. Drawing on lorraine's letters interviews and journal entries the title came from a nineteen sixty four speech of lorraine's when she spoke to the winners of a united negro fund writing competition. She said speech though. It be thrilling marvellous thing to be merely young and gifted in such times it is doubly so w dynamic to be young gifted and black

Lorraine Chicago Berry Lorraine Langston Hughes Local Homeowners Association Supreme Court Of Illinois Englewood High School Jesse Owens Robert Co Cindy Oh Cindy Duke Ellington Augustus Us Supreme Court Berry Carl Paul Robeson White Theater University Of Wisconsin Harlem
Notre Dame Lands Marcus Freeman At Defensive Coordinator

The Paul Finebaum Show

03:10 min | Last week

Notre Dame Lands Marcus Freeman At Defensive Coordinator

"Just ended the last hour talking about the reports. That bo pollini is going to get four. Four million dollar lump sum payoff to to after being fired as the defensive coordinator and there's been a lot of speculation and even some reports that the That lsu was on the verge of hiring. Marcus freeman from the university of cincinnati. But pizza animal has just reported that he is going to notre dame instead of always breaking stories literally as he's coming on the air here pete great to have you on. This was a much watched battle between a number of schools for marcus freeman. Good afternoon and tell us what happened. Well i this is what one of the more public and hotly contested coordinator Tussles that i can recall in In in recent seasons anyway there's been a few a few of them over the years and You know we'll we'll we'll never know only only the only the folks in the grotto will really know How much notre dame has a market because their private but you know. Lsu lsu is ready to pay him Both leaning plus money and You know he went to both places this week. And i think at the end for For marcus freeman. Who is cincinnati. Thirty three might be thirty four year. Old defensive coordinator and the architect of that That great cincinnati defensive wanted this year one the afc and then Loss to george on a last second field goal in the in the peach bowl. I think for for marcus. There was geography and You know there will be some stability right. You got notre dame brian. Kelly is just steady ship there and You know there was a lot attractive. I think about. Lsu they were. I think on for twenty four until defense or some some number that would be easily improved upon with some new blood in better schemes. And obviously they probably have more raw talent down there so i mean really a really a compelling decision for a bright young coach. Call that we're going to be hearing a lot about in the In the next couple of the next couple of years course the next guy will probably not be thrilled to because all the attention was on freeman. But where does she go next. That's a that's a really good question really. Good question You know they they. They made hard shortages at At freeman and he was he was clearly be The target and the guy they wanted. And i i don't know From ahead who. Who were they go next. You know there's a lot of people have preserved our net at mississippi state right now Chain being made around adam this week. There's been rumblings if texas is going to go after in the chris ash Won a national title As buyers defensive coordinator at ohio state six seven years ago. It was the head coach at rutgers in the news at texas last year. And she's got a lot better on defense under wraps. I think that's that's another name right. Now let's That's brewing through the The the defensive coordinator mill show there will There will be options. And if we know and scott woodward they will be addressed.

Marcus Freeman LSU Bo Pollini Dame Brian University Of Cincinnati Cincinnati Pete AFC Marcus Kelly George Chris Ash Freeman Texas Mississippi Adam Rutgers Ohio
COVID-19 in China: Researchers found an antibody prevalence rate of 4.43% in Wuhan

Squawk Pod

02:58 min | 2 weeks ago

COVID-19 in China: Researchers found an antibody prevalence rate of 4.43% in Wuhan

"A thirty four year old ophthalmologist from wuhan. China posted a message in his. We chat group alerting fellow doctors that a new disease had emerged in his hospital. A year later the pandemic rages on eunice. Yoon joins us now from beijing. Then while yunus how you doing. Hey jail We're doing relatively okay here The pandemic as you mentioned has been raging on overseas but here in china things are relatively back to normal. I'm here at a restaurant. Sports bar which i spoke to the owner and he said that back in january he could have actually thrown a baseball through this restaurant because it was so empty today. He said that seating capacities at about fifty percent. It's looking actually quite full. Now you mentioned that ophthalmologist. The ophthalmologist name was li wenliang. He's very famous here now because he was the one who had alerted other doctors in a we chat group of a mystery virus that had emerged in his hospital. He later was silenced. By police he then caught the virus himself and then he eventually died and of course that virus is the one that is now known as covid nineteen be economy though and businesses generally have been much much better since the beginning of the year. The economy is on track to Folks post some of the strongest growth compared to a lot of other major economies in twenty twenty one about eight percent but still life is not totally back to normal. And tell you that. Because just today i found out that my new year's eve plans have been cancelled and a lot of that is because we keep getting these mini outbreaks here in beijing. So we have twenty reported cases and one point two million people have been tested in the city and then on top of that. There's still a lot of controversy as you can imagine over the origins of the virus. And what exactly happened in hon. So yesterday the chinese cdc had said that the antibody prevalence rate for wuhan was four point. Four three percents so some experts were looking into that figure and saying that that suggests that in wuhan about half a million people which is about ten times more than the reported cases heavy infection or were exposed to covid as a lot of questions here and then this week. Another story that that people was that a local journalist was sentenced to four years of prison time because of her reporting and wuhan so obviously the authorities. Here don't want. The those types of reports should be conflicting with the narrative that they want to continue to perpetuate a here in china as well as overseas.

Yoon Joins Wuhan Li Wenliang Yunus Beijing Eunice China Baseball CDC
It's a Wonderful Life With Gigi

Recovery Happy Hour

06:36 min | 2 weeks ago

It's a Wonderful Life With Gigi

"All right. Today's interview is released. Special gee-gee langer has been sober for thirty. Four years used a twelve step program but what is so wonderful about. Her story is all of the other resources that she's used to do. Even deeper healing. We talk about energy work. Inner child healing topping Rural linguistic reprogramming. Meditation cranial sacred healing and outta jillian really incredible books to read all of which are linked in the show notes. This is proof that healing goes on forever and that your recovery won't look the same forever. Either she is the author of the book fifty ways to worry less now and is retired in florida with her husband. It was an absolute joy to get to know her. Here's digi langer hygiene. How are you. I am great. I'm so glad to be here. And yeah i'm so excited to be having recovery. Happy hour with you today. Thank you for taking the time to to share your story of recovery. I'm going to start this interview. The same way i start every interview and that is what is your name and your sobriety date and would you have described yourself as a high or low functioning drinker when you were drinking langer smy name and my sobriety date is february. Eleventh nineteen eighty six. And i was still a high functioning. I except in the area of romance in the area romance. I was extremely low functioning. I mean are we ever high functioning their love and logic those two things. Just don't mix well well. Why don't we just say that to other people. It looked like i was high functioning dairy cow. Mary go. I think i'll i think all of the above is super relatable before we get into your story. Tell me real quick just about what you're doing right now where you live. How old you are what you do for a living family hobbies anything like that. I'm retired. And i'm a little over seventy and i live in southwest florida. I grew up outside of chicago area and then travelled all over in my rambunctious years twenties and thirties. And most of my time. I've lived in michigan for the last several years just this summer. My husband and i moved down to florida. We have a little condo here. We have our kitty with us. And i don't have any children. Because i couldn't stay married long enough and snow grandchildren. So yeah life is good. I don't know what else you asked me. I think that hobbies. What do you like to do for fun right now. In south florida. Play a little golf You know. I have a blog and a lot of service work and a a nonprofit. I'm on that helps. Connect women in sobriety and i do a newsletter and i'm working on another a workbook for how to worry less and my husband and i play we. We just have a good time yeah. I'm very grateful that is fantastic. We'll let's get into your story and in five ten minutes or less. Tell us how long you drink. Tell us how long it was a problem and why you decided to stop you know. It really wasn't a problem for a long time in high school. I got drunk really drunk once and got deathly ill and had a blackout and everybody said how fun. I was a couple of times in college. I got drunk and did not stupid things. And and then i got married and started a teaching career and and he didn't really drink so i drank very little toward the end of that that it. It's kind of a long story about that marriage. But anyway i was very desperate at the end and i discovered marijuana so in my you know. Twenty three or so. I discovered that marijuana killed the emotional pain that i was going through. I really preferred marijuana. I could drink about six. Or seven beers. You know and i got through grad school by getting high and at night to ease the stress and it was really when i was around thirty four years. Old let's see. I had already been divorced twice. I was finishing my doctorate. I had gotten through that with the aid of drugs and alcohol just to calm anxiety and And i lived with two other guys long term. And so i met this guy who was different from all the other guys and i thought. Oh this is. The john and i moved to michigan and we got married very fast and within nine months of marrying him. I went to a bar picked up a stranger and he had marijuana and i started having this affair. You know with this guy. And and i went out to bars a couple of more times when my husband was traveling. My third house but my new you know went home with strangers. Finally i went running to a psychologist. I said what is wrong. With this problem. I have a brand new phd from stanford. And i have this private cd life and my professional life is looking better and better in my private life was worse and worse and he said well you're in the early stages of alcoholism you know. He got my family history and He said just try for a month or two. Try having one or two drinks but stopping and see what happens. Well sure enough. I tried to do his experiment. And sometimes i have two drinks and stop just like a normal drinker. Other times i would have the two drinks and then it was third drink and fourth rank and pick up the stranger and do crazy things that no one could get me to leave and eventually it. I could see the pattern very clearly. That if i had even one drink i could not trust myself to do really dangerous things for myself and other people

