35 Burst results for "Thirty Years"

USA gymnastics 'giant' dead after trafficking, sexual assault charges filed

Democracy Now! Audio

00:35 sec | 18 hrs ago

USA gymnastics 'giant' dead after trafficking, sexual assault charges filed

"Michigan former. Us olympic gymnastics coach. John gathered died by suicide. Thursday moments after he was charged with sexual assault and human trafficking in addition to to charges of sexual assault against children. Get it was accused of enabling former olympic team physician and convicted serial rapists and child. Sexual abuser dr. Larry nassar nassar survivor. Sarah klein was just eight years old when she began training and get her gym on thursday. She said quote he tortured and abused little girls myself included for more than thirty years and was able to cheat

Olympic Gymnastics Larry Nassar Nassar Sarah Klein Michigan John United States
What Would Happen If Chabot Dam in the East Bay Hills Broke Open?

Bay Curious

04:37 min | 1 d ago

What Would Happen If Chabot Dam in the East Bay Hills Broke Open?

"What would happen if chicago damn cracked open an empty the lake behind it onto neighborhoods in san leandro and east oakland. It's an alarming thought. We asked cake. Ud's dan bricky. Who's reported on safety issues at california's oroville dam to find the answer. Holly and vickers kings question is a really good one because it reminds us that all dams pose risks of some kind given the nature of the job they perform holding back huge volumes of water they can turn from placid lake into deadly torrent. If unleashed all at once. They deserve very close attention. When that attention lapses catastrophes can do happen in late may eighteen eighty nine flood. Water overflowed badly maintained private dam in western pennsylvania. Triggering its collapse. A wall of water race down the valley below a century later. Historian david mccullough said. The johnstown flood was so vividly alive in the local consciousness. I grew up in western pennsylvania. I'd heard about the johnstown flood my whole life as children. We used to shout run for the hills. The damas busted little knowing what real terror is in those words. The flood wiped entire towns off the map and killed twenty. Two hundred people in california owns its own special chapter in the history of dam disasters with a tragedy that unfolded more than ninety years ago in a remote canyon fifty miles north of downtown los angeles from the day. The saint francis dam opened in one thousand nine hundred twenty six. It leaked the folks in the farm. Towns downstream used to joke. They'd see you later if the damn don't break on march twelfth nine hundred twenty eight. The saint francis damn disintegrated just hours after it was pronounced sound by los angeles water. Chief william mulholland who had designed and built the two year old structure when the massive concrete dam broke apart water raised more than fifty miles to the pacific ocean killing about four hundred fifty people along the way but those events one hundred thirty years ago in johnstown ninety some years ago in los angeles county sound like ancient history much more recently california. Got a lesson in how dangerous and costly failure of even part of a major dam can be failure ambiance spillway structure results in an uncontrolled. Lisa flood waters from link oroville and eating evacuation from the low twenty. Seventeen collapse the spillway at oroville dam in the northern sierra foothills one hundred thirty miles northeast of san francisco touched off a series of events that lead local officials to order one hundred eighty eight thousand people to flee their homes. This is not a drill. Repeat this is not a drill. Spill ways are crucial to preventing overtopping. That's what happens. When a reservoir rises over the top of the dam and simply spills over a spillway is like an emergency valve. Damn managers can open to safely release water from a reservoir bills over the top but back in february twenty seventeen oroville dam spillway began to disintegrate just as a series of winter storms dumped huge amounts of rain across northern california without a fully functioning. Spillway lake oroville rose rapidly water poured over a hillside that was supposed to serve as an emergency spillway. That emergency spillway began to fail to leading to the mass evacuation. In the aftermath investigators found the emergency spillway was ill conceived and the main spillway was badly designed poorly built and inadequately maintained. So how is should bowe damn different from all those bad dams and what does east bay mud have to say about. Chaba cracking open and unleashing catastrophe on the east bay. Simple answer to that question is that the dam would never crack open. That's jimmy yolly east bay mud director of engineering and chief damn safety officer he oversees the district twenty six times including chabad. Damn the reality is that the dams are designed such that. They don't just crack open. You will see signs of a failure if one is to occur and The dan's designs with monitoring equipment to make sure that you can see that happening if it was a east bay mud confidence that a dam built within a quarter mile of a dangerous fault will stand up to violent shaking. Let's take a look at how the dam was first built. Nearly one hundred fifty years ago and how it's been maintained since

Oroville Dam Johnstown Dan Bricky California Saint Francis Dam Placid Lake Chief William Mulholland Pennsylvania San Leandro David Mccullough Vickers Lisa Flood Northern Sierra Foothills Los Angeles Oakland Holly Chicago Oroville Dam Spillway
Drew Barrymore Said Her Mother Placed Her In A Psychiatric Ward At 13 And Spoke About How It Affected Their Relationship

Mojo In The Morning

02:06 min | 2 d ago

Drew Barrymore Said Her Mother Placed Her In A Psychiatric Ward At 13 And Spoke About How It Affected Their Relationship

"Barrymore opening up about being placed in a psychiatric ward at age of thirteen by her mom. She told howard stern in an interview this week that she was going to clubs not going to school stealing. Her mom's car was just out of control. Thirteen years old. Your father mother. We're just not there for you. And i thought about britney spears documentary. I have so much empathy towards so many people. Paris hilton came on the show and she had been institutionalized by her mom. And you know you think. Like britney and paris. And i've thought it for myself. I'm sure that people look on and think these party girls. These privileges says how dare they have feelings about any of this. They've put themselves up out there. They've asked for this. It's fair game. And i just go there. Humans they're just humid. Stayed in that psychiatric ward for about eighteen months. And she said after thirty years of therapy and soul-searching she finally learned to forgive her mom for doing that or my mom. Put me in a place that was like a full psychiatric word. I used to laugh at those like malibu thirty day places. They talk about things that pissed me off. I was just like a a little spa vacation for thirty days. Like in malibu was sort of the opposite of the experience. I had i was in a place for a year and a half called. Van is psychiatric. And you couldn't mess around in there and if you did you would get thrown either in thought padded room or get stretcher strains and tied up. Why were you so bad that you had in padded room. I grab you know with like the go. Go's and wendy williams and blondie and all these like bad ass chicks and i just would like you know channel my inner riot girl and i you know some days. It was really funny. I would rile up all the girls. And i'd be like listen to these people. Don't care about you.

Barrymore Howard Stern Britney Spears Paris Hilton Britney Paris Malibu VAN Wendy Williams Blondie
Should Ekholm Be the Bruins' Top Trade Target This Season?

Bruins Beat

02:34 min | 4 d ago

Should Ekholm Be the Bruins' Top Trade Target This Season?

"I will give you the floor to explain why Mattias ekholm is a great fit. Just thought I agree with you on pretty much most of these points. Yeah. I mean, I think you look at it even obviously the brand see some depth right now because you know, we could be in a situation where when the Bruins resume play on Thursday if Crews Lake is a barrel on healthy, you know, you could be a situation where you're another body away from a guy like, you know, Nick Woolf for Cooper's a cord jacket Sean getting calls up to be pressed juice. Service like this so not ideal from the government's perspective. But even if this whole left side was completely healthy when you had loads on Grizzly kinds of oral. I still think the proactive move for this team is to still acquire a proven top floor guy just to shore up that defense just turned it as overall security like one. There's the health risk, which you know, we remember what it was a few years ago in the Bruins played the song is in the playoffs and it was you know, Tommy Crofts and Joe Morrow and those guys like that was that was you know, garlic McEvoy. Yeah. We're trying to give it was, you know, averaging 23 minutes of ice-time mean that's the worst case scenario in terms of injuries. But also you just run the risk of you know, going into the playoffs and it's you know solid as low as on as looked, you know as promising as a moral has been you still running a whole bunch of risk, if you roll those guys out expecting them to kind of, you know, not deal with the bumps along the road with that comes with playing heavy minutes and a playoff setting against tough teams like the capitals or off. No Penguins Flyers. If you get past that, you know, the the lightning, you know, all these teams that are going to you know, bring it to you. So I think would you rather keep this defense which has been great like you can I think you can you can admit that. It's defense has exceeded expectations and they've been very good. We'll also acknowledging and being cognizant of the fact that if you want to go all in this year, you need more stability back there. So I think a guy like at home makes perfect sense of your the Bruins. I mean, he's thirty years old big body which looks like a lot of Bruins fans, right? Just thought you know, he's six four. Yeah 6 for 2:15, but he's not just also like a I wrote that he's not like a guy like maybe Brenden Dillon who the the capitals acquired last year whose, you know, six four big guy, but he's kind of a stay-at-home option. I mean not Combs a skilled defenseman back there. He's one of the best over the last couple of years at generating 5 and 5 offense, which you need like you suck. Which I didn't it's funny. I was reading your column. I didn't realize he was that high up with 515 offense until I read that that

Mattias Ekholm Bruins Crews Lake Nick Woolf Tommy Crofts Joe Morrow Garlic Mcevoy Penguins Flyers Cooper Sean Government Brenden Dillon Combs
An End to the Tech Rally?

CNBC's Fast Money

04:35 min | 4 d ago

An End to the Tech Rally?

"We'll rising rates kill the tech rally. Guy what do you say yes back to. You melt absolutely so much of this has been predicated on on this low interest rate zero straight environment when you have tenure yields go from fifty three basis points in august two one point four percent today i understand rates are still low but the velocity and the speed of the move has been well. It hasn't been historic. But it's been noteworthy. And i think we're headed to one and a half. We've said it for a while and that's your line in the sand you start getting significantly north of one and a half percent and the entire thesis in my opinion behind a lot of these high flying tech names starts unravel and you're starting to see it now in the big hans christian andersen fan. I know euros well. Mel and a lot of people mistakenly call the that little vignette that he wrote. The emperor has no clothes. It's the emperor's new clothes. But i got to tell you the close at the fed is wearing right now are not fitting and i think they're going to be revealed for what they are in the coming weeks. They think they can control this out of their control at this point. Yeah karen i. I'll go to you on this. Well i mean obviously we have been in this environment of close zero percent insurance for so long and so when we move out of that. Something's gotta give now. Yes i think. So but i think a few things are happening at the same time. So there's the higher rates that guy talked about. We always talk about the risk premium. What should the equity risk premium beaten as rates go up. The risk premium should be higher therefore valuations lower. But the other side of. It is a rates going up because the economy is improving. And i believe that. Yes that's the case. But i also think that the earnings of a lot of these high flyers and let's talk about something like google for example. I think those earnings are going to be actually much better so on long those. It's a painful day. One thing that. I have on as a hedge which is not nearly enough to hedge how much i would lose him. A day like today is the gb which is the it's tech software and its high fliers. The biggest position is microsoft. But it's really expensive. Names salesforce service now zoom video. Docu sign crowd strike. Those are all going to get hit. Against what i think of as my more value tech today wasn't value at all on sale again and again but i think that if the rates move up slowly because the economy improves. I'm okay with that. I know we'll have a rotation into more cyclicals. But i'm sticking with what i've got. Yeah and obviously it's highest wires on. They'll probably take the hardest hits at this point carfax. North cornerstone macro makes a very good point in that is their alliance the s. and hunt five hundred on information technology. More broadly and in terms of down days and information technology eighty percent of the time the s. and p. five hundred trades lower as well. This is since nineteen eighty nine. Dan and i know you like carter's work. So i mean his point basically is you can't hire overall without technology that being said though if you look at the mag accomplish the microsoft apple google amazon. They've gone sideways for the last four months. Or so as we've seen that rotation into more cyclical names so we did move higher without their real participation and now it's interesting on a day like today that you see the nasdaq down two and a half percent or so to me. I think what karen laid out is really smart. I mean you look at the mega caps and you see their value tech yes. They benefited from low. Interest rates. For a whole host of reasons most notably. They raised a ton of money and they put on their balance sheet and they really not paying a whole heck of a lot and i think as it relates to interest rates. You have to ask yourself who really wants. Interest rates to go higher at this point and guy makes a good point that yeah they're going to they're going because the economy is getting a little better. Look at the ten year chart of the us treasury. You'll we thought we had generational lows at about one and a half percent back in two thousand twelve then again in two thousand sixteen then again in two thousand and thousand nine hundred then you consider yourself or you consider how much negative yielding sovereign debt. There is in the world about fifteen trillion and you think about the corporate been john debt and even consumers you yourself who wants rates to go higher then you look at it over a thirty year period and i think we have that chart and it's just upper left to bottom right so maybe you get through that one and a half on the ten year treasury. Maybe you get to that long-term downtrend which would be about two and a quarter. If that is the case then yes equities. You're going to have a very hard time in this environment. Given the state of deficits right

