35 Burst results for "Thirty Years"

Average long-term US mortgage rates edge up to 5.3%

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 7 months ago

Average long-term US mortgage rates edge up to 5.3%

"Mortgage mortgage mortgage mortgage rates rates rates rates edged edged edged edged up up up up again again again again this this this this week week week week as as as as the the the the fed fed fed fed works works works works on on on on dampening dampening dampening dampening inflation inflation inflation inflation getting getting getting getting a a a a thirty thirty thirty thirty year year year year home home home home loan loan loan loan is is is is becoming becoming becoming becoming more more more more expensive expensive expensive expensive mortgage mortgage mortgage mortgage buyer buyer buyer buyer Freddie Freddie Freddie Freddie Mac Mac Mac Mac reports reports reports reports that that that that the the the the average average average average thirty thirty thirty thirty year year year year mortgage mortgage mortgage mortgage rate rate rate rate rose rose rose rose to to to to five five five five point point point point three three three three percent percent percent percent this this this this week week week week that's that's that's that's up up up up slightly slightly slightly slightly from from from from a a a a week week week week ago ago ago ago and and and and the the the the highest highest highest highest rate rate rate rate since since since since two two two two thousand thousand thousand thousand nine nine nine nine this this this this time time time time last last last last year year year year the the the the average average average average is is is is only only only only two two two two point point point point nine nine nine nine four four four four percent percent percent percent fifteen fifteen fifteen fifteen year year year year fixed fixed fixed fixed rate rate rate rate mortgages mortgages mortgages mortgages popular popular popular popular with with with with owners owners owners owners or or or or refinancing refinancing refinancing refinancing get get get get down down down down to to to to four four four four point point point point four four four four eight eight eight eight percent percent percent percent the the the the federal federal federal federal reserve reserve reserve reserve raised raised raised raised its its its its benchmark benchmark benchmark benchmark interest interest interest interest rate rate rate rate last last last last week week week week by by by by half half half half a a a a percentage percentage percentage percentage and and and and has has has has signaled signaled signaled signaled more more more more rate rate rate rate hikes hikes hikes hikes are are are are likely likely likely likely as as as as it it it it works works works works to to to to reverse reverse reverse reverse the the the the highest highest highest highest inflation inflation inflation inflation in in in in forty forty forty forty years years years years I'm I'm I'm I'm Jennifer Jennifer Jennifer Jennifer king king king king

Freddie Freddie Freddie Freddi Mac Mac FED Federal Federal Federal Federa Jennifer Jennifer Jennifer Jen
Home sales fell far more than expected in February, as mortgage rates rose and supply remained tight

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 9 months ago

Home sales fell far more than expected in February, as mortgage rates rose and supply remained tight

"Increasing prices and rising mortgage rates result in a decrease in home sales sales of existing homes dropped seven percent in February from January the national association of realtors says sales declined two point four percent from February of last year as the median home price jumped fifteen percent from last year at this time two three hundred fifty seven thousand dollars home prices are surging as potential buyers compete for relatively few homes available and according to mortgage buyer Freddie Mac the average rate for the benchmark thirty year mortgage rose above four percent this week for the first time since may twenty nineteen I'm

National Association Of Realto Freddie Mac
Was Arbery killing a hate crime? Jury to hear dueling views

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 10 months ago

Was Arbery killing a hate crime? Jury to hear dueling views

"Closing arguments are scheduled for today on whether the Ahmad armory killing was a hate crime a jury in Georgia will hear arguments from prosecutors and defense attorneys on whether the twenty twenty killing of Ahmad Arbor rate was a federal hate crime the three white men involved have already been convicted of murder for chasing and killing the twenty five year old black man father and son Greg and Travis make Michael along with the neighbor have all pleaded not guilty to the hate crime charges regardless of the outcome to make Michaels have been sentenced to life in prison without parole for their murder convictions neighbor William Roddy Brian also received a life sentence with parole possible only after he served at least thirty years I'm Shelley Adler

Ahmad Armory Ahmad Arbor Georgia Travis Greg William Roddy Brian Michael Michaels Shelley Adler
US could see a century's worth of sea rise in just 30 years

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 10 months ago

US could see a century's worth of sea rise in just 30 years

"The U. S. could see a century's worth of C. rise in just thirty years this report as a wake up call for the United States no I administrator Rick Spinrad on a federal report warning that America's coast will be hit hard by ever faster sea level rise between now and the year twenty fifty profound statements in this room is that the United States is expected to experience as much sea level rise thirty years as we saw over the span of the entire last century the information by seven federal agencies predicts the Gulf coast especially Texas and Louisiana we'll get hit the hardest I'm surely Ambler

Rick Spinrad United States U. Gulf Coast Louisiana Texas Ambler
Today Show 70th Anniversary-Today Intro and Wrap

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 11 months ago

Today Show 70th Anniversary-Today Intro and Wrap

"A a milestone milestone today today in in morning morning television television N. N. B. B. C. C. news news this this is is a a special special edition edition of of today today seventieth seventieth anniversary anniversary the the today today show show first first aired aired on on January January fourteenth fourteenth nineteen nineteen fifty fifty two two with with Dave Dave Galloway Galloway as as the the host host co co host host now now our our Savannah Savannah Guthrie Guthrie and and Hoda Hoda copy copy but but Guthrie Guthrie was was not not on on the the set set today today she she tested tested positive positive for for the the coronavirus coronavirus Savannah's Savannah's always always front front center center I I mean mean she she may may not not physically physically be be here here but but we've we've always always had had a a name name but but eight eight thousand thousand times times and and this this is is just just one one of of those those unlucky unlucky moments moments where where you you happen happen to to get get you you know know get get Kobe Kobe during during this this moment moment al al Roker Roker has has been been delivering delivering the the weather weather on on the the today today show show for for more more than than thirty thirty years years it's it's not not an an act act yeah yeah you you know know you you see see that that on on TV TV I I think think a a lot lot of of places places of of tried tried to to manufacture manufacture that that it it but but I I think think it it speaks speaks to to the the seventy seventy years years speaks speaks to to the the the the the the the the genuineness genuineness of of what what goes goes on on in in Studio Studio One One last last night night the the lights lights on on the the Empire Empire State State Building Building in in New New York York or or in in the the today today show's show's trademark trademark orange orange I'm I'm at at Donahue Donahue

Guthrie Guthrie N. N. B. B. C. C. News News Dave Dave Galloway Galloway Hoda Hoda Kobe Kobe Al Al Roker Roker Savannah Empire Empire State State Buil New New York York Donahue Donahue
Louisiana governor pardons Homer Plessy, whose segregation protest went to the Supreme Court

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 11 months ago

Louisiana governor pardons Homer Plessy, whose segregation protest went to the Supreme Court

"Louisiana's Louisiana's governor governor has has pardon pardon the the black black man man who's who's eighteen eighteen ninety ninety to to arrest arrest led led to to a a Supreme Supreme Court Court decision decision that that allowed allowed racial racial segregation segregation in in the the United United States States for for nearly nearly sixty sixty years years there's there's never never a a bad bad day day to to do do the the right right thing thing Louisiana Louisiana governor governor John John bel bel Edwards Edwards said said citing citing a a posthumous posthumous pardon pardon for for Homer Homer Plessy Plessy is is something something that that should should never never have have been been needed needed in in eighteen eighteen ninety ninety two two the the thirty thirty year year old old shoemaker shoemaker part part of of a a group group trying trying to to overturn overturn laws laws against against equal equal rights rights after after the the civil civil war war was was wide wide enough enough to to buy buy a a train train ticket ticket New New Orleans Orleans with with black black enough enough to to be be arrested arrested for for refusing refusing to to leave leave a a whites whites only only railroad railroad car car when when he he lost lost his his case case before before the the Supreme Supreme Court Court Plessy Plessy versus versus Ferguson Ferguson ushered ushered in in an an era era of of unabashed unabashed racism racism and and segregation segregation that that was was considered considered legal legal until until brown brown versus versus the the board board of of education education in in nineteen nineteen fifty fifty four four the the pernicious pernicious effects effects of of Plessy Plessy linger linger still still at at a a ceremony ceremony near near the the spot spot where where plus plus he he was was arrested arrested bel bel Edwards Edwards says says she she was was beyond beyond grateful grateful to to help help restore restore plus plus he's he's legacy legacy undefiled undefiled by by the the wrongness wrongness of of his his conviction conviction this this party party is is a a step step in in the the right right direction direction I'm I'm Jennifer Jennifer king king Louisiana's Louisiana's governor governor has has pardon pardon the the black black man man who's who's eighteen eighteen ninety ninety to to arrest arrest led led to to a a Supreme Supreme Court Court decision decision that that allowed allowed racial racial segregation segregation in in the the United United States States for for nearly nearly sixty sixty years years there's there's