Gee Langer Florida Jillian Michigan South Florida Mary Chicago Golf John Stanford
The New Age For Pest Control Services

The Pest Posse Stampede Podcast

05:02 min | 3 weeks ago

The New Age For Pest Control Services

"I'm foster here at the past posse. Had ranking shenanigans together here. I'm kelly and creator here at the posse as our mission is to be the trusted resource for training information. Upnp's need to grow your skills and knowledge in this great s control industry. Yes to provide. You are insights and experiences in the pest management industry and help us do that today. We have invited special guests from their job. Oh gosh i'm job. Rally service lead and scott brought us yet. The product's unique for digital pest management. And they will be discussing with us today. The new age of control services so i would start off. Want you guys introduce yourself joe. Want you go first scott. Thanks my name's gop rally. I'm the technical service lead for bears. Pest management public health Business within our our crop science group. I've been involved in pest management. This is i'm starting my forty second year here so i kind of go back to the old days I like to tell people. Yes i used to apply chlordane for cockroach control. That was certainly a part of my day. When i was out there. I've been a technician tech director extension demolished for the university of massachusetts. I'm a new england native Forbear i do. Product support technical support for pest management for vector management for grain protection Couple of other things a little bit into animal health Had a great time. I typically travel. This year's been very unusual for me. I been on an airplane for about a year. Now that's the longest stretch at thirty four years. So how doing a lot of this virtual stuff. That's for sure even while joe you've seen some changes here in the industry i'm sure. Oh yeah yeah thanks to a. Everybody brought us sales and business. Leave for what we're doing at bayer within Detroit pest management that falls under our pest management public health business alabama bear for thirteen years Held a number of different roles. I i currently reside just outside a rally in apex north carolina. But they can tell these home so on hello to anybody that a chiming in from from kentucky university of kentucky indiana and innovation management from nc state. And that really is it. Really the i think my passion for service model innovation which i'll probably use some of our discussions today and just really looking out. We can do business different Three implementation of a new tools and technology song excited about what we're seeing what. The future of the industry looks like at least from our lens. So thanks again for your welcome. You're welcome you've started here. We got rene kirby welcome to the show From mitchell past services there in northern looks like virginia. They're so welcome rene. We got Tim wallace chimed in there So from what. It's like to say leo. Call us directly later today or tomorrow. Not in our just rocking. Just give us a phone numbers right on our website. Just call give us a call on that definitely. We can definitely get taken care of on that so so yeah so welcome everyone. So let's let's dive into this. You know you kind of kind of mentioned a little bit there. Scott really the new age of pest control services i mean what does that mean for you guys when when you hear that Scott once you go first yeah thanks. both robbing. I think first of all most probably looks a little bit different for everybody right. Depending on maybe what segment of the market that they services and things to things of that nature but one thing I certainly think about as i'm gauge with customers and clients they think about what they want the future their business full by are really child and think about how how the expectations of their customer. Continuously change I know just by a conversing with neighbors and friends that of you know they're they're looking for an immediate response and remediation right. They like something bastard. Look what uber's down to the taxicab business. We don't really have to wait around. It's it's right there when we need it. I think of what the new age of pest control looks like In how i think i- ot internet things solutions start to play a role in that is Is is enabling. That type of i think new age service if you will

Scott Kentucky University Of Kentuck Nc State JOE Rene Kirby University Of Massachusetts Kelly Tim Wallace GOP New England Detroit Alabama North Carolina Indiana Rene Mitchell LEO Virginia
AXIS Dance Company

Voices of the Community

03:10 min | Last month

AXIS Dance Company

"I join remotely via zoom by mark brew the artistic director and choreographer and deny reese the managing director of xia stance company. Thanks for being here. Mark engineering. Thank you for having us mark. Would you like to please provide a little overview of the axis dance company and guys. Serve your key programs. I know you do a lot of training and engagement and advocacy and your whole history of danson disability collaborations. So tell us more definitely access dance company and we are thirty. Four years old. Wearing our clint california. And i'll mission is to collaborate with disabled and known disabled artist to create the joystick productions that challenge perceptions of dance and disability alec statement. Is that axes odyssey. Redefines downs disability. And we do this. Through three pills activity out ostry which is all about performances and touring work that we do we a harm season every year and then we to nationally and internationally at a part of that of course is our engagement killa and as we were we have an extensive engagement program and also locally. We stood out community literally. Three different workshops. Assembly programs teacher trainings and masterclasses and of course advocacy which very much embedded although the we do is to really support and create opportunities for disabled artists have access to dance and dance. Training vision at access is to strive to create a radically inclusive down sector and weld by removing barriers ensure casing the beauty of difference. Some of the programs that have been most successful if being dance to stay in that we have every year fried youth programming our assemblies as i mentioned where we as a team going to different schools around the oakland district and beyond and educate young audiences about accessibility inclusion down disability as well as course contemporary downs and another program that we do is around. How summer intensive program that happens every year where we invite people from all around the well. She's coming with us. And that is through three different modules so we have a choreography and women's mijo. We have an improv inside pacific. More joel Teacher training and each of those modules of three days and never really important because these bad gauging supporting people who work in the field of physically integrated dance a disabled atas and also teacher training to really give tools and support to teachers Back within their communities or it's organizations and look at how they can remove barriers of make their work more accessible to others. We also have online classes and workshops that we do in moscow classes which is really about sharing accesses thinking in processes of how we make work and how we try to include an find an inclusive environment for everyone to feel. Welcome in now workshops classes so that's just a few things of what we do a very busy and there's always more

Mark Brew Ostry Reese Alec California Assembly Oakland Moscow
How Gen Z/Millennials use podcasts

podnews

03:36 min | 2 months ago

How Gen Z/Millennials use podcasts

"Listening habits. Thirteen to thirty four year olds have been highlighted by team whistle her research company in the us and the uk. Two thirds prefer podcast to box. We linked to the full research from our show notes and newsletter today glow has launched refer matic a paid tool to incentivize your listeners to share your show beat idea. Volvo spent two point. One million dollars on podcasts advertising in october according to new data from gallon is highlighting advertising increases. The automaker was promoting luxury. Suv the top podcast. Advertisers were amazon at number three with two point. Seven million dollars ziprecruiter at number two with three million dollars and at number one just gonna take a quick break from the show and tell you a little bit more about better health. How better helped dot com. That's right that's right at number one slot help an online counselling service one for those still wondering how the apple podcast chance work. Pull culligan posts. All the cool kids says ratings and reviews places apple podcasts but our client is currently and legitimately and number five in all of health and fitness without a single review. The podcast is strength. Changes everything the tribeca film festival has added a new podcast section for the first time. Submissions will open for fiction and narrative. Nonfiction podcasts amazon. Music quietly launched in mexico and brazil in mexico. The company has also launched and exclusive podcast and lasala hosted by latino artists becky. G there's also an original in brazil to sirius. It is the new destination for original exclusive and popular. podcasts claims. A press release promoting new podcast with marvel entertainment. We've covered their relationship with stitcher in two thousand eighteen. And when they signed with pandora and sirius. Xm in twenty nine thousand nine hundred companies also announced further exclusives. According to quayle's ultimate guide to branded podcasts. Twenty twenty one will be the biggest podcasts yay yet as with covid nineteen on the rise. Advertisers move marketing spending towards podcasting to connect with their customers during lockdowns and experience of tad for two hundred and eighty million dollars. Work with companies. like pod. sites aac asked chargeable and adds ways among others diving into a conspiracy theory involving the cia and the deadly virus. Impo cost news sons versus has been looking at a pandemic but this pandemic was in nineteen. Seventy-one happened in cuba involved. Pigs and might have been put there by the cia. The invincibles park. Assassins is a new true crime series from ireland's taking listeners. Back to dumpling. In victorian times and assassination squads to british rule and the new police force set up to track the culprits. Whatever happens to from curious. Cast in canada looks at what happens after the cameras shut off the reporters walk away. Just because a story disappears from the news doesn't mean it's gone after all it's brand new and launched yesterday and whatever happens to pizza at mcdonald's is nothing to do with the above forecast. I just found it as i was searching. That if you went appalled fest expo two thousand and nineteen the answer already because right across the street from that hotel was the only mcdonald's in the world that still says pizza even today and that's an interesting piece of news that you never thought you'd hear on podcast about podcasting news. And

