35 Burst results for "Thirty Year"

President Trump wraps up campaign rally in Carson City

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:34 min | 16 hrs ago

President Trump wraps up campaign rally in Carson City

"Adams out in force over the weekend many arriving several hours before polls open for early voting arise Brown reports. Vice President Joe Biden leads President Donald Trump in Nevada where the average number of newly identified covid nineteen cases is more than double. What it was in mid September. The president nonetheless held a rally in Carson City on Sunday similar to others were most attendees went without face coverings carry DERMIK. State Director for the group. All voting is local. She says voters who arrived at a polling place without a mask won't be turned away but instead provided with one. She knows all registered active Nevada voters should have already received a ballot in the mail. Her. From his seventeenth, all the ways of the thirty years at any point Greece, and you can also do it third of November two. Nevada is going to the polls for early voting need to show a driver's license voter ID prior to the rally trump attended a mega church service in Las Vegas yesterday where few people were mass and there was no social distancing. Nevada was one several states where Republicans attempted to block the. State from sending mail in ballots to every registered voter. But last month a federal judge dismissed the lawsuit. Dermik says because voting by mail will be so nude, many Nevada NHS. It's important that all voters and other options in Nevada we've never had this scale of the by mail election before the pandemic has been especially hard on Nevada's economy with the gross domestic product down more than forty percent compared to about thirty one percent nationwide. Nevada and Hawaii both heavily dependent on tourism have seen the largest drops in GDP.

Nevada Dermik Vice President Joe Biden President Trump Donald Trump Adams Brown Las Vegas NHS Greece Carson City Director Hawaii
Socks And Underwear (MM #3496)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 d ago

Socks And Underwear (MM #3496)

"The Maisonette with Kevin Nation some things never change as a kid. You always hated going shopping for things like school clothes or will basically just clothes shopping in general. You never like what your parents picked out and the worst thing you had to do was go out to buy socks and underwear. So what do I have to do the other day the only two major purchases I've made in the last six months or so socks and underwear and sadly I had to do them online because the stores I buy them from are actually in other states. The closest Jockey Outlet is an Indiana or actually, I think there's one over in East Tennessee, but the one in Indiana is closer, but we're not traveling out of state of my socks. I need the specific brand don't even know if you can buy them at a local store. So I had to buy them online so it's no big deal shopping, but I still hated every second of it even though I'm in my fifties even though I've been buying socks underwear on my own known for over thirty years. I still hate it when I do and it's my wife will tell you I probably don't buy them often enough. Yes. I like to have lots of pairs of underwear around because I don't want to have to buy them for years. I still hate it always have and always will dead.

Indiana Kevin Nation Jockey Outlet East Tennessee
Socks And Underwear (MM #3496)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 d ago

Socks And Underwear (MM #3496)

"The Maisonette with Kevin Nation some things never change as a kid. You always hated going shopping for things like school clothes or will basically just clothes shopping in general. You never like what your parents picked out and the worst thing you had to do was go out to buy socks and underwear. So what do I have to do the other day the only two major purchases I've made in the last six months or so socks and underwear and sadly I had to do them online because the stores I buy them from are actually in other states. The closest Jockey Outlet is an Indiana or actually, I think there's one over in East Tennessee, but the one in Indiana is closer, but we're not traveling out of state of my socks. I need the specific brand don't even know if you can buy them at a local store. So I had to buy them online so it's no big deal shopping, but I still hated every second of it even though I'm in my fifties even though I've been buying socks underwear on my own known for over thirty years. I still hate it when I do and it's my wife will tell you I probably don't buy them often enough. Yes. I like to have lots of pairs of underwear around because I don't want to have to buy them for years. I still hate it always have and always will dead.

Indiana Kevin Nation Jockey Outlet East Tennessee
Socks And Underwear (MM #3496)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 d ago

Socks And Underwear (MM #3496)

"The Maisonette with Kevin Nation some things never change as a kid. You always hated going shopping for things like school clothes or will basically just clothes shopping in general. You never like what your parents picked out and the worst thing you had to do was go out to buy socks and underwear. So what do I have to do the other day the only two major purchases I've made in the last six months or so socks and underwear and sadly I had to do them online because the stores I buy them from are actually in other states. The closest Jockey Outlet is an Indiana or actually, I think there's one over in East Tennessee, but the one in Indiana is closer, but we're not traveling out of state of my socks. I need the specific brand don't even know if you can buy them at a local store. So I had to buy them online so it's no big deal shopping, but I still hated every second of it even though I'm in my fifties even though I've been buying socks underwear on my own known for over thirty years. I still hate it when I do and it's my wife will tell you I probably don't buy them often enough. Yes. I like to have lots of pairs of underwear around because I don't want to have to buy them for years. I still hate it always have and always will dead.

Indiana Kevin Nation Jockey Outlet East Tennessee
Socks And Underwear (MM #3496)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 d ago

Socks And Underwear (MM #3496)

"The Maisonette with Kevin Nation some things never change as a kid. You always hated going shopping for things like school clothes or will basically just clothes shopping in general. You never like what your parents picked out and the worst thing you had to do was go out to buy socks and underwear. So what do I have to do the other day the only two major purchases I've made in the last six months or so socks and underwear and sadly I had to do them online because the stores I buy them from are actually in other states. The closest Jockey Outlet is an Indiana or actually, I think there's one over in East Tennessee, but the one in Indiana is closer, but we're not traveling out of state of my socks. I need the specific brand don't even know if you can buy them at a local store. So I had to buy them online so it's no big deal shopping, but I still hated every second of it even though I'm in my fifties even though I've been buying socks underwear on my own known for over thirty years. I still hate it when I do and it's my wife will tell you I probably don't buy them often enough. Yes. I like to have lots of pairs of underwear around because I don't want to have to buy them for years. I still hate it always have and always will dead.

Indiana Kevin Nation Jockey Outlet East Tennessee
Socks And Underwear (MM #3496)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 d ago

Socks And Underwear (MM #3496)

"The Maisonette with Kevin Nation some things never change as a kid. You always hated going shopping for things like school clothes or will basically just clothes shopping in general. You never like what your parents picked out and the worst thing you had to do was go out to buy socks and underwear. So what do I have to do the other day the only two major purchases I've made in the last six months or so socks and underwear and sadly I had to do them online because the stores I buy them from are actually in other states. The closest Jockey Outlet is an Indiana or actually, I think there's one over in East Tennessee, but the one in Indiana is closer, but we're not traveling out of state of my socks. I need the specific brand don't even know if you can buy them at a local store. So I had to buy them online so it's no big deal shopping, but I still hated every second of it even though I'm in my fifties even though I've been buying socks underwear on my own known for over thirty years. I still hate it when I do and it's my wife will tell you I probably don't buy them often enough. Yes. I like to have lots of pairs of underwear around because I don't want to have to buy them for years. I still hate it always have and always will dead.