Supreme Supreme Court Court Louisiana United United States States Plessy Plessy John John Bel Bel Edwards Edwa Homer Homer Plessy Plessy New New Orleans Ferguson Ferguson Brown Brown Board Board Of Of Education Ed Bel Bel Edwards Edwards Orleans Jennifer Jennifer King King Lo
Finland Reindeer Climate-Reindeer Intro and wrap

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Finland Reindeer Climate-Reindeer Intro and wrap

"Reindeer reindeer herders herders are are feeling feeling the the effects effects of of climate climate change change a a new new study study says says reindeer reindeer herds herds have have gotten gotten smaller smaller and and lighter lighter and and a a little little it's it's a a herder herder near near the the Arctic Arctic Circle Circle she she says says climate climate change change is is a a reason reason twenty twenty thirty thirty years years we we have have had had interest interest in in getting getting more more unstable unstable one one researcher researcher says says the the Glasgow Glasgow climate climate packs packs one one point point five five degrees degrees Celsius Celsius temperature temperature goal goal is is impossible impossible for for reindeer reindeer herders herders and and reindeers reindeers you you cannot cannot split split so so at at a a very very easily easily over over heat heat and and they they might might get get caught caught some some as as much much kill kill a a lot lot of of pride pride researcher researcher Nuccio Nuccio muzzle muzzle low low at at the the university university of of Lapland Lapland says says the the one one point point five five degree degree goal goal is is the the issue issue it it is is already already a a general general understanding understanding that that the the for for the the the the no no see see such such with with temperatures temperatures these these going going faster faster Leslie Leslie is is supplementing supplementing her her reindeers reindeers diets diets with with ivy ivy branches branches and and dried dried hay hay to to help help them them get get through through the the winter winter I'm I'm a a Donahue Donahue

Arctic Arctic Circle Glasgow Nuccio Nuccio University University Of Of La Leslie Leslie Donahue Donahue
Biden aims to cut bureaucratic runaround for gov't services

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Biden aims to cut bureaucratic runaround for gov't services

"President president Biden Biden will will sign sign an an executive executive order order Tuesday Tuesday aimed aimed at at easing easing bureaucratic bureaucratic frustration frustration among among Americans Americans seeking seeking a a wide wide swath swath of of federal federal services services from from renewing renewing passports passports to to applying applying for for social social security security benefits benefits Americans Americans waste waste a a lot lot of of time time with with the the office office visits visits award award long long phone phone calls calls the the executive executive order order is is geared geared toward toward cutting cutting paperwork paperwork and and allowing allowing them them to to access access more more services services online online the the White White House House hopes hopes improving improving experiences experiences with with federal federal agencies agencies will will help help renew renew faith faith in in the the government government and and democracy democracy itself itself the the president president last last week week or or to to the the US US and and other other nations nations to to show show they they can can work work for for their their people people Marcus Marcus is is hard hard we we all all know know that that similar similar attempts attempts to to make make the the government government more more nimble nimble have have failed failed for for generations generations Bill Bill Clinton Clinton famously famously pledged pledged to to reinvent reinvent government government nearly nearly thirty thirty years years ago ago Sager Sager made made Donnie Donnie Washington Washington

President President Biden Bide Government Government White White House House Marcus Marcus Bill Bill Clinton Clinton United States Sager Sager Donnie Donnie Washington
Update on the latest sports

AP News Radio

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Update on the latest sports

"AP AP sports sports five five a a nearly nearly thirty thirty year year record record went went down down to to the the NBA NBA the the largest largest margin margin of of victory victory the the Memphis Memphis Grizzlies Grizzlies took took apart apart the the Oklahoma Oklahoma City City thunder thunder one one fifty fifty two two seventy seventy nine nine of of seventy seventy three three point point victory victory for for the the griz griz records records are are meant meant to to be be broken broken all all those those things things that that people people say say so so what what motivates motivates us us every every single single day day is is about about just just playing playing our our best best basketball basketball and and I I think think over over the the last last three three games games we've we've done done a a lot lot better better job job with with that that Memphis Memphis coach coach Taylor Taylor Jenkins Jenkins whose whose team team led led by by as as many many as as seventy seventy eight eight jaren jaren Jackson Jackson junior junior led led the the scoring scoring for for the the griz griz with with twenty twenty seven seven the the Chicago Chicago Bulls Bulls blew blew a a twenty twenty one one point point lead lead regrouped regrouped to to beat beat the the New New York York six six one one ninety ninety one one fifteen fifteen the the Martin Martin Rosen Rosen rose rose up up in in the the fourth fourth quarter quarter eighteen eighteen of of his his team team high high thirty thirty four four is is fine fine when when we we go go out out there there compete compete you you know know we we we we we we face face adversity adversity at at times times and and not not feel feel good good when when we we come come out out come come out out on on top top Milwaukee Milwaukee had had its its eight eight game game winning winning streak streak ended ended in in Toronto Toronto the the raptors raptors beat beat the the box box ninety ninety seven seven ninety ninety three three the the box box did did not not play play leading leading scorer scorer got got a a son son of of a a couple couple who who set set out out with with a a calf calf injury injury lebron lebron James James has has been been cleared cleared to to play play again again after after missing missing one one game game out out of of the the NBA's NBA's health health and and safety safety protocol protocol NFL NFL Tampa's Tampa's Antonio Antonio brown brown one one of of three three players players suspended suspended for for three three games games for for violating violating covert covert nineteen nineteen protocol protocol Thursday Thursday night night football football Dallas Dallas got got back back on on the the winning winning track track after after its its thanksgiving thanksgiving day day loss loss they they had had their their way way with with New New Orleans Orleans twenty twenty seven seven to to seventeen seventeen thousand thousand lost lost three three of of its its previous previous four four games games was was playing playing without without head head coach coach Mike Mike McCarthy McCarthy was was out out under under covert covert protocol protocol but but dak dak Prescott Prescott and and company company still still prevailed prevailed Prescott Prescott threw threw a a touchdown touchdown pass pass the the Michel Michel Galopin Galopin Tony Tony Padron Padron fifty fifty yards yards for for another another TD TD call call us us walk walk and and scored scored on on a a twenty twenty nine nine yard yard interception interception return return one one of of four four picks picks for for the the cowboys cowboys defense defense off off taste taste in in hell hell making making his his first first start start of of the the year year for for the the saints saints I'm I'm John John Merriam Merriam at at HL HL forty forty two two save save died died for for goalie goalie Jeremy Jeremy swim swim and and pave pave the the way way for for Boston's Boston's two two nothing nothing win win over over Nashville Nashville it's it's fun fun to to watch watch guys guys are are taking taking pride pride the the defensive defensive zone zone and and also also any any offenses offenses on on I I was was had had the the best best seat seat in in the the house house watching watching him him work work you you know know play play together together a a lot lot of of talk talk out out on on the the ice ice college college football football coach coach Bronco Bronco Mendenhall Mendenhall stepping stepping down down in in Virginia Virginia check check Freeman Freeman AP AP sports sports

NBA Ap Ap Memphis Memphis Grizzlies Oklahoma Oklahoma City City Th Taylor Taylor Jenkins Jenkins Jaren Jaren Jackson Jackson Chicago Chicago Bulls New New York York Martin Martin Rosen Rosen Memphis Times Times Basketball Raptors Lebron Lebron James James Milwaukee Grizzlies Antonio Antonio Brown Brown Toronto New New Orleans Orleans Tampa
"thirty years" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Between The Lines