Lasala Amazon Apple Brazil Volvo Mexico Marvel Entertainment UK Quayle Becky CIA XM Pandora United States Cuba
Texas Supreme Court rejects Republican-led effort to throw out nearly 127,000 Houston, Harris County votes

Democracy Now! Audio

01:16 min | 2 months ago

Texas Supreme Court rejects Republican-led effort to throw out nearly 127,000 Houston, Harris County votes

"Meanwhile on sunday the texas supreme court denied a request to throw out nearly one hundred. Twenty seven thousand early votes from ten drive-thru polling locations in harris county to houston the drive through polls allowed any registered voter to cast their ballot in their car. instead of going inside polling centers. The case will now be heard today before the notoriously conservative. us district judge and your scott heynen who was appointed by president. George w bush. The harris county clerk's office said it created drive thru voting quote in the wake of the covid nineteen pandemic as a safer socially distant alternative to walk in voting for all voters. The office is led by thirty four year old chris. Holland's the county's youngest and the first black clerk holland's also pushed to make it easier for historians to vote during the pandemic by tripling the number of early voting sites last week he kept eight polling locations open for twenty four hours for the first time in texas history. The results has been record breaking voter. Turnout critics note. The drive thru voting sites now being challenged were originally approved by the republican texas secretary of state were set up in consultation with local republican officials.

Scott Heynen Texas Supreme Court Harris County George W Bush Houston Holland Chris United States Texas
11 Trivia Questions on The Human Body

Trivia With Budds

04:44 min | 3 months ago

11 Trivia Questions on The Human Body

"All right guys we are diving into some human body related trivia questions. Let's see if you know all these answers number one approximately how many bones does the average adult have question number one approximately how many bones does the average adult have number one? Question number two, five, human senses are sight hearing taste touch, and what five human senses are sight hearing taste touch and what what's missing their number two. And number three. What is the most common human blood type? What is the most common human blood type number three Number four what is the colored portion of the human I called? What is the colored portion of the human I called number. Four. Question number five approximately how many pints of blood doesn't average adult body contain approximately how many pints of blood doesn't average adult body contained. And number six human sex determination occurs at six to seven weeks in Jeff. Station prior to this, all fetuses are essentially what? Number seven. What part of the human blood carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body part of human blood carries oxygen from the lungs the rest of the body. And eight what is the largest solid organ and the average adult human? What is the largest solid organ the average adult human? Question Nine, what nine hundred, sixty, six, sci fi film involved injecting a miniaturized crew into a human body what nineteen sixty six film was that An number nine number ten, what spiral shaped ear bone is mainly responsible for hearing what spiral shaped ear bone is mainly responsible for hearing. Andy Bonus question to close out this episode humans are the only animals with which of these body parts. Is it a belly button fingernail knuckle or Chin Chin Belly Button fingernail or Chin or sorry or knuckle knuckle cinelli button fingernails. Those are your choices humans, the only animals with which of those body parts. All right. Those are your questions for the human body will be right back in just a second to see how you did. We are back with the answers to human body Trivia here comes question number one and the answer approximately how many bones does the average adult have we are looking for around two hundred for this one kind of just general answer there I think. The actual answer is like two. Oh, six to five. But if you put somewhere around two hundred, that's the approximate answer we were looking for number two the five human senses are sight hearing taste touch. And smell when you smell stuff like a Yankee candle, maybe burning some kind of autumn sent around your house right now in time for Halloween number three, what is the most common human blood type O positive I think that's what I am but I have no idea. My wife asked me the other day she goes what's your blood type I said I don't think anyone's ever asked me before they're thirty four years of life I have no idea. Number four what is the colored portion of the human I call? That's the Iris also a Goo Goo dolls song number five approximately. How many pints of blood doesn't average adult body contained? That's eight pints of blood eight number six human sex determination occurs at sixty seven weeks in station prior to all fetuses are essentially female female. Number seven what part of the human blood carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body that the red blood cells, red blood cells, number eight. What is the largest solid organ in the average adult human? That's the liver liver alone STU. And number nine, what nine, hundred, sixty, six, sci fi film involved injecting a miniaturized crew into human body. That is fantastic voyage. Also the plot of most of the magic school bus episodes I remember as a kid number ten, what spiral shaped your bone is mainly responsible for hearing. You're using it right now to listen to this episode and that's the coke. La. Cochlea. And number eleven. Humans are the only animals with which of these body parts we had Chen belly button fingernails and knuckles. The answer was Chin Chin. So they have it

Chin Chin Chin Andy Bonus Jeff Chen
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 3 months ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
Uprooted, a Book by Page Dickey

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

05:42 min | 4 months ago

Uprooted, a Book by Page Dickey

"It begins with an Anton chekhov quote. it says I am in the condition of transplanted tree, which is hesitating whether to take root or begin to wither, and it looks like you took root page. So tell us a little bit sort of set the scene about this transition for us. Well. I. Think in the beginning and and certainly when when I didn't know whether I might with her it was it was very hard to leave. my old garden I'd been there for thirty four years. my husband join me for the last fourteen of and and it was. A place. Created over the years with just tremendous amount of love and passion and and to just walk away from that was was difficult But. After much searching and and lots of. Panic when we really couldn't find anything right away we decided to move to North Western Connecticut and we found a plot of land that took my breath away and. Because, it was full of fields and woods and wildland and a view. Of the Berkshire Hills and It started me on a new adventure and I think that's when. I realized I wasn't gonNA weather. We didn't have to irrigate. Don't worry. She's GonNa. Be. Okay. Oh how how did so so you had been at Duck Hill. For those thirty four years and so you came to start again in said, this piece of property was breathtaking. It took your breath away and. But How do you know where to begin because? Both of us, we were much younger gardeners much less experience crash when. When we began our where I still live around same time as when you went to kill and where in your your work at Duck Hill. So we were experimenting with different things We're at a different stage in our as I said in our experience. You know. Like what lessons? Where did you begin? How did you know what to do I when you got to this new place? Do you know what I mean like what what did you say? I've got to DOT DOT DOT? Yeah. Well, first of all, they were remnants. Of, a garden. As sort of cottage garden in the front of the House and and. And although it, it crossed my mind just wipe it all out I didn't and it was mostly just peonies and. So. I knew that I wanted to play with that and that would be my. Perennial Garden you might say or place perennials. and. Bulbs and a place we walk through every. Time. We go inside and out. So So it would. It would be a fun place to have that sort of a garden. But I realized. Almost. Immediately I didn't want a garden like I had Kale Duck Hill was Full of hedges and. And Boxwood topiary and. It was a series of rooms and it was very enclosed. And this new place where we lived was open to the sky and open to the fields and open to the view and I realized I didn't want. hedged. Garden anymore I wanted something that related to that wildness. So I I think I knew pretty much right away that I wanted a lot of natives in the in the in this. Little. Garden things like M. Sonia and Baptista and astor's and so on. And But then at the same time, I was thinking about what to do about this little garden. I was starting to explore. In the woods we I think we have about eleven acres of woods. And I got so excited about the woods, we have high rocky limestone dramatic woods on one side and low rich. Damp. Woods on the other side and I got so excited about. This wildland that all of a sudden. We were the stewarts of. that. I was almost torn. Half interested in creating a new garden. Half of me just wanting to start walks start pass in the woods and start cutting down the invasive. and. So that was a whole new world that excited me right from the beginning

Woods Duck Hill Anton Chekhov Berkshire Hills North Western Connecticut M. Sonia Astor Baptista
Teacher deaths raise alarms as new school year begins

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 4 months ago

Teacher deaths raise alarms as new school year begins

"With the deaths of several teachers who would return to classroom learning the nation's largest teachers union is demanding better coronavirus safeguards at least four teachers have died since the fall semester started after contracting co would nineteen two were in Mississippi a third grade teacher died in South Carolina and the thirty four year old special ed teacher in Missouri died this past weekend since the pandemic was identified in February the American federation of teachers says two hundred ten of its members have died the federation's calling for mandatory facemasks strict social distancing and only online learning in areas where community spread is growing like Mississippi we're more than six hundred school teachers and staffers have become infected since the new school year began I am Jackie Quinn

Mississippi South Carolina Missouri Jackie Quinn American Federation Of Teacher
The March ON Washington, 57 Years Later