Christian Andersen Karen MEL FED Microsoft Google Us Treasury Carter DAN Amazon Apple John Treasury
The Case Of The Dead Fortune Teller

Sword and Scale

04:43 min | 5 d ago

The Case Of The Dead Fortune Teller

"On april of nineteen. Seventy five the. Us army pulled out of the vietnam war as the capital city of saigon fell to the socialist people's army of vietnam in the days prior and the days and weeks following the fall of saigon the. Us military accused several operations aimed at evacuating refugees. Fleeing the communist government operation baby lift evacuated over three thousand three hundred children and the operation. Frequent wind rescued more than seven thousand vietnamese operation. New life and new arrivals saw these refugees processed in guam before being transported to a few army bases across the united states. One of which was camp pendleton in orange county california all in all orange county slowly assimilated thousands of vietnamese thirty years later in two thousand five that influx of vietnam refugees successfully transformed a stretch of strawberry fields and salvage yards in westminster calif into something more familiar. The area is now known as little saigon. Little saigon in westminster california is the largest vietnamese population outside of saigon. A a result of that There are often street signs in little saigon that are in vietnamese businesses. Use silage in vietnamese. It almost gives you the feeling of being in vietnam but you're in california as a result of that. There is a large presence of cultural traditions in little saigon. The cafes are popular karaoke bars. All kinds of ethnic foods and things like dad can easily found in little saigon. This a place where people from the vietnamese community can gather and talk and there's a sense of community there. This is sonia but yesterday my name is sonia. Chief deputy district attorney at santa barbara. Da's office a decade ago. I worked at the orange. County district attorney's office vietnamese in orange county brought with them to the united states. The kind of determination that only comes with the suffering and adversity that they had endured but also they brought their culture their food and their superstitions one major aspect of the vietnamese culture is what some in the us might consider a novelty pastime. Fortune telling to the vietnamese is serious business deeply rooted in their cultural history. Community members will consult fortune tellers for all sorts of reasons like making sure their businesses are properly situated for the flow of good energy to ward off evil spirits and haunted souls with rituals and spells to diagnose supernatural causes of illness establishing lucky dates for personal undertakings and to predict the future of wealth. Health and love. Then two thousand five. One of the most popular fortune tellers in little saigon was haas smith who went by the name. Jade i say was because in april of that year. She was found murdered in the home she shared with her daughter. Anita vo anita's ex-boyfriend young tran would visit regularly. Bringing coffee and snacks. In an attempt to rekindle their relationship him in anita had been dating for a period of time and very young love and as such can be kinda volatile times deterrent in the sense of It wasn't a serious romance at least it wasn't for anita but there was a real friendship there so i think that in his efforts to not only lure her back but general friendship and carrying it would not be unusual for him to share a meal. Bring over some coffee or just talk to her on a regular basis even if they were not quote unquote boyfriend and girlfriend. So happens is young. Tran goes and delivers coffee and biscuits and he leaves it in the front door area of the home he never enters

Saigon Vietnam Socialist People's Army Orange County Westminster California United States Sonia Us Army Pendleton Guam Calif Haas Smith Santa Barbara Anita Vo Anita Young Tran DA Anita Jade Tran
Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner gives update on power outages and weather impact

All In with Chris Hayes

06:23 min | Last week

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner gives update on power outages and weather impact

"With me now is houston mayor sylvester turner previously served nearly thirty years as a texas state representative. He is in a command center right now. Monitoring situation in his city mayor. Thank you for taking a little time with us. And i don't want to start first with things aren't houston. Are they getting better. Chris in the last twenty four hours. Things have improved yesterday. At this time we had about one point. Three million customers without power Today as i talked to you that number is under thirty thousand in houston region yesterday The the water pressure was extremely low In fact hospitals were having a hard time getting but they needed Just to run a bear chillers to stay warm and other necessities today. The water pressure in the city of houston has increased And hospitals in much better shape at the same time people many of the people able to flush their kamoze improvement with still not wear. We want it to be but yesterday the pressure was below what we call twenty. Ps today as we speak that what a precious right around thirty so being things improving but again we still have some tremendous needs at. They're just zero in on the water aspect of this has been one of the more harrowing parts of it and a kind of a kind of cascade effect. We're going out water treatment facilities. Just explain to me what that means that it does. It mean pressure. Now you can you can. People can run water in their homes. That firefighters have water that hospitals have it is. That is that where things are correct. Hospitals now have watered. That can run the chillers. Keep the patients that doctors and medical staff Warm in in in in cool weather so to speak People able to take showers. Peabody plus two komo but because the water pressure dropped below the regulatory requirement twenty. Psi you automatically have to give ball water. Notices so you have over seven hundred jurisdictions around the state of texas a chieftain san antonio austin example in many others where there are bald notice requirements and that will continue to be the case probably through the weekend at the earliest that ball. What notice could probably be lifted on sunday. But i think for houston probably be monday. Which means if people don't have power because just also ball your water about two minutes but what happens if you don't have power then people are going to rely a great deal on bought a water and that's why starting today We started distributing water to those persons for example. Who don't have the means to go into a grocery store and purchase tomorrow for example will be masked water distribution site in the city of houston where we will probably give out tomorrow anywhere between seven to nine hundred thousand bottles of water primarily for people for families who already on the modulus. Chris and they just can't afford to go in and purchase two and three and four cases of water. And we'll do that Tomorrow saturday sunday until this ball. Water notice has been listed. That's really that's very helpful in understanding where things are. Let me let me also ask what your interfaces have been. With spill state and federal government i know females on the on on the ground. Have you been talking with aircraft that run the the grid with folks from fina. The federal government and with governor abbot. What are those interactions been like. Well i've talked several times with the ceo. Behead of eric hot And n n what he will say to you. Is that the system that we have in the state of texas. Our texas korea is designed for the summer heat. It is not necessarily designed for winter storms and then as relates to this. What happened in this. In the last four or five days that was simply not enough adequate generation supply available to meet the demand and the supply that they had reserved so to speak when with shop when some of the facilities came all flying of been made things even worse and let me quickly speak to those who are trying to say. oh the wind turbine frozen. You shouldn't be looking at renewables as a false false aligned. Being put four because the plants that came off line while natural gas plants coal fired. Plant Nuclear plants came offline. You wind turbine strobes. So it was a combination but when it comes to win and sola that's still only counts for a fraction of the energy that's produced in the state of texas. The rally at reality is that the state was. Ill prepared The other thing that i would add when i was in the legislature but twenty three of my twenty seven years i said on the on the committee that oversees our electric utility industry back in twenty eleven fouled a bill saying to the public utility commission that we need to exert greater oversight over urquhot to prevent blackouts of every kind that we have are experiencing in texas for four for these last four days batmobile. Chris was never given a hearing. And so for anybody. Who's just trying to place the blame on irc That's not enough as part of the story but it's not the total story. Archive is an agency of the state of texas is the leadership of that overseas or cat and what happened in this week with the failure. Not just urquhot but of the statewide leadership state representative state senators. Who didn't do enough to make the necessary. Structural changes prevent what took place this week but mccurry and as a result of that hundreds of thousands of texans paid a horrible price and they are number of stony that we live in the city of my city that anada that not allowed to date to go into next week. Some of them died from carbon monoxide. Trying to keep themselves

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner Texas San Antonio Austin Chris Komo Peabody Public Utility Commission Federal Government Eric Korea Legislature Mccurry
Texas Grid Failure Stirs Feud Between Cities and State

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:15 min | Last week

Texas Grid Failure Stirs Feud Between Cities and State

"Brutal winter. Storms swept through america this week killing more than thirty people. More snow is expected in the south and east. In the coming days electric grids were overwhelmed by surges in demand leaving millions without power and shivering amid dangerously. Low temperatures officials warned people not to bring grills or propane heaters indoors after a carbon monoxide poisoning. Killed at least two people hospitalized several others. The grid failures were most severe in texas which experienced widespread blackouts governor greg. Abbott spoke at a press conference yesterday. The fact is every source of power. The state of texas has access to has been compromised finger pointing and blame placing have already begun. Some republicans claim the state's reliance on renewable energy was the source of the problem. Charge shutdown down by white house. Press secretary jen psaki. Yesterday numerous reports have actually shown the contrary that it was failures in coal and natural gas that contributed to the states power shortages and officials at electric reliability council of texas which operates the state's power grid have gone so far as to say that failures and wind and solar where the least significant factors politics aside. The crisis has put a spotlight on weaknesses within america's infrastructure a particular concern as extreme weather events are on the rise this week. whole skylines. like dallas's went dark to conserve power. Alexandra sewage bass is a senior correspondent for the economist and is based in dallas. Texans were advised to stay indoors although some didn't really have a choice because they lost power and their homes. Were so cold that they brave the road to try and check into the few remaining hotels with rooms only to see hotels power as they arrived others put on every piece of skiwear they owned and tried to stay inside their homes. Hoping the heat and light would go on what we're supposed to be quote unquote rolling. Blackout were often long-lasting so we saw people lose power for hours. Thirty six hours sometimes longer at a peak this week we had four and a half million households in texas without power. So why the blackouts. What went wrong with electricity supply. This was really a perfect storm of failures. And i would point to three causes for the blackouts one is a failure of forecasting. Another is a equipment. Failure and a third is a failure a potential failure in the design of the market and not having enough capacity to meet demand. Let's take those intern. In what way was a failure of prediction. What we have seen this. Winter is a record call street and snowfall. We haven't seen it in about thirty years. Temperatures reached this low in texas and so urquhot which operates the grad knew that it was going to get cold a knew there was going to be snowfall but did not prepare. They thought they had enough capacity to meet the demand and they were off significantly. Some say they should have been better at forecasting. Because there had been allusions to the weakness of the grid in the past the summer say texas has seen brownouts before but never before has the state in recent history seen so much demand in the winter. And that's where cops forecasting really did the state poor and as for equipment failures. This was an interesting one at the very beginning. Republican politicians came out pointing fingers. I saying that. The showed the failure of green energy in america and renewables. Were to blame in fact. That's actually not the story at all. We now understand. Natural which accounts for about half of texas says energy supply when off line on the freezing cold temperatures caused natural gas plants to break down and so did the supply chain pipelines. It wasn't possible to operate in such freezing temperature. The cold also caused a reactor at one of the states to nuclear plants to go down wind turbines froze and it may be that transmission lines that help distribute electricity may have also iced analysts so it was really an across the board failure of equipment and you mentioned also the design of the energy market. I mean how. How does that figure in. Texas is energy market is really unique because of it independence that works well during good times where weather patterns are as predicted in difficult times where the grid is stressed. Other states are able to import power. An electricity from other states. Texas does not have that ability. Because it's not connected and so that independent is part of what caused issues this winter. The other feature of the market is that back in one thousand nine hundred nine. The legislature deregulated the power market to encourage competition and so while urquhot overseas the grid. We see some three hundred retail electricity providers by fuel on the wholesale market and then sell it to customers so customers have a lot of choice. It results in lower costs. Texas's are half the cost of electricity in say california but deregulation has also meant that the state and central authorities haven't required investments that might have helped combat some of the problems. We've seen emerge during this cold spell but this uniquely designed system does not seem to be designed flexibly yes. I think that this event has really put in stark relief the limitations of the system. And i think this event is going to lead to a political reckoning already. We've seen calls by the governor and bad house speaker to investigate. What's gone on with it. And i think they're going to be some proposed fixes. One big question is whether or not texas needs a capacity market and that basically axes an insurance product so if we see extreme temperatures there's more reserve capacity. The reality is that that would raise consumers electricity prices and so it's unclear whether or not consumers will ultimately want that and whether that's going to be the conclusion of this investigation but they're certainly going to be a lot of discussion about what fixes texas needs so that it's better prepared to withstand extreme weather events like this one you would imagine though that it's certainly after an event like this people wouldn't mind paying a bit more for their energy if it's insurance against this kind of disaster happening again. That may well be true. I think the key question to ask is how long lasting the lessons from this experience will be we saw after the polar vortex in two thousand fourteen. That hit the east coast. Pj m a regional. Transmission organization started making higher payments based on the reliability of service so that encourage providers to invest in their equipment to ensure performance during peak demand. We could imagine. Texas embracing a similar concept. It will depend on how politicized this event ends up being and whether politicians choose to draw incorrect conclusions about what caused this versus. what dead. But i think the hope of all texas customers is that there are real changes. That are made that help. Ensure the reliability of bread going forward. Because we're going to see more of these extreme weather events.