"To between the lines on air online or via ABC listen up. This is Tom Switzer and thanks for tuning in. Later on the program. Climate denial is waning on far right fringe movements. What's likely to replace it? It might be just as scary. Essentially, it's lame blame for environmental destruction on people from developing countries largely, those who actually consume far less than those in wealthy countries and blaming them for overpopulation in their own countries and then coming to wealthy countries and cause inclusion there. Stay with us for my chat with the guardians Oliver millman. But first, how the U.S. lost the post Cold War peace. While 30 years ago, this happened. Fellow citizens here. In view of the world's situation that is developing the Commonwealth of Independent States. And terminating my activity as president of the USSR. It was an emotional moment for the man who's been described as a coach without a team. Outside and the chill of Moscow air, the red flag of communism was hauled down and the standard of the rising Russian Federation raised instead. Christmas 90 91, Moscow allowed the Baltic states to separate from the Soviet Union and the USSR flag was lowered at the Kremlin for the last time. Now the disintegration of the USSR marked not just the collapse of Soviet communism. It also marked according to the then president George H. W. Bush, the triumph of America's democratic mission. The biggest thing that has happened in the world and my life in our lives is this. By the grace of God, America won the Cold War. But did America's victory in the Cold War lead to hubris. Encouraging successive administrations to expand NATO, eastwards. Thus upsetting Russia's strategic sensibilities. The NATO enlargement in the late 1990s and beyond. So this is under presidents Clinton Bush junior, Obama, even Trump, denied our expansion represent a betrayal of any agreements to end the Cold War that the U.S. and the old Soviet Union made in the early 1990s. I do that in exchange for a reunified Germany, the west's alliance would not move east. Or has NATO enlargement being a great success locking in hard one democratic gains in central and Eastern Europe. Mary sarati is Professor of historical studies at Johns Hopkins University's school of advanced international studies and a research associate at Harvard University's center for European studies. Mary's new book is called not one inch. America, Russia, and the making of post Cold War style made. That's just been published by Yale University press. Mary, welcome to ABC radio. Thank you so much. Great to be connecting over the airwaves. Now, was the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union three decades ago was all that inevitable. No, it was not. And so it's worth taking some time now on the 30th anniversary to reflect on exactly what did happen, what went right and perhaps more pertinently for today as Putin is threatening Ukraine, what went wrong? Because I think that to understand the problems we have today, we need to go back to when things seem to be going right to the 1990s. At the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union was not inevitable. We can see that by comparison with China. There were popular revolutions in 1989 in both central and Eastern Europe and in China, but we can see how very differently they turned out because of course the regime in China in 1989 imposed violence in Tiananmen Square cracked down on the uprising and maintained a toll on power. So that shows that alternate outcomes were possible. Now, in central and Eastern Europe, the story turned out differently. In large part because of the Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, he decided to gamble that he could reform the Soviet Union and cooperate with the west and stay in power that way rather than by cracking down and using violence. But he underestimated the power of nationalities both in Europe and within the Soviet Union itself. And once he began with some reforms, some limited reforms, it became apparent that the people wanted much, much more. And when the wall came down, when different components of the Soviet Union, republic started clamoring for independence. He was overwhelmed and couldn't really handle all this crises. And then his most important political opponent Boris Yeltsin took advantage of all these crises, realized that he Boris Yeltsin could ride the wave of Russian nationalism and basically become leader of Russia and dismantle the Soviet Union, thereby leaving Mikhail Gorbachev, his hated nemesis as president of nothing. And so that's what yeltsin did. And that plan was daring, but it succeeded brilliantly, 30 years ago in December 1991. So all of these were very contingent events that could have turned out very differently. It also could have turned out much more violently. So I think it's worthwhile to really look at what happened and understand just how contingent those events were. And when empires collapse Mary, you know, brutality violence that they usually coincide. You think of the British departure from Kenya, Malaya, the Indian subcontinent. The French departure from Vietnam, Algeria, the Belgium from Congo, what's happened here with the Soviet Union's collapse was very much the exception. Now take us back to February 1990. When James biker, the U.S. Secretary of State, met with Mikhail Gorbachev. Yes, okay. So the wall comes down and it's clear that along with the wall, the Cold War order is crumbling. So the obvious question is what next? What order is going to follow? And all around the world political leaders like Secretary of State James baker, president George H. W. Bush, Mikhail Gorbachev, Margaret Thatcher. They're all trying to figure out what now. And so James baker goes to Moscow and is part of a hypothetical bargain. He says words to the following effect to Mikhail Gorbachev, the leader of the Soviet Union. How about you let your half of Germany go so it can unite after the fall of the wall and we agree that NATO will not shift one inch eastward. The problem is that baker by saying that is leaning too far forward over his skis. When he gets back to Washington, his boss and old friend George Bush says you know James, that's not actually what I want. What I want is not only to preserve NATO, but also to preserve its ability to expand. So instead, James, what we're going to do is we're going to move NATO across the Cold War line, but we'll just make concessions as we do so. And the net result is actually that the territory of former East Germany to this day is the only part of Europe that is guaranteed by treaty to be nuclear free. That was the concession. The problem is that it took Gorbachev a while to figure out that what baker had said was no longer on offer. And that is the heart of the controversy that lasts to this.

Soviet Union U.S. NATO Tom Switzer Oliver millman rising Russian Federation Mikhail Gorbachev Eastern Europe Moscow Clinton Bush old Soviet Union west's alliance Mary sarati school of advanced internation center for European studies ABC radio Russia Commonwealth of Independent St George Bush
Jury is seated in Jussie Smollett trial

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Jury is seated in Jussie Smollett trial

"A a jury jury has has been been seated seated to to hear hear the the case case against against former former empire empire actor actor jussie jussie Smollett Smollett no no panel panel that that will will decide decide the the case case consist consist of of twelve twelve jurors jurors plus plus alternates alternates the the judge judge James James Wynn Wynn told told the the jury jury he he expects expects the the case case to to take take about about a a week week and and seeding seeding the the panel panel then then asks asks would would be be jurors jurors about about their their feelings feelings about about the the case case that that riled riled the the nation nation thirty thirty years years ago ago he he asked asked potential potential members members of of the the panel panel if if they they have have been been the the victim victim of of a a hate hate crime crime if if they they had had watched watched the the late late show show empire empire or or were were familiar familiar with with TMZ TMZ celebrity celebrity website website in in TV TV show show Moscow's Moscow's Gabriel Gabriel

Jussie Jussie Smollett Smollet James James Wynn Wynn TMZ Moscow Gabriel Gabriel
A jury has been seated in the trial of Jussie Smollett

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

A jury has been seated in the trial of Jussie Smollett

"A a jury jury has has been been seated seated to to hear hear the the case case against against former former empire empire actor actor jussie jussie Smollett Smollett no no panel panel that that will will decide decide the the case case consist consist of of twelve twelve jurors jurors plus plus three three alternates alternates the the judge judge James James Wynn Wynn told told the the jury jury he he expects expects the the case case to to take take about about a a week week and and seeding seeding the the panel panel then then asks asks would would be be jurors jurors about about their their feelings feelings about about the the case case that that riled riled the the nation nation thirty thirty years years ago ago he he asked asked potential potential members members of of the the panel panel if if they they have have been been the the victim victim of of a a hate hate crime crime if if they they had had watched watched the the late late show show empire empire or or were were familiar familiar with with TMZ TMZ celebrity celebrity website website in in TV TV show show Moscow's Moscow's Gabriel Gabriel

Jussie Jussie Smollett Smollet James James Wynn Wynn TMZ Moscow Gabriel Gabriel
"thirty years" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