20/20

06:18 min | 5 months ago

The March ON Washington, 57 Years Later

"Hello I'm Deborah Roberts those images from today an echo of something fifty seven years ago when a quarter of a million people I descended on the nation's capital protesting for jobs and freedom. On today's anniversary of Dr Martin Luther. King Junior's I have a dream speech we at twenty twenty or proud to present the march a documentary directed by Jonah Comfort and narrated by Denzel Washington originally made in twenty thirteen to commemorate the Marches Fiftieth Anniversary. Some of those voices sadly are now gone, but their legacy lives on. I have had to tell my children about the segregates what it means. Seven year old daughter she wanted to go from town. And we found it necessary to explain to That she couldn't go to fun town because she was colored. To attempt to explain a system like unjust and. Segregation. Six year old child is very difficult thing. In nineteen sixty three. The Movement for civil rights came to the most segregated city in the American. South. Birmingham Alabama. All. Resistant to the gration. Thoroughly, segregated. City the United States. had. More on saw on. WILL HOMES ENSURE A. United. States. Many other southern city. Okay. Birmingham is bombing him. They have quarries and conducting the quarry business you used dynamite. So there are a lot of local people who are expert in Isa Dynamic. Teenage. Board riding a bicycle had been knocked off the bike and castrated. Young couple had gone to the City Hall to get a wedding license. Came around the corner. And Brush shoulders with Birmingham policeman and he pulled out his pistol and pistol whipped the more to the ground. It was a horrible heinous place. The campaign was to be led by the organisation's Ben Thirty four year old leader. The Reverend Dr Martin Luther King Junior. WHO HEARD PEOPLE? who except in dusted oppression and second-class citizenship. in an attempt waiting go the Paul Pompidou. The time all we ripe to do right. Dr King was the voice of Civil Rights from the bus boycott on but by the end of nineteen, sixty, two, he recognized. That the civil rights movement. was. Losing what he called its window and history. The. South was still segregated and he said we need to take more of a risk. We need to go for broke I need to go for broke. I think he felt that. We have to be willing to give our lives to put an end to segregation. If we do. Then segregation will end even if we die. That was the reason he chose. Birmingham. For the victory won some even have to face physical death. We must come to see the now some things. So eternally true that they're worth dying for, and if a man has not discovered something that he will die for he fit live. In January of Nineteen, sixty three. One man was determined to stop kings desegregation message from spreading any further. Birmingham's police chief Eugene. Bull Connor. Negro is off the attempted takeover of our country the lazy. The beat nate, the ignorant and buy some misguided religious and bleeding ought. Do, you think you can keep coming in the present situation of segregation I may not be able to do it, but I'll die trying. Overcoming Bull Connor segregationists zeal not to mention his jails would take something special. And in the winter of sixty, three king would find out just how special that effort needed to be. Spent all of January February and March nineteen sixty three training people to accept nonviolence to go down into marches and be willing to go into bull connor's jails. But. Conner's jails were so fearsome that no matter how much they exhorted people no matter how many freedom songs they sang, how many prayers they prayed, how much fervor there was in the meetings, people wouldn't show up to risk going into those jails.

Birmingham Bull Connor Dr Martin Luther Dr King Deborah Roberts Negro Denzel Washington Isa Dynamic Twenty Twenty Jonah Comfort City Hall Alabama Paul Pompidou United States. Ben Thirty Conner Nate Bleeding
Florida leads nation in average number of daily new coronavirus cases

The Lead with Jake Tapper

01:34 min | 7 months ago

Florida leads nation in average number of daily new coronavirus cases

"Is holding onto an unfortunate ranking with nine thousand, four, hundred eighty eight new corona virus cases reported just today. Florida leads the nation outpacing California and Texas and having the most cases reported in a single day CNN's Randi Randy in Palm Beach. County Florida for us. Randi health officials are really putting the pressure on younger people to help slow the spread. Absolutely Jake. We're seeing now about one hundred sixty nine thousand cases statewide more than thirty six hundred deaths, and it's younger people who seem to be getting the most sick right now. The Median Age, the state of Florida for those testing positive is thirty seven years old. It used to be over sixty five and twenty five to thirty four year olds jake makeup, twenty percent of the state's entire number of cases, so it's definitely hitting the younger people. The latest numbers show that seven thousand miners in the state of Florida have been infected with Covid, and also the governor of course is not now closing the stay. There's no statewide. Statewide mandate to close it or to roll back any of the openings. He certainly leaving the beaches opens leading up to the counties. If you look over my shoulder this beach here in Palm Beach, county would normally on the holiday weekend be jam packed. certainly not going to be because it's closed as well as the beaches in Miami Dade, and also in broward, but some beaches. Jake are going to be left open Volusia County. They're gonNA monitor crowds with drones and Jacksonville beach is going to be left open because the mayor there says that it was the bars, not the beaches that caused the spike in

Florida Palm Beach Jake Makeup Randi Randy Jacksonville Beach Jake Volusia County CNN Miami Dade Covid Broward California Texas
Florida faces COVID-19 surge after reopening

News, Traffic and Weather

00:19 sec | 7 months ago

Florida faces COVID-19 surge after reopening

"Coronavirus growing in Florida where more than ninety six hundred new cases were reported Saturday A. B. C. Trevor Ault says senator Rubio says health officials in Florida telling the expected surge to pick between July fifteenth and July twenty third the reviewer says young people are driving this surge right now the median age of people testing positive in Florida is just thirty four years old

Florida A. B. C. Trevor Ault Senator Rubio
2 People Charged With DUIs Following 2 Crashes On Chicago Dan Ryan Expressway

WBBM Morning News

00:50 sec | 7 months ago

2 People Charged With DUIs Following 2 Crashes On Chicago Dan Ryan Expressway

"But on the D. U. I. charges been filed against two people involved in crashes of the Dan Ryan expressway early Sunday morning including a woman who had three men who would stop to help at an accident scene the three were outside their car after stopping to help at the scene of a rollover crash involving an infinity on the inbound Ryan at forty seventh street an adult couple and three children were in the upside down infinity state police say forty five year old Sabrina Johnson was drunk as she approached the scene and her car hit the three people who stopped to help killing one man thirty one year old Curtis Dion day Hale Melton of may would and seriously injuring the others Johnson was charged with aggravated do you why the driver of the infinity involved in the original rollover thirty four year old Francisco Carino was also charged with aggravated do you why and child

Ryan Sabrina Johnson Hale Melton Francisco Carino Dan Ryan Expressway Curtis Dion
Raven-Symoné introduces the world to her wife

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:15 sec | 7 months ago

Raven-Symoné introduces the world to her wife

"Getting married that's so raven raven Simone is posted photos of her wedding on Instagram the thirty four year old actress Mary Maranda pyramid that day who she calls a woman who understands her from trigger to joy and from breakfast to midnight

Simone Mary Maranda
The World is Watching Us

Why It Matters

03:46 min | 7 months ago

The World is Watching Us

"Why it matters spends a lot of time discussing how things that happen around the world of us at home. It's kind of our thing. But today we're GONNA flip that around because the killing of George Floyd, the protests against police, brutality and systemic racism, and the administration's response are not only unfolding here in the united. States the world is listening to and depending on where you are, the echoes can sound different. To better understand how this is playing out, we turn to two American journalists who've spent their careers. Reporting abroad will ask them to give us their own thoughts and experiences, and to describe what America looks like right now through the eyes of those who are watching from afar. They told us to places Africa and Hong Kong. I'm Gabrielle Sierra and this is why it matters today. Diplomacy starts at home. This kind of reminds me how throughout history and on I've studied history and political science, and throughout history, America's goal and mission of trying to go around and promote democracy and human rights around the world has constantly been undercut by how they treat minorities and particularly African Americans at home. I'm Keith Rich Berg I'm currently the director of the journalism and Media Studies Center at the University of Hong Kong, but I spent most of my career about thirty four years as a reporter and correspondent for the Washington Post. During the Cold War The old Soviet Union. Propagandists used to take great pleasure in pointing out. How Black Americans were treated in the American south during the Jim. Crow, era. Know the propagandists during the Vietnam War would like to point out how American blacks were being treated that we were not able to really as strongly as we wanted to stand up against the apartheid regime in South Africa in its early days, because the apartheid regime in South Africa was in many ways modeled on the Jim Crow segregation laws of the American south, so I think throughout history, America's stated mission and goal of promoting democracy and Human Rights and Roosevelt's four freedoms around the world have constantly been undercut by enemies who are willing to point out the hypocrisy of America's positions in America's promotion of human rights by saying before You Cup lecture US wanted you deal with their own problems at home. It's quite painful for me because I do have both experiences you know living in, America when Nigeria I do have both us. I've experienced racism in America. My name is Chico Odwalla. I am an independent multimedia journalist I am based in West Africa and I cover the entire continent for various international media outlets. Killing of George Floyd was very jarring. It was a wakeup. It was a brutal awakening for people who actually don't quite believe. Racism is as real as African Americans say that it is. You still got people who don't believe. It's that strong. Who believe that it's from the past that there have been many moves towards overcoming you know some people still believe that. America is a post racial society so for this incident. This killing of George Florida's like Oh. Actually it's still there and we saw it on TV we saw this guy breathing for his life for nearly nine minutes. So that aspect it is a rude awakening. It's really provoking some nations to look inward. Look at their own injustice for example in France. A people they're calling for an end to the chokehold that some police officers us, and so they're having debates on how to handle people