Texas Governor Greg Jen Psaki Electric Reliability Council O Alexandra Sewage Bass America Dallas Abbott Texans White House Legislature California Transmission Organization East Coast
Rush Limbaugh, conservative radio host, dies at 70

The Adam Carolla Show

00:35 sec | Last week

Rush Limbaugh, conservative radio host, dies at 70

"Conservative radio personality rush. Limbaugh has died one year after announcing his lung. Cancer diagnosis who was seventy Limbaugh had been hosting the rush limbaugh show in syndication for more than thirty years. Who's republican party icon. A close ally of former president donald trump. He was awarded the medal of freedom during the state of the union address. Last year he was diagnosed with lung cancer in january. He shared last january. He shared his cancer diagnosis in february in an october. He announced that the cancer is

Limbaugh Cancer Republican Party Donald Trump Lung Cancer
Learn How to Break Away From the Pack & Standout In a Busy Marketplace with Dr. Joel Kahn

Healthcare Business Secrets

05:17 min | Last week

Learn How to Break Away From the Pack & Standout In a Busy Marketplace with Dr. Joel Kahn

"Welcome to healthcare business. Secrets show where we interview industry leaders and break down exactly how they dominated the markets you can live from the best and can w revenue w impact and w time off and this episode was speaking. Joel can joel. Otherwise known as america's healthy hot dog is a graduate of the university of michigan. School of medicine is a clinical professor of medicine at wayne state university school of medicine a frequent lecturer and author on topics of vegan nutrition health heart disease reversal and has written several books about alternative nutrition and hothouse. He's had been a guest and commentator amy. Tv shows podcasts. Magazines m practices at the concept of a cardiac longevity is very unpracticed in michigan. Welcome to the show joe. Thank you so much excited to share with the audience. Yeah so i wanted to kind of give out with some background on you. And and how you got into the space because you've kind of gone down a different role than maybe stanford medicine and things teaches. Unfortunately not because of any time in the in the slammer or any problems with my license in a somewhat thoughtful various er- pigeon Course but i grew up in detroit michigan Talking now from the suburb in detroit michigan attended university in ann arbor. Michigan graduated top of my class medical school. But i knew from about a swallow wanted to be a heart moved to dallas moved to kansas city out and training with the best skills and particularly treating heart attacks with angioplasty instead. You have some wonderfully people from australia. New zealand in the my mentor in kansas city was from all actually a dislike from new zealand allah but when visit i'll be of the difference between the do another very different entry but nineteen ninety way before you were born. I imagine or at least run it. I join back in detroit. Michigan big practice. And i was the guy running a night treating sick people coronary Cardiac cath lab artists. But i was even back then very interested in the other part the About our of health which is prevention nutrition. Lifestyles sleep stress. Nutraceutical supplements the whole thing. Much more light perhaps naturopathy and chiropractic. So i was always reading on my own incorporating little tidbits been using coenzyme q ten of people for thirty years my college or and then i'll percolating along as very happy guy got a chance to look down to. The university mentioned developed a preventive cardiology program. But i knew that there was something else that i really had an energy for something else. I mean that was doing wonderful. Things are day is the same thing every day. When wonderful big over i went back to university in two thousand twelve a whole year doing a university based courses integrative cardiology natural gas and pretty much nutrition thing adnan stunning that for decades. But i didn't know all the nutraceutical isn't about chemistry testing and the epa genetics and the protonix and we can use fancy words. I graduated and of course. I say in traditional practice but i ultimately with some thought took a big breath five years ago and says you know what i've done enough cath lab emergencies. That mouse running three hassles on the weekend alone. A great practice. I one focus on prevention and i looked around the country. I could barely find in the united states preventive cardiology practice. That was not attuned to only prescription. Drugs are printing preventive cardiology practices more precision more prescription. I wanted to about more health lifestyle disease reversal. I gleaned from various people what i could kinda created a model. I left the insurance system. You wanna have a sleepless night. As a physician who's always had a whole room full of baylor's and medicare and blue cross as we call in the united states and others and tell people in the city of detroit that is not beverly hills los angeles by a reasonably prosperous busy city with auto industry. But i don't take insurance. I can't even take your insurance them out of the system and launched in five years ago and yes. There's always challenges. My tears thought that maybe. I did. Have alcohol rounds. Drug problem slices. Is he doing all as they didn't understand. It has been the best decision. I don't think would have been as meaningful if i didn't pay the price. All those years of doing traditional medicine I'm respected because know what heart catheterization angioplasty bypass Medications use them when needed by I'm very much dedicate myself as upstream cardiologists. I'm the salmon trying to go upstream. Everybody else is going the other direction. But there's a lot of people out there and you know. I i'm sure for practice that are looking or a different path. They're just tired and they feel tired too many drugs too. Many ten minute appointments with dr the game now. It's a good nurse or a physician since i've provided alternative of time education a different approach. And it's so gratifying. Amin that i'm sixty one years old. I don't know what the word retires. Because i love what i do day after day today

Detroit Michigan Wayne State University School Kansas City New Zealand University Of Michigan United States School Of Medicine Joel Heart Disease Ann Arbor Heart Attacks AMY JOE Dallas Adnan Australia EPA
Transforming Healthcare With Rebecca Love

Outcomes Rocket

05:55 min | Last week

Transforming Healthcare With Rebecca Love

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Everyone saw marquez here. Today i have the privilege of hosting rebecca love. She is a nurse. Entrepreneur inventor author. Tech's speaker and i nurse featured on ted dot com and part of the inaugural nursing panel featured at south by south two thousand eighteen. Rebecca was the first director of nurses innovation and entrepreneurship in the united states at northeastern school of nursing the funding initiative in the country designed to empower nurses as innovators and entrepreneurs where she founded the nurse hackathon the movement as lead to transformational change in the nursing profession in two thousand nineteen rebecca with a group of leading nurses the world founded and is president of sand sale the society of nurse scientists innovators entrepreneurs and leaders a nonprofit that quickly attained recognition by the united nations as an affiliate member to the on. Rebecca is an experienced nurse entrepreneur founding hire nurses dot com and twenty thirteen which was acquired in two thousand eighteen by realto in the uk where she served as the managing director of us markets until its acquisition and twenty nineteen currently rebecca serves as the principal of clinical innovation at optimize rx. She's passionate about empowering nurses and creating communities to help nurses innovate create and collaborate start businesses and inventions to transform healthcare. Such a privilege to have you here. Rebecca i'm really excited to touch on this very important topic of nurses going to be with you. Thank you for having me absolutely. And so rebecca. You've done some really neat things in your healthcare career and you know before we jump into the actual details of what we're gonna talk about. I love to hear more about you than and what what keeps you inspired in in your healthcare career. I think that being a background and being a nurse And washing with the front lines going for and doing on a daily basis especially in the face of i think every day i wake up. I'm inspired by those nurses to go out selflessly to transform and take care of individuals that most of I would wonder if we would cross that. Threshold and nursing was a second career choice for me in life and it was inspired because my mom really encouraged me to pursue nursing. Because she said that. Although there's a whole bunch of great leaders in other areas we needed really strong nursing leadership to sort of transform the future of the profession. And i took it very seriously after becoming immersed in watching certain challenges that was basically in the profession. I don't know if you know. Some of the statistics but percents of nursing graduates leave the bedside within two years of practice which is nearly the largest exodus of any profession out there and we are facing potential nursing shortage of vermillion nurses in the united states. And i think what motivates me is. How can we stop that accident. And how can we secure this profession at the future of healthcare And i think. I'm still motivated by both that here that there may not be nurses by the bedside in the future as much as i am inspired to transform. What a career for nursing. Looks like that me inspire the best to choose that profession debt. And you know. I wasn't aware that's a. That's a pretty big number of of nurses leaving and also want to say thanks to all the nurses listening or if you have somebody in your family your friends that are nurses at the front line. As as rebecca mentioned it's tough and especially during this pandemic The importance of what you do is critical so so yeah let's kick things off with a thank you and yes a rebecca. Why why so many people like white white is so many people eat nursing. Yeah there's there's some interesting study that are being collaborated on this entire thing. Why thirty to fifty percent of them are leaving the bedside within cheers of practice and my dad asked me this question. He that he the. Cfo honey when you graduated with your finance degree. Were you expecting to carry the same level of responsibility as cfo laughed and he instead. Of course not. And i said well welcomes the world of nursing where you graduate you enter the profession and not only. Are you carrying an incredible boat and patience upon you. But you're expected to carry the same kind of patient and responsibility as nurses with thirty or fifty years of experience. So i think one is incredible dichotomy of being put into a world. Where even if you have little training you're going to deal with those two patients. And then secondly i think one of the biggest factors is that the profession of nursing if you call it a profession has not been cultivated along a career progression and think younger nurses that are entering the profession realized. I don't know if you've noticed. But over course a twenty year career the average increase of salary of nurses only one point five percents a year which is half the cost of the increase in wages or salaries on the average american But more importantly there is no career development. So it's not as though when you start out as financial assistance and you progress ups eventual pointed the being the cfo and nursing. The first day of your career can very much look like the last day of your career thirty years later and i think that because healthcare has focused a very long time that the roles of nurses are to be by the bedside and that that job that has driven position is not in and of itself that they've never focused on. What are the career and the ambitions of the nurse by the bedside new ford so suddenly two years into a nurse his career. They're working in day night holiday weekend rotation they've had an increase of salary of about three percent and of them are patients that are constantly dying or sick and being called to work in and they don't know where their career is going in comparison to the friends that they have chosen other careers. Who are working monday through friday. Have five weeks of vacation and are steaming. The world where these nurses aren't sure what's going on. I think there's a couple downwards playing trends. But i think those are two of the largest.

Rebecca Rebecca Love Northeastern School Of Nursing Society Of Nurse Scientists In Realto Marquez United States United Nations Tech UK Ford
Damon Johnson misses live concerts

