37 Burst results for "Thirty Years"

Spirit Week (MM #3475)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 d ago

Spirit Week (MM #3475)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation back in my much younger day. We used to have Spirit Week in high school. It was usually around football homecoming or maybe when this whole team went to the state tournament, but these days I've noticed something and I see it through my Facebook timeline that grade school kids are celebrating their own versions of spirit week. I just kind of shake my head and I noticed it a lot the last couple of weeks are in Facebook. Now, I realized covid-19 has changed everything. But if we're just this year, I wouldn't think anything about it. But I've seen it over the last few years. I saw a picture of one of my friends kids who were maybe seven eight years old. I think they're in first or second grade. It was spirit week and they were dressed in their favorite decade the eighties, you know, the one that ended thirty years ago and started forty years ago. I'm thinking of myself. What does a seven or eight-year-old child know about the 1980s? Okay, maybe mom was born in the a teenage Mom dressed him up that way but why are kids celebrating Spirit Week in grade school now, maybe if I had kids would understand and I don't have any problem with them doing it. It just doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me. It's really strange to me. I got to admit dead.

Facebook Kevin Nation Football
Fresh update on "thirty years" discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

00:42 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "thirty years" discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"Either coming it's coming from one or two places. It's your allowing somebody else to judge you or you're judging yourself. That's what I felt and the reason I actually thought you were GonNa say myself I would have bet on it is because you say I always get my goals I noticed how my only goal is something that's so outer space could take thirty years. He now chill I am like. You know how like November first time you heard when I said I was GONNA buy the jets you really disappointed because it seems so far away. I always laugh when they see. What's that? Yeah I mean like how about ten years ago even you? Know I I always say like twenty five years from now twenty years I. Always think that I'll buy the jets at sixty, right like sixty five. So like to me, you're just judging yourself in the micro instead of the way that you should really do it since that's how life really is in the macro would need to challenge yourself on is, are you really judging yourself or.

Trump expected to announce conservative Barrett for court

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 d ago

Trump expected to announce conservative Barrett for court

"Congressional Republicans say president Donald Trump will nominate federal seventh circuit court of appeals judge Amy Coney Barrett to replace the late Supreme Court justice Ruth pater Ginsburg during a campaign rally Friday night in Newport news Virginia president trump relished the chance to nominate yet another justice to the Supreme Court we don't have to do it by the election but we should be easy really able that would be a great victory going into the election earlier in the day trump told reporters at joint base Andrews I'll be announcing the decision of March very exciting five o'clock at the White House rose garden the likely shift in the courts make up from Ginsburg a liberal icon to an outspoken conservative would be their sharpest ideological swing since Clarence Thomas replace justice Thurgood Marshall nearly thirty years ago I had to acquire

Donald Trump Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court Andrews White House Clarence Thomas President Trump Ruth Pater Ginsburg Newport Virginia Thurgood Marshall
Fresh update on "thirty years" discussed on Unreserved

Unreserved

00:39 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "thirty years" discussed on Unreserved

"Sherman any from CBC podcasts in Nineteen Ninety Nine fifteen year, old charmian on Devel-. Disappeared on her way to a job that police believed in exist four months. Later, her remains were found in a wooded ravine I revisit the case that has stayed with me for over twenty years ever since I I covered it as a cub crime reporter for the Toronto Star. You can find uncovered share meany on CBC listen on your favorite podcast APP. This is a CBC podcast. I want to go to my trap line one last time he says. I cannot breathe. I know he hasn't been to his trap line for almost seven decades. We've been on a journey as father and son for thirty years, and for the first time, it feels like we've found our destination. And I think maybe we've been headed there all this time. Whatever choose exists between us. The end of our journeys in.

CBC Sherman Reporter Toronto
Trump expected to announce conservative Barrett for court

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 d ago

Trump expected to announce conservative Barrett for court

"Congressional Republicans say president Donald Trump will nominate federal seventh circuit court of appeals judge Amy Coney Barrett to replace the late Supreme Court justice Ruth pater Ginsburg during a campaign rally Friday night in Newport news Virginia president trump relished the chance to nominate yet another justice to the Supreme Court we don't have to do it by the election but we should be easy really able that would be a great victory going into the election earlier in the day trump told reporters at joint base Andrews I'll be announcing the decision of March very exciting five o'clock at the White House rose garden the likely shift in the courts make up from Ginsburg a liberal icon to an outspoken conservative would be their sharpest ideological swing since Clarence Thomas replace justice Thurgood Marshall nearly thirty years ago I had to acquire

Donald Trump Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court Andrews White House Clarence Thomas President Trump Ruth Pater Ginsburg Newport Virginia Thurgood Marshall
'Mr. 80 Percent,' An Intimate Portrayal Of Surviving Prostate Cancer

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:29 min | 1 d ago

'Mr. 80 Percent,' An Intimate Portrayal Of Surviving Prostate Cancer

"We're talking about prostate cancer why we don't talk about it because of issues like incontinence, impotence, men's private parts, and so forth I'm joined by Boston Globe Mark Shanahan who is out with a new podcast Mr Eighty percent, which tells the very personal story about his own prostate cancer and a warning again to listeners, we are talking a very frankly about this disease about sexual function and so on and so forth, and so this might not be suitable for younger listeners. We just want to put that warning out there. mark I want to talk a little bit about how this diagnosis it didn't just affect you affected your loved ones too. So your audio, your daughter Julia was in junior high when you were first diagnosed. So I want to hear a little bit of the two of you talking in episode one of Mr Eighty percent. I think I just took it to like. Like he actually died I would basically lose my best friend. This is my daughter Julia she's in college. Now they say like we're not your best friend like where your parents by. Having. Cancer means you get a preview of what your kid might say at your funeral. You're the funniest person I've ever met I. Think one of the most supportive and hardworking people I've ever met and. I also think you one of the most intense people I've ever met and you have a very impressive career, and so I always like looked up to that and by impressive you mean I have talked to Bj. Novak. You took me to Taylor concert. She gave me her bracelet, right? So. So that's a cut from Mr Eighty percent I'm here with Mr, with Shanahan and mark that's really touching moment. But say a little more about that because you make this, you spend a lot of time in this podcast talking about. The effect that this has on your entire family, and by the way the way your wife stepped up in heroic ways and supported you and this is a huge theme about in this story. It's true Anthony that You know you just can't anticipate something like this and and again it's the nature of this disease that you know. This was something that as my surgeon says, at some point in the podcast, you know when you're when you're treating. Prostate cancer patient, you're really treating the couple. And So Michelle had a heavy lift Michelle, your wife correct. I should say right Michelle. My Wife. And she was Extraordinary and But so it's a learning process. For she and then in terms of our children. You well, I Beckett we would like to get back into the podcast but your son as fifty s fifteen year old boy now and You know we wanted him to say, well, we're going to have to talk about our penises and that was. He he just wasn't willing to go there. So again, it's it is. You know we say in the podcast that you get the cancer but everybody's life changes and you know I I don't think that unless you go through something like this, you can really appreciate what that means but I. Certainly do i WanNa talk a little bit about Get get you to talk a little bit about the course of treatment that you opted to follow. So so walk us through first of all the options that you had to consider. When you were first diagnosed well. So we want to also say that because prostate cancer. So slow growing and because many men who are diagnosed are much older I think that people should think very very carefully before embarking on any treatment that there is something called active surveillance, which means we watch it we pay attention to it. And but but. For Myself I was young I had two kids. I had forty years may be to live and. I had a gleason score, which is a score after they give you your biopsy and take a look at what's happening they grade basically of the severity of the intensity of your cancer in mind was seven. Out of ten that's considered to be intermediate I guess you know the options for me were to watch it to have surgery. Or to a radiate my prostate and. In, the end there have been enormous advances in the treatment of prostate cancer over just thirty years. If I had gotten prostate cancer fifty years ago. I. would be rough rough rough. And not just for me every man who had a prostatectomy which is surgical procedure to remove your prostate. before nine, hundred, eighty, two, left the hospital impotent every single Guy which is just incredible to me because nineteen eighty two is not that long ago. Right, it is incredible. So you went for the surgery but I did but that wasn't the end of your ordeal surgery. It turns out we learned didn't get all the cancer. So you had to go back and sign up for pretty radical course of hormone therapy, and this is really the most excruciating part of your journey to read into here about you describe it essentially as a kind of. Chemical. Castration. Well. Indeed and I don't just describe it that way. That's in fact what it is It removes the testosterone from your body and the reason that we do that is because it's the thing that feeds the cancer prostate cancer. Grows Thanks to to Saas thrown. So if you removed from your body to cells cancer cells week in some cases they die and then when they're at their weakest blast them with radiation. The problem is that when you take a testosterone out of a man's body it is a as you say excruciating I became a different person. ahead you know the the euphemism is mood swings. I didn't have mood swings had a I had tantrums and I will say that I was on the phone this morning, the guy who listened to the first three episodes of the podcast and. He. said, he'd never talked to anybody about his course blueprint and he was arrested he actually got arrested. Because a parking garage. because. He could he he got completely out of control. So it's scary. And and you know now as I sit here. There's you know at this surgery if if the prostate cancer should return, there is no surgery there is no radiation. Those are no longer alternatives. and. The prospect of more loop ron or any kind of hormone therapy is really terrifying

Prostate Cancer Cancer Mark Shanahan Mr Eighty Julia Michelle Testosterone Boston BJ Novak Taylor Anthony RON
Airbus' Ambitious Hydrogen Plans