Indiana Kevin Nation Jockey Outlet East Tennessee
Socks And Underwear (MM #3496) - burst 1

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 d ago

Socks And Underwear (MM #3496) - burst 1

"The Maisonette with Kevin Nation some things never change as a kid. You always hated going shopping for things like school clothes or will basically just clothes shopping in general. You never like what your parents picked out and the worst thing you had to do was go out to buy socks and underwear. So what do I have to do the other day the only two major purchases I've made in the last six months or so socks and underwear and sadly I had to do them online because the stores I buy them from are actually in other states. The closest Jockey Outlet is an Indiana or actually, I think there's one over in East Tennessee, but the one in Indiana is closer, but we're not traveling out of state of my socks. I need the specific brand don't even know if you can buy them at a local store. So I had to buy them online so it's no big deal shopping, but I still hated every second of it even though I'm in my fifties even though I've been buying socks underwear on my own known for over thirty years. I still hate it when I do and it's my wife will tell you I probably don't buy them often enough. Yes. I like to have lots of pairs of underwear around because I don't want to have to buy them for years. I still hate it always have and always will dead.

Indiana Kevin Nation Jockey Outlet East Tennessee
Socks And Underwear (MM #3496)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 d ago

Socks And Underwear (MM #3496)

"The Maisonette with Kevin Nation some things never change as a kid. You always hated going shopping for things like school clothes or will basically just clothes shopping in general. You never like what your parents picked out and the worst thing you had to do was go out to buy socks and underwear. So what do I have to do the other day the only two major purchases I've made in the last six months or so socks and underwear and sadly I had to do them online because the stores I buy them from are actually in other states. The closest Jockey Outlet is an Indiana or actually, I think there's one over in East Tennessee, but the one in Indiana is closer, but we're not traveling out of state of my socks. I need the specific brand don't even know if you can buy them at a local store. So I had to buy them online so it's no big deal shopping, but I still hated every second of it even though I'm in my fifties even though I've been buying socks underwear on my own known for over thirty years. I still hate it when I do and it's my wife will tell you I probably don't buy them often enough. Yes. I like to have lots of pairs of underwear around because I don't want to have to buy them for years. I still hate it always have and always will dead.

Indiana Kevin Nation Jockey Outlet East Tennessee
Star Trek: Discovery: What to expect from the new season