America George Floyd Jim Crow Gabrielle Sierra Hong Kong Africa South Africa Washington Post West Africa Soviet Union France Keith Rich Berg University Of Hong Kong George Florida Chico Odwalla Nigeria Roosevelt
"thirty four year" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"thirty four year" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Of stuff I need to see the basement under your basement to really see I got a friend of ours nobody's allowed over give us call six five one six four one one of seven one we love to play the culture pop culture knowledge with you call now one seven one everything entertainment thirty four years three thirty four years Rustad thirty two this is Jim hall of the valley the other day a friend asked me this car sales still full of job jumpers and I thought well maybe but certainly not in our view GNC stores Jerry Miller he keeps in twenty years Ricky one twenty seven the majority of our sales staff has been with us two decades or more where is proud of them as we are all the great new view exigencies date twenty five years Tim Connor twenty three years so if your last sales person the disappearing act or the dealer's website staff photos are just a bunch of gray boxes come see us value it GMC in apple valley experience the difference experience may just one twenty seventeen years discover plan do the Minneapolis home remodeling show Jerry twenty four to twenty six at U. S. bank stadium three days only to shop compare and save with hundreds of expert all under one roof urban from TLC's trading spaces plus learn how to make your home eco friendly sustainable alley kitchens and baths before him more don't miss the Minneapolis home remodeling show twenty four to twenty six buy tickets online is two dollars and Joe dot com J. F. masterly new year's resolutions don't have to be a pain when keeping that means you're also doing good with Y. W. C. A. Minneapolis every workout fuels their mission to eliminate racism and the power women every child care and youth program promotes equity and inclusion every include consultation support social justice with Y. W. C. A. Minneapolis you're making a difference just by walking in the door visit Y. W. C. A. M. P. L. S. dot org to learn more and don't forget our annual women's triathlon is in August so start training now having a hot flash you know what I'm talking about ladies what if instead of reading that word we embrace it it's the middle of winter we could all use the good kind of hot flash and that's what you'll feel when you walk into.

"thirty four year" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"thirty four year" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Twice the thirty four year old man's under arrest charges are pending the fifty nine year old victim is in critical but stable condition at Saint Luke's it's not known what led to the argument between them and that led to the stabbing. in Brooklyn thirty seven year old man was stabbed to death on Graham Avenue in Williamsburg today police are looking for two men who fled the scene there's no word on what that was about. Suffolk County police arrested nineteen year old Brian Quinn terrace was involved in that amber alert on Wednesday accused of taking his six month old son without permission following a physical altercation with the child's mother Quinteros as been charged with criminal content and endangering the welfare of a child the baby is fine. rewards up to twenty thousand dollars now the disappearance of five year old dolce Maria Alvarez who was the subject of an amber alerts here in South Jersey still is Jennifer web McRae is the prosecutor in Cumberland County the FBI has contributed a five thousand dollar reward in addition to that my office is contributing five thousand dollars the new field National Bank is also contributing ten thousand dollars girl was last seen at a park in bridge ten just before five on Monday afternoon her mother told police her daughter was playing on the swings when she disappeared police say they believe the girl may have been abducted by a man driving a red van with sliding door and tinted windows meantime the FBI office in Newark is urging people on social media to stop spreading rumors about the girl's mother tweeting that it distracts from the search they didn't elaborate on the rumors about the mothers of people have accused her of giving her daughter away. a Missouri man has become the eighth person to die in the US of a vaping related illness the CDC now has more than five hundred vaping illness cases reported correspondent Lynsey Davis reports that investigators now believe the problem is whether the device manufacturers have been claiming all along people vaping black market T. H. C. products they're saying look we're not trying to go after and prosecute people who are using illegal products that's not the point of our investigation our focus right now is the supply chain so they're trying to do is track down what is the break down what is causing this illness to to try to eliminate it the CDC says don't vape but if you must don't buy vaping products off the streets and don't modify them. well the measles outbreak has been declared under control in the city of I've got a couple of cases now in Nassau County in Maryland the rain is with the county health department Nassau County hasn't had a case of measles since twenty thirteen this is our second case this year measles is a highly contagious disease we are concerned of those who may not be vaccinated of those babies and the six months of age anybody whose immune system is suppressed we want to reach out to them to tell them they may have been exposed to measles especially if they were riding the allied double our because one of the infected people is known to have been at several L. I. double our stations last week notably Mineola Jamaica and hymns that spoke to six degrees with clear skies were going up to partly sunny eighty and that's how the now this Mets fans prior to each game tune into the Nissan Mets pregame show on WCBS eight eighty. president trumps the subject of a whistle blower complaint over something he told a foreign leader and there are reports now that the leader was the president of Ukraine corresponded Alex melon reports the underlying issue here maybe Joe Biden's alleged efforts to help his son's business dealings in the Ukraine if the president had privately encouraged a leader of a foreign country to investigate somebody who might go on to be his twenty twenty opponent and that would certainly raise alarms among the intelligence officials and would probably explain why the inspector general said this raised to a level of urgent concern on CNN last night Chris Cuomo asked presidential lawyer Rudy John Giuliani about all this they did ask you crazy look into Joe by of course I did you just said you didn't know I didn't ask him to look at the job by NASA with the allegations the related my client which tangentially involved Joe Biden in a massive bribery slowly all this is going on the president will be hosting a state dinner tonight in the rose garden in honor of Australian prime minister Scott Morrison. we have traffic and accu weather coming up in just a moment Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau now says he doesn't even know how many times he put on black face over the years there are at least three known incidents from years ago it was not something that represents the. the person I've become the leader I try to be he says there's no excuse I have always acknowledge that I come from a place of privilege but I now need to acknowledge that comes with a mass of blind spot he's in the middle of a reelection campaign the elections a month away there but no calls for him to resign from within his Liberal Party but the opposition leader Andrew Scheer said this proves that Trudeau is unfit to lead Canada. time.

Suffolk County Saint Luke Williamsburg Brooklyn Brian Quinn twenty thousand dollars five thousand dollars five thousand dollar ten thousand dollars thirty seven year thirty four year fifty nine year nineteen year six degrees six months five year six month
"thirty four year" Discussed on Bunny Ears

Bunny Ears

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"thirty four year" Discussed on Bunny Ears

"I had a dead sister because she wasn't sure because i kept kept on joking about whether or not she was dead or not colombo with a religion believe me like oh this thirty day chip no no i'm just kidding and it's gullible but she'll actually believe me and she actually go into it but <hes> she <hes> but a and actually you know that's one of those things. Actually my sister would appreciate that kind of stuff. You know and yet no it's. It's mine was this'll tragic to the thirty four year old. I mean schizophrenia things of the mind things that they haven't solved. She took a cheap jake. She took ourselves to know. We don't know i think so. I was worried about my sister with her and she took herself for a minute there again it. It was ears puzzle yeah yeah because sometimes the pain is so great it doesn't we don't know what's going on in people's heads and i do think how often do you cry about it. How often a year nah about her by both my sisters my parents either one <hes> <hes> all. I not that often not that often but i'd say about twice a year. Maybe yeah that's about right i i i miss will my younger of the two sisters <hes> who is six years older than me <hes> i. I was very very close with her and i don't know i kind of be trader because she was smoking and dating guys and and she was a little loose and i told my mom on her and then she was city. You know you're in ten. I know but still i betray i yeah i know i know but still and then the older one. I'm just going to cure the goddamn disease and then the other one. I gonna go back. I wanna wanna do mental health stuff really bad and because people are fucked 'cause people are being given everything wrong and they're guinea pigs and psychiatrists the kaya trysts sh- most of them should go to jail they would up there with the drug companies also like yeah with drug companies but has also dominates both am. I am saying the doctor who thinks symbiotic relationship yeah yeah. Here's the new pamphlet but they're not really learning anything and they're also also piling on such shit too sensitive people yeah people that if you if you take just a little bit of something that's enough does just give them a little bit tight. Ration- is the key jin. <hes> mental meds and it's not upon mental meds. It's about human communication and you gotta keep them involved in life..