08:30 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on BrainStuff

"This episode is brought to you by discover. At discover, they believe managing your credit card should be uncomplicated. That's why with discover card holders can get their questions answered by a real person based in the U.S., they are night, 24 7. They can also get help by using the discover app or messaging them on the website. Because having the option to connect with a real-life person beats dealing with a recorded message any day of the week. That's just common sense. So go ahead and give them a call, send them a message online, or connect with them on the app. They look forward to speaking with you live. Discover. Learn more at discover dot com. The Daily Show is actually the whenever the hell you want it show. Now that you can get it whenever the hell you want it in podcast form, as The Daily Show ears edition, and if that doesn't satisfy your auditory cravings, you can dive deeper with the all new daily show beyond the scenes podcast where we take your favorite segments from daily shows pass and go beyond with the correspondence writers producers and expert guests that make the show happen. It's an all you can hear buffet with The Daily Show podcast on the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. Hey, have you ever found yourself thinking I like The Daily Show? But I'd love some more of it. I wouldn't mind revisiting some of my favorite segments from the show and listening to the experts expand and explore on the topics to find out where we're at now with those issues. It'll be cool to hear The Daily Show's producers and writers and correspondents and special guests simultaneously enlighten and entertain me. Wow, I really would love if it was hosted by Roy wood junior because I just can't get enough of his voice. In fact, if that existed right now, I would binge it on the iHeartRadio app. Apple podcasts, or whatever I get my podcast, and I'd subscribe for new episodes every week. Well, if you haven't been thinking that, boy, I got some news for you. That's it. That's the news. Beyond the scenes, go find it. You heard me, iHeartRadio app. Apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren vogelbaum here. When Mark Shelton was a boy, growing up in Fort Worth, Texas. One of his more nagging concerns was that someday he might grow too big to fit into a space capsule. That was the 1960s. NASA's mercury program had just made its first forays around earth. The Apollo program was in its planning stages. The moon landing was still a dream and years away. It was a time as president John F. Kennedy said in Houston in the early part of the decade to take up, quote, the most hazardous and dangerous and greatest adventure on which man has ever embarked. That was the beginning of young Marc Shelton's infatuation with space travel and the American space program. And though he never made it into space himself, or hasn't yet, anyway, a Shelton has become a part of NASA and the space program in his own poignant way. America's exploration of space has been marked by soaring triumphs and crushing tragedies. The space shuttle program suffered its first disaster in 1986. When the orbiter challenger exploded, barely a minute after liftoff, killing all 7 astronauts on board. Shelton, like many others in America, a watched in horror that day. He didn't know what to do to show his support for a program that, until challenger had become almost an afterthought too much of the American public. Before the article this episode is based on, how stuff works spoke with Shelton in 2019. He said, I wanted to find a way to let them know that every flight people care. Just because there isn't media coverage didn't mean that people didn't care. Oh, we take it seriously that they take it seriously. More than two and a half years after the challenger program, when NASA scientists had worked countless hours to determine what went wrong with challenger and countless more, finding ways to make sure it didn't happen again. The space shuttle program finally resumed. And Shelton decided on a simple gesture. It was after STS 26, the first return to flight mission after the challenger disaster wrapped up its mission in October of 1988, and the shuttle discovery was safely back on land, but Shelton, his wife, Terry, and daughter Mackenzie, sent a bunch of roses to NASA's mission control at Johnson Space Center in Houston. In the bouquet was a red rose for each of the 7 discovery crew members on board. Plus, a single white one, in remembrance of those who had been lost in the space program. The bouquet included a short note, but no phone number or address for the sender. For every manned mission that NASA has flown since, the family has continued the tradition. Over more than three decades, the sheltons have sent more than a hundred bouquets to mission control. A house of works also spoke with retired NASA flight director milt heflin. He said, they've never missed one time. They've always been supportive. Mark and I talk every once in a while. He'll call me and I'll call him. It's a friendship that's lasted. They are just so dedicated to doing this and to showing this support. That's what makes this really, really remarkable to me. They even sent a bouquet to mission control for SpaceX test launch of its crew dragon capsule on March 2nd of 2019, which docked successfully at the International Space Station. The crew dragon was unmanned, but carried a sensor laden mannequin, dubbed Ripley after the space explorer in the alien movies. It was the first time the family sent to bouquet for an unmanned mission, and the first one they sent after the space shuttle program ended in 2011. This bouquet also included a fake rose in honor of Ripley. Shelton said, this was like, we're back. We have a capsule that is capable of supporting human life. A crew rated capsule that can dock with the ISS. In 2020, in 2021, with astronauts launching from U.S. soil again, they've kept up the tradition. It was NASA flight director heflin, who spent 47 years with NASA and supervised 20 shuttle missions. For 7 of which, he was the lead flight director, who tracked down the sheltons after receiving that first vase of roses in 1988. They talked briefly on the phone. A Shelton said in 2019, I couldn't believe it. I was thinking, you've got way too much to do to be talking with me. A few years later, with hefflin at mission control, helming another shuttle flight, another bouquet arrived, with a handwritten note from Terry. It read, in part. NASA and her projects and missions have always been a source of hope, pride, and inspiration to the people of the United States, and more importantly, to the people all over the world. We all know the dedication of all of you associated with the space program to the successful completion of each mission, and to the safety of those whose lives are in your hands. We send flowers each time because we care that y'all care. I'm so grateful for the things that have come out of the space program, which help our lives and those of our children. And my daughter, Mackenzie, is most important in our lives, and we are grateful for what you all do to improve the quality of her life. Almost 50 years after a human first walked on the moon, Shelton and heflin still marvel at what the space program has accomplished. What it's still accomplishing, and look forward to what's next. Shelton said, miniaturization health and medical improvement and technological changes. We got this little phone in our hand, and it has so much power, and we can see a satellite image and a pretty close up view of where we live and the weather in what's coming, and global communication. Other studies of earth, that's really important. And we don't know in the future, are we ever going to need to leave the planet? Exploration is just such a basic need we have as individuals and a civilizations. Thanks to Shelton and those like him heflin says, the more than 17,000 scientists engineers, astronauts, teachers, and many other professionals who work for NASA feel the appreciation..

The Daily Show NASA Shelton Apple Lauren vogelbaum U.S. Mark Shelton Marc Shelton Roy wood Houston house of works milt heflin John F. Kennedy Fort Worth Ripley Mackenzie Terry heflin Texas hefflin
"thirty years" Discussed on Our Body Politic

Our Body Politic

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Our Body Politic

"Just the latest revelation about the tech industry. A former facebook employee named francis hogan blew the lid off of what she says are the social media. Companies decisions to choose prophets overdoing. What's best for its users. My next guest will help us. Examine the real impact of a lack of regulation in tech dr nicole. Turner lee is the director of the center for technology innovation and a senior fellow at the brookings institution dr turner lee. Welcome to our body politic. Oh thanks for having me. We're going to start by chopping it up about facebook. So whistle blower francis hogan went on sixty minutes to talk about company documents that she took an has shared with the sec and other members of government and the media and it shows what she says is a pursuit of profit regardless of toxic effects on teens and other users of different facebook products then within days the facebook we'd of sites and platforms went down twice now is this a critical inflection point for the company. So there's a couple of things to sort of dissect from this conversation that happened on capitol hill and what. We're learning about facebook as a platform in general first and foremost..

francis hogan dr nicole Turner lee center for technology innovati dr turner lee facebook sec capitol hill
More than 10,000 John Deere workers go on strike at 14 U.S. plants

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

More than 10,000 John Deere workers go on strike at 14 U.S. plants

"Hi Mike Rossi reporting deer and company workers go on strike after rejecting a contract offer more than ten thousand workers at fourteen Deere and company plants in five states what on strike Thursday in the first major walk out of the company in more than thirty years members of the United auto workers rejected an offer from deer earlier in the week of five percent raises for some workers and six percent raises for others rejected offer would have paid top scale their production workers just over thirty dollars per hour rising to thirty one dollars eighty four cents after five years the agricultural machinery giant known for its green tractors enjoyed a pandemic Boone gear is expected to report record profits of between five point seven billion dollars and five point nine billion dollars this year hi

Mike Rossi Deere United Auto Workers
Author Matt Rosenberg Is a Chicago Native Son Who Can’t Believe What He’s Seeing

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:49 min | 1 year ago

Author Matt Rosenberg Is a Chicago Native Son Who Can’t Believe What He’s Seeing

"His name. Is matt rosenberg. The book is what next chicago notes of a pissed off native son. Wow matt rosenberg. Welcome to the program. Thank you eric. It's a pleasure to be here. I know of you because of your dad the legendary milt rosenberg my goodness. How long did he do radio. I mean how many years was he in that world. Thirty eight years he was on. Wgn am but it was just a second job. His first job He was a professor of social psychology at the university of chicago. And i grew up in hyde park in the professor of social social psychology with common sense and great curiosity which i think he passed on at least partially to me. So you've been a journalist. You've done a lot of things this book. I mean everybody in the country Including some chicagoans are wondering what in the world is happening in chicago. so what. What is the book about what next chicago. What ultimately Are you saying here. I am addressing urban progressive misrule In our nation's biggest cities. I'm looking at the unified theory of systemic racism and positing that that is not the problem that the problem is that urban political elites largely of color are running our nation's biggest cities into the ground. What i'm also trying to do. When this book. I went deep into the south side. I moved back to chicago where i lived for thirty years. from the time of being a a young child six years old to you know My mid thirties. When i finally left and moved to seattle with my lovely wife where we raised two children. I had to come back in twenty twenty looking at the city in chaos and turmoil. I went deep into the south side. Talk to black people in their homes and workplaces about what's gone wrong how to set things right so that was a big part of it but then the policy piece. Eric was very big. I felt don't shy away from this. How is it that the public schools are failing. How is it that the criminal court system has run off the rails. How was it that. of fiscal governance has gone so wrong. Why is it that corruption is endemic and rules of governance are rigged so it was ambitious. But i feel like. I had a chance to step up to

Matt Rosenberg Milt Rosenberg Chicago WGN University Of Chicago Hyde Park Eric Seattle
What Democrats Are Doing Is a Moral and Constitutional Abomination