The 3:59

17:33 min | 3 d ago

Star Trek: Discovery: What to expect from the new season

"With. Michelle. Paradise Co Executive Producer and Co show runner of Discovery Welcome. Michelle, thank you. Thanks for having me. Excited to be here. So after two seasons of exploring the nooks and crannies of the Kirk, era star Trek discovery catapults nine hundred years into the future season three. It's a huge departure for the show. What can we expect to see from this big shake? A. Lot of new things. The world, the world that they come into is very, very different than the one they left there it's actually nine hundred and thirty years ahead. So what that does is it takes us a just beyond all established cannon. So really in terms of storytelling, it's fresh snow it's. We have whatever the world is that we that we wanna make of it so. I think people will be excited to see. We've got some new technologies that we're going to be introducing the season. We've got new characters that will be introducing the world as I mentioned is in is an Kinda different state and we can get into that in a second. But the thing I wanNA highlight is even as we're going nine hundred and thirty years ahead even as we're going beyond established cannon What is what was super important to us throughout the development of season three s make sure that we're honoring existing cannon. So the species, their relationships, all of those sorts of things that have been established on all of the series that came before us are things that we are continuing to honor. technology were continuing to honor even as we push it forward. The Federation. STARFLEET. All of these things that mean so much to everyone who loves track we continue honor those but going into the future allows us to look at these things in a new way and so. One of the things that people may find is That's species that we know from a series past maybe we interact with them in a different way. This season may be alliances shifted of folks are friends who didn't used to be friends or enemies who didn't use to be enemies. Going so far into the future allows us to do all of those sorts of things. And the new kosher honor show runner and congrats on the promotion What changes would you bring to the show? Oh Well I don't necessarily bringing changes. It's really I mean I I started in season two when I joined the show joined about halfway through season two. And toward the back of the season started working very closely with Alex Anyway as we were finishing up season two. So you know I feel like I've gained a good understanding of what he wants from discovery and you know as a group in season two, we are still finding. Really. What is the what is the right tonal mix for this show Because you know any season, one of the show is still kind of finding itself in that way and I feel like in season two, we really hit our stride with that. In terms of we've got the action adventure in via fax. We've got the character moments the emotion we've got you know fighting in. All sorts of mystery in all of the elements of the show I feel like in season to found the right balance. So for me coming in and working with him, it's really about maintaining that kind of balance in every given episode doing what this show does. So well, which is letting are actors, directors and everyone in Toronto shine in the way that they do and You know really just continuing to to try and. Make. The best possible version of tracker we we Cam Michelle. So well, let's get to the show. You you sort of teased trailers have shown and teased a grimmer future one where the federation doesn't necessarily exist or isn't around anymore hats that changed the show and I know you talked about how you want to stay faithful to the spirit of Star Trek. But we'll talk about the differences in how you're. able to play around with that. Sure. So to be clear, the federation is still there it's just It's been diminished in that something that are characters will come to discover as they go through the season and they'll They'll begin to learn the reasons why that happened and the the why of that, and then the drive to bring the federation together again, really becomes their main drive of the entire season. Ends when we looked at going so far ahead into the future We thought well, what what is what are the big things that could have about this world and that seemed like a natural place to go and. It seems like you know if we are going that far ahead, what what do our characters have? What do they bring to this new future that makes them uniquely able to have a significant impact on this new future and when you talk about a world where the federation has been diminished in some way, it's it's still out there just so everyone is clear. It's still out there. It hasn't gone away but but if it's not as strong as it used to be you have you have Burnham in Seru and all of our heroes. On discovery coming from a time when the federation was strong when it was the bedrock of everything and they grew up with that and they grew up with that feeling of security and optimism and hope and if they're coming into a world in which those things are are struggle for people, then our heroes are uniquely poised to help bring that kind of hope and bring that kind of optimism into this new future and inspire others around them, and so it it just felt like a great opportunity to be able to position them from center with all of that gun. The show has last two seasons wrestled with Continuity Canon, and making sure everything's working out in instep with previous series but hell freeing is it to get out of the constraints of cannon and really. Kind of go go out, go free with with what you really want to explore with star trek dare. I, say to go boldly where no one has gone before I did that I totally did sorry. it is. It has been very freeing. You know when? I when I joined the show in season two, we were right in the middle of that. The middle part of how do we answer these questions about hike that we knew from the original series? How do we answer some of these questions about spock widened stock never mentioned having a sister, all of these sorts of things and so that by the way that was really fun figuring out how all of that was going to work and how it fit into what was existing was really a lot of fun from story perspective. And now being beyond that is also fun and one of the really cool things that we've gotten to do is taken. We've gotten to take relationships that had been established previously, and then kind of change those up a little bit So the. You know the species you might expect to be friends may not necessarily be friends in this new future or vice versa It allows us to explore those new relationships explore species in new way explore worlds in new ways. So an into an again I, do want to say that that with all of that, we are definitely honoring the cannon that came before we're not just. To sticking things lender and tossing them all our place where we've been, we've been really thoughtful about If we're going to play with something, how do we play with? How do we adjust it? How do we shift those relationships? And do it in a way that will feel both familiar and new same time for audience Gotcha. Your Star Trek has always been a reflection of modern society, the avast this from season to season. But given the fact that there's a pandemic going on. There's a discussion about the role of race in America there's climate change field disasters take your pick of issues right now. Unfortunately but it turns discovery and season three. How does discovery reflect what's going on today? Well I can answer that in a couple of ways. In terms of just the the pandemic itself Alex I've talked about this. We could not have imagined when we wrote and shot season three of the show how much it would resonate today because obviously no one could have. Seen this coming a year year and a half ago when we were first working on all of this thematically in season three where we're looking at a lot about connection and disconnection, and that's very much where the world is right now. So I think it it resonates quite unexpectedly just just in terms of the stories that we're telling the thematic residents of those stories. And then in terms of things like are characters You Know Star Trek. has always always valued diversity and know gene roddenberry started it back on the original series having a diverse cast at a time when diversity was not the thing one did on television so. Making sure that we honor that continue that we're continuing that with the introduction of some new characters this season. and. Making sure that that we honor those characters, those voices and that we represent those on the show is super important to us. At C, Net, we've always asked now what? So that's what we call our new series of conversations about the future that is shaping up as we speak I'm Brian Cullin everyone has an interview series, but we try to be different posing a problem driving toward a concise answer and doing it all in about fifteen minutes that we don't waste your time. Check it out at senior dot com slash now what? And speaking of those characters gave update on where some of the crew Michael Berman's through what are they as the season begins. Sure. So when we begin the season or characters have are just coming through the Wormhole, which is where we left them. In episode two, Fourteen last year so they will they will come through land somewhere. I. Can't tell you where they will land or what they'll do. They'll get their or or will spoil that but I I can tell you that one of the first things they'll be looking for is did they achieve their goal because going through the wormhole was about saving life from season to? And, making sure that there is sentient life in this in this new future that they ventured is is the first question Alaska of course, the answer is, yes that's not a spoiler or we wouldn't have season three because there would be no people So they did achieve their goal. I can tell you that and and then it's a question of. Who are they now and what what this new season gives us opportunity to do is really explore all of our characters in a in a much deeper way. You know when they left season two, they left everything behind anyone who was not on this ship that was in their orbit their family, their friends everything that was familiar to them. They left behind and so they are very much a they're a family unit and connected in. A really new and much deeper way when they come into this new future because they are all they have and. Everything else was left behind so. They're kind of strangers in a strange land figuring out this new world as they go and and that gives us choices to learn a lot more about about who they are to challenge them in new ways to see how each of these characters individually will grow. And some of that will come out with a new characters we introduce You know this is not a spoiler he's in the trailer. Everybody knows David Jolla is joining us this season as as book, and you know here's a character who has grown up in this new world who's going to become a kind of a guide for Burnham once she lands and she's in this new future. and. Seeing him challenge her. We will get to learn new things about her and as our characters face unique challenges. Over the course of the season we'll get to learn new things about all of them. Great. We saw Harry Mudd we saw Sarah saw a bunch of figures from past star. Trek shows in previous uses discovery are can you tease or can we expect any other release cameos or you just sort of breaking free from can completely in just starting with something completely new? Well, I can't. I can't give anything away 'cause. Away but you know a lot of this season really is about. Seeing what this new future is all about and seeing what new characters come in So you know in nine hundred, thirty years ahead so There's a there's quite a time gap there I do WANNA mention I I don't know if you. Earlier of saying about the new characters, we also have the characters of. Deer Gray who are in the season Bluto Barrio Alexander. Tremendous and speaking to diversity of all when we talk about diversey on camera that's They are also representative of that as a non binary and transgender in real life, and then also being a non binary and a transgender character on cameras, well with these characters that they represent. So. that. All of that has been very, very important to us. Great in terms of the tech obviously seen at the tech site talk with. You. That's that's great. We love that you love seeing A. A little bit about that. What what are some of the if interesting fats of? This 'cause there are a lot of fascinating concepts you played with the previous using network time travel was a big deal last year what what what tech we serve guys embrace for this next season. There is some new tax that we will explore the season. I hesitate to say only because I don't WanNa give it away but but I will say that again in the tradition of honoring what has come before and then also pushing that forward. There are there are some new tech, the elements that we will see the season You know the the ways in which people interact with their ships might be a little bit different You know certainly there would have pollution in the the technology we use the things we hold the things we interact with on ships, all of those sorts of things and you'll start to see. Some of those things right away in the premiere episode of Season Three. So there have been a wave of Scifi shows that you know ground themselves in hard science I'm scared that something you consider star trek which Kinda plays a little bit fast loose with tack at like how real some that check is that is this something you guys are considering or you thought about a four season three already beyond it's something that we have absolutely done. And I I can't speak to. A to the season's when I wasn't here. But we have we have a science consultant Dr Aaron McDonald's She is fabulous. She is an astrophysicist and some Some audience members might be familiar with her she's She does a lot of star trek events and things like that where she talks about the science of Star Trek and we work very very closely with her on all of these things, and so if we have a science or tech thing that we wanna do you know as as writers will make it up and play in the sci-fi realm and we rely on her to help us. Tailor that to make something that obviously these things are not possible right now but we want to get them as close to future possible as we can. So she helps us with all of that. She gives us you know how many kilometers per second is something going? You know all of these sorts of things she helps with So yeah, for sure we we know that a lot of actual scientists watch the show and. We don't want anyone watching the show and going up man that's insane. So Aaron helps us with that guy well I ask this for most of the folks who deal the show I haven't had a chance to ask you. So I'll ask him in terms of the tech that's available in Star Trek. What which which bit of tech would you like to see in real life which would you could actually see yourself using own my gosh? Transporter. I would love to have a transport but I would I would want it to be a transporter that wouldn't just take me from here to the grocery store, but I wanNA transport could take me to to visit my loved ones or to go someplace else especially. Now since we you know it's very tricky to get on planes and. Do things like that I I would. I would want to I would want to transporter yet that that's a good one especially nowadays transport. Yeah. He can get around TSA airplanes in general totally like that Yeah I just need that pad built living room just walk into it. You go where you WANNA go. Yeah, that's that's it. For me. I would just say cheers of guest stars and notes it's nine hundred years in the but a Q. is not you know he doesn't age is pretty much more. Sane. Just out there for you kids shows up. Okay now. Awesome. Okay. Wow Michelle thank you for your time. Really appreciate season three of star trek discovery premiers on, Thursday yeah. So much and thank you everyone for watching. Hope you enjoy the show. It's