Pantheon

07:43 min | 2 weeks ago

Damon Johnson misses live concerts

"Nothing better to do during a pandemic than listened to some new tunes. Some stuff you've been wanting to listen to and haven't had the chance to. I know things are starting opened up across the country but it's nevertheless music can always be escape. It can always be a form of healing and rock and roll is always there for you. It's it's loyalty you so please be loyal to rock and roll like to welcome in our next guest. Some really excited about this. I've had the pleasure of seen him live over the last few years with his old band. Black star riders and also solo. I had a pleasure of seeing him up for the winery dogs here in saint charles just outside of chicago couple years ago. Like to welcome in mr damon johnson. What's going on man. How are you good buddy. Thank you for having me on Sure i miss getting to play live shows at all but i definitely miss coming to the greater chicago. Area man there some of the best rock and roll fans in the country right there. Yeah it's always a great seen a great show whenever whenever. There's a live concert here in chicago whether it's a small club theater or arena it it just has an atmosphere that is like no other. It's really cool. I agree man I've been coming to chicago since the early days of brother cane We could have first. Album outweigh back in ninety three and straightaway man chicago and northern illinois radio in general. They really embrace this. And i feel like it's a relationship that i've been really fortunate to have for gosh man crazy number thirty years ago long time and you have some connection here too in chicago. I know steph from f three design. I think he does your local man. Stephon stephan does everything. He's yeah steffen. I think the first thing he did for me was help me. Get my website design in early two thousands and then Bizmart work for me. On my i guess my second solo album which was in a stick record and then when he has started warns. The arm in You know i've been a proud supporter of their clothing company and i love awareness stuff and they're just they're to of my favorite people on the planet. They're like family to us. Yeah i've known stephan for gosh. It's gotta be two decades three decades almost and i used to live with this rock band in chicago and he used to do. They're designed to as well in all their kind of marketing in and You know other kind kinda website and designing stuff. And i've known him so i run into him at shows like him and i always like bump into each other like. Hey man what's going on so it's always good to see him. That's amazing you've known him longer than i have. So that's That's really cool. And i'm i'm so proud of the growth. They've had their company and They're both incredibly talented. And it's inspiring you know for them to start their own kind of mom and pop business as they as they have and they grown it to the level that they have. I'm really proud to be a part of their circle. Well we got lots to get into but we always begin the episode. Every time we have a first time guest the same way and that's the essence of the show. The the question. We always ask just like every rock song has a hook. That sucks you in rock fan has a moment whether it's a band performance a song or album that hook them on rock and roll. What was it for you. Wow that's a big question The thing that hooked me on rock and roll was. I saw kiss on the midnight special on my television. When i was in the seventh grade and i it was the equivalent. I'm sure jay of our older friends. When they saw the beatles on ed sullivan that was the equivalent of that moment for me. No one's ever asked me that question to tell you the truth You know. I grew up my my folks to this day man. Both my parents love music and so it was a very musical household. The radio was always playing in. Dad would buy vinyl records of perjury artists pop artists and but yeah that was when i felt like it was something that was specifically mind. You know my parents not care for kids. They played black diamond complete with this. You know the rising drum riser in the pyro and everything manages your that. Messed me up preordained. I think it put me on the path for sure. Your kiss was an inspiration for a lot of musicians. And i think it was just the the imagery you know the the faces and the explosions and all the stuff. That kind of just pulled you in you know. The music was great too. But it just had like this power over young kids. I mean i got exposed to kiss back in like the early eighties. And i always remember knowing of them in knowing what they look like before i heard their music and then i heard their music and then i was just hooked. Yeah you know. I you know. I'm i'm probably a little older than you. So you know that midnight. Special show man that would have been nineteen seventy seven grow. This was this was early. This was. I believe this was between kiss alive. One destroyer and You know it was cool. Because i had a group of friends at school that you know we were all kind of discovering rock and roll at the same time and i remember that year in school that no kid and leonard skinner. I'm from the south. And so you know sweet home. Alabama was already the national anthem for us. And so you know the musicality of a ban like skinner We love led zeppelin and You know not long after that. We really got into bands like rush pink. Floyd bad company was big call. Rogers greatest singer of all time. You know things like that. So that set the table for me. I guess jay and then the two big bands not long after that you know when i finally started going to concerts where we saw thin lizzy. Ironically i saw them in seventy nine and that was a game changer for me and The the next summer. I saw van halen for the first time and i was cooked like that's it. I'm i gonna play guitar. You know. I have friends who go to college and get a degree and and and pursued that actually and it wasn't until i had already graduated junior college that i really ever thought of even considering it to be possible to play music as living especially for women coming from such rural backgrounds. There was nobody from where i came from. That was a professional musician. You know so. It just didn't seem possible.

Chicago Mr Damon Johnson Stephon Stephan Saint Charles Northern Illinois Steffen Steph Stephan Ed Sullivan JAY Beatles Leonard Skinner Skinner Alabama Floyd Rogers Van Halen
Making a career change in the middle of a pandemic

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:50 min | 2 weeks ago

Making a career change in the middle of a pandemic

"I mean you're curious right about what it's going to be like in the economy yet to come because it's going to be different whether we're ready or not so. We begin today with two stories on that theme. The newspaper for the first of which is our regular thursday update on the state of the american labor market lousy in a word and other seven hundred ninety three thousand americans lost their jobs last week. Yes that is down a tad from the week earlier. But still as i think i say every week now stratospheric lee high and overall twenty something million people in this economy are getting some kind of government benefit so to the bigger point which is of course the theme of the top. Half of the program when it's going to be like when it's done to find new jobs when this is all over a lot of people might have to find new careers. The pew research center. Some new data out on that two thirds of people who are unemployed have considered going into a new occupation or a new field while one third have taken concrete steps to get new training or education as marketplace's mitchell hartman reports getting all the cogs in the back to work machine turning together leading can be easy in normal not pandemic times. Many rodriguez would have about twenty local men and women in the construction pre apprentice program. He runs in west chicago called revolution. Workshop recruiting from underserved communities typically talking about black brown and women. I mean the community desperately needs upskilling and a pathway into family sustaining careers. Most of the graduates go into construction jobs paying eighteen dollars an hour or more but the pandemic happened and seventy five percent of the folks that we have placed were laid off in the spring summer and fall revolution workshop. Didn't start any new cohorts of job trainees. Because there was no construction work for them. Thirty year jeremy smith of reno nevada got laid off from his job as a casino valet in march. He took his relief check and some savings and went back to community college with able to graduate with a bachelor's and why train management about two semesters early so ended up kicking me down the road a little quicker than i planned on. He's looking in his new field. But no luck so far. I'm sure it'll come roaring back. But it's a little dry right now. Meanwhile manny rodriguez at revolution workshop has a new class of construction pre apprentices. Now we are currently recruiting for our second cohort. So you know. I can put that blog out there or if you can do that for us every awesome. Consider it done website at our website. I'm mitchell hartman for marketplace gotta finish it mitchell it's marketplace dot org. Just make sure funny knows

Lee High Mitchell Hartman Pew Research Center Rodriguez Jeremy Smith Chicago Manny Rodriguez Reno Nevada Mitchell
Taylor Swift's Re-Recorded Fearless Album Has 6 New Songs

Daily Pop

04:24 min | 2 weeks ago

Taylor Swift's Re-Recorded Fearless Album Has 6 New Songs

"Taylor. Finally getting revenge on scooter braun. Absolutely i love it because it's her masters you know and when you're young or when you're excited you sign onto a record label and you don't even think about everything else. Happy to get it. Yeah you're so happy to get it. So i'm excited for her her new album and the new songs that are on there. I think our fans are going to support her and the everyone's going to buy it. I think you're right. Her fans are gonna supporter. I just don't this is really about revenge at this point. I think this is more about making a statement making a stand for artists out there to own their own masters. But i've said this time and time again. I don't think that she needs to be thinking about. This is me versus scooter. Scooter made a business deal that anybody would have made had. They had the capital and the chance for it to be brought to the table. I think she needs to rearrange in and and stop thinking in that manner if she is because we know what happened last time. She got an a few of ninety. We ended up with the whole snake gate and it was crazy and it didn't really turn out very well for her but i read. This is the best way to do revenge like you said i think her you're right though. Her message is for future artists. Who do what you can to try to own your your own songs. It is challenging for an upcoming artists because the label feels. They're taking a risk on you and so they they really fight to own that they're putting money into your marketing budget to your studio time to all of things and it takes a song. I don't remember the exact math but like a song has to be number one for so many weeks for you to really make any kind of money on it at all. I mean as you guys all know. Artists make most of their money off touring and the rights. So another reason why she's probably doing this too is for all the future times that movies or commercials or whoever wants to use her music. She gets the credit for. I don't know if i would want the thirty year old taylor swift singing about fourteen year old things. I think i'm going to want the original. I'm going to want the fourteen year old taylor. Her voice change. Her body has changed. Everything about that. Time has changed the music chain. It even better now. You have grown woman singer. That's kind of scary. I think this is going to be huge for her. I think it's the maybe the old songs aren't going to give them that much recognition but the six new songs. It's gonna be a whole new money pop. The did make it to the first album. Probably risi nine or instagram. She says because she didn't want to many slow songs or too many sad songs. Or you know those reasons why you cut songs and you put together an album the way that you do you know you don't wanna bunch of slow tempo songs. You don't want all fast tempo songs. You wanna have a variety show your range and you can only fit so many on an album. Release back in the day now. Things are looking a little bit differently. So i think and she that was like some of my favorite song writing for her was back in the waiting for this. I really think i'm excited about up waiting. Don't you want to hear the woman saying before. I mean i'll listen to it. I think it's gonna be great. I just think we need to lower our expectations. I remember when this album came out in two thousand and six. It was not only the bob. It went diamond like for album to go diamond into one. E twenty is almost impossible. Because i think it is a little bit of revenge. The little bit of. I'm gonna show you. It's a little bit. Let me show the other artists. I get what you're saying. It was definitely a business deal and a business move for him. But she's like you know what. I what my masters you gotta understand. When michael jackson bought the beatles masters. Can you imagine the beatles a lot really for my business move. That was gangster. You can't be mad at somebody if we're coming to the table with money to buy something like it wasn't his fault and i stick with that but i understand where she's coming from. I just think when you get wrapped up in revenge and one upping somebody. You often get your expectations kinda deflated. Because it doesn't go as

Taylor Braun Taylor Swift Risi Michael Jackson Beatles
The Hollywood Ripper And The Hollywood Slashers

Drowning Verdict

04:43 min | 2 weeks ago

The Hollywood Ripper And The Hollywood Slashers

"Hello and welcome to drowning verdict. I'm chip mahoney and you're listening to my true crime podcast. This is a podcast where i talk about cases out there that fascinate me and go more in depth with the case. So thanks for joining me today. You might found me on my youtube or twitter which is a good way to check out the episodes. And if you're there on youtube i'm doing full episodes their format c-can sub follow and always get the latest episodes there You can also find me by the way on just about any where you get your favorite podcast whether it stitcher spotify apple Whichever platform you prefer. I'm there you can follow share with friends and come back for more. Because as i often say to listeners of the podcast try to deliver something New and interesting a unique angle if you will. I'm an author. I like to talk about story connections and maybe from time to time finding some truth here and there especially on something that's Say a cold case and can be No excuse me a case that's been solved. That was once cold and that can be applied to something. That's open and active something to be learned if you will so in today's episode I've got a interesting thing to talk about One is a recent case that is Been in the courts last couple of years and has finally come to justice. The other is traveling back in time about forty years nonetheless. Same place of activity crimes. Which would be los angeles area sunset strip hollywood and you know not the bright lights and and fancy stuff there the underground the dark underbelly and also i have a fun fact for you Maybe i should backtrack there. It's not so fun as much as it is an interesting fact but you tell me What you might think of it now. If you leave a comment you know Ted bundy you know the name and in america. He's the most sensationalized killer of our time. There's probably no less than fifty movies and books on that guy. And he wasn't the most prolific if you will if you're keeping stats I think it was samuel. Little died recently. He was near ninety three victims. So he's not like that guy but nonetheless you know his name and the serial killer world he reigned supreme which is an interesting thing and a sad thing at the same time because in america we like to keep stats so very strange about us folks. But here's a fun fact for you if you will. There was another serial killer in the united states named bundy with the same last name. And furthermore wasn't a guy it was a woman and her name was carol m bundy and she's a focus of Part of today's episode. Along with her partner in crime men name doug clark and they were coined the hollywood slashers. They did their dirty work about forty years ago. So today's episode. I'm talking about the hollywood ripper. Which is a recent kind of case that's come to being closed. And justice brought to their and then the hollywood slashers going back about forty years and just to talk about these two Cases and maybe learn something for the future. So let me talk about carol bundy and doug clark before i get into the ripper. Who came around. Oh probably about twenty five thirty years later and was most recently convicted. So those two somehow each other in the dirt and grime areas of sunset strip area in those bars and they got together with her dark ideas And found that they shared some some dark fantasies. If you will on some sick fantasies

Youtube Mahoney Hollywood Doug Clark America Ted Bundy Twitter Carol M Bundy Apple Los Angeles Samuel Carol Bundy
The Empowerment Of Using Social Media To Reinvent Yourself