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

07:18 min | 1 d ago

Airbus' Ambitious Hydrogen Plans

"I'm happy to welcome with me on the program senior editor, Guy Norris and tier to our France Bureau chief who as you surely know if you read ideation? Gregory is an expert in aerospace technology subjects to. This week, we are going to talk about three aircraft concepts that Abbas presented for the first time. They are very different from each other in many ways, but they do have one thing in common they are supposed to be powered by hydrogen. And Abbas Vision in the transformation of aviation into a greener more sustainable, future exciting ideas but lots of questions too. So let's take a step back I wonder if I can ask you to just walk us through the plans that Abbas. Presented this week. Sure So basically, there are three concept plaints. At the center of the city they called him supplies because none of them will actually be built but three directions that are going to be studied in depth. One of them is looks like turboprop aircraft to wing configuration. I think the maximum. Capacity would be around one hundred passengers. The other one. Sorry. The first one, I mentioned a because it would burn hydrogen in relatively conventional outside rented conventional. Engine turbines. The second concept plane is also conventional Tuban Wing country duration from be powered by two defense number props to defense money hydrogen. Again, capacity is between one, hundred, twenty, two, hundred passengers, and just like the first concept plane the shooting hydrogen attack is located at the rear of the fuselage and the third concept is definitely the most spectacular. It's a blended wing but. Again powered by defense. So often concepts contemplates both hundred ten. Engines but the big difference, the May feature of the sudden is the blend buddy consideration, which means you can much more optimize hide myrow dynamics, and you can also dispute passengers and fuel tanks. I, know much more efficient way in the in. So. Roughly speaking this, all three concepts that are is. Speaking about so we're we're kind of fifteen years right I mean they're talking about enter enter into service in twenty thirty five but already, they're making some very important technology choices you mentioned liquid hydrogen for instance can just walk Ciragan. You know what are the steps that are coming up in between now and twenty, thirty five so between now one, twenty, thirty, five, the and again, twenty thirty five is the plant date for entry to service our first main Maislin if she wishes twenty twenty-five by then they expect to have majored some technology bricks as they. Call them to choose from and they would launch a program in twenty, twenty, seven or twenty, twenty eight. So that would be a food program for the Industrial Program between or twenty degrees and would would be very, very informative for us to follow is the next five years they plan to do several demonstrations. So they will demonstrate that technology bricks such as hydrogen storage, for example, and one of the most demonstration projects is about hydrogen storage and distribution they were stopped on the ground, but they also plan some instructional on the sorry in the era in. which could be quite a spectacular and they plan quite. Surprised by this, they plan to start with gaseous hydrogen storage demonstration before moving to liquid, and as they seem to have made a choice ready for liquid hydrogen meet surprised by the fact, they are going to also test guess. So Guy. Abbas. Seems to be really enthusiastic about this and it's kind of came out of nowhere but it came a bit of as a surprise to me. That's enthusiasm isn't really shared by everyone in an industry particularly in the engine industry they're still seem to be quite some serious reservations about this. So can you tell us what what what you're hearing? Yeah Hi there. It's basically a very is a very interesting time because, of course, the engine manufacturers like the fray manufactures they're all facing this kind of cliff of how do we meet the sustainability targets in really thirty years seems like a long time but but in the aerospace business, it's really not They've got. So they've they've been approaching this idea of whether to adopt the new transformational approach. Mostly based on alternative fuels, which would be dropping into the existing kind of infrastructure, the existing propulsion designs and the existing tube and wing configurations that the framers of loved and developed and perfected for the past fifty years all nor so you can imagine that there is a bit of a shock going on here to how do we suddenly move all of that towards a hydrogen based ecosystem. Of course, the other thing is that they've saying, well, you know we have been that before we've studied this, we started in the nineteen fifties, for example, more based for military type applications again, in the seventy s during the fuel crisis when they the first global fuel crisis and again in the nineties when there was the first glimmers of the emerging environmental issues this time of course, it's different as you both said, you know the there is a driving force has never been there before, and of course, the the French government tying the. Incentive. Package really to sustainability is the big decision making sort of driver on this. So you know the fact that. There's much more urgent need now is is changing the game, but doesn't change the fact that there is seventy years of history of safety and certification and development behind a no operational cycle around kerosene people know how to handle it. They know how to certify it, and this is a whole new ballgame. So why would you know bus get buy in from the other industry participants if that wasn't possible for one reason or another over the past? Several decades well I mean one of the thunder, the reasons that time does move on and technology has improved. They're all ways of coping now as a couple of ways to look at it. One is from a big picture perspective. The big challenge that a lot of them see both in and out of aerospace is the fact that they feed stalking. The actual production of hydrogen has to be done in a sustainable way to make this entire equation balance

Abbas Tuban Wing Senior Editor Guy Norris France Bureau Gregory Ciragan Stalking
Pregnant woman rescues husband from shark attack in Florida

Mojo In The Morning

02:08 min | 2 d ago

Pregnant woman rescues husband from shark attack in Florida

"Would you guys jump into water to rescue your spouse from a shark attack? Would you do that? But no I would drown. Species of shark are we talking. There are species of sharks quickly calculate. Yeah. It depends on what kind of shark. Attack you instantly when you hit the war a thirty year old pregnant woman pregnant woman. Oh my gosh of course. Did this she actually jumped in to save Oh, the I thought the pregnant woman was in the water she jumped in to save her S.. Nine. One one, where is your emergency? Only. Way You can bring him in. You know there's nobody can bring a four mile drive bleeding control now. Controlled big taken out of his shoulder. This was in the Florida keys. The pregnant woman was there vacationing with her her husband and with mom and she jumped into the water to hunching punching punching on the short Johnny get it off. The white whose pregnant and a friend immediately jumped in and ran to him and helped get back to this short community came over his right shoulder and just clamped down on his right shoulder and then started shaking violently took him down water. The Guy by the way survived he's still alive. He actually airlifted to a hospital in Miami from the Florida keys and the pregnant wife is now a hero because she jumped into the water to save them you know what? I. Would Tell you that. I would do that for my pregnant wife. No you would do it for your wife pregnant or not pregnant I want answer moment. Of course you know Mojo she's not GonNa know if you do it or not. You just say, yes of course, I'm I'm cheesy take sharks she's not GonNa know that you didn't jump in a stand on this one here only if she's pregnant, would I jump in the water for her I just want everybody to know that

Johnny Florida Miami
The Shade Room: Pros & Cons

The Nod

06:12 min | 4 d ago

The Shade Room: Pros & Cons

"In a world filled with Daesh ously bountiful boss of headlines and videos that screen world saw the shave room has taken instagram by storm in two thousand fourteen Joachim. Wanda start at the shade room after realizing she can use her love for celebrity gossip to practice her writing. But after hating ten thousand followers you want to realize she was on something. Today, the Shade Room has over twenty million followers on instagram and features regular commentary from celebrities like the descent Nicki. menaj and Ti that last part is what makes the Shade Room truly unique outside of twitter it's pretty rare for celebrities and everyday people to have so many interactions with those blurred lines are also what makes the Shade Room? So controversial whether it's making Ziya, Wade owner of harmful comments or the legal back and forth with Cardi B. When it comes to boundaries, things can get ugly. So today we brought on journalist and author George. M Johnson to help us figure out if the Shane Room is good or bad for the culture. Thank you me. I'm excited. You know the showroom has built an empire. Moving celebrity gossip here's what's your take on the importance of celebrity gossip. Gossip. It kind of is what keeps your career going on social media wise. As media has shifted from red carpets to kind of step of house, you can kind of create your own `Paparazzi. Kylie Jenner. Day. The. Whole Light Brown skinned girl only. Even though it was big, it kept her name out there viability for twenty hours on. Sale somewhere absolutely down, I think that celebrity gossip in general is fun I. Think it just gives me something to think about. Everyday life especially, these days I'm like recently has gotten dark I will say. The thing that? Has To be say. For the most part, it can be fun. I think that there is a difference between having good fun and that exposing like the more vulnerable aspects of somebody's life four laps, all that being said, what's actually start our. Conversation today with the pros. So you our guest you welcome to start off with the pros at Oh i. Froze are that the platform very very large and When they are used for good, can generate a lot of money especially to light nonprofit organizations are community based organizations and especially small businesses. I think a lot times sites will amplify. Small black businesses or business owners were creating things and it literally opens you up to people to support your products i. think in ways when you utilize your platform to uplift. And encourage and support resources in things that are out there for black folks I think that's something that more of. These types of sites can start to do. Now that's the point I do wonder what percentage like if you actually did, what percentage of share on posts are act I kind of lean towards the lifted Maybe one out of every fifteen. Twenty. That's something I. Think if I'm considering what my pro is I think the showroom actually does what I consider a pretty exceptional jobs documenting how black people use the Internet, black folks have. In DEX on social media, you know we are on twitter. So much is referred to as black twitter. This thing that all kind of white corporate executives are trying to figure out and the share room kind of will break down those pieces before black people like I think about the the not obeying video that came out recently. Day aware she. Fucking Bang. Not A. wakeup talking about not obeying and I'm like what is going on and I knew that I can go to the shave room and it will break down who made it why popular all the means they had developed all around it and I think that actually can be a big service like I don't know of too many other places that are talking about. The way. Black people use the Internet and social media like the share room us. Come along with a whole lot of other stuff. Absolute. Auto. I think that this shade room is a reliable platform for black celebrity. A celebrity period is is celebrity gossip every single celebrity whether they want to admit it or not they benefit from the celebrity height machine and that gossip like gossip mechanism the shade room does is provide back black celebrities who are frequently shut out of your us. Weekly's people magazine's it's a place. Where you know a black celebrity knows that somebody is GonNa care who they are what they're doing whether they are selling Tommy T or in the case of the simone dry like usually I like to keep some of the scams but I can be some old was I can go on the find out but also Michelle Obama gives a speech at the Democratic National Convention. Even if I missed it. Yeah NPR. Have NBC. SHAVER. Remarks on that to the thirty years from now we look back. The Oscars, the grammys, the emmys, the institutions that don't frequently reward black talent. We might look back did not see an accurate reflection of what was happening in the culture, our culture at the time American culture at the time. But this Shade Room Shave is GonNa Habit accurate count black people the culture and shaver actually documents a wide variety of black people and I think that's a good thing. Archive of like everything going on black. That's a good point. It's an interesting slice.

Shade Room Twitter Shane Room Instagram People Magazine Joachim Kylie Jenner Wanda Oscars Ziya George Nicki. Menaj NBC M Johnson Wade Shaver Michelle Obama NPR Tommy T
CBO's Current Projections Don't Look Good

What A Day

01:19 min | 5 d ago

CBO's Current Projections Don't Look Good

"So the congressional. Budget Office released a forecast for the united. States for the next thirty years of economic growth and well, it doesn't look great. Cove. It is a big reason why so big picture deaths are way up and births are way down CBO is forecasting eleven million fewer people in the US and twenty twenty-fifty than in previous estimates declining population seems like something proper immigration policy could fix but I'm sleep. So outside of the covert bump, US deaths are up the report points to increasing deaths from Alzheimer's suicides and drug overdoses but also fertility is going down and CPO says that in the short term, this cove related, but it was already trending downward before the pandemic and now onto the money, the national debt in this country is growing and by twenty fifty CBO believes it will be twice the size of the. Entire yearly economy. That's because of the massive amounts of spending we're doing right now about the pandemic and then in later years if interest rates go up, that could start to pile on top of the debt for now though the Federal Reserve which sets interest rates has said they will keep them near zero for at least the next three years. But this is the kind of thing that down the road could threaten things like social security for those who rely on it most IMP. Republicans call for cuts the also projects income inequality to grow. That's because income's for the wealthy are expected to grow faster than the rest of us and their overall tax rates won't what else is new?

CBO United States Budget Office CPO Federal Reserve Alzheimer
Have You Forgotten Your Friends?

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

04:37 min | 5 d ago

Have You Forgotten Your Friends?

"By, the end of this hour we're hoping to inspire you to pick up the phone and reconnect with a friend. You've lost touch with just a phone call, but hopefully a new start for your friendships and hopefully those of you who haven't made the call in six years ten years twelve will get the nerve from this show to pick up the. Phone and reconnect as one woman wrote us a true best friend nurtures the soul and that couldn't be more Trooper Anna and Regina their bond save their lives during World War Two they help each other survived the Nazi death camps and they were only young girls at the time, and now as women they a bond that so strong they consider themselves sisters. I came into the camp was eleven was nineteen, ninety, two I was a long line I don't know why. CAN'T And side. Little go nothing. It was the beginning of a friendship that would last for sixty years in the midst of death and suffering in the concentration camps of Poland and Germany. They were two little girls reaching out for each other that was looking for somebody. To. Be Nice because I didn't have no matter no more I didn't have no fad I. didn't have no family look for each other one could. We're not supposed to go from one back to the other sometimes I, would go in they say hi and then she would be afraid they're going to do something to me. She would succeed give up give out the two girls were separated several times when one girl was shipped to another camp heard it like animals onto cattle, cars, but fate drew them together each time we'll want so many cans wouldn't again too wide. Say Anything of course we should communicate. Was, then to Bruce I had. Half Time. So I was. So Hang I was yanked I needed food. Sites. To Steal from the dog, Regina had smuggled a loaf of bread with her and even though she was hungry, Regina risked her life to share it with her friend. When I saw I rapped the play. Talwar to hey. And votes. killed. I forgive put we went to well. I so what? People just Within weeks they were scheduled to be guest but liberation came I lost in the chaos they never knew if they would see each other again they were separated once more they both married and began families, and after years apart fate Ju- them together again, they discover dot only had they both resettle in the united. States. But actually we're living in the same Boston neighborhood just blocks from each other. Clam to the same street. Trout Chink hours so We're boats that shock. After the war was over a wonderful friends, their friendship grew deeper as the years passed we cannot sit and talk about those things to allow the people's because even even to my kids, this is the bond between us. It's concentration. Can I cherish? Come forget what? What fifty sixty years. If I before she dies before we we're gonNA still love each out. And an-and Regina stories featured in the book. Best Friends. Now, where's Judy night duty I, hear you had a best friend since you were what? By five five years old but you haven't seen each other more than thirty. Thirteen thirty years, thirty years really cracked and the reason for that is. We just don't find the time. I. Guess We make excuses for it and we've just never. Merged our time together to make it work. What you do talk you do communicate we communicate through letters. We've been pound pals for over forty years. and. Where does she live and where you live she lives in like Huntington, New York and I live in Naperville Illinois. Wow. Never a Greyhound bus between you. Never, would you recognize her if you saw her on the street I would hope so through photographs but I don't know. What does she look like? Last. I knew she had long blond hair. Very pretty face does she look like anybody here? Not that I see right now okay. Stand up look around take the audience know. Right there. Say. Anti.