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:45 min | 1 year ago

What Democrats Are Doing Is a Moral and Constitutional Abomination

"Are fed up. And i promise you this idiotic. Effort to force people to get a vaccine in the workplace is a huge part of it. I'm angry about it. And i'm angry about about to get a booster. I guess i don't know. I'm going to get the what happens with the booster johnson and johnson. I got an employee who's going to get his booster today and eric's all set to go set up an appointment. He got to the pfizer. Vaccine the to dose. And he's going to get fis booster. I wanna find out what my antibodies are. I keep forgetting to call the doctor and get a test set up. I wanna know where my antibodies are. And what he thinks. I should do about getting a booster. I think he believes. I should get one if he does. I'm gonna get it. I shouldn't be fired if i don't and we are into a state and this article is so important i want to read more of it. From joy pullman of the federalist and you hear from this last guy in north carolina paul. Who's about to be fired after a thirty year. Career at american airlines when he america. You're gonna fire your pilots. Paul did at the airline but apparently thirty percent of american airline pilots aren't getting the vaccine joy pullman rights what democrats are doing as republicans stand down yet again is a moral and constitutional abomination not even the fig leaf pose of a pen signing balderdash phil document is needed for today's democrats. Whatever they say you do

Johnson Joy Pullman Pfizer Eric North Carolina Paul Pullman America Phil
"thirty years" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"This is the premier at the cairo opera house in the mid nineteenth century. I think it was Eighty seventy one and We always had uprising. I remember the first person who took to the opera was was my grandmother so also like the opera country continued throughout the twenties and thirties forties and things have changed a little bit in the last year is i would say it's not as essential as it was earlier in the twentieth century but was it was a very different route for you to take to perhaps look this for what type of music you wanted to make or what those around you make of that. Absolutely it was a different definitely. In comparison to my generation when they have studied at my friends studying opera something completely different specially eleven years ago when i had to move out of the country to to not to study engineering or law but to to study music so this was a big deal something also very very different than might what my friends has have gone through. Let's hear a bid from from one of the trucks on your album. L no oh tell us what. What are we listening to their. Fatima definition not across the.

cairo opera house Fatima
"thirty years" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"But then ultimately it is an individual's choice about how to do what i want to fight for is the day when people go into a process and feel that they are treated fairly in the they have a fair chance to be heard and to have some accountability in every process. And that is what we all deserve. I had a young woman right in the ones who said that that she had been sexually assaulted in her college that she filed a complaint college that in the complaint. She was able to be heard she was able to bring her case. She was able to ask for some Reckoning and accountability. She felt she was treated fairly afterwards. She didn't even tell me what the outcome was but that she felt the process were and she said it was because things change after the here. That's one success story. It's not enough and it certainly isn't what i hear over and over again or what you read about in the newspapers whether it's the vapors in the united states or in the papers up in the uk. And i just like to say. I do believe that we can do this. I do believe that we deserve better that we can't change as that. The urgency is now. And i believe it because of all the information all the knowledge all the wisdom that we have gathered over the last thirty years because of all the activism especially activism of young people in the great awareness and we have around black feminist thinking that is helping communities color. I know that we have to take all of that energy and all of that knowledge and put it together toward solutions in that still though solutions have to start at the top with our leaders. The ceo's in the president's even the president of the united states professor anita hill and have booked believing are thirty year journey to gender. Violence is out now. The gramophone awards the classical music version of the grammys. We'll be streaming live from seven o'clock this evening. Fatima saieed is an addiction opera singer and is the winner of this year's song category award ivan also exclusively veil on women's that she is also the recipient of this year's young artist award in previous young artist gramophone award recipients in the last thirty years include lease davidson young and benjamin grosvenor. I'd seen as a precursor of an international performing karez. Let me start by saying congratulations. Thanks for joining us. Thank you so much i. It's been a pretty exceptional. You've already won. I believe to bbc music magazine. Awards in april for newcomer the and the vocal award for your warner classic album eleanor. We're going to hear a bit of music. Shortly and i could carry on just one to gramophones or about to this. Evening is the full suite. Yes i think so but what does mean to you. What drives do it. Means a huge deals to me. I mean i've been following the gramophone award. Since i basically started studying since many years. So it's a huge deal to receive an award from from the gramophone also just means a lot to me to get it as a as as as young artists was just starting with like with my. It's the first album. It's the first step into my like discography and it just means a lot that it can be recognized this way especially from become of words. So i'm really really happy. You're part of a new generation of egyptian singer. What is the history of of egyptian opera. Well in egyptian on upper music opera music is hard to talk about egyptian upper music but we had an accra. Since the mid nineteenth century and i remember vanities a the premier we had was the electile adi of course and we also have that..

gramophone awards the classica Fatima saieed davidson young benjamin grosvenor united states anita hill gramophone award uk ivan eleanor bbc accra
"thirty years" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Women act that is part of the law in the us all he has been involved in efforts to encompass sexual violence It's not a matter of whether any of us or borne able to deal with this. It's weather we will each in our own way in an our own capacity a non alleged. The problem acknowledged or what it is. I mean there's so much evidence out there. If you think about the fact that in the united states one out of every four women they that they have been sexually assaulted or rate in this country one out of every four college students will be assaulted array as they go into into college and the rates are higher for young women. Don't go to college. One fifty percent of the women in the country say they have been harassed in the workplace. One out of every six men have been sexually assaulted. Men and boys have been sexually assaulted in this country so we have a problem. That's obvious we have numerous scandals. Of course i move say minded of the fact that we we discussed this only on a woman's the other day about the significance for women in america particularly black women that the singer r kelly was found guilty last week of exploiting his superstar status to run a scheme to to sexually abuse women. Children and answer met over the past two decades. How important is that verdict. It is a breakthrough conviction is a breakthrough. It took thirty years nearly to happen. And that's the travesty. Because we know. Many people were abused in the interim Even though there were charges against of our kelly he seemed to always escape until now. And and i would just directors raters if if they can find a copy of a recent new york times op ed piece written by kimberley crenshaw about why it happened. Why are kelly escaped prosecution for so many years. She says invite bluntly it is because society. The values black women and so that issue of race is always. It's always an element that overlays misogyny and that combined with ed to could women of color at greater risk or abuse and then to reduce the likelihood that when they do complain that people are going to take it seriously in actually respond also very lately college campuses now in the throughout the midwest throughout the country. Actually in massachusetts here. It's well are protesting sexual assault on college campuses. The directing their attention paternity attorneys. Where many have been happening and have been documented happening sexual assaults. That is but what that says to me. Is that now. We are starting to direct our attention not only at the individuals who are behaving badly but also to the institutions like the fraternities bet may be shielding now them from any kind of scrutiny or any kind of accountability all that we're moving in the right direction but we have so much to overcome to really get to where we should be a conversation that we have been having in this country very recently in the last few days especially because of the sentencing of serving police officer who raped kidnapped and murdered a woman in her thirties called. Sarah everard at very much looking at the police and those systems as well the ones that are meant to keeping us safe and violence against women and cheese..

r kelly united states kimberley crenshaw kelly new york times ed midwest massachusetts Sarah everard
"thirty years" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Is tragic and shouldn't happen but home for many is not safe at type of information you would go with your children because context is all and and that is a very important piece of context. Yeah i think it is. I did some volunteering with a shout. Text helpline around this oversee most of the young people the most threats to pilots actually in a one out on the streets by strangers so it is a context to give daughters. But i think the other thing to mention is that your girls need to find that voice you know. Women are often not powerful. Now we don't listen to men interrupt all the time. We know who the statistics around that. But i would really encourage girls to learn how to speak up. Uptick around authority to confident. They can voice their opinions in the classroom out of the classroom among their peer groups. I think on stay. Find their boys then. They start to feel slightly more powerful in in more worrying situations knowing candy. Thank you very much to all of mom. What's wrong with you. One hundred one things only mothers of teenage girls. Now were all of you getting in touch this morning into becoming at this from either very personal situations where advice that you would give even if you don't have to all sons but it's definitely sparked something about how we're talking about this and keeping it on if the right side of the facts and the context of this tides written and say please remember that mothers worried about the safety of their sons who are more likely to be assaulted. Otherwise we perpetuate the myth of boys. Tough girls need special treatment. The myth of of of boys there. Another one here informal but facilitated groups in the school lunch hours question to encourage peers to discuss broader issues. Racism misogyny homophobia and guarding street. Risks and safety boys are more likely to suffer around assaults of all will benefit another one here as a sixty six year old woman. I've seen for many decades..