colombo jake thirty four year thirty day six years
"thirty four year" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"thirty four year" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"FM thirty four year old man was shot in a drive by in west ridge on the city's north side yesterday he was walking in the twenty five hundred block away sure you when someone fired at him hitting him in the arm he took himself to the hospital is in stable condition the mayor of south suburban song village loses the latest battle with the other village leaders sister for Williams was hired as an administrator for Sauk village July sixteenth but sock village mayor Derek Burgess said the move was illegal so he prevented Williams from getting access to the village hall but now a judge has granted a temporary restraining order that prohibits Burgess from interfering with Williams hiring Williams my go to work on Monday to suck village trustees told the daily Southtown they hope the judge's decision would allow the board and the mayor who have been fighting since may when the boards balance of power shifted away from the mayor to now begin a more constructive relationship Terry Cashner newsradio one all five point nine FM Arlington Heights police have released more info about what led to the disorderly conduct charges against a former high school coach and counselor prosecutors have charged just a badge Caskey with four counts of disorderly conduct after investigators say he sent inappropriate text messages to students at Saint vaider high school the daily Herald reports police released information about the text after receiving a freedom of information request of redacted much of the content of the text messages investigators say in addition to the content of the texts they violated school policy which requires staff to communicate electronically with students only through emails which must also be sent to the students parents Jim got us news radio one of five point nine FM thank you heather nice WBBM news time tree twelve anytime anywhere on the radio dot com newsradio seven eighty and one oh five point nine FM let's say you just bought.

Williams administrator Derek Burgess Caskey Saint vaider high school Jim Terry Cashner daily Herald thirty four year
"thirty four year" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"thirty four year" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Seventh thirty four year old Dangelo Martin was taken into custody Friday in Detroit as a person of interest in connection with three E side murders. The prosecutor's office declined to confirm if the criminal sexual conduct warrant was related to Martin the body of a woman was found in a vacant house on the city's east side Wednesday, the bodies of the other two women were discovered in separate empty dwellings earlier this year, including one in may. Investigators believe the deaths are related and possibly the work of a serial killer. Meantime, a killer is on the run after a triple shooting in downtown Detroit. One man is dead. And two other people are seriously injured after gunshots. Rang out in downtown Detroit early Sunday morning. Witnesses say they could hear two men arguing in the area of congress in Bogan just after two o'clock before the shooting started a forty eight year old man was shot in the chest back and leg. He was taken to a nearby hospital where he later died, a thirty eight year old man in thirty four year old woman were also hit and are both listed in temporary serious condition. The suspect is still on the run after originally being reported by police as in custody. The suspect described only as wearing all black and being armed with an unknown weapon. Dan Jenkins, w w j NewsRadio nine fifty enforcement officials and via working to prepare students and faculty for the worst case scenario. There's active shooter training at Novi high school that took place where Novak police and fire departments simulated arm suspects within. In the facility, various school, administrators teachers and students all played a role in a hypothetical environment and responded in accordance with the school response plan. Police chief, David Malloy says recent nationwide events have only served to highlight the need for preparedness. A construction crane buffeted by high winds during a storm toppled on a Dallas apartment building Sunday fire rescue chief Dominique artists says rescuers believe they found everyone in the building. We can't say her say, but we are pretty confident about what we seeing from our equipment as well as I say that we did a complete. We searched the building. Yeah. One person was killed five others injured. At least seven people were injured during a scary and chaotic couple of minutes at the capital pride parade in Washington commander. Giller mole Rivera with MetroPCS. Polices one man was arrested Saturday night for allegedly carrying a weapon, but at no time where there shots fired the man at his handgun were placed in custody at a nearby park. Officers arrived.

Detroit Dangelo Martin Novi high school Dan Jenkins prosecutor MetroPCS Washington Rivera Bogan congress David Malloy commander Dominique artists Novak Dallas thirty four year thirty eight year forty eight year
"thirty four year" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"thirty four year" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"His thirty four year old Gregory Etcheveria of Brooklyn. It was trying to lift the weight into place when the accident occurred he was pronounced dead at the scene to others were taken lenox hill hospital for operation they suffered minor injuries. This is the third. Deadly construction accident in the city this week in another incident. Monday on the upper east side, a worker was killed by a falling piece of stone construction. Accident debts are far too common in New York City report from twenty seventeen indicates twenty three percent of worker debts in the city involve construction workers in SoHo MAC, Rosenberg WCBS NewsRadio. Eight eighty an extra hot day along the jersey shore after a fire broke out in ocean grove it happened just after noon flames were tracked down to the dunes. Boardwalk cafe where the roof collapsed. The fire also spread to the adjacent building firefighters quickly doused the flames. The damage though is reported to be extensive no injuries were reported NYPD on the hunt for an MTA bus passenger who has altered a driver Friday morning in the Bronx inside the shirt, the whole side of the shirt here in my left shoulder was soaked driver trellis Robinson tells CBS to she was doing her usual route when a man approached her and doused her with urine of shot. I could. And move. I stood there for a minute for two. She's hoping police can use bus surveillance video to track down the guy. She's taking some time off before heading back to work on a different route this time, according to the Transport Workers Union there were more than one hundred assault. I'm trying to workers last year. Talk about I opening police in Connecticut, say a man crashed his SUV into a strangers yard, and then wandered into the house. Completely naked happened this morning in Newtown. Luckily, the homeowners were out shopping thirty five year old Joseph arch botch from Watertown was arrested on a long list of charges, including DWI and criminal trespass. WCBS news time nine oh. Seven. Freetime tips and fun facts. From Paul Kristen index ter- at total wine and more garnishing your hand with.

Gregory Etcheveria lenox hill hospital New York City Transport Workers Union Brooklyn Paul Kristen ocean grove NYPD Newtown MTA Watertown trellis Robinson CBS Bronx assault Connecticut twenty three percent thirty five year thirty four year
"thirty four year" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"thirty four year" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"The average rider thirty four year old man most were injured by not paying attention to traffic laws or warnings from the scooter companies west LA attorney, Catherine Lehrer says some people just can't be bothered with reading all the fine print when you download the scooter there's a liability waiver in there. It says you can't see what's if you're injured and that you would seem all risk of injury. So that's problematic. Now still did two or three hundred scooter. Injury victim so far over the last year and not one of them ever read that user greement, and it wasn't until after the accident that they learned that's going to be a problem. So back to the study found eighty percent of accidents happens because the rider fell off the scooter and other eleven percents, they ran into something continuing our team coverage of the government shutdown, and perhaps the ending of it tonight. The house and Senate both approved legislation today that's intended to reopen the government after a record long five day shutdown. It's gone to the president for a signature was still waiting to hear. If he signed it. President Trump now three week extension to put federal employees back to work. I will make sure that all employees received their back pay very quickly or as soon as possible. It'll happen fast. The government will remain open at least until February fifteenth while negotiations continue to settle the issue a border security, some see this as another victory for speaker Nancy Pelosi who was asked if we might be facing another government shutdown in mid February. I can assure the public on anything that the president will do. But I do have to say I'm optimistic. I see every challenge your every crisis as an opportunity an opportunity to the right thing for the American people. President Trump says he will declare a national emergency to build his US Mexico border wall. If there's no deal with congress by mid February. We'll have more on this story coming up at the bottom of the hour. Little more right now to conservative commentator and columnist. Ann Coulter tells KNX the president was outplayed by Pelosi joining today because of the attacks on the president for capitulating. There's no other way so read this culture says that President Trump is failing at his central campaign promise to build that border wall. Donald. Unusual creature to be sitting in the Oval Office. The American people didn't vote for him. This'll be fun. We'll put this this trashy, not, you know, developer reality TV star in the Oval Office. He won because of the crisis because Americans have been trying to say this to their elected representatives for thirty years. Toltar- says you legal immigration will continue to drive down wages in America's liberals are being scammed. She calls herself a leftist on that issue. We spoke to her at some length today on KNX in-depth, you can hear.