Regina Bruce I Trooper Anna Boston JU Judy Germany Illinois Naperville Huntington Poland New York
Hank Aaron: Breaking the Home Run Record

Black History in Two Minutes

01:55 min | Last week

Hank Aaron: Breaking the Home Run Record

"On April Eighth Nineteen seventy four Atlanta Braves outfielder Henry Louis Aaron better known as Hank, his seven hundred fifteenth home run finally breaking the record of the legendary Babe Ruth like everyone else in the country I've been following errands pursuit of the record since the previous season. He played in the Negro Leagues in the Early Nineteen Fifties, and now here he was just two home runs away new but the excitement was undercut by a sense of alarm as errands quest unleashed a torrent of vicious racism baseball is the quintessential American sport. Now, an African American, a dark skinned black man challenging the power, the supremacy of baseball and of white men. That's why the hate mail death threats bomb threats. This was driving a stake at the heart of American culture. Has All this made you more aware than you're a black baseball player? I've never forgotten. Later, he would confess that he was afraid. He wouldn't live long enough to break the record. Then at the start of the nineteen, seventy, four season. All. Of all. Errands triumph was electrified By the end of his Major League career nine, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, six, he had hit a total of seven hundred and fifty five home runs. Errands record would stand for more than thirty years. The braves retired his number and he was elected to the hall of fame. To. This Day Hank Aaron is considered one of baseball's greatest players.

Baseball Hank Henry Louis Aaron Braves Babe Ruth Major League
Update On The Leadership Conference In Sweden

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:46 min | Last week

Update On The Leadership Conference In Sweden

"The world is ripe and ready for restarting and looking ahead. So where better to get a clear and uninterrupted view than from the eastern Swiss Alps and that is the setting for the chiefs. Monaco's. Conference which welcomes visionaries, founders and industry leaders for look ahead how business and indeed the whole world could move forward from here well. Is, tyler lay and he students all through the day's event at Subaru in summer. It's and I'm delighted to say he's taken a moment out of the conference to join us now to tell us what is happening where he is tyler apart from the obvious attraction from the chairlift right to an Alpine dinner, it must feel good to bring people together again. Good afternoon. Good afternoon Emma absolutely, and I think that has been one of the probably. Comment people just feel so good to be out in the world again and just meeting people in a setting which feels pretty normal I. I don't think there's much going on here that would make you think otherwise that we are still in in the midst of course cases rising in Europe, we have Orrin teams being imposed and and and borders also going up as well. So I I think that is. One of the people are just happy to be together and be listening to great ideas and and and I think also to be challenged. A little bit as well. We'll Tennessee little bit more about these challenges because people are coming together facing momentous challenges. What is it the world trying to focus on here? Well number, we just had a failed bomb nora failed bomb is the CEO of vitro. Of course, one of the world's most respected design brands I imagine in many many listeners right now are right likely sitting on a beatrice AU faux or chair or stool or in front of a desk. Here's a business, which is which is completely focused on the topic of what is going to happen to our city centers you know will work from home account for fifty percent of the workforce is going to be twenty percent. So we tackle that issue. It. With her and it was interesting. You know she was talking about are we may be moving into a world of spoke Yes. They'll be a main office in a city that will there almost almost More like owned and operated co working spaces where people come together. So that was one topic but then we just had a our he's the head of the the intermeshed. With the Red Cross and the and he was looking at at the current crises. The fact that we have a pandemic Emma but of course, get thirty messy parts of the world is he talks about this hasn't gone away and he's just a literally almost fresh off the plane from a mission in Mali, And Burkina into Hell region. What I find interesting is is the names of the people you've gathered that. We oversee have world of of of of vitro, but then. We have the head of security policy in the Swiss Federal Department of Defence Civil Protection and sport you mentioned now we have the head of the red. Cross. These are figures from the world of dealing with emergencies. Does that reflect the kind of times that we're in? Will it does because you're going to have an informed view about about risk and where the world is going. Then I think you do need people who are at the pointy end that that point he and might be how is a small but very economically successful. Country like Switzerland, how is it going to navigate geopolitical issues that wide Switzerland potentially need forty new fighter aircraft at a time when people talk of drones and and country, which is known as being neutral, and at the same time, you also want to hear from someone who's the head of risk for one of the biggest banks who can of course, apply some of these elements as well to a of. Course, the end consumer, the person who wants to go in byproducts from that that bank and how does that impact your day to day? How are we able to look ahead at the moment I mean is what we're talking about today stuff that we need to deal with at that pointy end in the next six months to one year or is there any sense yet that people can sink a little further ahead? Well I think actually North Alabama interesting because someone else oppose a similar question about short-term. What are you doing right now with marketing just how do you look at advertising? How do you promote a brand right now how do you stay top of mind and then what you do long term and her response with where we're a family company from Basel we have time and and so of course, we continue to develop an invest in great furniture and we and we take we take a long-term view. And yes you also have to be mindful of of the realities of up today as well. I mean is she's a little later on the conference to be talking about. The chiefs as a future when you talk about sustainability. And yesterday, the president of the European commissioners of a funder line was saying that we will rebuild our way out as a covert pundit DEMOC following an entirely green agenda. But when you have things like you know you're orderbook isn't as full as it should be your staff coming back from furlough and you're thinking, how am I going to make it through the next six months and people are saying actually you need to be green a you need to think about this you need to think about that. The priorities become quite quite challenging they. Absolutely. And I think that you know that that is one of the topics I mean, how much does you could talk about sustainability all you want but you know does. Your does your program, which of course has the best intentions is that we need to take a back seat for because you know that was going to involve retooling your factory. You knew that it was going to actually mean of course, upping the prices or accepting a more expensive supply chain, and maybe that has to get not kicking the grass necessarily, but it maybe has to drift out maybe three years I according to your plan and i. think that is also something we've heard you today is well, if if you're going to do these things aren't easy a lot of his. Let's walk at first before we talk and try to either talk green credentials are sustainability agenda and I think actually on that probably the one thing that I think is really coming out of the conference so far I'm as is. Being a by the let's let's let's invest in things that last And it really interesting to hear. You have MS failed I'm talking about you know if you go and buy an eames chair and I believe you're probably sitting in an email chair right now if I know it studio you're in. Those comes with a thirty year guarantee. Extraordinary and you know that has to be now and again you know is the entire chair perfectly sustainable no but it's not going to be in in five years either it's absolutely not in it's been comfortable for very long time finally looking into this afternoon. You're taking the floor talking to us about a few things that have caught your eye that you like and that if it's inspired you I mean we we have to be lifted out of this somehow what are you talking about them? Well. After lunch I I do a spin around the world and of course, the look at some things that yeah. Basic things that I that I experienced in everyday life, which which I think are are interesting that we we might need we might need more of so and I think probably one thing I was going to slide them. And you'll appreciate this. There's a lot of Austria and they're the world maybe needs a little bit. You know even though of course I'm standing in Switzerland at the moment. But if I if I look across the the mountains look across the border I know that Austria lies beyond and there's definitely whether it's brands whether it's the urban interventions that the world needs a little bit more Austria it full of wisdom of real and I'm just Sitting next to our affairs at a Christian mccue is half Australian I've never seen warranties thumbs up in all my days time. Thank you so much.

Switzerland Chiefs Tyler Austria Swiss Alps Subaru Monaco Europe Basel Emma Red Cross Swiss Federal Department Of De Beatrice Au Nora Tennessee Mali Orrin CEO North Alabama
How the North Bay Became 'Wine Country'

Bay Curious

03:48 min | Last week

How the North Bay Became 'Wine Country'

"To answer Michael's question about when wine country got start and how it became. So popular, we brought in reporter Christopher Beale Hey Christopher Hay alluvia. So let's start with when wine grapes were first planted in the North Bay. When was that all the way back in eighteen twenty three the Spanish created a mission in Sonoma's. It's the first place where grapes were intentionally planted in wine country but the wine made from these grapes was Sacramento Kinda like alcoholic. Grape juice used in church, not what we would recognize as wine, and then in eighteen thirty s some of the early European settlers in the NAPA sonoma valleys would have grown some basic wine grapes as well. Now, when does the wine country that we think of today start to take shape for the sake of the story let's start in eighteen forty California is ten years from entering the Union and this guy named Charles Krug arrives in San Francisco. Crew was a German after the revolutions of eighteen, forty eight in Europe the comes into San Francisco. It was the editor of a German language newspaper in San Francisco. That's Jim Lapsley he managed agricultural continuing education at UC Davis for more than thirty years with focus on wine-making. Now, after a few years in San Francisco Charles Krug gets married and ended up as a dowry getting quite a bit of land. This is the area just North of Santa Lena where the Charles Krug winery is located considered. It'd be the first commercial winery in Napa Valley. The wine country story is really one about marketing and innovation, and this Guy Charles crew gets credit for a lot of the early innovation and wine country including being the first to use a cider press, which is kind of like a slotted barrel to press wine grapes before that grapes were generally crushed by people's feet. When California entered the union, it was a place where we could grow grapes because the climate was quite similar to the southern Mediterranean. It was dry during the summer it had wet winters and differ grew very well here in California. For, is a species of grapevine. It's used to make wine after the early success of pioneers like Cruyff people began to plant grapes and produce more wind and the NAPA and sonoma valleys. But this was still considered low quality table wine and it continued to represent only a fraction of the US market mainly because it was still cheaper for east coast consumers to import wine. From Europe by boat, then from California by train. But that all changed in eighteen, seventy five, the US government stepped in and increase the tax on imported European wines to twenty cents a gallon which leveled the financial playing field for California's wine producers, and as a result, the wines dig it imported from Europe can be much more expensive wines and oak wine that was everyday drinking. That became the from California. Now. It wasn't a linear march from this moment today. The wind industry suffered a few major setbacks over the years but one way or another managed to survive them. Here's a few of the important ones I wine country was almost destroyed by bugs in the eighteen seventies. This is a microscopic bug that eats the roots of wine grapes. It's related to an eighth fit in it's called. PHILOXENIA. And when it arrived in wine country, it destroyed the vineyards to kill the vineyards and the only way could really come up with a solution was to plant on grafted vines the bottom, the rootstock would be a native variety and then on top graft with Vida's Benifica.

California San Francisco Charles Krug Europe Napa Charles Krug Winery Union Sonoma United States Guy Charles Napa Valley North Bay Christopher Beale Michael Reporter Jim Lapsley Christopher Hay Santa Lena Cruyff Vida
Are your employees coping with this ok?

Hacking Your Leadership

02:29 min | Last week

Are your employees coping with this ok?