"thirty years" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Yes it's very personal actually really triggered me. Because not as booming clapham am. I don't actually lives in a flat where i was born. It's not being converted into flats and she overlooks. Komen and sarah would have walked that journey. And then when i saw the photographs with sarah in stalked it just took my breath away and i burst into tears because i used to catch the bus in point is just from there so you can see that. It has a personal thing for me. I have a twenty-seven-year-old daughter but also you know the whole thing has affected everybody. And what can we do. That's the thing. I feel so helpless about so my king about hats trying to get mothers and daughters and sons dads and everyone trying to talk about it and then at higher level trying to make some full of change unless a bit disappointing to boris us. This morning from michael interview. We've done a lot on policy and the police and we'll keep doing that. Believe me but i suppose this conversation today is trying lorraine to to keep him balance how we respond and how response may affect those. Who rely on us for guidance. And in your case your daughter's yes exactly. i mean. I've tried to approach with what i call measured concern because i didn't want to panic them. It won't then catastrophes. Every time they go. I don't want them to feel helpless and powerless. I want to actively. Listen to what frightens. Then because what frightens. One teenage go might not another teenage girls. I need their view. Of and also i don't want to make them feel that it's what i wear or where they go them to feel. They've got to and so. I need to feel the power and the resilience around. They've got to have some sense. Obviously but also it's really hard. I think to parents not show that panic because we're tired tire worried about all young girls going out in the Brains all over. The place is teenagers risk assessment..

sarah Komen boris lorraine michael
Texas inmate faces execution for fatally stabbing 2 brothers

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Texas inmate faces execution for fatally stabbing 2 brothers

"A Texas inmate faces execution this evening for fatally stabbing to Houston area brothers during a robbery in their home more than thirty years ago Rick Rhodes is scheduled to receive a lethal injection at the state penitentiary in Huntsville his attorneys have asked the Supreme Court to stop the execution arguing his constitutional right to due process is being violated because roads is being prevented from pursuing claims that somebody central jurors at his trial might have been dismissed for racially discriminatory reasons his attorneys have filed other appeals and lost prosecutors say roads broke into the brothers home and killed them he confessed but claimed it was self defense if road is executed he would be the third inmate put to death this year in Texas and the sixth in the U. S. I'm Julie Walker

Rick Rhodes Huntsville Houston Texas Supreme Court Julie Walker
Dr. Jeff Barke: It's Easier to Call in a Prescription for Oxycontin Than Ivermectin

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:44 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Jeff Barke: It's Easier to Call in a Prescription for Oxycontin Than Ivermectin

"Let's stay here for a second. So i for my sins. I spent Oh my gosh. Almost thirty years in academia prior to joining the Trump administration i. I hate being called an academic But pay reviews was the big deal. Pablo perez was was the choice of The the expression for those inside of academia Peer review dr balki. It's a joke. I mean it's it's a mutual masturbation society isn't it because you're being reviewed by your body's and therefore it's just a collective group think exercise. This isn't unbiased review. By people who have no vested interests these people have viewpoints. They wanna protect and like crazy. That i mean in theory. It makes sense it sort of like a a trial by your peers Theory in theory but what happens at these journals is that they're all like minded people and up. An article comes through. That is a positive article about ivermectin. They're not even gonna look at it. Let alone review it and so it's almost impossible to get publish. Some of these articles that are critical of karma and critical of vaccines. And so yes. You're right it's a you know it. It saddens me to say but these journals and healthcare agencies have become political in nature and they shouldn't be because when that happens what it's it's patients that suffer and so the science has been corrupted. Patients are being injured as a result and listen every single day now when i call in prescriptions for patients as it relates to cove it. It is literally easier for me to call in a prescription for oxycontin than it is for either

Trump Administration Pablo Perez Dr Balki Academia
Michael West as "Tree"   A Comedy Interview   Show #84 - burst 01

Standup Comedy "Your Host and MC"

02:35 min | 1 year ago

Michael West as "Tree" A Comedy Interview Show #84 - burst 01

"But he's a big guy that has seen a block out the sun. He wore a black leather jacket. Like kind of like you'd picture from the biker movies and black leather chaps and and was kind of an intimidating figure. Well okay you were scary looking guy you would come on stage in everybody in the room would kind of lean back a little bit and what was so interesting was that you had this kind of scary big persona on stage but off stage. A lot of the staff commented on you being one of nicest guys they ever worked with and by the way. Thank you for that When i told several the old staff people that i was going to be interviewing you. They were not only a very excited. That we connected but wanted to share that you're one of their favourite people to work with because you were such a nice guy off state so there's that but then when i would go through the rules at the beginning of my set rule number one was always tip your server would. Yeah we reinforce. The course of the evening because i came from a background of like over thirty years in food and beverage the bartender by cook in my mom's restaurant when i was thirteen. So so food beverages my blood. We'll show you imagine this. Big intimidating guy Laid out in black leather coming out and pointing at the audience. And saying you will tip the waitresses. I learned. I learned to why you say the word server servers. Well there you go but still. It was a great way to start off your set. So let's let's back up a little bit. Because i know what Working with you how. That was it laughs but Share with the audience. How did you kind of fall into. Stand up comedy. It's something that i had. Since i was a kid and i'm probably dating myself but growing up watching the old ed sullivan show and shows variety shows I always loved the when the comedian came again. You like checking green myron cohen You know the old borscht belt comics the first ones and then Involved into you know cosby carlin's Which she prior. Before he turned into richard pryor notice when people were watching. You know family watching it. Everybody was laughing and so everybody was in a good mood. And i always liked

Nightclub Stand-Up Comedy Tree Michaelwest Laugh Funny Myron Cohen Ed Sullivan Cosby Carlin Richard Pryor
Suspected arson wildfire forces evacuations in California

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Suspected arson wildfire forces evacuations in California

"Thousands of people in northern California are under evacuation orders and a woman is charged with setting a fire that chase them from their homes fire officials say at least four thousand people in the Shasta county community of mountain gate north of Redding had to flee and a number of homes have already burned the flames erupted Wednesday when a woman emerged from the brush with a lighter in her pocket near a quarry workers reported seeing thirty year old Alexandra super Neva acting strangely before she approached by our fighters and ask them for medical help the Shasta county district attorney says the woman's being charged with felony arson to wildland and is being investigated in connection with other fire sat in the county and other parts of the state I'm Jackie Quinn

Shasta County Northern California Alexandra Super Neva Redding Jackie Quinn
"thirty years" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

RNZ: The Detail

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

"Let's move to the two thousands now and the famous fat takes uproar and the repercussions of that. Did they kind of demonstrate the power. Pharma's ish but it also must trade issue. That new zealand has so while we compete ourselves with other wealthy developed nations. Our emissions profile is very different. Most of wealthy nations don't have primary industries as a backbone of the economy and for us it means that our emissions profile is half carbon dioxide and the other half roughly speaking agricultural emissions methane from cows and sheep and deer in nitrous oxide and boy not including agriculture in any of the pricing that seems to tax on emissions trading scheme use zones always only try to take a half of our missions and agriculture has remained out of the picture and in fact will remain out of the picture until at least twenty twenty four because of remains extend by begging back in two thousand and three. I think it was the in. We have a labor government and pete hotness the ministerial climate change. Who was trying to introduce another team to have a carbon tax but parallel to that called for mandatory labelling on agriculture leary. That would pay for her suj- to look at reducing methane emissions from livestock. But that caused the. You know the uproar that most people probably remember it became known as a fat techs and it's partially derailed or contributed to the effect that in the end. They're coming in here. Some members to introduce the techs on carbon dioxide either turks and during that time what we had was sort of voluntary negotiated agreements with individual companies. But nothing major in tim's off pricing carbon until two thousand eight. The government is said to introduce an emissions trading scheme after finally securing the numbers at needs to pass the legislation since its introduction. Two thousand eight a wing through a whole number of amendments changes tweaking here and the end during that time infected big at all for all sorts of reasons so in essence the ideas that you have a certain number of units or credits that account for the emissions that you allow yourself for that particular period and then in meters. Have to buy these serena these government and in the pay for the emissions but it's globally coincided with the time wean former soviet union collapsed and a lot of countries sent the economies collapsed and the emissions dropped and elites to your collapse of the price of those units below dollar so the became worthless essentially but fast forward to now. We now have an as remains on important tool that has this year began a series of walks him so there's quarterly auctions. The prices now at fifty dollars just about fifty dollars. It is starting to kick in as a price into new zealand. Emissions trading scheme is our primary toll for reducing climate pollution and outeiro will remain the main economic twelve main price tool into the future. But it's no longer the main tool. The big difference between nineteen ninety and now is public awareness and evine slight the student marches. Give veronica maduna some optimism on worth paul young. He was one of the people interviewed for the street. He was part of generation zero and then after the paris summit began a campaign to have a carbon zero egg that had clear it and clear goals in that space. And i was talking to him. He's now with. The commission is one of their models about exactly. How do you feel after having run this campaign having seems to finally some movement in that space but still rising emissions and i probably fool into his same sense of cautious optimism that while we looking.