President Trump president Oval Office Nancy Pelosi KNX Toltar LA Catherine Lehrer Ann Coulter congress attorney Senate America Donald US developer Mexico thirty four year eighty percent
"thirty four year" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"thirty four year" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Killed the chef Thirty-four-year-old FU five pun critically injured the owner and the manager panicked patrons ran and took shelter. Nearby restaurants and locked the doors. Police eventually ran down the suspect a few blocks away. So what sparked this murderous rampage, perhaps a psychiatric evaluation will yield dancers and sheep's said bay, Sean Adams WCBS NewsRadio eight hundred. Democratic Senator Kirsten gillibrand as announced on the late show with Stephen Colbert going to run for president United States because as a young mom, I'm gonna fight for other people's kids as hard as I would fight for my own which is why I believe that healthcare should be a right and not a privilege after the show. Gillibrand tweeted that she believes in right versus wrong and that wrong wins when we do nothing. Now is that we're time to raise our voices and get off the sidelines, unquote. There are ten priests with ties to New Jersey whose names appear in the list of Jesuits accused of sex abuse. Here's Marla diamond nine of the ten priests from New Jersey on the list for years at Saint Peter's prep, Saint Peter's university or in Saint Peter's parish and Jersey City several more priests were affiliated with prominent schools in New York Xavier Regis, Brooklyn prep, and Fordham prep. Some of the allegations date back to the nineteen fifties. It's a small. Step in the right direction. Mitchell Garabedian who has represented hundreds of victims of pre sex abuse says he has no reason at all to believe the list is complete. We just don't know what criteria. The Catholic church uses the Jesuits used in. It. People are victims are highly skeptical because of their long cover-ups most of the archdiocese in New Jersey have promised to release their own lists soon and New York and New Jersey's attorneys general set up a task force last year, urging victims to come forward Marla diamond WCBS, NewsRadio eight eighty.

New Jersey Senator Kirsten gillibrand Saint Peter New York Jersey City Fordham prep Mitchell Garabedian Stephen Colbert Sean Adams Catholic church United States Xavier Regis president Brooklyn Thirty-four-year
"thirty four year" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"thirty four year" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Shows the thirty four year old gunshot victims staggering across the street from the Tompkins houses before collapsing on the sidewalk and police say the victim was shot once in the chest the top seven sixty Park Avenue. Passer-by tried to help him and call nine one one. He was rushed to Woodall hospital in critical condition. Police are searching for the gunman. Al Jones ten ten wins on Park Avenue in bed. Stuy brooklyn. You can see surveillance video the shooting at tens end wins dot com wins news time three oh three. A back to school stabbing in the Bronx to return to the classroom after the long holiday break apparently didn't calm some nerves in money even thirteen year old girl stamped a fourteen year old boy in the shoulder at the hostas Lincoln academy of science and avenue lunchtime. The cafeteria no word on a motive. He needs girl taken into police custody charges, pending. Why now session with congress? Top leaders did not lead to any breakthroughs and ending the partial government shutdown Democrats, take control of congress this morning. They met in the situation room for a border security briefing hours after the president would not venture a guess as to win the shutdown would end could be a long time. Quickly Nancy Pelosi Democrats say they'll introduce bills tomorrow to reopen. The government saying the president's using the American people as hostages and demanding money for a border wall. Whereas the president to open up government, but the Democrats plan has no wall money at the house GOP leader. Kevin McCarthy says they insist on stage show vote instead of working on a compromise. But he sure what will come. I think we can come to an agreement rather quickly. Saga megani? At the White House wins news time three or four. So many times who tell you about massive multi-state lottery. Jackpots one in states very far away from New York, New jersey in Connecticut. This time, though, the winner is within our midst, though, they remain a mystery. It's what so many people wish for that. They can go buy some gas and a lottery ticket and poof instant millionaire the four hundred twenty five million dollar ticket was bought at the BP station on northern boulevard right on the border of Glen head and upper Brookville, the owner j one was tickled mazing.

president Kevin McCarthy congress Woodall hospital hostas Lincoln academy of scie Nancy Pelosi brooklyn Al Jones White House New York BP station New jersey GOP Glen head Brookville Connecticut four hundred twenty five milli thirty four year fourteen year
"thirty four year" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"thirty four year" Discussed on KOMO

"A thirty four year old man shot in Seattle's pioneer square neighborhood late last night may not survive. That shooter is still on the run say the shots rang out at first avenue and cherry around eleven pm officers tell us there were too many people in the area after the Sounders game essentially failed. So they couldn't bring in canine said try to track down that gunman if you know anything that could help with the investigation, please call Seattle. Komo's Brian Yamamoto. Police think the shooter described as a black man in his twenties wearing a dark top and dark pants took off southbound along first avenue, south Justice last week, a group of business leaders wrote an op Ed in the Seattle times pleading with the city to do more to prevent crime in pioneer square. Also comes on the heels of a gallery owner being attacked in October. The group is calling for more beat cops the removal of illegal camps for navigation teams and a heightened focus on arresting. People who commit crime in the neighborhood. That's komo's Kelly Cubans reporting on the heels of the Thousand Oaks shooting an organization called Washington's mass shooting workgroup is making its own recommendations to Washington. Lawmakers yours KOMO Suzanne fog, one of the task force recommendations to make funding available for K through twelve schools across the state for school resource. Officers advocates say it's not really just about responding to an active shooter. That's as they say. It's also about building relationships in keeping kids in school. How many contractor crews does it take to change a light bulb? That's not a riddle. We're not sure actually of the answer, but it will require closing the westbound side of the five twenty bridge from ninety second avenue northeast to montlake boulevard. Here's komo's Brian Calvert. The eastern approach to the new five twenty bridge features three lids over the highway lids. That are green spaces on top and underneath our Aloom native by about thirty five hundred light bulbs. We started installing these fixtures.

Komo Seattle pioneer square Seattle times Washington Brian Yamamoto Sounders Aloom Thousand Oaks Brian Calvert Kelly Cubans thirty four year ninety second
"thirty four year" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"thirty four year" Discussed on KOMO

"Murder of a thirty four year old single mother found dead last month in a wooded area of joint base Lewis mcchord. Komo's Kelly Blair has the latest thirty four year old. Jessica Jackson was last seen alive at Tacoma convenience store and September fourth. She was with forty nine year old Bobby piece of Tacoma and thirty year old Jeremy Warren of forks, Washington, her body was found in a wooded area of joint base. Lewis mcchord nine days later detective say she was beaten with a baseball bat and shot three times in the head. The FBI has arrested the two men she was last seen with and charged them with second degree murder. The defendants have admitted to authorities. They took Jackson to the wooded area and killed her. They also have surveillance video showing them driving to and from the general area of the murder and have recovered the gun believe used in the killing. Kelly bleier. Komo news police chief has been cleared by outside investigators after a woman accused him of a crime chief, Steve my lead was placed on administrative leave in August and baffled. Detectives were called in to investigate those. Detectives now say they believe the women lied to investigators and may have tampered with evidence. They forwarded a case against the woman to prosecutors. My let's been reinstated. Do his job. Cameras and automatic license plate readers watch as you move through town. But some people say it's just the government's way to keep an eye on you. Komo's Ryan Harris explains. How you give police your opinion on the technology. Seattle. Police aren't the only ones using surveillance equipment. The city's transportation department uses cameras to provide traffic information and has mad teams use them to assess the situation before exposing a person to a potential danger, even though department policies forbid, keeping the information collected for long unless it's needed for an investigation city council member Bruce Harrell tells the Seattle channel they want you to feel secure about your privacy takes.

second degree murder Komo Jessica Jackson Lewis mcchord Tacoma Kelly Blair Kelly bleier Seattle Bruce Harrell FBI baseball Jeremy Warren Bobby Ryan Harris Washington Steve thirty four year
"thirty four year" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"thirty four year" Discussed on KCBS All News

"To seem thirty four year old miller catches the beat i will very excited and very happy music is therapy for some two dozen people with developmental disabilities like autism and down syndrome the session at the ed roberts campus in berkeley run by maya's music therapy it's cofounder neurologist dr joanna cooper says the group is especially important for adult to age out of government funded services offered movie only service that they get in the therapeutic way to improve their motor ability their coordination their social abilities their language is music therapy fund honors dr cooper's severely disabled daughter maya who died at age fourteen from a rare neurologic disorder she was non verbal but she could really come alive with music dr cooper and maya's father founded the nonprofit in one thousand nine hundred nine they started with a handful of children today's the nonprofit is twenty nine years old and serves more than one hundred children and adults the nonprofits paid music therapist says dr cooper has expanded the sessions to several locations in richmond and berkeley she's very strong willed and she knows what she wants and she makes it happen all of the participants perform in a music festival and sometimes it takes years but dr cooper has seen near oracle's through maya's music therapy fund somebody who never spoke being able to sing so for co founding a music therapy nonprofit that improves the quality of life of developmentally disabled participants this week's jefferson award in the bay area goes to dr joanna cooper sharon chin kcbs so far this week wall street has gotten out of its pattern of late session pullbacks the dow jones industrials gained three hundred forty six points or one point four percent and settled above twenty five thousand for the first time since march thirteenth the nasdaq closed at a third straight record high on seven tenths percent advance the s and p five hundred closed up nine tenths percent at a three month high shares of delta airlines fell nine tenths percent delta cut its profit forecast because of the cost of jet fuel spirits maker brown foreman parent of jack daniels and other brands reported strong sales for the fiscal fourth quarter and the full fiscal year but the company's profit for the quarter was down because of higher costs brown forman shares fell a quarter percent worker productivity was weaker than originally thought.