"Are For this week's episode Arnold talking about something called terror management theory. Is a social psychology theory created more than thirty years ago by Professor Jeff Greenberg at the University of Arizona it basically says that when facing our own mortality, we've human beings attempt to eliminate the associated feelings of terror by doubling down on the values. We already hold specifically the ones that had meaning to our lives and by investing in people who seem to subscribe to those same values. Great so is on a leadership podcast. Will. Because over the last six months covid nineteen is forced millions of us to face our on mortality. And ERTA lesson those feelings of dread. Every one of US subconsciously is doing things that allow us to feel like we're valuable contributors to a meaningful world. After. All. If I'm an important worker, an entrepreneur, a teacher, a scientist, a doctor apparent. I'm much more capable of believing that some part of me will carry on after death that might impact might be enduring. Because of Corona virus were reminded of death all the time. This will react in ways that support the values we already hold dear and will gravitate towards leaders whose actions appear to support those values to. It also means people who already have a difficult time believing they contribute value to a meaningful world or even though we live in a meeting for wall to begin with are likely struggling. The more people struggle with this, the less likely to be successful at mitigating those feelings of terror and the more likely they are to interpret difficult but manageable situations, tasks and responsibilities as overwhelming. These people will also need to assign blame and because assigning blame to the cause of their actual fears isn't really helpful. They'll find people to blame for the frustrations they experience in those overwhelming situations, tasks and responsibilities think about your current group of direct reports I bet there's one or two of fit this bill. By turning on the news, we can see the negative impact of this phenomenon on the growing political divide in America but not taking into account can also undermine your ability to lead support develop your team. If your leader a people and what you're hearing now is resonating with you. The first thing to do is really understand that everyone deals with mortality differently and should try to meet your people where they are rather than having the same expectations of their grit as you did a year ago. And I think people should be let off the hook for the expectations of their job when people have a job to do the expectations to get done are perfectly appropriate even during a pandemic. But I'm saying is that some people who were able to move through challenges with easy year-ago might need a bit more compassion now and leaders who provide it will have the teams who bounced back the quickest months. The fears truly gone.

United States Professor Jeff Greenberg University Of Arizona Arnold Scientist America
Dream Boy And The Poison Fans

Rough Translation

05:23 min | Last week

Dream Boy And The Poison Fans

"By the time that Emily Fangs reporting this story in March, the controversy around this actor at already gotten so hot that many of his fans refused to talk to a reporter others asked to speak in ways that would not reveal their true identities. NPR, by the way has very strict standard on this, you have to reasonably expect harm to your person or livelihood, and they met the standard there been retributive attacks and death threats. But we're GONNA start our story before all that back when Xiaojun was getting more endorsements than almost any idol in China is twenty eight tall and thin with Pale skin big eyes and understand the role he played in Chinese pop culture. You can look to the TV ads that were scripted with his image in mind. Mike Emily showed me this ad for Esti Lipstick So it starts in this. Hotel lobby most is really warm. Golden Sojourn appears the top of the staircase. He looks down and sees one beautiful woman in the crowd. She looks quite unsure of herself. He, sees this woman. And he can tell you quickens his steps who walks down the staircase briskly and it looks like he's about to approach her. But instead he grabbed golden balloon and he sends it her way with a package attached. The balloon didn't inside is surprise and estee louder lipstick which puts on an all of a sudden. She has confidence she struts out and she takes position on stage in front of a microphone. And you sojourn the crowd, he begins to clap for her and everyone else begins to clap her. As the woman smiles. They're selling the image of him as someone who helps others and to as helper of beauty he's too good to be human. But he's always there helping others be their best selves. Really Shapes. Shenzhen's millions of fans. See Him looks very clean. Looks. Very decent. He looks very gentle. This is an we're calling by her initials is E. IMA passer. Yes life I have never seen someone look at it. Is. E is thirty years old married. and. She was about to become the mother when I talked to her. So she has not the typical style Jonathan? Savage John Fans are usually single women young teenagers, teenagers likely in middle school or high school is e says that. This kind of connector to her friends because they always have something to talk about show. Good looks. And also there is a another reason is because I feel when people are pursuing I'll say when they're Authorian cert- can kind of celebrity they must have fun something in the celebrity that way don't have our self. So is he describes herself as very frank, a very frank and outspoken person maybe even a little harsh and one of the things she ended these most in South Asia is his gentleness so that I feel that is something I want to learn from him because John is portrayed a sweet person. He also needs protection because that gentleness can be taken advantage of in his fans need to. Be the ones who stand up for him here is where China's Fan Culture and actually Asian Fan Culture in general it kind of veers away from even the most intense fan behavior in the West because a lot of fancy it as their job, even their responsibility, not just to admire their idol and to support him but to go so much further. So is he talks about how in these? Media groups, some of which will have hundreds of thousands of followers. Each there are something called a child Wa. So sopra topic, what's called Super Topic or Toha, and which some of the lead fans who devote hours a day to organizing this fans structure, we'll give orders to. Fans beneath them about what they need to achieve for that day. So today, we're all going to click on this one music video and watch it or today we're all going to buy products from this brand because they've signed an endorsement deal with children. Say the broadcaster from the Child Watt who say today when you to do this today when you to do that so you remember that Estee Lauder ad for lipstick according to Chinese media estee Lauder Botox, pitched show in two thousand eighteen sold out not only within the first day of their release but within the first. Hour. Totalling almost six million dollars in sales, and then back on the fan club sites, fans would celebrate what they saw as their success. It's IMMA fine. You want to support your idol by making here she gets the most brand endorsements and makes the most money on behalf of these companies. I get I get what Xiaojun gets out of this he gets. And success money what fans get out of making him. So successful by being particularly influential fan of Superfan you also get a lot of power and influence the majority of his fans are going to be. Young girls in their middle school or high school years. So in real life, they're not going to have a lot of power in Chinese society. But by being a part of this fan group, you become part of this very powerful commercial

Mike Emily Xiaojun John Fans China Estee Lauder Emily Fangs Estee NPR Estee Lauder Botox Reporter Shenzhen South Asia Jonathan West Watt
How Do I Do the Baby Steps on Disability?

Ramsey Call of the Day

04:45 min | Last week

How Do I Do the Baby Steps on Disability?

"Eddie's weathers in Salt Lake City Hi Eddie how can we help? Rachel. Talked to you today you to what's up. Well I I'm wondering how my baby step journey actually is going to look I. most of my. Is actually from disability income. and I've somehow managed to make myself to pass baby sent three gut and. Now, I'm looking at. Trying to save for. The future and possibly by home Do you make a smaller earned income so I'm able to contribute to A. Roth IRA. But. I'm just Kinda wondering that doesn't quite get me to the fifteen percents. And I'm wondering how to do that and balance three be at the same time. On this kind of income. So what is your income? Make about. Forty eight, thousand from disability. What is the nature of your disability? blind blind. Okay. All. Right and who pays. Its from a workplace insurance policy thought I was actually injured on the job my goodness I'm sorry. Are you have you lost one hundred percent of your side or just most of it? Good Chunk of it. I still have. Some people would call functional being able to see. Some objects just no find detail at all just generally you can walk around the room but but but the idea of opening up a website and looking at it's off the off the off the out of the options. What are you doing for your extra earn money? I'm actually still teaching. On teaching. The subject that was trained in. So I was teaching chemistry. Able to do that still how That's so cool. How do you have been doing it for thirty? Years doing it all from memory. YEA, pretty? Much. Okay. All right and you got the lesson plans in Braille or whatever have you learned Braille I have some adaptable software Screen thing okay. Well, good and then after thirty five years off thing or two about it. Yeah. Yeah. That's promising. That's promising. Okay. Cool. Well, the reason I ask all these questions is on your right you can you you know you're doing good and how long ago was the accident? Seven years ago. Okay. How old are you? forty, seven you're over your and overcoming man you've been getting it I'm proud of you and your your impression. Thank you. So I, mean because that's a life altering to say the least and some people just get paralyzed and you just kept rolling man good for you. All right. So how much do you make teaching Eddie? Kind of. It's been as little as about. Nine thousand. And it's been as much as about thirteen. It's all depend on. You know how much I get person master? Okay. Yeah while say because between that and your disabilities or are you are you married kids family situation? Not just me. Okay. Well, I was GONNA say that's a relatively. Average income. That's the positive part is how to do the steps in disability is that people are doing it with this amount of income they're just working their way through it. So if you wanted to pause baby step forward to do baby step three B and go ahead and save up that down payment, you could for a short period of time just kind of accelerate that and actually get that quick win faster than if you were putting your money into that Roth Ira so you could do that as an option. Yeah. I agree I think you're getting there. Let me tell you what I'm hearing I'm hearing you got. Big Future ahead of you. And you've been through hell and so it might be harder for you to grasp that future but. I think I think you could do it I think you could I think you could do tutoring. Thank you. Could you might double your income If you push around and think about this a little bit you don't have to but you're just a survivor man I mean you've gotten after it. I'm so proud of you. So I would be continuing to think about ways you could do the teaching because you know your stuff like you said and anything you can do to get your income up, of course, accelerates all of these issues.

Eddie Roth Ira Salt Lake City Rachel
The Dignity of Work

Accelerate Your Business Growth

04:57 min | Last week

The Dignity of Work

"Guest today is Audie pen audience the principal owner of Audie Penn Consulting. He's been working in consulting for thirty years providing different services to several fortune fifty companies in diverse industries and organizations. Is Approach is a lean transformation by applying coaching. Training and project facilitation with local teams securing solid. Foundation. Audie has been most notable as a global consultant where he combines tactical leadership skills with pro processed focused improvements. Some of his clients are Caterpillar John. Deere. Martin Marietta and Han thanks so much for joining me today Audie. Thanks for having me Diane I'm looking forward to our conversation today. I am as well and we're GONNA be talking about culture in in business you know the impact that it has in. Most likely. Spending some significant amount of time talking about the current situation we were in an I had said in the introduction These episodes are evergreen and they are I think no matter when people listen to them. They're gonNA valuable information and We are recording this. I would love to say like toward the end but I'm not quite sure where we are with the whole covid nineteen pandemic and. So while there are things that leaders are going through and employees are going through therefore, companies right now I'm pretty confident that we're going to be talking about. Translates. No matter what the environment is that company finds itself. Absolutely Yep. Okay. So to start if we could. With you providing us with. A description of. Talking about the impact of organizational culture on business performance. The idea that comes to mind there is is a recent discovery of my own and I'll. I'll frame it in this language often I find. Organizations. Are Struggling with their lean or operational excellence deployments and there's a statistic that gets kicked around quite often that seventy to ninety percent of operational excellence. ORLEAN deployments end up in failure. and. My initial response to that was well, they're doing it incorrectly I need to understand why they're doing it incorrectly but I think, I've I've actually adjusted that language to not incorrectly but incompletely in, there's the connection to your question. And for me, the connection is we can do process improvement very well. But. If the rest of the organization is disconnected, the sponsors of the leadership level or the management level of process owners, then we can't sustain or continue to find ways to improve those processes in it seemed like we just continue to solve the same problems over and over again. That is so interesting. Okay. So, if I inherit you right. company decided they want to go through process improvement some area of the business, but they don't necessarily have. Complete buy in from everyone involved. So they go through the process and then everyone walks away. They go back to the way things were. Yes. Okay. So that feels to me like. The in has to start at the very top and then has to be pushed down is that A fair assessment. I would say, yes, there's there's one word though that mutiny short that is pushed because. When those sponsors and it's language that I use to refer to leaders when when leaders actually show up? and. They're clear what their organizations about what's important It's easy for organizations to align to that and questions that I ask often is how many of you came to work today to fail And no one answers the question. Yes. So I always say, well, if that's true of us, don't you think that's true of everyone in our organization we fail them by not being clear about talking about what's important.