Federation Cam Michelle Alex Burnham Executive Producer Kirk Starfleet Alaska Gene Roddenberry Seru Pandemic Toronto Dr Aaron Mcdonald Bluto Barrio Alexander Spock America TSA Brian Cullin Michael Berman
GOP pushes Barrett toward court as Democrats decry sham.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:12 min | 3 d ago

GOP pushes Barrett toward court as Democrats decry sham.

"Republicans powered Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett close to confirmation yesterday pushing past Democrat objections and other properties during the covid nineteen crisis in the drive to seat President Donald Trump's pick before the November third election. The Senate Judiciary Committee said October Twenty second for its vote to recommend Barrett's nomination to the full Senate the final confirmation vote expected by month's end. You don't convene a Supreme Court confirmation hearing in the middle of a pandemic when the Senate's on recess when voting has already started in the presidential election in a majority of states declared Senator Chris coons. Republicans eager to fill the seat of the late Justice Ruth Bader. GINSBURG counted that trump is well within the bounds to fill the vacancy and they have the votes to do it. Barrett's information would bring the most pronounced ideological change on the court in thirty years poised to launch a new era of court rulings on abortion voting rights and other matters that are now open to new uncertainty. The forty eight year old Barrett was careful during two days of public testimony, not to tip her views on many issues or take on the president who nominated her facing almost twenty hours of questions from senators. She declined to offer specifics beyond the vowed to keep open mind and take the cases as they come. Barrett refused to say whether she accepts the science of Climate Change under questioning from Kamala Harris saying she lacked the expertise to know for sure and calling it a topic to controversial to get into. Barrett framed acknowledgement of a man made climate crisis as a matter of policy not science when she was pressed by the Democratic senator from California the Federal Appeals Court judge responded that she did think Corona virus was infectious and smoking caused cancer but rebuffed Harris on the climate change question for seeking to solicit an opinion on a matter of public policy. Especially, one that is politically controversial effectively ignoring science in the face of the ever-present. Climate. Crisis.

Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court Senate Donald Trump Senate Judiciary Committee Ginsburg Kamala Harris Senator Chris Coons Federal Appeals Court President Trump Ruth Bader Senator Cancer California
The Hippie Trail Killer Charles Sobhraj

Serial Killers

03:17 min | 4 d ago

The Hippie Trail Killer Charles Sobhraj

"Nineteen seventy four, thirty year, old Charles Sobhraj had an international rap sheet that would make any con artists blush. He committed grand theft auto and France smuggled black vehicles into Bombay oath thousands to Macau's casinos and robbed a jewelry store and telly. Perhaps. Worst of all Charles tricked his half brother Andre into switching places with him abandoning him to eighteen years of hard labor. Charles was a manipulator of the highest order and he was only shot just getting started after his escape from a Turkish prison. Charles made his way back to Southeast Asia from there, he concocted a scheme to con people out of their money and identities. Charles, stationed himself along the HIPPIE trail, a tourist laden road between Thailand and Turkey because he was half Indian and half Vietnamese he easily blended in and could pose a helpful local. He often claimed to be a gem dealer or photographer and offered his services to help guide Western tourists. Once he gained their trust, he robbed them blind or convinced them to smuggle precious gems for him. For over a year Charles Rome to Southeast Asia perfecting his scams and in May of nineteen seventy five, he was in northern India carrying out his usual scheme on some French tourists when he met a young Canadian woman who would change everything. Twenty, nine year old marie-andree. Leclair was French Canadian and had never traveled outside of her country. But when she arrived in India, she was delighted to meet a man who introduced himself as a long goatee. Along was really Charles who used his fluency in French to Charles Marie and convince her he was a famous photographer. Charles Pursued Marie suddenly at first coming across us a mysterious rogue adventurer then to Marie, it seemed like he wasn't entirely interested. So of course, she fell head over heels in love with him. When her vacation eventually came to a close Charles asked her to stay and travel with him through Thailand but Marie used she had a life back home in Canada once in Quebec. However, Marie couldn't stop thinking about the mysterious along she wondered if she should have prolonged her travels and as she felt the weight of regret, a slew of love letters from her dashing prints made up her mind. Convinced. He was the one Marie flew back to meet Charles in. August of Nineteen, seventy five. She was completely devoted to him and completely unaware of his criminal past or his criminal present for that matter. That Fall Charles Marie were in Thailand spending time in the coastal town of Taya. But when they met a young Australian couple Charles knew it was the perfect opportunity to test Marie devotion to him. He Convinced Marie to help him drug their coconut milk when the tourists were knocked out Charles and Marie stole all of their belongings and ran by the time. The Australians Awoke Charles. Marie were Long Gone

Charles Charles Marie Charles Sobhraj Charles Rome Thailand Southeast Asia India Leclair Bombay French Canadian Theft Macau France Andre Turkey Canada Taya Quebec
How to Buy in a Hot Housing Market