miller ed roberts campus berkeley dr joanna cooper maya oracle delta airlines jack daniels dr cooper richmond jefferson foreman brown forman twenty nine years thirty four year four percent three month
"thirty four year" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"thirty four year" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"To a thirty four year old name with the name memorial via gomez memorial villagomez okay nine the maurya appeared in court today because she stabbed her sixyearold son six times with a steak knife say that three times fast now yes stabbed him gave him a staff each year he was born now i know you're wondering why what could have six iota done to get stabbed six times i thought about this because i don't like the rest of judgment because somebody's kid is bad is okay but what could he could do to get stabbed six times of course in a perfect world the correct answer would be nothing but guess what we don't live in a perfect world in this world that we live in the maurya villagomez says she stabbed her sixyearold son six times because he deserved it let's go to keiji w eight nbc for the report police perhaps the worst part of this story that mother told police her little six year old boy deserve to be stabbed thirty four year old memorial via gomez has another mug shot she's charged with intentionally trying to kill her son even trying to strangle his fourteen month old baby brother police say saturday night a woman here the avid heights apartments called nine one one when her six year old neighbor rant her yelling that his mother was trying to kill him police got him to a hospital then found via gomez covered in blood in a back bedroom holding the baby the baby was treated for choke marks on its throat and has tested positive for meth the little boy possibly had a punctured liver and lung via gomez has a history of assault d y and drug possession we're hearing that you know that six year old boy didn't deserve to get stabbed that's this show boy deserve to come out of the womb of a better human being all right that's your boy deserve to live with a family that actually cares about his being that six year old boy deserve to have a mother who within struggling with anger and substance abuse issues her youngest child had method system because clearly memorial was using meth when she was pregnant with her youngest child.

maurya villagomez gomez assault gomez memorial drug possession six year thirty four year fourteen month
"thirty four year" Discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"thirty four year" Discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

"This you know this cloud hanging over the cavaliers about whether lebron with stay or not i think this is the most vulnerable team since then so too let's trying to the phone call it's go to temple city this time and manny manny europe next what's going on not much guys how you doing great i'm just gotta point that if the broad comes to the west the brian will age in dog years because the west is so much better in competition wise than the east that's why lebron james says the neighbor to sustain himself throughout his career and these eastern has strong people a thirty four year old brian to the east to the west he will age in dog years therefore disappointing laker fans in and therefore if he were to come and take a pay cut keep julius round oh give paul george the other team develop the bridal bill and their kids money and just kinda like retired sunset here now lay paint him max money to come down here and age in dog years competing against the west i mean there's seven eight teams that will run lebron james ragged out here and we don't have enough quality players like when shocking kobe together we have the big shot rob robert or i mean mid socks ron harper all these companies veteran come in there's really take the levers lakers over the hump to the championship years we don't have that yet out here in this young team so veron wants to take a pay cut say fifteen come play out devout these teams make a run for let's see what happens fan hit max money to age dog years out here because.

cavaliers lebron brian rob robert lakers manny manny lebron james julius paul george veron thirty four year
"thirty four year" Discussed on KALW 91.7 FM

KALW 91.7 FM

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"thirty four year" Discussed on KALW 91.7 FM

"The city of los angeles sinderen baiters smeared my good name i wish unemployable for quite a spell thank goodness for the quaker fell out in pasadena who hired me as a janitor or my family would have starved to death my whole life changed turned upside down it was the end of a dream young man it was the end of public housing in los angeles i went to jail for a year was chased by the fbi for thirty four year this document i'm holding here is my deaths warned an internal fbi memo confirming a plot to assassinate me sent to an initial by director j edgar hoover himself the detective in charge of intelligence for the la pd at that time was a young ambitious cobb named gerald gay my name is frank wilkinson i am ninety two years old funny thing fernando i outlived most of those dirty bastard no it's easy to romanticise the working class residents of john s ready but we should not many of us were immigrants firstgeneration sons and daughters of emigrants and what does the immigrant winds the immigrant doesn't want trouble he wants to making he wants this little piece of land my students often asked me professor maurice their way was the fight for chavez ravine so important look stand on bunker hill city hall is there the la times disney hall the federal court house there the new cathedral and none other than the department of water and power across the street how did we ever have the audacity to take on this civic civil it's true we lost but what's important fernanda we help create a culture of resistance that continues to this day the struggle for china's ravine prepared me for civil rights the farm workers union my labour work with burco donor and the tea ghana movement john as ravine was huge for me it made me that person i am today so do me a favor remember chavez ravine fernando let me tell you one more thing about chavez ravine there was always a lot of talk of a buried treasure some were appear ride i can hit a stolen gold in these like a myth right here under dodger stadium you mean bishop lawn my and my little better than i think there was a treasure but the.

civil rights chavez ravine disney hall la times john s frank wilkinson gerald director dodger stadium los angeles china bunker hill city hall professor cobb j edgar hoover fbi pasadena ninety two years thirty four year
"thirty four year" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"thirty four year" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"A thirty four year old michael gambine charles gray oh 007 yes yes he we played blow field he was blow feld in diamonds are forever it's right yeah he played the criminal gist in rocky har uh any also played mike croft homes on the jeremy brett granada sherlock series i'm sure he was great at that yeah yeah yeah he was great it was terrific and everything he is dry as a bone yes man this is a very dry british film uh as is one might expect in it's a it's a wear wolf whodunnit based in large part on the agatha christie a book in movies and then there were nine so the film climaxes with a scene in which everyone gathers in a parlor and they're tested with i think a silver candlestick they pass it around to see whose aware walton and this is the only movie that i know off to feature a wear wolf break this is a brief intermission for the audience to discuss theor theories on who the where wolf is and then vote on the where wealth before you get the biegel reveal in the movie now the really great version of this would be that the audience vote determines which real they load into the projector and becomes the where wolf in the final seen yeah i'd i'd the that was not the case though it was due to just a chance to discuss what you thought about the about the the movie up to that point but i feel like we need more where wolf breaks in our films even a non where will films right say for instance you're watching glengarry glen rice the movie yeah okay there no actual worlds in it but there i think it's constructive to have a point where the audience talks about who might be aware wolf while there's a there's a burglary seen like he adds a pause to discuss film and everyone pauses and goes into a extremely profanity laced discussion about who broke into the office and stole those leads right.

michael gambine feld agatha christie walton burglary charles gray mike croft jeremy brett granada glengarry glen thirty four year
"thirty four year" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"thirty four year" Discussed on KTRH

"Was a thirty four year hpd veteran he died in his patrol car on houston's northside is the flood waters of hurricane harvey rose the man charged in the assassination of harris county sheriff's deputy daring go forth has struck a plea deal it was two years ago when shinhan miles gunned down deputy go forth at a gas station in northwest harris county miles argue our lawyers argued he had a history of mental illness but a judge this year did declare him competent to stand trial more than one hundred thirty dogs and cats in the houston area in shelters were being shipped off to california to make room for pet still waiting to be reunited with their owners after harvey area talks that have been owners surrendered or their docks that pipeline before pets recovered during harvey will be held for thirty days in an effort to find their owners best friends animal society will list the animals on its website senator ted cruz pushing tax reform in dc today in a speech to the tax foundation senator cruz said government needs to simplify the tax code and make it easier for individuals to file nine on two yeah those are congressional republicans have been pushing a simplified postcard since last year katie resuce time is three or four the markets are closed here's ktrh money man pecchia well good afternoon has got dr jose today the dow industrials finishing that a up by thirty nine points closing at twenty two thousand one fifty eight the sp 500 of course while we call the broader market it was up by just one point for the day the techheavy nasdaq also flat up by just five points energy stocks were one of the better performing groups today precious metals minors were among the day's laggards this morning before the bell the producer price index was up i just two tenths of one percent that was a bit below what analysts had forecast if we look back over the past year producer price index was up two point four percent oil up by one dollars seven cents forty nine dollars thirty cents a barrel oil prices higher after the weekly oil inventory reports showed a smaller than expected build in crude supplies we also saw a very big drop in unleaded gasoline also gold prices down four dollars seventy cents an ounce.

patrol car houston hurricane harvey senator senator cruz dow industrials energy stocks oil prices hpd harris county california ted cruz katie resuce producer forty nine dollars thirty four year four dollars four percent one dollars one percent thirty days two years