Audie Audie Penn Consulting Deere Principal Martin Marietta Consultant Diane HAN
The Lifequake Survival Guide With Bruce Feiler

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:01 min | Last week

The Lifequake Survival Guide With Bruce Feiler

"All right well, nice to see you. Thanks for doing this my pleasure. Thank you for having. What how would you describe the the thesis of this book? Debating whether I should start right with a thesis or tell you how I came to the pieces. So. I think I'll do the second way because. I didn't go into this project with pieces, but a big linking pieces showed up halfway through. So what happened what led me into this? Somebody's what this book is. About is how we deal with these big wrenching changes in our lives back hallway light quake. And like what we're in now. And I got interested in these because I went through a life quake some years ago as you know, I I got cancer as a new TAB. About was that same year as the great recession and my family was hit very hard. And then my dad who has Parkinson's Lost Control of his mind. This was a man who was never a depressed admitted his life. And he tried to take his life. Times in twelve weeks. And this was kind of a big crisis. In every way, you can have a crisis, the conversations that we had to have. unhabitable eye like difficult conversations and these were difficult conversations that were impossible to have. But I'm the story guy and I'm the meaning guy in one morning on Monday morning I woke up and I said, well, your idea like what if I send my data question because my dad was always a bit of a storyteller. And I sent question like what toys did you play with a kid? Couldn't move his fingers at this point Dan. But he thought about it all week he dictated his answer to Syria who spit it out he began to edit it in at work and so I. Also another one like dummy balance you grumpy. And This went on essentially every Monday morning for what became years. Up. The. Hatch Become Eagle Scout. How'd you join the Navy how you meet mom and this man who had never written anything longer than three sentence memo in his life back into writing a fifty thousand word. And I got very interested in times of crisis in our lives like it. It's a narrative event in some way and it turns out there's a whole field narrative gerontology. There's all field of narrative adolescence, narrative medicine and kind of storytelling becoming kind of thing that people talked about at that time and so what happened and you know this makes me think of your own life and how you ended up in this conversation is when I began to tell the story to people everybody had a similar story. My wife had a headache and went to the hospital and died my daughter tried to kill herself. I. had nervous breakdown on my television in your case and and I thought well, no one else to tell their story anymore and. Let me see what I can figure out because people were saying like the life I'm living is not the life I expect like I'm living life out of order in some way. And I call my wife one night and I said. I got to figure out how to help. And I don't know I'm going GonNa find and I don't know how to do it but I feel compelled to do this and so I set out on this journey. What became Three four years crisscrossing the country collecting what became hundreds of life stories of Americans all ages all walks of life all fifty states and you name it damn. People lost homes, lost limbs, changed careers, genders, Religions got. Sober got a bad marriages. And at the end of it, I had it was powerful, but it was too much. I had six thousand pages of. Transcripts a thousand hours of interviews and I ended up doing something. I've never done thirty years of writing books. I got a whole team of people and we spent a year coating these. Combing through them debating I'm kind of beating one against the head trying to figure out. What was the big message? What was the big theme coming out of it?

DAN Parkinson Headache Syria
interview with Dr Mike Schneider

Moving2Live

04:59 min | 2 weeks ago

interview with Dr Mike Schneider

"Dr Schneider. Thank you for taking time to talk to Pittsburgh Philip PG and moving to live. Sure my pleasure. Guess the first question I. Want to ask because I was I made aware of you because I'm also guilty of these silo knowledge is. You see somebody in the elevator, what's your thirty second elevator Spiel of who are you or what you do Yes. So my elevators. I am a chiropractor by training working in a physical therapy department doing back pain research on a full-time basis. And I know I wanNA touch briefly on how one goes from a career as a chiropractor seeing patients which I know you did for many years we won't say many many years and then you did Not, really a complete one eighty, but a big shift and decided to get a PhD. Briefly. How to do or why did you decide to go into chiropractic medicine and then what was the decision to kind of go and get some additional education and go from primarily patient care to doing research? Sure and I did do kind of a one eighty mid career so. Beginning back to why they go into Chiropractic it's interesting. Her somebody saves me once before we choose our career pass when we're basically teenagers. Right, so I'm. I'm doing Undergrad, studies I went to. University of New York at Binghamton, as a biology major, and I wanted to go into some kind of healthcare profession and. I you know I was was intrigued by sort of the the alternative fields to medicine. I didn't want to go to medical school I wanted to do something else carpet just appealed to me was something different. Alternative. Kind of A. Mainstream alternative and not completely alternative medicine field. So I chose Chiropractic as as my profession being young and. Naive I guess. And I know prior prior to moving to Pittsburgh and becoming acquainted with the number of chiropractors. My thought of Chiropractors were they were somebody that you went to a couple of times a week for basically I'm saying this an air quotes back cracks and I've learned over the past seven or eight years that there's really. Two directions, the chiropractors go there's those that do that. They want to get people in maybe on a subscription basis where they come in multiple times a week, and then there's others that I've been fortunate to meet where they work in a manner that's very similar to the way physiotherapists work in other countries or physical therapists work. Which Direction when you started out in your career path where you or was it entirely different when you started out as far as the directions, the chiropractors tended to go. Well I'm not embarrassed to tell you to my agent I've been practice I graduated from chiropractic school in Nineteen Eighty two. So many many years ago well over thirty years ago. And at that time, chiropractic. Had Not quite evolved to where it is now but over the years since that time we started seeing, I think the boundaries between physical therapy and carpet professions getting blurred and what I mean by that it's probably in the late ninety s crate Lebron Sin The chiropractor from Los. Angeles started bringing his rehabilitation model to car practic. So prior to that most banks just doing the manual. As you call back cracking techniques and then start blending rehabilitation techniques at the same time the physical therapy sessions going the other direction where they mainly just prescribing exercise not putting your hands on people as much and there was an interest in the PT profession and the eighties and nineties start introducing more manual techniques. So I think we're seeing you know blurring of the lines now as evidenced by me a chiropractor working in a physical therapy department. And what was the impetus after working as a chiropractor to as you said, do a career one eighty, get a PhD in rehabilitative sciences and become more heavily researcher. Yes. So even when when I was in clinical practice all those years and I practice over twenty five years before he decided to get a PhD which is very unusual thing I'm finding out that's not typical path. But all those years in practice it always kind of bothered me I was helping people but I was realizing in a sense we're experimenting on patients doing things that I would learn at conferences or at reading books. Would do them my patients. I felt part of me felt badly about that like I. Don't know for sure that this works I. Think it does. And so even when I practice I was publishing papers and trying to get involved research. It seemed like I always was being pulled in that direction. So. Quite frankly was his family events change. I have two kids when I started getting sat empty nest part of life. So we're really what do I to do now right I got my kids through. High School and they're often going into college. I'm going to go back myself.

Pittsburgh Dr Schneider Philip Pg Binghamton A. Mainstream High School University Of New York Angeles Researcher LOS
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:07 min | 2 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"It's part of why <Speech_Female> it can be difficult <Speech_Female> even now to <Speech_Female> get your hands on <Speech_Female> the Nintendo <SpeakerChange> switch console. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> A core part <Speech_Female> of the appeal is <Speech_Female> that the game allows <Speech_Female> players to <Speech_Female> be together <Speech_Music_Female> virtually in <Speech_Music_Female> real time. <Speech_Female> That's <Speech_Music_Female> what made the production possible. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> While they recorded <Speech_Female> the music separately. <Speech_Female> All of <Speech_Female> the performers were <Speech_Female> able to act out <Speech_Female> their roles through <Speech_Female> the game <Speech_Music_Female> as their <SpeakerChange> own <Speech_Music_Female> animal crossing avatars. <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Watched the opera <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Female> you hear it <Speech_Female> it sounds like these people <Speech_Female> are in the same room <Speech_Female> and there's no visual <Speech_Female> reminder telling <Speech_Female> you that they're not. <Speech_Music_Female> So <Speech_Female> it feels like <Speech_Female> this is <Speech_Female> performance that happened <Speech_Female> together <Speech_Female> when you see the <Speech_Female> squares on Zoom, <Speech_Female> you <Speech_Music_Female> know that they're not together. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> the best part of <Speech_Female> life theater is <Speech_Female> experiencing something. <Speech_Female> I think <SpeakerChange> together <Speech_Female> that's <Silence> Pellegrino again <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> before <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the pandemic do <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> a Donnie productions <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> was planning <Speech_Music_Female> three in person <Speech_Music_Female> operas in received <Speech_Female> grants to help <Speech_Female> them employ about <Silence> forty singers. <Speech_Female> Now, <Speech_Female> the future <Speech_Female> for any in person productions <Speech_Music_Female> is uncertain <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> says <Speech_Music_Female> being ten. It's <Speech_Female> been like <Speech_Female> a uniquely devastating <Speech_Female> experience <Speech_Female> and that singing <Speech_Music_Female> is like one of the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> most dangerous <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> like things you <Speech_Female> can do <Speech_Female> and it's kind <Speech_Female> of like <SpeakerChange> put <Speech_Female> the whole industry <Speech_Female> in chaos. <Speech_Female> Baynton, is among <Speech_Female> many in the industry <Speech_Female> experimenting <Speech_Female> with how <Speech_Female> to perform and connect <Speech_Music_Female> with audiences <Speech_Female> remotely <Speech_Female> the traditional <Speech_Female> way to do it <Speech_Female> is great <Speech_Female> but like <Speech_Female> these other kind of <Speech_Female> new, maybe weird <Speech_Female> ways of doing it <Speech_Music_Female> are also <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> exciting I. Think <Speech_Female> it doesn't. <Speech_Female> It's nice to <Speech_Female> be able to look. It doesn't <Speech_Female> have to be this like one <Speech_Female> way that everyone <Silence> kind of thinks of it. <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> And as pelegrina <Speech_Music_Female> points. <Speech_Female> Cartoons and opera <Speech_Music_Female> have been intertwined <Speech_Music_Female> for decades. <Speech_Music_Female> It pops <Speech_Female> up episodes <Speech_Female> of the ninety show. Hey, <Speech_Female> Arnold in spongebob <Speech_Female> squarepants <Speech_Female> and of course, <Speech_Music_Female> looney <SpeakerChange> tunes <Speech_Music_Female> and Bugs Bunny. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> I feel like if you ask <Speech_Female> anyone, they're going to know <Speech_Female> the right of the <Speech_Female> Valkyrie theme. <Speech_Female> They might not know <Speech_Music_Female> the name, but they'll know <Speech_Music_Female> what it is in their head. <Speech_Music_Female> So I don't <Speech_Music_Female> think this is totally <Speech_Music_Female> out <Speech_Music_Female> of left <SpeakerChange> field. <Speech_Music_Female> That <Speech_Female> being said I think <Speech_Female> the video game is just <Speech_Female> like the next generation <Speech_Female> of that <SpeakerChange> kind of <Speech_Music_Female> cartoon. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> They <Speech_Female> hope that this approach <Speech_Female> to opera, we'll draw <Speech_Music_Female> nontraditional <Speech_Music_Female> audiences. <Speech_Female> Pelegrina <Speech_Female> says they have also received <Speech_Female> positive responses <Speech_Music_Female> from opera, <Speech_Music_Male> lovers. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Benton said the most <Speech_Female> powerful thing about <Speech_Music_Female> the project was <Speech_Music_Female> performing <SpeakerChange> again <Speech_Music_Female> with other people, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I. Think we all felt kind <Speech_Female> of emotional <Speech_Female> like watching it for the <Speech_Female> first time and hearing <Speech_Female> all of our voices <Speech_Female> together <Speech_Female> and we were like, oh my gosh, <Speech_Female> like it sounds <Speech_Female> like we're together even <Speech_Female> though <SpeakerChange> we <Speech_Music_Female> were apart. <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female>

Nintendo Pellegrino Benton Arnold
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

05:28 min | 2 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Plane and little, and she has to do with all of that in addition to being a woman in a time when women had little to no autonomy. So she has quite a lot to overcome and Jane is resilient in the face of all that adversity. I think the resilience that I'm most moved by in the book is Jane's Moral Resilience like she would quite literally rather be starving and homeless and act outside her own values or sacrificed her independence and I think it was amazing as a young person and as you know a woman in my early thirties now to be. To have this example of someone who's committed to her own spirituality and morality in a way that honors her own passions and desires without robbing her of equity. And then quickly the second down endorsed that yet. It's so so good. And there are lots of great film adaptations as well. The. Second Book I WanNa recommend is full disclosure. By Cameron. Garrett which is a young adult novel that focuses on an HIV positive teenager whose navigating high school and all the normal things that teenagers deal with like making and keeping friends falling in love and just developing as a person and the protagonist is the black adopted daughter of two gay men, both of whom are also people of Color it's primarily a story of the resilience of HIV positive people but it also touches on the resilience of Queer folks and Black and Brown people So if there is a young person in your life that you want to. Share. Some of those important stories with full disclosure is a great book for them. Those are great recommendations and Nick I know you have station eleven on your list which really struck me I loved it. I read it a few years ago in it felt more like fiction than than I think it would feel now. Is the wonderful scary thing about that book because you know in the middle of the pandemic why not go back to a book that is about a Pandemic and flu that decimates the population. What I loved about the book was that it begins with Shakespeare, which is how I want of course, all of my pandemic post apocalyptic books to begin In this case, it's King Lear and one of the stars dies onstage, and that's how the story begins and then we flash forward twenty years out to this pandemic has literally killed most of the population that we have a traveling troupe Called the traveling symphony that is itinerant and age wander around the Great Lakes region and they are artists doing the only thing that they know how to do how precent though Emily Saint John Mandell was in her book to describe some of the things that are happening today is uncanny loved about it though is that at the.