Money For the Rest of Us

04:46 min | 5 d ago

How to Buy in a Hot Housing Market

"I recently got an email from listeners listening about six months or so has listened to well over one hundred episodes of the show. He writes that he's relatively new to investing. He's been investing for three years now, as he graduated from college in two thousand seventeen. He's been saving for his first home purchase in Austin. Texas. He writes the Austin Housing Market is very hot at the moment arguably one of the hottest markets in the country even with the recent effects of covid nineteen. He points out the median sales price in Austin has increased over eleven percent since this time last year, and there are forty five percent fewer homes on the market now versus a year ago he would like to buy a house in early twenty, twenty one. But after seeing the market conditions, he's worried that he might be entering the real estate market at the wrong time. He has heard of stories from realtors in home buyers about individuals and families putting offers of ten to fifteen thousand dollars over the asking price for homes that aren't even on the market yet only to find out, they did not win the bidding war. In short, he continues I'm wondering if you could offer some. Rules of thumb to look for as a first time home buyer in I. Hot Market such as Austin. I'm conflicted because I don't want to buy at the wrong time and potentially lose value in my home only after a few short years however at the same time if this market to continue at this pace for several years to come buying in the near future, I think might be the right move. He points out he's tired of handing over his money to landlords and would like to start building equity in a home to diversify his current return drivers. Austin is not the only hot housing market. There are a number of them in fact, nationally in the US housing is on fire. In August of two, thousand, twenty, there were five point nine million homes sold on a seasonally adjusted annual rate. That's the highest number of home since two thousand six and it's being driven because the average thirty year fixed rate mortgage at the end, of August was two, point, nine, four percent. The median single family home price in the US is up eleven point seven percent in the past year ending August twenty twenty. That's the biggest annual increase in twenty thirteen. Sales of newly built homes are up forty, three percent year over year the highest increase since one, thousand, nine, hundred, two. There have been about one million new homes built in the past year highest level since two, thousand six. The market is being driven because of the low interest rate, which is pushing up the value of all assets. Plus there's a desire for many given covid nineteen to move out of their city, for example, out more into the suburbs or the country. So increased demand and reduced supply because of concern regarding the pandemic. Some. People don't want potential buyers traipsing through their homes. Others don't want to sell because they're not sure they'll be able to find something to buy. The frenzy to purchase homes has pushed up valuations if we look at the value of household real estate. So the total value of houses and condos as a percent of economic output in the US GDP, it's a hundred and fifty eight percent. Total value of all houses divided by GDP is one hundred and fifty eight percent that's up from hundred and forty percent at the beginning of the year the all time high was one, hundred, eighty percent in two, thousand, seven, and the recent low was in two thousand twelve of one hundred, fifteen percent. This is data from Ned Davis Research. The. So the value of the housing stock relative to GDP is approaching that all time high of two, thousand seven, and then if we look at the case Schiller Index, it has appreciated since nineteen fifty-three on a real net of inflation basis of about point seven percent per year. That's the trend line. So we statistically create a trend line again, data from Davis research that trend line increases at point seven percent per year, and then we can see well, how much do current prices differ from that trend line and right now we're fifteen percent above the trendline. In two thousand, six, US home prices were forty percent above the trend line and then by twenty twelve, two, thousand, thirteen, they had fallen two point, nine percent below the trendline.

Austin United States Ned Davis Research Texas
Stevie Wonder leaves Motown and releases two new songs

The Breakfast Club

02:46 min | 5 d ago

Stevie Wonder leaves Motown and releases two new songs

"Stevie wonder had a new kidney. He had a kidney transplant last year. He said he feels thirty years younger after that. Any also announced that he is leaving motown. So He's been on motown forever. So that's a big deal and he put out to new songs as well. So we actually have one of those songs for you right now and this song is called can't put it in the hands of fate. It's a call to action with rhapsody, Corday CHICA and BUSTA rhymes. Don't repeat many. took notes from the Peter you Samah Vitamin. Apologize. Made debts legal. When the dog equal. A debt. Town got to find. The. Time was raised by Mother Nature in the projects in the mid war withdraws. Was Easy to spot the government. Dropped include Bob Rhapsody who there? Yes. They get busy. Telling me one did leave and motown is like telling me somebody died that I thought vindicated who the hell thought. stevie wonder was still on motown. I no clue until either. Let's hear Stevie wonder's part of the song as well. You. have to make a change. Again. Wouldn't. told. US. Can't. Okay timeless talent, timeless talents devi one absolutely. Never forget the brass club hats TV WANNA come saying happy happy birthday to Senator Hilary Clinton when she was running for president in two thousand sixteen. She didn't win. Of course I a great moment it was. Put out another sound call whereas I love song this is under his new. So what's the Fuss Music Label with republic records all the proceeds from is our love song will be donated to feeding America. You know he was on Motown for sixty years all right now oprah. Seaport seventy years old. Wow. Sixty is. To leave and kept he probably kept on signing again masturbate I. Don't know if he got on TV hope he has some I can almost guarantee stevie wonder message

Stevie Wonder Bob Rhapsody Motown Senator Hilary Clinton United States Corday Chica Peter America President Trump
Stevie Wonder releases 2 new songs after announcing that he's leaving Motown

The Breakfast Club

02:46 min | 5 d ago

Stevie Wonder releases 2 new songs after announcing that he's leaving Motown

"Stevie wonder had a new kidney. He had a kidney transplant last year. He said he feels thirty years younger after that. Any also announced that he is leaving motown. So He's been on motown forever. So that's a big deal and he put out to new songs as well. So we actually have one of those songs for you right now and this song is called can't put it in the hands of fate. It's a call to action with rhapsody, Corday CHICA and BUSTA rhymes. Don't repeat many. took notes from the Peter you Samah Vitamin. Apologize. Made debts legal. When the dog equal. A debt. Town got to find. The. Time was raised by Mother Nature in the projects in the mid war withdraws. Was Easy to spot the government. Dropped include Bob Rhapsody who there? Yes. They get busy. Telling me one did leave and motown is like telling me somebody died that I thought vindicated who the hell thought. stevie wonder was still on motown. I no clue until either. Let's hear Stevie wonder's part of the song as well. You. have to make a change. Again. Wouldn't. told. US. Can't. Okay timeless talent, timeless talents devi one absolutely. Never forget the brass club hats TV WANNA come saying happy happy birthday to Senator Hilary Clinton when she was running for president in two thousand sixteen. She didn't win. Of course I a great moment it was. Put out another sound call whereas I love song this is under his new. So what's the Fuss Music Label with republic records all the proceeds from is our love song will be donated to feeding America. You know he was on Motown for sixty years all right now oprah. Seaport seventy years old. Wow. Sixty is. To leave and kept he probably kept on signing again masturbate I. Don't know if he got on TV hope he has some I can almost guarantee stevie wonder message

Stevie Wonder Bob Rhapsody Motown Senator Hilary Clinton United States Corday Chica Peter America President Trump
Trouble Church Browne