Pharma new zealand leary pete tim serena soviet union veronica maduna government paul young paris
"thirty years" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

RNZ: The Detail

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

"The sport on the scientific work the emissions stole continue to increase. They it's climate pioneered dave law and this quite a famous picture of him as a young scientist at a wind. Blown bearing head on wellington south coast. He started a co two measuring station. The back in the seventies and it still they're tracking continuously rising siato levels. This is to be the longest standing measurement we have also of rising co two emissions. Day flaw was in his twenty s at the time when he set this up and he was at that age sort of realizing not only seeing the rising missions here but it was a realizing the consequences. So he's gone through in. Frustration has probably understated description of it. He is now strongly involved worth school strikes for climate and a lot of youth groups that are now taking this really to the streets and he relates to their anger. That young people of looking back at you know the entire locks being spent discussing climate. Change that much action without much progress on policy he completely relates to that feeling now in his seventies there. I feel optimism because these young people and those highly innovative engineers scientists are out there. They really wanna do things in they have solutions before we move onto the two thousand key. Oto was that also a date. New zealand came back from the auto worth a negotiated deal that we would bring our missions back to nine hundred ninety labels and this was ninety ninety seven and we'll bring them back to ninety ninety levels but kyodo also under the rules. You could use offsets and you could trade with other nations. So that's where the idea of offsetting emissions rather than necessarily reducing them directly became important and forestry or sits in particular where a significant significant policy tool for new zealand. The thinking has changed since or optin was the minister who went to kyoto and negotiated a deal on behalf of new zealand and at the time on cute or favorite forestry offsets strongly but he has since changed his mind on it significantly. The thinking then was that it would give us time to give tom to develop policies to actually reduce emissions and it was clear eventually that it's not all long term solution at basted social. Tim fix to buy time because a Now realized that. It favoured the plantation of commercial pine. But that comes with a cease to affect that you plant the trees and their secrets the carbon. They stripped out of the out of the atmosphere. But then of course you cut the trees down and you release will at counter back into the atmosphere so forest off seats really. We can't rely on them for a strong as we have so far in the climate change commissioners quite clear on that for associates will remain a significant tool for the emissions. That we cannot easily reuse. We shouldn't rely on them as strongly as we have..

wellington south coast new zealand dave optin kyoto tom Tim
"thirty years" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

RNZ: The Detail

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

"Carbon and give the incentive to industries to change something about the way they do things there was little thinking about regulation in fact that was looked down upon wouldn't do anything about changing the way we transport things around with into much thinking about how designed cities to make it easier for people to not have to use their car so all of this kind of thinking was just not happening. You mentioned the business. Roundtable was roger kerr in charge of it at the time he was and he passed away a few years ago so that wasn't able to talk him obviously but are have gone back to some of those submissions that the business roundtable made at the time and in this mission to this proposed comtex. By the time we're talking ninety three ninety four and the proposal was to have a three a period in which the industry would have time to volunteering find ways reducing emissions. And if that didn't happen in nineteen ninety-seven that'd be carbon takes introduced at tim. Knowles tunnel from carbon dioxide and today proposal the The business roundtable at the time made a submission to say that. We're not sure enough where the news would infect possibly benefit from rising temperatures yet. Cloud of to submission was that the temperatures would rise so gradually that people could adapt to it or industries for to it and the for new zealand. Shouldn't do anything too. Hasty end should do anything much at all. Really but the business roundtable. That's the right wing. Think tank of the time does something else it broughton climate sceptics people who were part of an orchestrated denial campaign and they came out and you know went on a tour and new zealand. So veronica who with a so one was richard lindzen. Who was an mit professor monotonous feerick physicist. I've published more than two hundred scientific papers. For thirty years i taught at. Mit during which time the climate has changed remarkably little but the cry of global warming has grown evermore shrill and beaune lem walk was not a one. he's arguments less about the understanding of the climate system. But more about how we deal with that in arguing for for standing back and doing this rather than war if you realize what. The climate science is actually telling us as climate change is a problem by reasonably manageable problem. Gosh so so. The business roundtable was hugely influential. I don't know about hugely Powerful yes a powerful lobby group representing business interests influential in the same said. The people there brought out obviously did get coverage in the media. You know i'm just wondering what attitudes were like. And they time it would have influenced some people and it was perhaps also. There's this sort of process that we still have ongoing today. But perhaps less saw off of sewing down. So you hit this. This one body that intergovernmental plan on climate change which was bringing to get a scientists to assist research into in produced. These reportedly six or seven years and there were hundreds of them involved in the process. You had this one body producing these assessments. But you had other individual often scientists with a with a good pedigree. In in academic research stowing doubt con raising questions. And that's did confuse people at politicized the issue. It polarized issue and raised arguments steps in time..

roger kerr new zealand Knowles richard lindzen broughton tim veronica
"thirty years" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

RNZ: The Detail

07:14 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

"Me about nine hundred ninety. We were at near zero carbon emissions. So the brave for for the pace was to go back and look at the history because we know that we now looking at three decades of rising emissions science journalist. Veronica maduna was digging into the big story of our emissions record. She came across something staggering. Went back to nine thousand nine hundred because that is the year that we started. The inventories net country started to track the missions. And i to be honest. I was surprised to see that that. Back thing mia carbon neutral four carbon dioxide so not for the greenhouse gases such carbon dioxide a next golden. We're now trying to get back to you by three hundred fifty. I'm sharon brick kelly. Today on the details we were so close through two years ago. Now with part of the global meese code ran for humanity ever changes now. Rapid widespread intensifying. Our future is going to be warmer than it is right now. Crackling wildfires raging rivers devastating storms evidence. Climate change said on monday. That human activity is indisputably to as preparations gear up for this november's cop twenty six climate summit in glasgow we've known for decades world is warming and locally new zealand is currently on a parkway that would enable us to pow mystic target and fill our international obligation to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions by twenty by twenty fifty. You immediately. Think that if we've done something stronger. Being during the ninety. S chris kate. We could easily be innovative from the place. Now today. we look at the mistakes and missed opportunities with maduna. She's written about it in a story. For north and south called we spent twenty five years doing virtually nothing but first a basic explanation of carbon dioxide emissions versus greenhouse gas emissions. Who new zealander thing this three most relevant greenhouse gases are commodore signed me thane from agriculture nitrous oxide from agricultural. So the letter to are coming out of agriculture world. Carbon dioxide is essentially part of everything. Else we do. So that's energy. That's manufacturing transport that's carbon dioxide emissions are the main part. What was going on in thousand nine hundred i mean. Why was that figure so good. Was that joe too good policy or was it. Good luck more than letter infect. It was a carbon neutral points. It's not that we had no emissions. It's just that we had a good mix of emissions in the balancing from forestry. So it wasn't good policy because issue wasn't really good stage of developing policy. But ninety nine hundred was the year we're the intergovernmental panel on climate change produced. Its first assistance. Those the first time we actually looked at all the research that had been done up to that point points and what we can do to mitigate or to lower emissions reduce emissions. so it's important year in medicines. One surprise for me. When i was researching the story was that all went back to nineteen eighty eight back the climate scientists. It got together. He and wellington then done already discussed issues that we are still talking about that. Disgust civilized disgust. How arise in emissions and the consequence of warming will how we can do agriculture lift. Hell we can do just about anything. And what was the language like. That was used the because now the language is so dramatic really when it comes to talking about climate. Change us note. I mean code rid. The latest report it's apocalyptic almost but what we level of concern back. Then i've just got in front of y'all got a sunday star one page. Destroy that reports on this on this conference. Nine thousand nine hundred eighty eight and it describes it as an issue profound political importance. Something that will require significant changes across all industries and to me. It almost feels like we're word. Eddo level of recognizing this was a big issue in the nineteen ninety s in the green through a dip in both public awareness but was a sort of political importance and then confusion. I came with some of that. Denying forces was that nineteen ninety. There there was a major political assertion. Globally yes say. By that point we had the un framework convention on climate change. It started to find nations into commitments to do something that the actual plan when it happened much later in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven at kyoto climate summit but it was the beginning of of that process even before nine thousand nine hundred new zealand's labour governments sore climate change was the biggest show and had policies to cut emissions. But what was the hurry. L. pollution levels were offset by forestry. People won't really talking about it. The national minister simon ogden's proposal for a carbon tech's fellow ver. It could have put us with the group of countries that have reduced emissions and steed at gross emissions have risen twenty six percent over thirty years. You has manage previous targets by offsetting emissions. And i think that's one of the major factors that place into this that the policy approach was one of least cost like you not actually doing anything about real cuts about the actual pollution. Really what happened in in the nineteen ninety s. What was the tuning point. Who were the people influencing the decision making at this time after remember. This was the time of roy genomics very short time. We divided the della. We got rid of agricultural subsidies. We reduced tariffs. We simplify the tech system. Deregulation privatization in strong belief in market forces was the thinking at the time say hymns the focus was on. If we're going to do something about emissions it would have to come through a.