Jane Pandemic King Lear Great Lakes Nick Emily Saint John Mandell HIV Cameron Garrett flu
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:23 min | 2 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Which of course is? Frightening on so many. Different levels. But that when they call you, a terrorist is just an amazing book really a resilient writer, the other. is they can't close all by Larry who was a terrific young journalist and this book stemmed after Michael Brown was killed. You know yet another young African American man who was murdered on this time, of course, by the police. So those are two books that are high on the list, but maybe weren't as popular as you know between the world in me or how to be an anti-racist, which also, of course, are wonderful wonderful books. I'd love to get your reaction to one that has really stayed with me books about ten years old now. But in this space, it's called the warmth of other suns by Isabel. Wilkerson and it's about the great migration. I think it was published in two thousand ten and tracks a number of families migrating from the south to the north over a forty year period and tells incredible stories of what people left, what people came to how they built their families, and for me was just a deep education in a piece of our history in America that I was just not taught in school at all. I don't I'm sorry. You're familiar with the fact that I got dead silence for both. I'm GonNa have to carry the torch on that one alone. I was having the the the microphone over but no the. Book came out. It was a huge huge seller. That's one bit. In all the bookstore associated with has continue to sell incredibly well, and like you say it was a piece of history that for me I also was unacquainted with and to see that Modern Day migration you say, going south to north and what had to be left behind and what they faced on that journey north. Yes you know just just incredible Wilkerson is just wonderful. Yeah and I would absolutely cosign I think that a lot of times what we're taught in schools about black history is really like all around the civil rights movement and it's like black people don't exist like much before or after nine hundred and sixty five. So it is nice to tell these other stories. So Camille to come back to you because I want to shift into fiction. Now, sometimes would a fiction book can do is give us a chance to escape but also either validate our reality or give us a way to make sense of it or maybe in this case with stories of resilience overcoming role modeling, what it means to truly tough it out you've been talking with us about little women in the past. I know you admired that book are there other fiction books that came to mind for you on this subject? Yeah. There are a couple. The first is an Oldie but a Goodie Jane, Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte Now, if you haven't read this book since you were forced to in high school I, we encourage you to crack it open again. I began my relationship with this book as I think an eighth grader and it has become over the years my favorite book of all time I mean Jane Eyre is kind of Proto feminist novel she describes herself as poor. Obscure..

Jane Eyre Wilkerson America writer Charlotte Bronte Michael Brown Camille Larry
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:11 min | 2 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"You're going yes. Sorry. We have a delay. Of course we're all three different places due to the virus that we're talking about right now go ahead and add your point there. Normally. As far as you want some concrete data right now Massachusetts we have over thirty two thousand people that are living in nursing homes right in his estimated that at least ten, thousand of those people could be living in their own homes with the proper supports. So the onset decision on ninety nine ruled that unjustified segregation of people with disabilities in five discriminate because it violates the ADA and we all know to stable housing is one of the key determinants of health. Right. But if you look at it in this pandemic, ask for the Kobe nineteen, the highest death tolls over forty percent are amongst people living and working in nursing homes that's over forty five thousand people that have expired. Nationwide, in over fifty three, hundred people here in Massachusetts alone and folks that disabilities are definitely represented amongst those underlying medical conditions. So you know if you want to talk about again real intraday it integration, we have to be able to move folks out of nursing homes where they're more at risk out of these institutional facilities and move into the community where they can live independently access the American dream live, it fully, you know folks need some supports personal care attendants supported living do a variety of them, but the key for our state really is a lack of affordable and accessible housing. All right. So we have about two minutes left and I want to ask you both just briefly from each of you. If there were an ad a two point. Oh, law to come forward today what would be key provisions you'd WanNa see. Good question well, I'd say I think some key points for progress into the future. You know I think that that policy change and legislation and laws can change infrastructure and we've seen some impact there but but but laws don't necessarily change culture, and so I think when we think to the future of what could have the biggest impact we still have a lot of work to do as it relates to reducing or cultural bias and stigma around disability. Disability is something that impacts frankly nearly everyone at some point in life and that when we think about inclusive services. We need to understand that it's not just for a small subset of people in our society that's actually for everyone. So I, I would probably try to tackle it from the standpoint of thinking of how how we can. We can continue to make progress as it relates to things like the built infrastructure, things like accessibility and communications, things like closed captioning and accessible websites. But how we really get at the cultural change reducing stigma around disability and understanding that it's not a lesser way of living or something that needs to be devalued but actually heart of the big life experience that we all face. You that have about a half a minute left please are good for me. I'd say education and enforcement a laws only as good as it is enforced and I think education about some of the things that we talked about..

Massachusetts Kobe WanNa
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:55 min | 2 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Difference children with disabilities how right to a full and complete education and the ADA generation kids understand that. Yeah. I would agree cartland than I think is I think as well. You know the FDA has ensured that that people with disabilities have their basic civil rights protected in that also have opportunities. A recourse of legal action if civil rights aren't protected and I think that's a very powerful thing. has changed come willingly when when when the act was signed into law did change come quickly easily and on which frontiers and wear has changed been slow to come even though it's codified now. I'd say that. I. I I'd say that I think it was incremental and we continued to see incremental change a for example, a lot of the changes in infrastructure that we enjoy. Now things like ramps and elevators and automatic door openers. You know those things weren't put into place overnight. So from the standpoint of physical access changes been very incremental and it's important to know that the ADA is more proactive than retroactive. So if you have an old. Building, that you haven't renovated in forty years that wasn't built under the premise or under the protection of the ADA. It probably still is an accessible and unless you choose to renovate it or get new permits to renovate it, you may not have to make it accessible. So early, what we really sees that new construction comes online it comes online in a way that is accessible. So we've seen slow culture change in that regard. For sure sitting here. No. Please go had. Yeah. Mean shortly after president was signed the a until into law, he also said, let these shameful walls of exclusion come tumbling down and while many of those walls have come tumbling down there certainly continued to many barriers there's areas to healthcare married to affordable accessible housing and that's a huge win for folks with disabilities they may be accessed to. The folks need a place to live, and that's still continues to be a huge problem, not only in Massachusetts but across the nation. Yeah and also thing. Oklahoma let me just yet. Let me just ask this one just following on specifically with the two of you were just talking about it makes me think of. Sorry Five Year Long Battle on Beacon Hill over sidewalk cutouts, the Beacon Hill Civic Association challenge that there was a lawsuit it took five years. Those cutouts weren't put in place until around May of two thousand nineteen. So how do we think about those kinds of battles given what you've just been? Yet I think it's a really important point and. A lot of the a lot of battles and wins as it relates to access have been hard fought over the years and there are still many ways in which you know the FDA has been very powerful and very impactful. But there are ways it's still limited to..

ADA FDA Beacon Hill Beacon Hill Civic Association Oklahoma president Massachusetts
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

04:08 min | 2 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Games in his possible. Especially when you have to put a couple of teams on the shelf, you're already talking about a condensed calendar. So there's limited time. The League has already said there. Okay. If they get to the end of the year and teams have not played an equal number of games, they'll deal with that At that point, they would just ranked teams by winning percentage versus actual numbers of wins But really in the long term, if this becomes a problem more than one team has a huge outbreak like this. I. Don't know how they make it work. Yeah once again, a bellwether right for so many other things I. Think a lot of people are watching to see if they can pull this off. All right. I, just WanNa have seen a lot of people say if a multibillion dollar organization like baseball with thousands and thousands of tests being run over the course of a few days can't handle this. How does that change our thinking about college campuses and schools and things like that? I think you're absolutely right people are watching this pretty closely. Exactly exactly and we will continue to before we let you go though I must torture you we drive around the collar teams. Now, let's talk about the socks. The sucker nobly, it's been ugly and it's an issue that we talked about last year. We talked about in the off season it's pitching. They have no pitching starters or bullpens are they don't have enough anyway they have a pretty solid lineup which is interesting and. You would think that okay they should be able to hit their way into wins and maybe they will in the long run over the course of the season. But so far you can tell that the lack of pitching has really weighed on the offense I wanNA play a cut here from zander. BOGART's WHO's known as being incredibly upbeat. He's a real leader in the clubhouse. He's a guy who's always kind of giving positive affirmation of folks in get your next time. Let's go do this. This is what he said after the loss on Monday there's stuff. You know. Obviously. It's not just like one wrong. You know as a corporate and then they just find a way to add on some more before we can kind of get some going and gets up. And you see the video that goes with that he's shoulders slumped. He is depressed and you can tell this offense is putting extra pressure on themselves knowing they don't have the pitching to hold the other team down hitting a baseball is often called. One of the hardest things to do in professional sports. That's why if you can do it three out of ten times, you're considered really good and so if you have that added pressure of now, you have to produce runs or this team will lose that really starts to weigh on you makes it even harder. All right. So Chris, we've got a little less than a minute left. So let me just ask you because that was depressing. Rays of hope to leave us with with the restive titled Towns Pro Sports Teams I do have a little bit of hope, and this is something people are kicking baseball for not doing the NBA and the NHL have created bubbles players to bring their seasons back both of which will start towards the end of the week here I think that is a at least the best hope that we have to try to get some normalcy going in the world of sports..