5 Minutes in Church History

04:25 min | 5 d ago

Trouble Church Browne

"On this episode five minutes in Church history, we are talking about Robert Brown he was an English separatist t was born in fifteen fifty and he died in sixteen thirty three. But we've titled This episode Trouble Church Round because that's what he was known as by those who didn't agree with him and those that he tangled with throughout his life. So I'm sure you're intrigued. Let's jump right in he studied at. Cambridge. University and there he fully aligned himself with the puritans he came under a puritan influence. And he sided with the puritans against the Elizabethan forces in the church, of England at that time. Now, the puritans at that moment were attempting to reform the church from within and Robert Brown was part of that movement but by the end of the fifteen seventy. So he began to realize where he decided that that was not the right path to take, and so he gave up on that attempt to reform from within and he decided to separate in fifteen eighty one he is credited as founding what would be the first congregational church. He was the first to officially secede, and we need to realize that he's about thirty years old at this time as he's doing this. Well, he was arrested, but he was very quickly released and within a few months he left for the Netherlands. There in fifteen, eighty, two married he married Alice Allen and together they had nine children she died in sixteen ten. But he married her back in fifteen eighty to fifteen, eighty three. He wrote his book by this title, a treatise of reformation without tearing for any and of the wickedness. which will not reform till the magistrate. Command or compel them. In this book which is really small tract actually he puts forward the notion of the separation of church and state. He believes that the church is not ruled by the monarch by Civil Magistrate, but the church is ultimately ruled over by Christ himself and churches. A Matter Church membership is a matter of private conscience and not a public mandate were law enforced by the magistrate. The Queen was over the civil life and over the magistrate, but the church separate from that, and so this is a very important book in the history of ideas, very important book and political philosophy and in the history of the church. And the first paragraph Robert Trouble Church Brown says it is marvelled an often talked of among many why we should be so reviled and so troubled many and also leave our country we talking there about himself and his fellow dissenters and how they had to leave their country. He continues for Suth say the enemies there is some hidden sing in them more than plainly appear with for they bear evil will to their Queen Elizabeth into their country. They, forsake the Church of God and condemn the same and are condemned of all the also discredit and bring into contempt the preachers of the Gospel in other words these dissenters are something wrong with them. They're against the Queen there against the Church of England, and to that Robert Brown says, we say that they are the men which trouble Israel, these preachers in the Anglican Church. They seek evil to the Prince and not we. And that they forsake in condemn the church and not we. Well, that was Robert. Brown in fifteen, eighty three but in fifteen, eighty five, he decided to go back into the Church of England. So after about five years and after his book which caused many ripples in England he went back into the Anglican Church he wasn't a total conformist however, and he often clashed with the church and its leadership has said that he was arrested thirty two times over the course of his ministry for his views. He did end up in the East Midlands in a small little village Thorpe H. He was there from fifteen ninety one until his death in sixteen, thirty, his followers, the Brown lists you might have heard of them made their way onto the mayflower and cross the Atlantic. Well, that's trouble church. Robert. Brown the English separatists I'm Steve Nicholson. Thanks for listening in five minutes churches.

Robert Brown Anglican Church Robert Trouble Church Church Of England Church Of God Robert England Alice Allen Cambridge Netherlands East Midlands Steve Nicholson Christ Israel Suth
The Surprising Truth About Environmentalists and Voting

Warm Regards

07:53 min | Last week

The Surprising Truth About Environmentalists and Voting

"Nathaniel I'm really excited to have you on the show today. I have never seen so much discussion about get out the vote efforts around a midterm election. So were really here. We're really happy to have you here in excited to have you on the show. Well thank you jacqueline and thank you Ramesh I'm I'm really excited to be here with you guys. So, do you do you feel like we're seeing something different in this election we keep hearing all these projections about how college students are really GonNa vote this time and You know the projected voter turnout is really high in various places and I think I just read an article that my home state of Vermont has something like a ninety two percent. Voter registration rate for the state, which is crazy. Awesome. So do you do you feel something's different? Are we going to see a shift from the from the recent past? Yes. I absolutely feel like something is different. A field director just told me about an hour ago that a million people have already voted in Florida so far as also voting. and they're in person early voting hasn't started yet. So all of these people are people who requested that ballots be mailed to them. And have already made them back in and just to put that number in context just to give you a denominator I think barely six million people voted in the twenty fourteen midterms and Florida. So the hot a million people have already voted mean something's going on now who are those people that I can't tell you? I can't tell you with whether these are young people storm in the polls or liberals or conservatives I don't know. But you're right that there's a new energy going on this time around. Suspending of demographics mean you focus mostly on on kind of an untapped group, the the environmental movements, and we often think of environmentalists is really active in terms of making lifestyle choices. giving up meat or dairy, or or abandoning abandoning your car for a bicycle that takes a lot of effort and a lot more than going to the polls. So my question for you is, how are we doing? Are we actually voting as a group? Jacqueline you you ask the the sixty four, thousand dollar question no, we're not we're not laugh. Yeah environmentalists awful voters. I'm not going to sugarcoat it. We. We've done a lot of research on this and it's pretty easy to measure because weather you vote or not, and a lot of Americans don't know this. Whether you voter not as public, record. Now. I'll never be able to look up who Ramesh voted for or who jacqueline voted for but I can absolutely look up which elections you vote in in which elections you don't. And so people are able to run large polls and build predictive models and identify all the environmentalists in various states. And it turns out. That environmentalists. Habitually under vote they vote far less often than the average voter in almost every other state and just to give you some context here, I'll use say the two thousand, sixteen presidential election as an example. In two, thousand, sixteen, Sixteen, nine percent of registered voters voted. But only fifty percent of environmentalists did. Wow Yeah and if you go back to twenty fourteen, it's even worse. Forty four percent of registered voters voted but only twenty one percent of environmentalists did. Okay. So the obvious follow up question there is why? Yeah. Why? Is that one hundred, thirty, five, thousand dollars. That's Before thousand. In one dollars. So we know some of the reasons but only some of the reasons. So part of what's going on here is just demographic correlations so I don't know what the Environmental Movement was like ten twenty thirty years ago but. It certainly isn't now. What People Imagine as the stereotypical environmentalist. The typical environmentalists now is not well, it's not me it's not some white Yuppie who hops into their electric vehicle to get to their job downtown. people who deeply care about climate and the environment are now much more likely to make less than fifty thousand dollars a year. Be African American or Latino, and live within five miles of an urban core end they are predominantly younger but that's not. Not so much the case anymore. And all of those demographic groups that I just mentioned right now. Vote less often than the average American. So part of what's going on here is just that environmentalists are likely to be part of demographic groups that just habitually under vote. But the really interesting thing. Is that's not all that's going on here because even if you look at just young. Environmentalists vote less often than the other young people. Were even if you've looked just at Latinos, the Environmental Latinos vote less often than the other Latinos. So something else is going on here and the honest answer guys is we don't know what it is because it's really easy for behavioral scientists to measure why someone takes an action. So it's really easy to set up an experiment to to figure out how to get someone to vote. What's really hard? is to figure out the opposite. What's really hard is to set up an experiment to figure out why people don't take an action like exercising or voting or or vaccinating their children or something like that. the best you can do is ask them. And when we ask environmentalists why they're not voting. They lied their pants off. They lie France off and so and I'm. That other people or So, so no not more than other people and that's a good question but no, I mean no matter how you ask the question if you try to determine why people don't vote. The responses they'll give. Our responses that they think you want to hear. What we've realized is that even non voters still buy into the societal norm that voting is a good thing. So everybody wants to be known as a voter. Just, like everybody wants you to think that they brush your teeth, brush their teeth or or wash their hands every time or something like that. This voting is a societal norm that we all buy into and so I ask people why they don't vote. They will often before they even give you an excuse guys. They will lie their pants off and say, Oh, no, I vote all the time Jacqueline. And we that's a lie because whether you voted not as public record, right? These people looking at their voting histories and we know that they've never voted their entire lives and they swear up and down all the time that they vote whenever there's an election and so. The honest answer to your question and it's a good one is. We. Don't know why environmentalists aren't voting, but we've got some good ideas as to how to get them