Trent365

03:14 min | 2 weeks ago

The Empowerment Of Using Social Media To Reinvent Yourself

"Have heard. I finally got on clubhouse a few days ago. And i am loving the platform. And i generally believe that it is a platform that has the potential to do a lot of good for a lot of people but the same functionality that allows it to do a lot of good. He's also allowing the scanners and so there's a lot of talk now about the people on clubhouse who climbing to have the success. Sorry the secrets to everything. The secret to success the secret to life the secret to making a million dollars there are multiple successful startup. Exit founders are multiple successful business investors. All of these claims many of which could be verified if people took the time but a lot of people don't bother taking the time they just kind of accept them believe what they read and if the guy or girl speaking is particularly convincing well they must be talking the truth it must be true what they say but the thing about these platforms is that it gives you the chance to dabble at reinventing yourself without throwing away your current or your previous life so for example with a most people see me as a hotel spa guy. I spent the first half of my career in the hotel. Business the second half of my career in the spa business so over the last thirty years quite thirty. I'm not that old. I'm the hotel spy. But i'd like to think that bring more to the table and more to the conversation then just being the hotel spa guy. I've liked to think. I have a fair amount of knowledge and information and opinions that could be useful and even valuable in relation to a whole bunch of other topics like branding or marketing or voice or technology in general or startups even so i could go onto these new platforms and not just be trent. The hotel spa guy. I could be trent. The business guy. Trent the marketing guy. Trent the voice technology guy. Now i'm not claiming to be an expert in those things. And that's not what i would recommend you do but you can get on the and say that you have knowledge and experience or opinions in all of these areas that you're interested in or just one so if you want to branch out and try and try to reinvent yourself using the social media platforms to do that without making crazy outlandish claims i recommend that at all. Because there's enough that rubbish out. But i do believe that using these social media platforms like clubhouse to reinvent yourself to try to dabble at another area of interest. I think is a really really empowering thing and i think sometimes that gets lost in all of the negativity that we talk about social media. It's no there's nothing wrong with trying to reinvent yourself as long as you don't claim to be something you're not so i reckon did on these social media platforms. Think about what else you want to dabble in and see if you can add value to those conversations. Maybe you can't. Maybe i think. I know a lot about technology and so i get on inside on interested in these these conversations i get in there and realize i know nothing doesn't matter i've dabbled. I found out that. I'm really out of my depth. So go back and reinvent myself in another way so using social media to reinvent yourself i believe is an empowering thing

Trent
Healing Your Body After Alcohol with Bryan Bradford

Recovery Happy Hour

04:25 min | Last month

Healing Your Body After Alcohol with Bryan Bradford

"Hi brian how are you doing good tricia. Thanks so much for inviting me tonight. Of course i'm so happy to have you. I know we go back a long long way. Known your family for almost thirty years and talk. Yeah your sister definitely started working for you guys twenty years ago. I miss you guys all the time. But after knowing you guys for so long and hot in for shopping at this flower shop for so long i know you are the guy to go to when it comes to talking about like more natural solutions for for repair essentially and for just for overall health. So what i did was like crowd sourced. And i got all the best questions from everybody and they are dying to pick your brain how they can recover in sobriety so i have won the honor of being the biggest erred so yes definitely be happy to answer those well. Let's get the party. Started the number. One thing that people want to know about is sugar cravings eliminate alcohol and then all of a sudden. We're dying for sugar. How can people deal with this in a healthier way. It's a great question. Tricia in is not just for alcohol. I mean this is type. Two diabetes is probably such fast growing disease in our country. Right now and so really. It's blood sugar. Prominent everybody is happy and so when it comes to that question. I always like to talk about the chemistry of the body a little bit and some people get bored with chemistry. But it's important understand our body a little bit more so you can understand why we do this and not that and so i like to talk about the hormone cortisol. Most people heard this hormone. Because it's your stress hormone so when you're under stress your body produces more cortisol. The problem is actually to other things that drive cortisol to go high in the body beside stress. The second thing that drives cortisol is is inflammation. And we know that alcohol can be one of the contributors of inflammation and the third thing that tribes cortisol up is drops in blood sugar. So when we were going through drinking binges or maybe eating too many carbs sugars you were just causing your your sugar to spike and crash throughout the day and this also made this hormone cortisol do the same thing so when this cortisol mechanism gets engaged. You're basically engaging most people know asked the fight or flight syndrome we talk about fight or flight all the time in recovery for sure. That's right. Because i like to talk about it on the chemistry level because we all heard the term stress did no one knows what that really means to the body. So i'm gonna put it in trying to pitch this through our audio here. What cortisol is that fight or flight hormone which means you were designed to run away from danger but you really weren't meant to eat and run at the same time so what the body does particularly what cortisol does is that when cortisol goes high is suppressed Digestive function. so this is a lot of people are not hungry when their cortisol is. Hi how many of you are waking up in the morning and you're not hungry till eleven twelve clock. That is not normal. We've most of us should be hungry as soon as we wake up. Because we've been fasting through the night but that's not way most of america's going right now so this is leading to an issue really of this sugar dysregulation so maybe night we had too many carbs. We are chocolate and popcorn and glass of wine percent people then basically. We spiked her blood. Sugar up in when that blood sugar starts to crash. Cortisol starts to go up so when we are suppressing our digestive system with this cortisol hormone. And now you decide to eat that piece of chicken or that hamburger whatever it is that protein yours. Your digestion has an acid in your stomach called. Hcl that's supposed to break down these proteins but when it's under suppression. The food sits in the stomach. Too long inserts to ferment. And so a lot of people start experiencing some bloating or belching or more gas sometimes. If it goes on long enough it turns no heartburn indigestion and then these undigested proteins that undigested piece of chicken that did not break down very well starts to go into your small intestines and now your small tested that proteins too big to be absorbed properly so your immune system starts to attack that piece of protein.

Tricia Brian Diabetes America
Jim's Recovery Story

Big Book Podcast

06:02 min | Last month

Jim's Recovery Story

"I was born in a little town in virginia in an average religious home. My father a negro was a country physician. I remember in my early youth. My mother dress me just as she did. My two sisters. And i wore curls. Until i was six years of age at that time i started school. And that's how i got rid of the curls. I found that. Even then i had fears and inhibitions we live just a few doors from the first baptist church and when they had funerals i remember very often asking my mother whether the person was good or bad and whether they were going to heaven or hell i was about six then. My mother had been recently converted and actually had become a religious fanatic. That was her main neurotic manifestation. She was very possessive with us. Children another thing. That mother drilled me was a very puritanical point of view as to sex relations and as to motherhood and womanhood. I'm sure my ideas as to what life should be like. We're quite different from that. Of the average person with whom i associated later on in life that took its toll. I realized that now about this time an incident took place in grade school that i have never forgotten because it made me realize that i was actually a physical coward during recess. We were playing basketball. And i had accidentally trip to fellow just little larger than i was. He took the basketball and smashed me in the face with it. That was enough provocation to fight. But i didn't fight and i realized after recess. Why didn't it was fear that hurt and disturbed me a great deal. Mother was of the old school and figure that anyone. I associated with should be of the proper type of course in my day. Times had changed. She just hadn't changed with them. I don't know whether it was right or wrong but at least i know that people weren't thinking the same. We weren't even permitted to play cards in our home. But father would give us just a little tidy with whiskey and sugar and warm water now and then. We had no whiskey in the house. Other than my father's private stock. I've never seen him drunk in my life although he'd take a shot in the morning and usually one in the evening and so did i but for the most part. He kept his whiskey in his office. The only time. I have ever seen my mother take anything. Alcoholic was around christmas time when she would drink some eggnog or light wine. I remember my first year in high school. That mother suggested that. I do not join the cadet unit. She got a medical certificate. So that i should not have to join it. I don't know whether she was a pacifist. Or whether she just thought that in the event of another war it would have some bearing on my joining up about then too. I realized that my point of view on the opposite sex wasn't entirely like that of most to the boys. I knew for that reason. I believe i married at a much younger age than i would have had not been for my home training. My wife and i have been married for some thirty years. Now was the first girl that i ever took out. I had quite a heartache about her then because she wasn't the type of girl that my mother wanted me to marry in the first place she had been married before. I was her second husband. My mother resented it so that the first christmas after our marriage which was in may of nineteen twenty-three. She didn't even invite us to dinner. After our first child came my parents both became allies. But in later days after i became an alcoholic they both turned against me. My father had come out of the south and had suffered a great deal down there. He wanted to give me the very best and he thought that nothing but being a doctor would suffice on the other hand. I believe that. I've always been medically inclined though i have never been able to see medicine quite as the average person sees it. I do surgery because that's something that you can see. It's more tangible. But i can remember and postgraduate days and during internship that very often i'd go to the patient's bed and start a process of elimination and then very often i'd wind up guessing. That wasn't the way it was with my father. I think with him. It possibly was a gift. Intuitive diagnosis father through the years had built up a very good mail order business. Because at that time there wasn't too much money in medicine. I don't think. I suffered too much as far as the racial situation was concerned because i was born into it and knew nothing other than that. A man wasn't actually mistreated. Though if he was he could only resent it. He could do nothing about it on the other hand. I got quite a different picture. Farther south economic conditions had a great deal to do with it. Because i've often heard my father say that his mother would take one of the old time flour sacks and cut a hole through the bottom and two corners of it and they're you'd have a gown of course when father finally came to virginia to work his way through school. He resented the southern cracker as he often called them so much that he didn't even go back to his mother's funeral. He said he never wanted to set foot in the deep south again and he didn't i went to elementary and high school in washington. Dc and then to howard university. My internship was in washington. I never had too much trouble in school. i was able to get my workout. All my troubles arose. When i was thrown socially among groups of people as far as school was concerned i made fair grades throughout. This was around. Nineteen thirty five and it was about this time that i actually started drinking during the years. Nineteen thirty to nineteen thirty five due to the depression and its aftermath. Business went from bad to worse. I had my own medical practice in washington at that time but the practice slackened and the mail order business started to fall off

Basketball Virginia Washington Howard University Depression
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:07 min | 7 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"It's part of why <Speech_Female> it can be difficult <Speech_Female> even now to <Speech_Female> get your hands on <Speech_Female> the Nintendo <SpeakerChange> switch console. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> A core part <Speech_Female> of the appeal is <Speech_Female> that the game allows <Speech_Female> players to <Speech_Female> be together <Speech_Music_Female> virtually in <Speech_Music_Female> real time. <Speech_Female> That's <Speech_Music_Female> what made the production possible. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> While they recorded <Speech_Female> the music separately. <Speech_Female> All of <Speech_Female> the performers were <Speech_Female> able to act out <Speech_Female> their roles through <Speech_Female> the game <Speech_Music_Female> as their <SpeakerChange> own <Speech_Music_Female> animal crossing avatars. <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Watched the opera <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Female> you hear it <Speech_Female> it sounds like these people <Speech_Female> are in the same room <Speech_Female> and there's no visual <Speech_Female> reminder telling <Speech_Female> you that they're not. <Speech_Music_Female> So <Speech_Female> it feels like <Speech_Female> this is <Speech_Female> performance that happened <Speech_Female> together <Speech_Female> when you see the <Speech_Female> squares on Zoom, <Speech_Female> you <Speech_Music_Female> know that they're not together. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> the best part of <Speech_Female> life theater is <Speech_Female> experiencing something. <Speech_Female> I think <SpeakerChange> together <Speech_Female> that's <Silence> Pellegrino again <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> before <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the pandemic do <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> a Donnie productions <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> was planning <Speech_Music_Female> three in person <Speech_Music_Female> operas in received <Speech_Female> grants to help <Speech_Female> them employ about <Silence> forty singers. <Speech_Female> Now, <Speech_Female> the future <Speech_Female> for any in person productions <Speech_Music_Female> is uncertain <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> says <Speech_Music_Female> being ten. It's <Speech_Female> been like <Speech_Female> a uniquely devastating <Speech_Female> experience <Speech_Female> and that singing <Speech_Music_Female> is like one of the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> most dangerous <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> like things you <Speech_Female> can do <Speech_Female> and it's kind <Speech_Female> of like <SpeakerChange> put <Speech_Female> the whole industry <Speech_Female> in chaos. <Speech_Female> Baynton, is among <Speech_Female> many in the industry <Speech_Female> experimenting <Speech_Female> with how <Speech_Female> to perform and connect <Speech_Music_Female> with audiences <Speech_Female> remotely <Speech_Female> the traditional <Speech_Female> way to do it <Speech_Female> is great <Speech_Female> but like <Speech_Female> these other kind of <Speech_Female> new, maybe weird <Speech_Female> ways of doing it <Speech_Music_Female> are also <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> exciting I. Think <Speech_Female> it doesn't. <Speech_Female> It's nice to <Speech_Female> be able to look. It doesn't <Speech_Female> have to be this like one <Speech_Female> way that everyone <Silence> kind of thinks of it. <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> And as pelegrina <Speech_Music_Female> points. <Speech_Female> Cartoons and opera <Speech_Music_Female> have been intertwined <Speech_Music_Female> for decades. <Speech_Music_Female> It pops <Speech_Female> up episodes <Speech_Female> of the ninety show. Hey, <Speech_Female> Arnold in spongebob <Speech_Female> squarepants <Speech_Female> and of course, <Speech_Music_Female> looney <SpeakerChange> tunes <Speech_Music_Female> and Bugs Bunny. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> I feel like if you ask <Speech_Female> anyone, they're going to know <Speech_Female> the right of the <Speech_Female> Valkyrie theme. <Speech_Female> They might not know <Speech_Music_Female> the name, but they'll know <Speech_Music_Female> what it is in their head. <Speech_Music_Female> So I don't <Speech_Music_Female> think this is totally <Speech_Music_Female> out <Speech_Music_Female> of left <SpeakerChange> field. <Speech_Music_Female> That <Speech_Female> being said I think <Speech_Female> the video game is just <Speech_Female> like the next generation <Speech_Female> of that <SpeakerChange> kind of <Speech_Music_Female> cartoon. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> They <Speech_Female> hope that this approach <Speech_Female> to opera, we'll draw <Speech_Music_Female> nontraditional <Speech_Music_Female> audiences. <Speech_Female> Pelegrina <Speech_Female> says they have also received <Speech_Female> positive responses <Speech_Music_Female> from opera, <Speech_Music_Male> lovers. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Benton said the most <Speech_Female> powerful thing about <Speech_Music_Female> the project was <Speech_Music_Female> performing <SpeakerChange> again <Speech_Music_Female> with other people, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I. Think we all felt kind <Speech_Female> of emotional <Speech_Female> like watching it for the <Speech_Female> first time and hearing <Speech_Female> all of our voices <Speech_Female> together <Speech_Female> and we were like, oh my gosh, <Speech_Female> like it sounds <Speech_Female> like we're together even <Speech_Female> though <SpeakerChange> we <Speech_Music_Female> were apart. <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female>