Veronica maduna sharon brick kelly chris kate maduna new zealand glasgow wellington joe simon ogden confusion un roy genomics
"thirty years" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"And here's the proof. Agai guy who likes to dress up. Like the joker from batman what a loser and miller said. I'm scared i'm living alone. I don't have anybody with me. Somebody's going to these. People are trying to kill me. Well would it surprise anyone. If he's making these kinds of stations to believe that antifa and black lives matter members are threatening him. I could absolutely be happened. I mean he sounds like Just a loser and and he's got a couple of screws loose. Yeah but I've yet to hear the reason. He's behind bars for thirty years potential. Yeah me too because you can legally own a firearm. Now this when he built at home. But i think again. Isn't that legal. And weren't they just yelling about that. That we need to make it illegal to do these ghost guns rob you. Can you remember. Are the ghost guns legal already. See when you're not sure okay So anyway he's in. He's in jail for things he was saying he was speaking mean things. Oh see look they. It is despicable not a good guy in my humble opinion But can you arrest him for that. Because he was saying mean things about minorities Does anybody remember this particular video. From a i think they were in tulsa and they had a militant black militant group that was standing in a field somewhere and they were talking about. What's to come in this country. Listen to these people by the way. These are not people who've been put behind bars. They're not facing thirty years in prison. Check this.

thirty years tulsa miller couple of screws
"thirty years" Discussed on Five four two and the Blue

Five four two and the Blue

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Five four two and the Blue

"Maybe give me a suggestion on something you'd like to see done into a podcast or research for podcast you can reach me at thelen filed dot com or directly by email at felon file at g. Mail dot com. Be happy to hear from you. Were listening to over twenty two different countries worldwide and and. I'm really enjoying talking to listeners. By email or zoom meetings with them and finding out information about what's going on in their communities getting some great tips on some possible interesting shades of blue story for you guys in the future speaking in the future remember as future comes up to us be safe and be secure and if you have the opportunity do something nice for somebody is really a thing to do. It's always a good idea to take the high road in the meantime victoria. You've got the control board back. Go ahead and close us out. And we'll talk to.

"thirty years" Discussed on Five four two and the Blue

Five four two and the Blue

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Five four two and the Blue

"The most part kept kept to himself the court case when it came up in november ended up being postponed again for one thing individuals and witnesses were very difficult to come by individuals who witnessed the incident as well as mr john randall. We're just not around anymore. So the core case was postponed again until nineteen thirty four and win the case came back up again. The assigned judge for that case was judged pinder a mcelroy and in an odd twist of fate judge mcelroy was the son of john h mcelroy. Who was the defense attorney. Hired by ally. Bud lunceford family as private prosecution in the state when this information came out again the court case and being postponed again criminal cases can just be postponed for so long when it came up again. It seems james. Lunceford hired a prominent martial attorney to represent him in the court case and this attorney ended up being the son of judge mcelroy therefore he employed an attorney who had not been born at the time of the killing one of the common statements that lunceford made to the press at the time was that he was quite eager. Stand trial on the case and to clear his quote citizenship so that he can return to his farm in louisiana no longer being a fugitive. The manner of his fence being was self defense. James lunceford got his day in court. Didn't necessarily get his trial. It ended up that the case was dismissed and this actually ended up happening thirty five years after he was charged with the murder of his cousin though his day in court had been put back continuously for almost for two years after he confessed to it. Every time it would come up again in court in madison county. For review. james would travel travel to marshal the county seat to to face his charges at each term of court he would make a trip from louisiana's in the hopes that his case would be called and when the case was finally called less solicitor or district attorney's zab nettles for the state ended up dismissing it. So many years had passed since the killing that occurred that everybody had forgotten about it and or had no knowledge or the witnesses were not available for one reason or another.

john h mcelroy louisiana James lunceford november Lunceford mcelroy madison james john randall one reason four lunceford So many years each term thirty five years after two years one thing nineteen thirty Bud
"thirty years" Discussed on Five four two and the Blue

Five four two and the Blue

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Five four two and the Blue

"The ordinary process of law cannot be served on him. Now therefore i charles b aycock governor of the state of north carolina by virtue of the authority in me vested by law do issue this proclamation of offering award of two hundred dollars for the apprehension and delivery of said james lunceford to the sheriff of madison county at the courthouse in marshall so on and so forth. Basically the same article except a different governor. Well apparently some people look for james. Let's fast forward about thirty three years into the future. Nineteen thirty three. James lunceford is now fifty eight years old and one day he shows up at the madison county sheriff's office out of the clear blue sky according to the newspaper article and you and then announced that he was wanted for the fatal shooting of his cousin. In one thousand nine hundred. Well the sheriff at that time and they weren't familiar with the case but james gave a full confession and confessed to the killing and said quote. I know i was justified. But i just wanted to get this thing cleared up and get it off my mind. The sheriff contacted the solicitor jeb at the time in asheville and after discussing the information with the solicitor. It was arranged. At the that james lunceford be released on a one thousand five hundred dollars bond which he paid in cash right up front now. The big question is where has lunceford been for the past thirty some years mel. After he left west. Virginia he moved to louisiana and took in continue life with his new with his wife changing his name to george w franklin and started working in cattle and farming became very good at it. Because it wasn't or in that time period he became a very rich man in the cattle business and owned a very large ranch. In de quincy louisiana. Apparently near maryville easy anna near lake. Charles lot's wife had no children of his own adopted. An older girl who lived with them for a number of years and supported and was one of the reasons. A james wanted to get record. Clear the story of the surrender of james lunceford four crime that he supposedly committed thirty three years ago. Drew a lot of press and attention in nineteen thirty three the headline of the charlotte observer. October twenty seventh nineteen thirty three north carolina fugitive a thirty three years to face trial and the article went on to explain how james lunceford was now a wealthy plantation owners how they placed it or how they listed it in an upcoming court. Date was set for november of nineteen thirty. Three james lunceford hung around in the area waiting for his court. Date come up. He was interviewed by several newspapers.

james lunceford two hundred dollars james October twenty seventh louisiana Virginia James lunceford charles b aycock asheville thirty three years ago thirty three years north carolina one thousand nine hundred Three lunceford de quincy louisiana madison fifty eight years old november of nineteen thirty Charles lot
"thirty years" Discussed on Five four two and the Blue

Five four two and the Blue

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Five four two and the Blue

"This is what happened. And the sheriff for the time ended up arresting mr randall in charging him with homicide after the fact aiding and abetting while mr randall ended up being found guilty of this was given four months time in jail james on the other hand he made after he left flag pond. Tennessee t left for west virginia. Now the state with carolina ended up putting out almost immediately a reward of fifty dollars for his arrest but it really wasn't sufficient enough to inspire a lot of expensive efforts to get him. Back to relocate. James lunceford after being in west virginia for a while james sent for his wife and the to live for short time in west virginia. After his wife's arrival james disappears at that point now a speculated that he had gone to texas that he had gone to other locations and There really wasn't much of an effort to look for james although he dropped off the map the state of north carolina still wanted change back to stand trial in march of nineteen o eight a seventy five dollar reward was issued and a proclamation was made by the governor of north carolina at that time that red state of north carolina executive department whereas official information has been received at this department that one james lunceford late of the county of madison stands charged with the murder of alive bud lunceford and whereas it appears that the said james lunceford has fled the state or so conceals himself that the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon him therefore i r b glenn governor the state of north carolina by virtue of the authority in me vested by law do issue this proclamation offering award of seventy five dollars for the apprehension and delivery of said james lunceford to the sheriff of madison county at the courthouse in marshall north carolina. And i do enjoy all officers of the state in all good citizens of the state to assist in bringing said criminal to justice sign in our city of raleigh in the one hundred and thirty second year of our american independence are be glenn governor of the state of north carolina. Well seventy five bucks. That's up from what it was but still james was not located. He seemed to just disappear and drop off the earth along with his wife. Not that they didn't keep looking no james well after two after a while of course governors change states change but being wanted by the law. Until you're caught. That really doesn't change. Another governor coming in governor governor. Charles b aycock who issued another proclamation by but this time rendering james lunceford an outlaw in the process in offering a two hundred dollar reward for his location stating whereas official information has been received. This department that james lunceford is charged with murder of bud lunceford in madison county on august. Twenty ninth nineteen hundred and whereas it appears that said lane that said james lunceford..

james lunceford west virginia texas Charles b aycock two hundred dollar north carolina fifty dollars James lunceford james seventy five dollars august randall four months seventy five bucks Tennessee raleigh madison march of nineteen o eight carolina hundred