Jacqueline Ramesh Environmental Movement Florida Vermont Nathaniel Environmental Latinos Director France
The Matter Of Castro Tum

Latino USA

03:20 min | Last week

The Matter Of Castro Tum

"Roland Sylvain was born in Haiti, though by the time of his birth in Nineteen, seventy, eight, most of his family had one foot. My grandfather actually was the one that started it. He had issues in Haiti for political reasons things like that. His grandfather's problems started during the brutal dictatorship of President Francois Duvalier who's usually known as Papa doc hopper allowed no political dissent while he ruled the mortality rate of political prisoners reportedly was the worst in the world he and his son known as baby talk ruled over Haiti from the late. Nineteen fifties till the made one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty s for the first time in nearly thirty years of Duvalier, dictatorships Haitians are talking openly about overthrowing their leader ruling doesn't know exactly what went wrong. But by the time he was born, his grandfather was building a new life for himself in New York City. He was one of tens of thousands of Haitians who came to the US around that time. have been fleeing their island claiming to be refugees from political repression within a few years rowlands grandfather got settled and was able to bring the rest of his family to New York legally. and. So in December of one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, five, little seven year old role in boarded a plane in shorts and a tee shirt and flew to John F. Kennedy airport in New York City. And given the time of the year New York. City was a little bit of shock. Possible world where was that freezing? But then a bunch of his relatives pulled up in a really big van and had a run at one of the stores inside the airport and get us coats may bundle them up and welcomed rolling to America. From the moment he arrived in the US. Roland was a legal permanent resident and his life became very American very quickly after a couple of years living in Brooklyn, his parents moved him and his siblings to the New Jersey suburbs Roland finished high school and got a job at a chemical plant became the manager there everybody loved me because I was the youngest guy a job. He started making good money. Then after nine eleven he got laid off for a while which someone else might have seen as a glass half empty kind of situation. But Roland he saw freedom. Just had fun I had my four one k. that was loaded sides. I took the 401k he took off on the road kept going back to Montreal Miami Atlanta well. Texas. I. Did Texas a few Tom I was teenager. Enjoying myself and it was on one of these trips that Roland got pulled over for speeding. This traffic stop and the events that followed would lead role in story to collide a few years. Later with another man's a teenager whose unusual journey through the United States immigration system has derailed tens of thousands of people's lives. We're going to tell you both of their stories because the trouble rolling got into is still haunting him now. It's threatening almost everything he assumed to be true about his life and he isn't the only one.

Roland Sylvain New York City Haiti President Francois Duvalier United States Papa Doc Hopper Political Repression Texas John F. Kennedy Roland New Jersey America Brooklyn Montreal Tom I Miami Atlanta
Kenneth Cole Says, Fashion Is What I Do, It's Not Who I Am

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:36 min | Last week

Kenneth Cole Says, Fashion Is What I Do, It's Not Who I Am

"To thrilled to have Kenneth Cole, who's joining us to have an important conversation about a topic That Kenneth has a really passionate perspective on We managed to speak a few weeks ago and I'm I'm delighted to have you here today and Kenneth, I wanted to ask start asking the question. Are you really doing today? So I guess we're going to speak about that but I'm okay and but what made reference to is probably the single most asked the question every day of the every day of the week, every everywhere in the world and the one most rarely answered. but in this time of Cova did. Doing more reflecting and looking inside out and and try to. Come to terms with all that. So I guess we're going to speak about. Today. Exactly. I wanted to start with. This idea. In the title of today's talk which is. You know mental health as the other pandemic. I mean we've all been really focused of course on this deadly virus that's still spreading all around the world. But perhaps less discussed an equally important topic is a mental health. Pandemic and you know one could argue that actually. This is something that predates Kovic but the current situation has really kind of amplified the importance of this discussion. So why don't we start there talk to us a little bit about your perspectives on why we should be treating this as the other pandemic as it were. So I, I don't know people know might might might resume my experience but I worked I lived in the world of HIV for thirty years and I campaign about HIV AIDS in nineteen, eighty five, and known as talking about it was everybody's minds some few people's lips because of the stigma devastation of Sigmund. If you presumed to be part of this at risk community, you were stigmatized in every regard in in your life and I did that adjoined the board of Amfar I was the chairman of for fourteen. Years. I. Stepped Away from that about a year and a half ago and it became apparent to me that there was this other public health crisis that was so much bigger in. So many ways that I it was oblivious to in in. in the ordinary course in wanted to people today still HIV but it became clear that one in four live with mental condition. And that I argue is not one in four it's four because if it is someone, you love somebody in your family in the community here in the workplace but we're all living with mental health conditions and and we're all struggling with it. Different Ways in how do you? How do you deal with The the Amenity of it and also the practical aspects of it so So that was. That was pre covert and that was the the So I set out down this road and I said I was asked by some friends at me if I would consider working on the stigmatize stigmatization initiative for health and. and it seemed like a lot of people were focusing on this. I knew little about it. I had hardly the credentials not a clinician. I'm not a psychiatrist not mental for some that public health person. But I am a branding person I'm a perceptive perspective person I mean that's a perception person. That's what we do in fashions we do in our business and that's what I did with HIV for years. And and I figured I'll do it but only if I could really build a coalition because. You can't you need to. This needs to be cultural shift is can't just be put out there kind of a new narrative, a new vocabulary new way to talk about mental health that wasn't debilitating. But in fact, empowering I five psychiatrist for definition of depression, I get five different answers and none of them were empowering. So nobody's going to own it. No one's going to. Discuss the circumstances that way. But meanwhile, it's so pervasive and it is so debilitating and. A million people you know two hundred. Thousand people died in the US from from Covid as of now about and and it's getting larger a million people are going to die from suicide this year and this is not something that we even realized how. How how pervasive is concerns are, and and the reality is is a two-thirds people with mental. The health conditions live at exists. So in the shadows and they're not comfortable dressing in, they don't know how to address. It certainly gives me build this coalition. Everybody end we systematically Nami says were in, and then we went to the We went to the suicide prevention line in. crisis text line and Mental Health America and and child mind and jet founded. She went to the twenty five largest mental health. Organizations the country they all said world will support. It will bring resources to it will empower to degree we're able and and and you're able.