Nintendo Pellegrino Benton Arnold
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

05:28 min | 7 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Plane and little, and she has to do with all of that in addition to being a woman in a time when women had little to no autonomy. So she has quite a lot to overcome and Jane is resilient in the face of all that adversity. I think the resilience that I'm most moved by in the book is Jane's Moral Resilience like she would quite literally rather be starving and homeless and act outside her own values or sacrificed her independence and I think it was amazing as a young person and as you know a woman in my early thirties now to be. To have this example of someone who's committed to her own spirituality and morality in a way that honors her own passions and desires without robbing her of equity. And then quickly the second down endorsed that yet. It's so so good. And there are lots of great film adaptations as well. The. Second Book I WanNa recommend is full disclosure. By Cameron. Garrett which is a young adult novel that focuses on an HIV positive teenager whose navigating high school and all the normal things that teenagers deal with like making and keeping friends falling in love and just developing as a person and the protagonist is the black adopted daughter of two gay men, both of whom are also people of Color it's primarily a story of the resilience of HIV positive people but it also touches on the resilience of Queer folks and Black and Brown people So if there is a young person in your life that you want to. Share. Some of those important stories with full disclosure is a great book for them. Those are great recommendations and Nick I know you have station eleven on your list which really struck me I loved it. I read it a few years ago in it felt more like fiction than than I think it would feel now. Is the wonderful scary thing about that book because you know in the middle of the pandemic why not go back to a book that is about a Pandemic and flu that decimates the population. What I loved about the book was that it begins with Shakespeare, which is how I want of course, all of my pandemic post apocalyptic books to begin In this case, it's King Lear and one of the stars dies onstage, and that's how the story begins and then we flash forward twenty years out to this pandemic has literally killed most of the population that we have a traveling troupe Called the traveling symphony that is itinerant and age wander around the Great Lakes region and they are artists doing the only thing that they know how to do how precent though Emily Saint John Mandell was in her book to describe some of the things that are happening today is uncanny loved about it though is that at the.

Jane Pandemic King Lear Great Lakes Nick Emily Saint John Mandell HIV Cameron Garrett flu
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:23 min | 7 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Which of course is? Frightening on so many. Different levels. But that when they call you, a terrorist is just an amazing book really a resilient writer, the other. is they can't close all by Larry who was a terrific young journalist and this book stemmed after Michael Brown was killed. You know yet another young African American man who was murdered on this time, of course, by the police. So those are two books that are high on the list, but maybe weren't as popular as you know between the world in me or how to be an anti-racist, which also, of course, are wonderful wonderful books. I'd love to get your reaction to one that has really stayed with me books about ten years old now. But in this space, it's called the warmth of other suns by Isabel. Wilkerson and it's about the great migration. I think it was published in two thousand ten and tracks a number of families migrating from the south to the north over a forty year period and tells incredible stories of what people left, what people came to how they built their families, and for me was just a deep education in a piece of our history in America that I was just not taught in school at all. I don't I'm sorry. You're familiar with the fact that I got dead silence for both. I'm GonNa have to carry the torch on that one alone. I was having the the the microphone over but no the. Book came out. It was a huge huge seller. That's one bit. In all the bookstore associated with has continue to sell incredibly well, and like you say it was a piece of history that for me I also was unacquainted with and to see that Modern Day migration you say, going south to north and what had to be left behind and what they faced on that journey north. Yes you know just just incredible Wilkerson is just wonderful. Yeah and I would absolutely cosign I think that a lot of times what we're taught in schools about black history is really like all around the civil rights movement and it's like black people don't exist like much before or after nine hundred and sixty five. So it is nice to tell these other stories. So Camille to come back to you because I want to shift into fiction. Now, sometimes would a fiction book can do is give us a chance to escape but also either validate our reality or give us a way to make sense of it or maybe in this case with stories of resilience overcoming role modeling, what it means to truly tough it out you've been talking with us about little women in the past. I know you admired that book are there other fiction books that came to mind for you on this subject? Yeah. There are a couple. The first is an Oldie but a Goodie Jane, Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte Now, if you haven't read this book since you were forced to in high school I, we encourage you to crack it open again. I began my relationship with this book as I think an eighth grader and it has become over the years my favorite book of all time I mean Jane Eyre is kind of Proto feminist novel she describes herself as poor. Obscure..

Jane Eyre Wilkerson America writer Charlotte Bronte Michael Brown Camille Larry
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:11 min | 7 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"You're going yes. Sorry. We have a delay. Of course we're all three different places due to the virus that we're talking about right now go ahead and add your point there. Normally. As far as you want some concrete data right now Massachusetts we have over thirty two thousand people that are living in nursing homes right in his estimated that at least ten, thousand of those people could be living in their own homes with the proper supports. So the onset decision on ninety nine ruled that unjustified segregation of people with disabilities in five discriminate because it violates the ADA and we all know to stable housing is one of the key determinants of health. Right. But if you look at it in this pandemic, ask for the Kobe nineteen, the highest death tolls over forty percent are amongst people living and working in nursing homes that's over forty five thousand people that have expired. Nationwide, in over fifty three, hundred people here in Massachusetts alone and folks that disabilities are definitely represented amongst those underlying medical conditions. So you know if you want to talk about again real intraday it integration, we have to be able to move folks out of nursing homes where they're more at risk out of these institutional facilities and move into the community where they can live independently access the American dream live, it fully, you know folks need some supports personal care attendants supported living do a variety of them, but the key for our state really is a lack of affordable and accessible housing. All right. So we have about two minutes left and I want to ask you both just briefly from each of you. If there were an ad a two point. Oh, law to come forward today what would be key provisions you'd WanNa see. Good question well, I'd say I think some key points for progress into the future. You know I think that that policy change and legislation and laws can change infrastructure and we've seen some impact there but but but laws don't necessarily change culture, and so I think when we think to the future of what could have the biggest impact we still have a lot of work to do as it relates to reducing or cultural bias and stigma around disability. Disability is something that impacts frankly nearly everyone at some point in life and that when we think about inclusive services. We need to understand that it's not just for a small subset of people in our society that's actually for everyone. So I, I would probably try to tackle it from the standpoint of thinking of how how we can. We can continue to make progress as it relates to things like the built infrastructure, things like accessibility and communications, things like closed captioning and accessible websites. But how we really get at the cultural change reducing stigma around disability and understanding that it's not a lesser way of living or something that needs to be devalued but actually heart of the big life experience that we all face. You that have about a half a minute left please are good for me. I'd say education and enforcement a laws only as good as it is enforced and I think education about some of the things that we talked about..

Massachusetts Kobe WanNa
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:55 min | 7 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Difference children with disabilities how right to a full and complete education and the ADA generation kids understand that. Yeah. I would agree cartland than I think is I think as well. You know the FDA has ensured that that people with disabilities have their basic civil rights protected in that also have opportunities. A recourse of legal action if civil rights aren't protected and I think that's a very powerful thing. has changed come willingly when when when the act was signed into law did change come quickly easily and on which frontiers and wear has changed been slow to come even though it's codified now. I'd say that. I. I I'd say that I think it was incremental and we continued to see incremental change a for example, a lot of the changes in infrastructure that we enjoy. Now things like ramps and elevators and automatic door openers. You know those things weren't put into place overnight. So from the standpoint of physical access changes been very incremental and it's important to know that the ADA is more proactive than retroactive. So if you have an old. Building, that you haven't renovated in forty years that wasn't built under the premise or under the protection of the ADA. It probably still is an accessible and unless you choose to renovate it or get new permits to renovate it, you may not have to make it accessible. So early, what we really sees that new construction comes online it comes online in a way that is accessible. So we've seen slow culture change in that regard. For sure sitting here. No. Please go had. Yeah. Mean shortly after president was signed the a until into law, he also said, let these shameful walls of exclusion come tumbling down and while many of those walls have come tumbling down there certainly continued to many barriers there's areas to healthcare married to affordable accessible housing and that's a huge win for folks with disabilities they may be accessed to. The folks need a place to live, and that's still continues to be a huge problem, not only in Massachusetts but across the nation. Yeah and also thing. Oklahoma let me just yet. Let me just ask this one just following on specifically with the two of you were just talking about it makes me think of. Sorry Five Year Long Battle on Beacon Hill over sidewalk cutouts, the Beacon Hill Civic Association challenge that there was a lawsuit it took five years. Those cutouts weren't put in place until around May of two thousand nineteen. So how do we think about those kinds of battles given what you've just been? Yet I think it's a really important point and. A lot of the a lot of battles and wins as it relates to access have been hard fought over the years and there are still many ways in which you know the FDA has been very powerful and very impactful. But there are ways it's still limited to..

ADA FDA Beacon Hill Beacon Hill Civic Association Oklahoma president Massachusetts
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

04:08 min | 7 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Games in his possible. Especially when you have to put a couple of teams on the shelf, you're already talking about a condensed calendar. So there's limited time. The League has already said there. Okay. If they get to the end of the year and teams have not played an equal number of games, they'll deal with that At that point, they would just ranked teams by winning percentage versus actual numbers of wins But really in the long term, if this becomes a problem more than one team has a huge outbreak like this. I. Don't know how they make it work. Yeah once again, a bellwether right for so many other things I. Think a lot of people are watching to see if they can pull this off. All right. I, just WanNa have seen a lot of people say if a multibillion dollar organization like baseball with thousands and thousands of tests being run over the course of a few days can't handle this. How does that change our thinking about college campuses and schools and things like that? I think you're absolutely right people are watching this pretty closely. Exactly exactly and we will continue to before we let you go though I must torture you we drive around the collar teams. Now, let's talk about the socks. The sucker nobly, it's been ugly and it's an issue that we talked about last year. We talked about in the off season it's pitching. They have no pitching starters or bullpens are they don't have enough anyway they have a pretty solid lineup which is interesting and. You would think that okay they should be able to hit their way into wins and maybe they will in the long run over the course of the season. But so far you can tell that the lack of pitching has really weighed on the offense I wanNA play a cut here from zander. BOGART's WHO's known as being incredibly upbeat. He's a real leader in the clubhouse. He's a guy who's always kind of giving positive affirmation of folks in get your next time. Let's go do this. This is what he said after the loss on Monday there's stuff. You know. Obviously. It's not just like one wrong. You know as a corporate and then they just find a way to add on some more before we can kind of get some going and gets up. And you see the video that goes with that he's shoulders slumped. He is depressed and you can tell this offense is putting extra pressure on themselves knowing they don't have the pitching to hold the other team down hitting a baseball is often called. One of the hardest things to do in professional sports. That's why if you can do it three out of ten times, you're considered really good and so if you have that added pressure of now, you have to produce runs or this team will lose that really starts to weigh on you makes it even harder. All right. So Chris, we've got a little less than a minute left. So let me just ask you because that was depressing. Rays of hope to leave us with with the restive titled Towns Pro Sports Teams I do have a little bit of hope, and this is something people are kicking baseball for not doing the NBA and the NHL have created bubbles players to bring their seasons back both of which will start towards the end of the week here I think that is a at least the best hope that we have to try to get some normalcy going in the world of sports..