BOGART baseball Chris NBA NHL
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

05:57 min | 2 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Kind of a bellwether for whether some normalcy is possible during a global pandemic, the number of New England Patriots football players opting out of the two thousand twenty NFL season due to the corona virus is now to six including star linebacker and defensive captain, Dante hightower and the red. SOX are off to a miserable start to their coronavirus shortened season jumping four of their first five games with one of their starting pitchers out due to coronavirus complications. The world is watching and not just the games to see who will win in the match up between professional sports and the coronavirus. So here to give us a read on what's happening is Radio Boston's Chris. Derek? Chris. Welcome. Back. Thanks for having me spoiler alert the news is not good on that front. Well. Yes. So let's start with football and I'm going to ask you about the Patriots players opting out the same question I've been asking. So often during this pandemic, how big a deal is this? So I'm going to answer your favorite question with probably your least favorite answer, which is it depends I think you mentioned? Were we're still in the midst of obviously of global pandemic and I don't think anybody really knows exactly what the future is going to bring. We've heard a lot of talk about a possible second wave in the fall and we're going to be seeing college students returning to campuses and a lot of places kids going back to schools in some places So I think it all of this discussion really depends on what the next few weeks in the next few months bring for us. We may not even have a football season. So with that huge caveat at the beginning of the answer. I would say on the field it is actually a pretty big deal for the Patriots, just because of the names. Of the players who have said they were opting out this year you mentioned Dante High Tower is basically the quarterback of the defense. He's the guy who's out on the field calling the plays for the defense moving guys around when they need to move. He's one of the true leaders on this team coach Belichick has made him Mr February for all of his big plays in the postseason in super bowls. you also Patrick Chung who's kind of unheralded. But I think a big contributor who never really gets the recognition he deserves for the kind of flexible. He plays on this team You've got marcus cannon who's been a pretty steady presence on the offensive line, Brennan? bolden. WHO's a special teams contributor. So you've got some pretty big name players who have said they will not be playing this year for the Patriots. And clearly players who understand what the impact is of opting out. So what are they saying about this decision about why they're doing it when they know what it's GonNa do to the team? Yeah totally, and it depends on the individual player. So in Dante hightower's case, he just had a child about a month ago and he says, he thinks it's the right move for..

Patriots Dante hightower Dante High Tower football Chris SOX Boston NFL marcus cannon Derek Belichick Patrick Chung Brennan
"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"This week's guest on the economists asks our interview show was the businesswoman Ursula burns. She made history ten years ago when she became the first black woman to run a fortune five hundred company, but progress has been slow. The second was appointed just last month. Mrs burns revealed why she's changed her mind about using quotas to achieve equality. I've been in business for almost forty years. And we have been talking about this problem where half the population. We're not anywhere near half we're not even ten percent. They're more CEO's named John than there are women. You know, you heard all of that stuff, we have been pushing against this thing for, for a long time with the belief that if we just let them alone and give them the facts that they that system will change. Don't you get it if we just kind of lay it out, and give them the survey because the? They who are giving the facts to don't believe it's urgent enough to change it. That's why say, maybe what you do is to start mandating things saying level both level of a big company. Yeah. Think board levels starts. I I think. think. I should it be half forty percent. Give me a number. That's reasonable you do the study of available people whatever the heck it is. And you start mandating companies to get you say, basically, we.

Ursula burns Mrs burns CEO John forty percent forty years ten percent ten years
"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"For both of us. I guess it was a life changing experience. And I think we both issue in particular is you book in Chinese on the Chinese language service of the BBC a lot, and it was a sense of loyalty to an audience in China, that seems like a bygone age now we often talk now of how gentlemen has been largely forgotten in China, the success of the communist party in racing suddenly, public discussion of this, but also it seems memories whole generation has grown up now has heard almost nothing about this. But then, you know I go back to Beijing. And from time to time I meet people, and they asked me, how long have you been in China? I say that it goes back to the nine thousand nine hundred and it becomes clear that I was there in nine hundred ninety nine and then suddenly, the conversation will turn to that. Question. It's clear that for those who were there for those who did experience it. It's still grips their minds just as much as it does our. Tianmen might live large in the minds of those who witnessed it. But Beijing continues to cover up the crimes and censorship efforts ramp up whenever the nursery approaches this year has been no exception. University.

China Beijing communist party BBC Tianmen
"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Today, marks thirty year anniversary of the Inman square crackdown. In April nineteen Eighty-nine demonstrators mainly students began together TNN square to mourn, the death of who done relatively liberal communist party leader soon. They began calling for political reform. The protests spread beyond the city and the government's patients began to wear thin, late Sunday afternoon, military headed gulped is, again, flew over the square of heavenly peace, dropping leaflets bowling on the protesters to leave yet with fists clenched, the students pledged to stay on to the Dan. In the early hours of June fourth Chinese troops rolled into Beijing firing at crowds of people who blocked their path. Hundreds if not thousands were killed. Two.

communist party TNN Beijing thirty year
"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"Is you know, it's interesting. I mean, it's thirty years, right? And the median age of China right now is thirty eight so a significant number of Chinese were not born. One channel score was happening. And the Chinese government has been extremely successful at wiping out. Any recollection of the ideas of the movement in any recollection of actually, you know, what happened? And so there's this remarkable documentary attack man, where they show pictures of the tank man to whom you referred earlier to Beijing University students that are like what's this is the guy doing performance, art? What is this? They have no idea of those images and of the importance that those images had to their country back in the day. And so the question is if you know something wiped out, so successfully will it ever have any residents again amongst the people of China. I don't know. I think we probably will at a certain point. There has to be a reevaluation of this. But people have thought it was going to happen. A lot earlier than it has so far that hasn't happened yet. The Chinese party state has a remarkable ability to really manipulate the minds of people in China still to this day, John I wanna thank you for coming on today to talk about the thirty th anniversary of gentlemen. Thank you. Thank you for having me, Sarah. John palm. I is a former reporter for the press and the Washington Post. He's also the author of the book the beautiful country and the middle kingdom American China seventeen seventy six to the present first person is produced by Dan Ephron, edited by rob Sachs. I'm Sarah Wildman, and I'm your host. Panoply..

China Sarah Wildman John palm Chinese government Beijing University Washington Post Dan Ephron reporter rob Sachs John I thirty years
"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"And so this is happening at the same time, you have the country opening up to western influences opening up to western ideas, and it was this marriage between significant discontent in the lower levels of society with on opening of minds among the elite among the student population. And that created the potential for real instability at the same time. You also had within the party different factions jockeying for positions one faction believed in faster economic reforms and more westernization another faction that really oppose that as well. So you had you had to basically all the raw materials for real problems going from ADA nine students start to gather an and lobby the ability together without being monitored by the party. How do they do that? I mean, are they watched over are there? How does that happen? So what was starting in in as early as eighty eight in fact, even earlier than that? But eighty eight was really the beginning is that people wanted to form organizations that were not under the control come his party because one of the issues in China was that the party controlled everything. And there was no such thing as a right to organize freedom of sociation was is not part of Chinese communist party platform on the students. Basically that was a main demand that the student unions would not be run by the party. And so in universities such as Beijing University ching hall university Nanjing university Fudan, which is another major university in Shanghai students began to have these natch. Organizations formed and have these specically democracies what they called salons where Chinese liberals were invited to speak about democratization process about freedom of association and other freedoms the US Bill of rights statue of liberty the history of democracy, and in the west, and this type of interaction between Chinese students and some Chinese liberals really intensified eighty nine and the trigger, of course, for the demonstrations was the death of party secretary by the name of who y'all bond who died in April of nineteen eighty nine and who was somewhat of a symbol for westernisers in China. He is a guy who basically came out against chopsticks. He said using a knife and fork was more efficient, but he also was very important in rehabilitating, hundreds of thousands of Chinese intellectuals who've been purged during the anti rightist campaign in the mid fifties. But also the culture of Lucien from nineteen sixty six nine hundred seventy six and. How did you have access to them? I mean, did you already knew people from when you were studying in China, did you have greater access? So. Ahead lived in Chinese dormitory for a year and a half. And so when I went into these dormitories, I kind of felt like I was home, and that I think subconsciously resonated with the people there. I mean, I would like sit on their beds and kinda hang out like I hung out in my own dorm room six or seven years before. So I was a little bit younger. I spoke pretty decent Chinese. And I just kinda realized that they were like my classmates earlier jet. I mean a later generation, but they were very more my classmates their rooms looked and I think more importantly smelled like the room. I lived in an engine university for unit half. If for me, it wasn't as exotic as it probably appeared to many other western correspondents who hadn't had that experience. When you say, they weren't later generation that students that you described earlier are actually plucked back out of countryside and given the chance to go to school where these students who had expected to go to school. Yeah. These were students generally speaking who had gone through high school. So this is just their life experiences significantly different from the life experience from their elders and describe the energy of these meetings, these early meetings on campus, it was just full of this sense of possibility. And a real search for a new set of values for their country. A lot of patriotism deep love of their country and deep desire in the sense of what direction are we gonna take? And anything is possible. That was the overriding sense. You got was optimism about what China could do and we're trying to go..

China Beijing University ching hall bond ADA Shanghai US secretary seven years
"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"From foreign policy. I'm Sarah wild Mun. And this is first person this week an inside account of the TNN square massacre. Thirty years ago this month student protests rutted in Beijing posing one of the most significant threats to the rule of the communist party in China's history. The demonstrations lasted two months and grew to include a range of citizens all demanding reforms in the country. For the first time in huge numbers. The ordinary men and women of Beijing the old and the young professors and taxi drivers have joined the student protests lending, their support to what is now taking on all the appearances of a peaceful popular uprising against the oppressiveness of communist rule campaign for China's renewal in an atmosphere of freedom and democracy, the focal point of the protest was Tiananmen Square. The heart of Beijing within a few weeks the government declared martial law and then in early June the world watched in horror as Chinese military tanks rolled in the streets of Beijing on the way to Chinaman's square. They fired indiscriminately at protesters there were reports of tanks rolling over students. The noise have gun five rose from all over the center of Peking, it was unremitting. On the streets leading down to the main road to ten on men square furious. People stood in disbelief at the glow in the sky listening to the sound of shots in the midst of all this chaos was John Pomfret who covered China for these Tosi press of the time hit an advantage over his fellow foreign correspondents. He had studied in China spoke Mandarin fluently and had many contacts in student movement. He joins us today. John, thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. So we're coming on the thirtieth anniversary of the TNN square massacre. But I want to actually start with how you came to China in the first place. How did you come? So I went to college wanting to study neuro physiology. Okay..

China Beijing John Pomfret Tiananmen Square Sarah wild Mun communist party Tosi Thirty years two months
"thirty years" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