BOGART baseball Chris NBA NHL
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

05:57 min | 7 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Kind of a bellwether for whether some normalcy is possible during a global pandemic, the number of New England Patriots football players opting out of the two thousand twenty NFL season due to the corona virus is now to six including star linebacker and defensive captain, Dante hightower and the red. SOX are off to a miserable start to their coronavirus shortened season jumping four of their first five games with one of their starting pitchers out due to coronavirus complications. The world is watching and not just the games to see who will win in the match up between professional sports and the coronavirus. So here to give us a read on what's happening is Radio Boston's Chris. Derek? Chris. Welcome. Back. Thanks for having me spoiler alert the news is not good on that front. Well. Yes. So let's start with football and I'm going to ask you about the Patriots players opting out the same question I've been asking. So often during this pandemic, how big a deal is this? So I'm going to answer your favorite question with probably your least favorite answer, which is it depends I think you mentioned? Were we're still in the midst of obviously of global pandemic and I don't think anybody really knows exactly what the future is going to bring. We've heard a lot of talk about a possible second wave in the fall and we're going to be seeing college students returning to campuses and a lot of places kids going back to schools in some places So I think it all of this discussion really depends on what the next few weeks in the next few months bring for us. We may not even have a football season. So with that huge caveat at the beginning of the answer. I would say on the field it is actually a pretty big deal for the Patriots, just because of the names. Of the players who have said they were opting out this year you mentioned Dante High Tower is basically the quarterback of the defense. He's the guy who's out on the field calling the plays for the defense moving guys around when they need to move. He's one of the true leaders on this team coach Belichick has made him Mr February for all of his big plays in the postseason in super bowls. you also Patrick Chung who's kind of unheralded. But I think a big contributor who never really gets the recognition he deserves for the kind of flexible. He plays on this team You've got marcus cannon who's been a pretty steady presence on the offensive line, Brennan? bolden. WHO's a special teams contributor. So you've got some pretty big name players who have said they will not be playing this year for the Patriots. And clearly players who understand what the impact is of opting out. So what are they saying about this decision about why they're doing it when they know what it's GonNa do to the team? Yeah totally, and it depends on the individual player. So in Dante hightower's case, he just had a child about a month ago and he says, he thinks it's the right move for..

Patriots Dante hightower Dante High Tower football Chris SOX Boston NFL marcus cannon Derek Belichick Patrick Chung Brennan
"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"This week's guest on the economists asks our interview show was the businesswoman Ursula burns. She made history ten years ago when she became the first black woman to run a fortune five hundred company, but progress has been slow. The second was appointed just last month. Mrs burns revealed why she's changed her mind about using quotas to achieve equality. I've been in business for almost forty years. And we have been talking about this problem where half the population. We're not anywhere near half we're not even ten percent. They're more CEO's named John than there are women. You know, you heard all of that stuff, we have been pushing against this thing for, for a long time with the belief that if we just let them alone and give them the facts that they that system will change. Don't you get it if we just kind of lay it out, and give them the survey because the? They who are giving the facts to don't believe it's urgent enough to change it. That's why say, maybe what you do is to start mandating things saying level both level of a big company. Yeah. Think board levels starts. I I think. think. I should it be half forty percent. Give me a number. That's reasonable you do the study of available people whatever the heck it is. And you start mandating companies to get you say, basically, we.

Ursula burns Mrs burns CEO John forty percent forty years ten percent ten years
"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"For both of us. I guess it was a life changing experience. And I think we both issue in particular is you book in Chinese on the Chinese language service of the BBC a lot, and it was a sense of loyalty to an audience in China, that seems like a bygone age now we often talk now of how gentlemen has been largely forgotten in China, the success of the communist party in racing suddenly, public discussion of this, but also it seems memories whole generation has grown up now has heard almost nothing about this. But then, you know I go back to Beijing. And from time to time I meet people, and they asked me, how long have you been in China? I say that it goes back to the nine thousand nine hundred and it becomes clear that I was there in nine hundred ninety nine and then suddenly, the conversation will turn to that. Question. It's clear that for those who were there for those who did experience it. It's still grips their minds just as much as it does our. Tianmen might live large in the minds of those who witnessed it. But Beijing continues to cover up the crimes and censorship efforts ramp up whenever the nursery approaches this year has been no exception. University.

China Beijing communist party BBC Tianmen
"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Today, marks thirty year anniversary of the Inman square crackdown. In April nineteen Eighty-nine demonstrators mainly students began together TNN square to mourn, the death of who done relatively liberal communist party leader soon. They began calling for political reform. The protests spread beyond the city and the government's patients began to wear thin, late Sunday afternoon, military headed gulped is, again, flew over the square of heavenly peace, dropping leaflets bowling on the protesters to leave yet with fists clenched, the students pledged to stay on to the Dan. In the early hours of June fourth Chinese troops rolled into Beijing firing at crowds of people who blocked their path. Hundreds if not thousands were killed. Two.

communist party TNN Beijing thirty year
"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"Is you know, it's interesting. I mean, it's thirty years, right? And the median age of China right now is thirty eight so a significant number of Chinese were not born. One channel score was happening. And the Chinese government has been extremely successful at wiping out. Any recollection of the ideas of the movement in any recollection of actually, you know, what happened? And so there's this remarkable documentary attack man, where they show pictures of the tank man to whom you referred earlier to Beijing University students that are like what's this is the guy doing performance, art? What is this? They have no idea of those images and of the importance that those images had to their country back in the day. And so the question is if you know something wiped out, so successfully will it ever have any residents again amongst the people of China. I don't know. I think we probably will at a certain point. There has to be a reevaluation of this. But people have thought it was going to happen. A lot earlier than it has so far that hasn't happened yet. The Chinese party state has a remarkable ability to really manipulate the minds of people in China still to this day, John I wanna thank you for coming on today to talk about the thirty th anniversary of gentlemen. Thank you. Thank you for having me, Sarah. John palm. I is a former reporter for the press and the Washington Post. He's also the author of the book the beautiful country and the middle kingdom American China seventeen seventy six to the present first person is produced by Dan Ephron, edited by rob Sachs. I'm Sarah Wildman, and I'm your host. Panoply..

China Sarah Wildman John palm Chinese government Beijing University Washington Post Dan Ephron reporter rob Sachs John I thirty years
"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"And so this is happening at the same time, you have the country opening up to western influences opening up to western ideas, and it was this marriage between significant discontent in the lower levels of society with on opening of minds among the elite among the student population. And that created the potential for real instability at the same time. You also had within the party different factions jockeying for positions one faction believed in faster economic reforms and more westernization another faction that really oppose that as well. So you had you had to basically all the raw materials for real problems going from ADA nine students start to gather an and lobby the ability together without being monitored by the party. How do they do that? I mean, are they watched over are there? How does that happen? So what was starting in in as early as eighty eight in fact, even earlier than that? But eighty eight was really the beginning is that people wanted to form organizations that were not under the control come his party because one of the issues in China was that the party controlled everything. And there was no such thing as a right to organize freedom of sociation was is not part of Chinese communist party platform on the students. Basically that was a main demand that the student unions would not be run by the party. And so in universities such as Beijing University ching hall university Nanjing university Fudan, which is another major university in Shanghai students began to have these natch. Organizations formed and have these specically democracies what they called salons where Chinese liberals were invited to speak about democratization process about freedom of association and other freedoms the US Bill of rights statue of liberty the history of democracy, and in the west, and this type of interaction between Chinese students and some Chinese liberals really intensified eighty nine and the trigger, of course, for the demonstrations was the death of party secretary by the name of who y'all bond who died in April of nineteen eighty nine and who was somewhat of a symbol for westernisers in China. He is a guy who basically came out against chopsticks. He said using a knife and fork was more efficient, but he also was very important in rehabilitating, hundreds of thousands of Chinese intellectuals who've been purged during the anti rightist campaign in the mid fifties. But also the culture of Lucien from nineteen sixty six nine hundred seventy six and. How did you have access to them? I mean, did you already knew people from when you were studying in China, did you have greater access? So. Ahead lived in Chinese dormitory for a year and a half. And so when I went into these dormitories, I kind of felt like I was home, and that I think subconsciously resonated with the people there. I mean, I would like sit on their beds and kinda hang out like I hung out in my own dorm room six or seven years before. So I was a little bit younger. I spoke pretty decent Chinese. And I just kinda realized that they were like my classmates earlier jet. I mean a later generation, but they were very more my classmates their rooms looked and I think more importantly smelled like the room. I lived in an engine university for unit half. If for me, it wasn't as exotic as it probably appeared to many other western correspondents who hadn't had that experience. When you say, they weren't later generation that students that you described earlier are actually plucked back out of countryside and given the chance to go to school where these students who had expected to go to school. Yeah. These were students generally speaking who had gone through high school. So this is just their life experiences significantly different from the life experience from their elders and describe the energy of these meetings, these early meetings on campus, it was just full of this sense of possibility. And a real search for a new set of values for their country. A lot of patriotism deep love of their country and deep desire in the sense of what direction are we gonna take? And anything is possible. That was the overriding sense. You got was optimism about what China could do and we're trying to go..

China Beijing University ching hall bond ADA Shanghai US secretary seven years
"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"From foreign policy. I'm Sarah wild Mun. And this is first person this week an inside account of the TNN square massacre. Thirty years ago this month student protests rutted in Beijing posing one of the most significant threats to the rule of the communist party in China's history. The demonstrations lasted two months and grew to include a range of citizens all demanding reforms in the country. For the first time in huge numbers. The ordinary men and women of Beijing the old and the young professors and taxi drivers have joined the student protests lending, their support to what is now taking on all the appearances of a peaceful popular uprising against the oppressiveness of communist rule campaign for China's renewal in an atmosphere of freedom and democracy, the focal point of the protest was Tiananmen Square. The heart of Beijing within a few weeks the government declared martial law and then in early June the world watched in horror as Chinese military tanks rolled in the streets of Beijing on the way to Chinaman's square. They fired indiscriminately at protesters there were reports of tanks rolling over students. The noise have gun five rose from all over the center of Peking, it was unremitting. On the streets leading down to the main road to ten on men square furious. People stood in disbelief at the glow in the sky listening to the sound of shots in the midst of all this chaos was John Pomfret who covered China for these Tosi press of the time hit an advantage over his fellow foreign correspondents. He had studied in China spoke Mandarin fluently and had many contacts in student movement. He joins us today. John, thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. So we're coming on the thirtieth anniversary of the TNN square massacre. But I want to actually start with how you came to China in the first place. How did you come? So I went to college wanting to study neuro physiology. Okay..

China Beijing John Pomfret Tiananmen Square Sarah wild Mun communist party Tosi Thirty years two months
"thirty years" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

12:27 min | 2 years ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"These thirty years, and we have a lot of difficult cases. And I'm trained in western medicine. I was never trained in any, you know, hemp oil or any of that stuff. I'm kind of a traditional vet, and I started really giving it some thoughts. When I, you know, just the barrage of clients that are asking us, and I'm just saying, I don't know much about it. And what's really nice? I was introduced the doctor walks. Log and Joe's a double board certified vet with a PHD and your Daime that made me go and after I spoke with him. He's like, no, there's really something to this. And I guess the way I'm looking at it from my standpoint, of course, I don't want to recommend things that aren't tested. So I didn't well the product that we're gonna talk about today. It's been tested really more than any other. And I'm just sick of looking at animal suffering that there's nothing I can do for them. So there's plenty of patients that have been on non steroidal or other pain medications that are getting no help including some of my own technicians pets that were old and one of my own. Own actually, and it was really my own pet. My fourteen year old lab where I'm like, I'm either going to, you know, have to stop and euthanize or or I'm going to try something different. And that's what was kinda the the switch that flipped for me. Joe I their states is kind of rolling off all these various states you can have medicinal marijuana. You can have recreational marijuana. Are there any states to your knowledge that allow veterinarians to prescribe CBD or a how do we go about it because yes, I want to give my clients the best information, but I don't know how. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I guess that's our biggest problem right now is that when states were making laws the veterinarians, we're sort of forgotten about for whatever reason. And so this led to a lot of questions coming into the American veterinary medical association, and they NS inside the right up some guidelines and their guidelines pretty much said that until we have further evidence of any true utility. We can't make recommendations therefore, we have to stick with the idea that we should not be recommending this, and you should not be recommending this as a as a veterinarian. Therefore, you know, your license could be in jeopardy if someone were to question you or sue because they their their dog had a bad reaction for whatever reason. And so this is where it came down to the science. And that's why folks like for I got involved saying, okay? How do we set up a really good study? And the reality is is that there are a lot of different recommendations out there. And I hear some of my colleagues going where did you get your dosing from? That's like, well, we went into the literature and looked at the human dosing. We looked at the road and dosing and we use dose. That were similar to where they were seeing effects in the other species, and which is far higher than than what a lot of the other companies out there recommend it's really about. You know, this is a pharmaceutical to some degree. And and we don't know exactly how it works. I it tends to have some pretty profound effect. You were saying that there are these various forms of cannon leads that's in help products. It doesn't have the THC thing that gets you high. Is it safe to use marijuana because oftentimes people are well, you know, I'll have a little edible. And I'll just give some of that to my pet, and I don't really know how much is marijuana basically safe to use in pets. Well, we we know that we, of course, we've all seen the we'll say poison control aspect where dog gets into somebody's stash of marijuana and they come in. And they'll dogs are down and out for a long time. And that's not what we're trying to do here. All we're trying to do is is mitigate the pain without that neurologic affect and and I think, you know, the reality is is that if you're using the right strain of ham for and marijuana. Here's the right strange. You can have some profound anti inflammatory effects without the the neurologic. And you know, they're just you know, we're sort of in the infancy of trying to understand this. All reality. And from a clinical perspective, we have evidence now that it does help with arthritis pain. And so we shouldn't be ignoring it. We should be looking to at least in the states that are allowing it to start changing the laws to help it or in areas, mitigate pain because we have very few pain relievers in dog. Just real quickly. So what I would say do not use marijuana in dogs. We know it can be toxic. All the strains are different. You know, what I'm specifically saying is with caution. Of course, watch what you're using don't use marijuana. We're talking about using CBD extracts that are not going to have more than point three percent THC. You know, we don't want THC that can be bad. So we're talking about products that are low and THC but have canal annoyed that have been studied. And that's the problem. There's a lot of products you can buy right now. They've had no studying. They don't know. Whether what the doses went to give it I mean, and we have a lot to learn on the elevate product. But at least we know what the pharmacokinetics are. We know how often to give it and what dose, and you mentioned side effects. I can just give you anecdotal side effects. I've had three dogs now that have eaten entire bags of the elevate shoes. So that's sixty choose and the normal dose on a dog. Would be one to to choose twice a day. So obviously, a pretty high dose this is only three dogs, but I've had no side effects, which is nice. I'm not saying there couldn't be. I'm just saying with my experience I are three dogs, and I actually had one cat that ate half a bag of the dog chews without a. Taste very good. So not to say, you can't have problems. You know, what I'm saying is about, but I'm just saying I have had four patients now that have consumed very very high doses without any side effects that doesn't mean there couldn't be. But my feeling right now is it's probably a pretty safe product. I love it. So your clinical experience is perfect. Let's go back a little bit. Dr watch leg where you're talking about. This elevate CBD oil. I always tell people when they come in. They're looking at various nutraceutical that you go to some health food store, you see a product is he okay, vitamin C? And here's a bottle of item in c has five hundred milligrams of vitamin c per tablet in it's forty two dollars for this little teeny bottling. We get another bottle. It's go to Costco. And it says she looked bottle in it's less expensive in the same psych. Well, expensive one must be better because it's more expensive. But CBD oils aren't all made the same. Tell us about these studies that you. You did at Cornell. So that in my mind, totally elevates the study because I can trust what you're saying. Tell me tell my listeners about this study. What happened? What did you do what kind of study was it? Yeah. So our study was actually a perceivable blinded crossover design where the dogs got one oil for about four weeks. And then we cost them over after a few weeks to another oil. And we didn't know which was which are owners didn't really have any idea. What was going on in terms of the oils? So we basically randomized it and we put them on. And then we just ask the owners over time, you know, how they felt we did our own examinations. Veterinarians, and and, you know, low behold by the end of the study we got through fifteen or sixteen dogs. I was very evident that there was one oil that seemed to be superior to the other. We started looking at the data, and we have enough data there to really show that there's a cocoa statistical a factor significant effect, and that we were basically dropping pain scores and we were dropping. Or an increasing activity and these dogs, and so he decided we might as well just start writing something up for publication. We met it and edited it the surgeons conference last year and finalizing some publication revisions to get this done in the next few weeks and the journal so that everybody can see it. It'll be online access so all all owners and all veterinaries can read it and evaluated for themselves. But from our perspective, we had some some very very pronounced affects particularly dogs that were in what we'll call more severe geriatric. So right now, Dr Fred with you being in clinical practice, I presume you been using this on your own clients coming through the door is it just odds. Can it be cats can use it in other species? And here we have had the indication Dr Jill of saying, okay? It's for pain. That's fabulous. What other things have you found that it can be used for Bernardino. No veterinarians we're going to start to think about other uses. So so once again, my idea on this was I'm training, western met. I didn't know that this was even an option, and I was very hesitant to use the elevate product I used it on my own dog. That's the first dog I ever used it on. And we prob- I probably have a hundred and fifty patients on one hundred and fifty canine patients, mainly with mobility and osteoarthritis problems. That's the main reason we put them on. But I definitely played around with other things I'm not saying to do it. But I have my feeling is it would be interesting, and we're actually doing some studies right now, how will this work for dogs with anxiety, for instance, phobias thunderstorm phobias, which we have a big problem on the east coast or just, you know, fear, anxiety and stress coming into the vet hospital. I think there's some interesting things certainly we know in people especially in children, they're using it and seizures that's pretty well known. Is that something we could use it for could be. Very interesting. And then certainly in the cat that was a big thing for me. And or someone going studies Joe knows of some of them better than I do in cats because I think there's some big uses the cat cats have a lot of anxiety problems urine marking that's a big problem, and there's certainly other ones. So I my feeling is. I think we will use this for a lot of conditions. But I'm also worried that you get on the internet and look up him or cannabinoid, and everybody's using it for everything. I mean, that's the problem, especially when it hasn't been studied. So I'm like you burn a dean. I'm like Joe I want to studies. I wanna know what the doses is it safe. We have to handle the legal issues too. Clearly, I think that's gonna take care of itself. But there's a lot of issues right now. But you know, I wanna know what's the product. That's being studied what studies are they doing is it safe, and what's the dose? So I mean, that's really where we're at right now. And one thing I applaud elevate on they're willing to do the studies which most of the other. People are not you can buy a lot of products online right now. No one has any idea if there's any cannabinoid in it, some of the early studies are showing some of the other products. There isn't any cannabinoid in it so buyer, beware. And that's why you know. I listen really to what Joe's doing. I trust them. He's a researcher. He has no financial interest in any of this. So that's why I'm so interested in the elevate product. And I mean, I'm sure there'll be others. But I want proof, you know, Bernardino. I'm like you. I wonder if I'm gonna recommend and I gotta have proof. And and I think we have a long way to go. But I think with elevate we know a lot more about that product. And then the other products on the market right now. And that makes me feel good doctor Joe with we're kind of all bowing to you. And thank you so much for doing this research. I'm impressed that Cornell was amenable to having you do this because I'm sure they were a little bit. I don't know. This is kind of out there on the fringes. We're gonna get bored certifications is in sports medicine and rehabilitation, so you must be seen. So many of these cats and dogs who are having joint issues. Arthritis is you're saying you've gone through the repertoire what we have available, and it's just not seeming to work what percentage of the that. You've been testing seemed to have a positive response. I'd say eighty eighty to ninety percent we're using it in, you know, I think we see the most dramatic responses are in the those older dogs who have multi joint lane. This is people aren't exactly sure whether the dogs and enough pain to to euthanize the dog, and and they'll actually go ahead and put the dog on this and say, you know, the quality of life is just better right now. And and they decide not to euthanize that older dog. And I think that's that's where this is. This is a real go to in those cases. Now if you have a dog. What we don't know if your dog just had surgery is a is this good for surgical pain. We don't really understand.

marijuana Joe Bernardino arthritis pain CBD Costco Cornell Arthritis Dr Fred Dr Jill researcher forty two dollars ninety percent fourteen year three percent thirty years four weeks
"thirty years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"thirty years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"The last thirty years, and he's recognizing that at his stage of life that he needs to start moving away from that business. And so it was a construction business. And you know, he realized that he's not going to be able to use his body as much as he gets into his seventies and eighties and they'll last month we had another student again same story. He'd built a successful construction business recognized that he needed to start taking different actions and start learning. A new skill to take advantage of the assets. He had and more importantly to not be relying on trading his time for money and part of it is just you owning that and recognizing that. If you start looking at your financial habits, if you're not satisfied with your financial results you need to break. Those habits you need to start doing something different and need to start making more productive financial habits. And so not only do we have business owners that have come in. And we have folks that work in factory and just feels like feels like they they're being treated as a number, and, you know, in with the factory worker, you know, he came to us and said, you know, what I need a different approach. I need a whole different. I need to stop trading. My time for money. And unfortunately, that's what most people have been trained to do. I know for me growing up. That's what I was trained to do. How is trained to trade my time for money? But as I started to look at the world around me as I started to look at the opportunities..

thirty years
"thirty years" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

Doug Loves Movies

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

"Thirty years. A little under three. Yeah, that's my guess. Under three years. That's your kiss. Three years give or take ten months. You three twenty. Are. Okay. The mess tres. So we got anywhere from six years to two weeks. Tom Hanks. I pretty big role and he knows you're alone. And then his second feature film, he started pretty big role in the movie. Never have heard of that knows you're alone. Never heard of never heard of classic, and I'm Scott twice. Yeah, anyone by applause because that's works on audio to one person. Popular many, and I read it. I thought I read Tom Hanks pulse here, thinks he's career didn't release started till Bessler parts. I've said in the meetings. Catch on TV like we didn't ask you anything. To the listener at home. If you look it up better on that, we'll Kapiti page by now. Do it. We on how did this get made kept on calling Stellan Skarsgard stellar skateboard because that's what auto credit to iphone. And then it was automatically changed and now on his Kapiti pages permanently locked because every time they would change it back, it would just go back to stellar skateboard. Skateboards skateboards. And now I know that and we made a shirt that's still skateboard and now I also that he has it still scars garden skateboard. Hat. And that's been get a shirt. It's like a sub podcast. Really. Scares guard good a shirt. Podcast, right. Tell you the barracks, the providence, if you will, all guards shirts. Oh my God, Jeff. I wish your laugh.

Tom Hanks Stellan Skarsgard Scott Jeff Thirty years Three years three years ten months six years two weeks
"thirty years" Discussed on This Week in Travel

This Week in Travel

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"thirty years" Discussed on This Week in Travel

"Hassle than it was yeah in that the processes easy this is the hardest concept when i teach beginner at beginner sessions at conferences it's it's the hardest six or there's a lot of people that they've had the amex business platinum for their business for thirty years and every time they book a ticket they just call up acts and say i want a first class ticket to here and they're going to say at one million points because there does redeeming points for at a cash rate of his penny or the new chase effort reserve as one point five cents in so it gets very confusing to s uh to have people understand that these cards can transfer to a certain number of airliner hotel programs and then those programs have the ability to book on their partners so you can buy hands for you chase card points to united in an united can be used to block on all of their airline partners like ethiopian that i mentioned than when so that takes a bit of time to understand that i'm i'm convinced most the chase after a reserve cardholders right now that that jumped in on it because it was the the cool thing to do our just redeeming the points at one point five cents which which which is flexible an easy and then that mean being a value to them of it it it it's they may not even be aware of the transfer the the the old go to card that a lot of people talk about is the amix s p g so the star would preferred guess card sure and the reason for that is not just because of the hotels program it's because they have all of these airline transfer partners in when you move twenty thousand of their points you get 20 you get a five thousand bonus so you have this is very flexible programme much like the chase that there were talking about now and that card has great every day earnings so that has always been for for active travelers in of the go to in the past and the annual fee as much more reasonable than than these new level ultrapremium cards that that have lounge access and all that.

thirty years