12:27 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"These thirty years, and we have a lot of difficult cases. And I'm trained in western medicine. I was never trained in any, you know, hemp oil or any of that stuff. I'm kind of a traditional vet, and I started really giving it some thoughts. When I, you know, just the barrage of clients that are asking us, and I'm just saying, I don't know much about it. And what's really nice? I was introduced the doctor walks. Log and Joe's a double board certified vet with a PHD and your Daime that made me go and after I spoke with him. He's like, no, there's really something to this. And I guess the way I'm looking at it from my standpoint, of course, I don't want to recommend things that aren't tested. So I didn't well the product that we're gonna talk about today. It's been tested really more than any other. And I'm just sick of looking at animal suffering that there's nothing I can do for them. So there's plenty of patients that have been on non steroidal or other pain medications that are getting no help including some of my own technicians pets that were old and one of my own. Own actually, and it was really my own pet. My fourteen year old lab where I'm like, I'm either going to, you know, have to stop and euthanize or or I'm going to try something different. And that's what was kinda the the switch that flipped for me. Joe I their states is kind of rolling off all these various states you can have medicinal marijuana. You can have recreational marijuana. Are there any states to your knowledge that allow veterinarians to prescribe CBD or a how do we go about it because yes, I want to give my clients the best information, but I don't know how. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I guess that's our biggest problem right now is that when states were making laws the veterinarians, we're sort of forgotten about for whatever reason. And so this led to a lot of questions coming into the American veterinary medical association, and they NS inside the right up some guidelines and their guidelines pretty much said that until we have further evidence of any true utility. We can't make recommendations therefore, we have to stick with the idea that we should not be recommending this, and you should not be recommending this as a as a veterinarian. Therefore, you know, your license could be in jeopardy if someone were to question you or sue because they their their dog had a bad reaction for whatever reason. And so this is where it came down to the science. And that's why folks like for I got involved saying, okay? How do we set up a really good study? And the reality is is that there are a lot of different recommendations out there. And I hear some of my colleagues going where did you get your dosing from? That's like, well, we went into the literature and looked at the human dosing. We looked at the road and dosing and we use dose. That were similar to where they were seeing effects in the other species, and which is far higher than than what a lot of the other companies out there recommend it's really about. You know, this is a pharmaceutical to some degree. And and we don't know exactly how it works. I it tends to have some pretty profound effect. You were saying that there are these various forms of cannon leads that's in help products. It doesn't have the THC thing that gets you high. Is it safe to use marijuana because oftentimes people are well, you know, I'll have a little edible. And I'll just give some of that to my pet, and I don't really know how much is marijuana basically safe to use in pets. Well, we we know that we, of course, we've all seen the we'll say poison control aspect where dog gets into somebody's stash of marijuana and they come in. And they'll dogs are down and out for a long time. And that's not what we're trying to do here. All we're trying to do is is mitigate the pain without that neurologic affect and and I think, you know, the reality is is that if you're using the right strain of ham for and marijuana. Here's the right strange. You can have some profound anti inflammatory effects without the the neurologic. And you know, they're just you know, we're sort of in the infancy of trying to understand this. All reality. And from a clinical perspective, we have evidence now that it does help with arthritis pain. And so we shouldn't be ignoring it. We should be looking to at least in the states that are allowing it to start changing the laws to help it or in areas, mitigate pain because we have very few pain relievers in dog. Just real quickly. So what I would say do not use marijuana in dogs. We know it can be toxic. All the strains are different. You know, what I'm specifically saying is with caution. Of course, watch what you're using don't use marijuana. We're talking about using CBD extracts that are not going to have more than point three percent THC. You know, we don't want THC that can be bad. So we're talking about products that are low and THC but have canal annoyed that have been studied. And that's the problem. There's a lot of products you can buy right now. They've had no studying. They don't know. Whether what the doses went to give it I mean, and we have a lot to learn on the elevate product. But at least we know what the pharmacokinetics are. We know how often to give it and what dose, and you mentioned side effects. I can just give you anecdotal side effects. I've had three dogs now that have eaten entire bags of the elevate shoes. So that's sixty choose and the normal dose on a dog. Would be one to to choose twice a day. So obviously, a pretty high dose this is only three dogs, but I've had no side effects, which is nice. I'm not saying there couldn't be. I'm just saying with my experience I are three dogs, and I actually had one cat that ate half a bag of the dog chews without a. Taste very good. So not to say, you can't have problems. You know, what I'm saying is about, but I'm just saying I have had four patients now that have consumed very very high doses without any side effects that doesn't mean there couldn't be. But my feeling right now is it's probably a pretty safe product. I love it. So your clinical experience is perfect. Let's go back a little bit. Dr watch leg where you're talking about. This elevate CBD oil. I always tell people when they come in. They're looking at various nutraceutical that you go to some health food store, you see a product is he okay, vitamin C? And here's a bottle of item in c has five hundred milligrams of vitamin c per tablet in it's forty two dollars for this little teeny bottling. We get another bottle. It's go to Costco. And it says she looked bottle in it's less expensive in the same psych. Well, expensive one must be better because it's more expensive. But CBD oils aren't all made the same. Tell us about these studies that you. You did at Cornell. So that in my mind, totally elevates the study because I can trust what you're saying. Tell me tell my listeners about this study. What happened? What did you do what kind of study was it? Yeah. So our study was actually a perceivable blinded crossover design where the dogs got one oil for about four weeks. And then we cost them over after a few weeks to another oil. And we didn't know which was which are owners didn't really have any idea. What was going on in terms of the oils? So we basically randomized it and we put them on. And then we just ask the owners over time, you know, how they felt we did our own examinations. Veterinarians, and and, you know, low behold by the end of the study we got through fifteen or sixteen dogs. I was very evident that there was one oil that seemed to be superior to the other. We started looking at the data, and we have enough data there to really show that there's a cocoa statistical a factor significant effect, and that we were basically dropping pain scores and we were dropping. Or an increasing activity and these dogs, and so he decided we might as well just start writing something up for publication. We met it and edited it the surgeons conference last year and finalizing some publication revisions to get this done in the next few weeks and the journal so that everybody can see it. It'll be online access so all all owners and all veterinaries can read it and evaluated for themselves. But from our perspective, we had some some very very pronounced affects particularly dogs that were in what we'll call more severe geriatric. So right now, Dr Fred with you being in clinical practice, I presume you been using this on your own clients coming through the door is it just odds. Can it be cats can use it in other species? And here we have had the indication Dr Jill of saying, okay? It's for pain. That's fabulous. What other things have you found that it can be used for Bernardino. No veterinarians we're going to start to think about other uses. So so once again, my idea on this was I'm training, western met. I didn't know that this was even an option, and I was very hesitant to use the elevate product I used it on my own dog. That's the first dog I ever used it on. And we prob- I probably have a hundred and fifty patients on one hundred and fifty canine patients, mainly with mobility and osteoarthritis problems. That's the main reason we put them on. But I definitely played around with other things I'm not saying to do it. But I have my feeling is it would be interesting, and we're actually doing some studies right now, how will this work for dogs with anxiety, for instance, phobias thunderstorm phobias, which we have a big problem on the east coast or just, you know, fear, anxiety and stress coming into the vet hospital. I think there's some interesting things certainly we know in people especially in children, they're using it and seizures that's pretty well known. Is that something we could use it for could be. Very interesting. And then certainly in the cat that was a big thing for me. And or someone going studies Joe knows of some of them better than I do in cats because I think there's some big uses the cat cats have a lot of anxiety problems urine marking that's a big problem, and there's certainly other ones. So I my feeling is. I think we will use this for a lot of conditions. But I'm also worried that you get on the internet and look up him or cannabinoid, and everybody's using it for everything. I mean, that's the problem, especially when it hasn't been studied. So I'm like you burn a dean. I'm like Joe I want to studies. I wanna know what the doses is it safe. We have to handle the legal issues too. Clearly, I think that's gonna take care of itself. But there's a lot of issues right now. But you know, I wanna know what's the product. That's being studied what studies are they doing is it safe, and what's the dose? So I mean, that's really where we're at right now. And one thing I applaud elevate on they're willing to do the studies which most of the other. People are not you can buy a lot of products online right now. No one has any idea if there's any cannabinoid in it, some of the early studies are showing some of the other products. There isn't any cannabinoid in it so buyer, beware. And that's why you know. I listen really to what Joe's doing. I trust them. He's a researcher. He has no financial interest in any of this. So that's why I'm so interested in the elevate product. And I mean, I'm sure there'll be others. But I want proof, you know, Bernardino. I'm like you. I wonder if I'm gonna recommend and I gotta have proof. And and I think we have a long way to go. But I think with elevate we know a lot more about that product. And then the other products on the market right now. And that makes me feel good doctor Joe with we're kind of all bowing to you. And thank you so much for doing this research. I'm impressed that Cornell was amenable to having you do this because I'm sure they were a little bit. I don't know. This is kind of out there on the fringes. We're gonna get bored certifications is in sports medicine and rehabilitation, so you must be seen. So many of these cats and dogs who are having joint issues. Arthritis is you're saying you've gone through the repertoire what we have available, and it's just not seeming to work what percentage of the that. You've been testing seemed to have a positive response. I'd say eighty eighty to ninety percent we're using it in, you know, I think we see the most dramatic responses are in the those older dogs who have multi joint lane. This is people aren't exactly sure whether the dogs and enough pain to to euthanize the dog, and and they'll actually go ahead and put the dog on this and say, you know, the quality of life is just better right now. And and they decide not to euthanize that older dog. And I think that's that's where this is. This is a real go to in those cases. Now if you have a dog. What we don't know if your dog just had surgery is a is this good for surgical pain. We don't really understand.

marijuana Joe Bernardino arthritis pain CBD Costco Cornell Arthritis Dr Fred Dr Jill researcher forty two dollars ninety percent fourteen year three percent thirty years four weeks
"thirty years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"The last thirty years, and he's recognizing that at his stage of life that he needs to start moving away from that business. And so it was a construction business. And you know, he realized that he's not going to be able to use his body as much as he gets into his seventies and eighties and they'll last month we had another student again same story. He'd built a successful construction business recognized that he needed to start taking different actions and start learning. A new skill to take advantage of the assets. He had and more importantly to not be relying on trading his time for money and part of it is just you owning that and recognizing that. If you start looking at your financial habits, if you're not satisfied with your financial results you need to break. Those habits you need to start doing something different and need to start making more productive financial habits. And so not only do we have business owners that have come in. And we have folks that work in factory and just feels like feels like they they're being treated as a number, and, you know, in with the factory worker, you know, he came to us and said, you know, what I need a different approach. I need a whole different. I need to stop trading. My time for money. And unfortunately, that's what most people have been trained to do. I know for me growing up. That's what I was trained to do. How is trained to trade my time for money? But as I started to look at the world around me as I started to look at the opportunities..

thirty years
"thirty years" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

Doug Loves Movies

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

"Thirty years. A little under three. Yeah, that's my guess. Under three years. That's your kiss. Three years give or take ten months. You three twenty. Are. Okay. The mess tres. So we got anywhere from six years to two weeks. Tom Hanks. I pretty big role and he knows you're alone. And then his second feature film, he started pretty big role in the movie. Never have heard of that knows you're alone. Never heard of never heard of classic, and I'm Scott twice. Yeah, anyone by applause because that's works on audio to one person. Popular many, and I read it. I thought I read Tom Hanks pulse here, thinks he's career didn't release started till Bessler parts. I've said in the meetings. Catch on TV like we didn't ask you anything. To the listener at home. If you look it up better on that, we'll Kapiti page by now. Do it. We on how did this get made kept on calling Stellan Skarsgard stellar skateboard because that's what auto credit to iphone. And then it was automatically changed and now on his Kapiti pages permanently locked because every time they would change it back, it would just go back to stellar skateboard. Skateboards skateboards. And now I know that and we made a shirt that's still skateboard and now I also that he has it still scars garden skateboard. Hat. And that's been get a shirt. It's like a sub podcast. Really. Scares guard good a shirt. Podcast, right. Tell you the barracks, the providence, if you will, all guards shirts. Oh my God, Jeff. I wish your laugh.

Tom Hanks Stellan Skarsgard Scott Jeff Thirty years Three years three years ten months six years two weeks
"thirty years" Discussed on This Week in Travel

This Week in Travel

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"thirty years" Discussed on This Week in Travel

"Hassle than it was yeah in that the processes easy this is the hardest concept when i teach beginner at beginner sessions at conferences it's it's the hardest six or there's a lot of people that they've had the amex business platinum for their business for thirty years and every time they book a ticket they just call up acts and say i want a first class ticket to here and they're going to say at one million points because there does redeeming points for at a cash rate of his penny or the new chase effort reserve as one point five cents in so it gets very confusing to s uh to have people understand that these cards can transfer to a certain number of airliner hotel programs and then those programs have the ability to book on their partners so you can buy hands for you chase card points to united in an united can be used to block on all of their airline partners like ethiopian that i mentioned than when so that takes a bit of time to understand that i'm i'm convinced most the chase after a reserve cardholders right now that that jumped in on it because it was the the cool thing to do our just redeeming the points at one point five cents which which which is flexible an easy and then that mean being a value to them of it it it it's they may not even be aware of the transfer the the the old go to card that a lot of people talk about is the amix s p g so the star would preferred guess card sure and the reason for that is not just because of the hotels program it's because they have all of these airline transfer partners in when you move twenty thousand of their points you get 20 you get a five thousand bonus so you have this is very flexible programme much like the chase that there were talking about now and that card has great every day earnings so that has always been for for active travelers in of the go to in the past and the annual fee as much more reasonable than than these new level ultrapremium cards that that have lounge access and all that.

thirty years