HIV Kenneth Cole Mental Health America Cova Chairman Kovic Aids United States Nami Covid
"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:07 min | 2 months ago

"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

"It's part of why <Speech_Female> it can be difficult <Speech_Female> even now to <Speech_Female> get your hands on <Speech_Female> the Nintendo <SpeakerChange> switch console. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> A core part <Speech_Female> of the appeal is <Speech_Female> that the game allows <Speech_Female> players to <Speech_Female> be together <Speech_Music_Female> virtually in <Speech_Music_Female> real time. <Speech_Female> That's <Speech_Music_Female> what made the production possible. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> While they recorded <Speech_Female> the music separately. <Speech_Female> All of <Speech_Female> the performers were <Speech_Female> able to act out <Speech_Female> their roles through <Speech_Female> the game <Speech_Music_Female> as their <SpeakerChange> own <Speech_Music_Female> animal crossing avatars. <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Watched the opera <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Female> you hear it <Speech_Female> it sounds like these people <Speech_Female> are in the same room <Speech_Female> and there's no visual <Speech_Female> reminder telling <Speech_Female> you that they're not. <Speech_Music_Female> So <Speech_Female> it feels like <Speech_Female> this is <Speech_Female> performance that happened <Speech_Female> together <Speech_Female> when you see the <Speech_Female> squares on Zoom, <Speech_Female> you <Speech_Music_Female> know that they're not together. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> the best part of <Speech_Female> life theater is <Speech_Female> experiencing something. <Speech_Female> I think <SpeakerChange> together <Speech_Female> that's <Silence> Pellegrino again <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> before <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the pandemic do <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> a Donnie productions <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> was planning <Speech_Music_Female> three in person <Speech_Music_Female> operas in received <Speech_Female> grants to help <Speech_Female> them employ about <Silence> forty singers. <Speech_Female> Now, <Speech_Female> the future <Speech_Female> for any in person productions <Speech_Music_Female> is uncertain <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> says <Speech_Music_Female> being ten. It's <Speech_Female> been like <Speech_Female> a uniquely devastating <Speech_Female> experience <Speech_Female> and that singing <Speech_Music_Female> is like one of the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> most dangerous <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> like things you <Speech_Female> can do <Speech_Female> and it's kind <Speech_Female> of like <SpeakerChange> put <Speech_Female> the whole industry <Speech_Female> in chaos. <Speech_Female> Baynton, is among <Speech_Female> many in the industry <Speech_Female> experimenting <Speech_Female> with how <Speech_Female> to perform and connect <Speech_Music_Female> with audiences <Speech_Female> remotely <Speech_Female> the traditional <Speech_Female> way to do it <Speech_Female> is great <Speech_Female> but like <Speech_Female> these other kind of <Speech_Female> new, maybe weird <Speech_Female> ways of doing it <Speech_Music_Female> are also <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> exciting I. Think <Speech_Female> it doesn't. <Speech_Female> It's nice to <Speech_Female> be able to look. It doesn't <Speech_Female> have to be this like one <Speech_Female> way that everyone <Silence> kind of thinks of it. <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> And as pelegrina <Speech_Music_Female> points. <Speech_Female> Cartoons and opera <Speech_Music_Female> have been intertwined <Speech_Music_Female> for decades. <Speech_Music_Female> It pops <Speech_Female> up episodes <Speech_Female> of the ninety show. Hey, <Speech_Female> Arnold in spongebob <Speech_Female> squarepants <Speech_Female> and of course, <Speech_Music_Female> looney <SpeakerChange> tunes <Speech_Music_Female> and Bugs Bunny. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> I feel like if you ask <Speech_Female> anyone, they're going to know <Speech_Female> the right of the <Speech_Female> Valkyrie theme. <Speech_Female> They might not know <Speech_Music_Female> the name, but they'll know <Speech_Music_Female> what it is in their head. <Speech_Music_Female> So I don't <Speech_Music_Female> think this is totally <Speech_Music_Female> out <Speech_Music_Female> of left <SpeakerChange> field. <Speech_Music_Female> That <Speech_Female> being said I think <Speech_Female> the video game is just <Speech_Female> like the next generation <Speech_Female> of that <SpeakerChange> kind of <Speech_Music_Female> cartoon. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> They <Speech_Female> hope that this approach <Speech_Female> to opera, we'll draw <Speech_Music_Female> nontraditional <Speech_Music_Female> audiences. <Speech_Female> Pelegrina <Speech_Female> says they have also received <Speech_Female> positive responses <Speech_Music_Female> from opera, <Speech_Music_Male> lovers. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Benton said the most <Speech_Female> powerful thing about <Speech_Music_Female> the project was <Speech_Music_Female> performing <SpeakerChange> again <Speech_Music_Female> with other people, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I. Think we all felt kind <Speech_Female> of emotional <Speech_Female> like watching it for the <Speech_Female> first time and hearing <Speech_Female> all of our voices <Speech_Female> together <Speech_Female> and we were like, oh my gosh, <Speech_Female> like it sounds <Speech_Female> like we're together even <Speech_Female> though <SpeakerChange> we <Speech_Music_Female> were apart. <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female>

Nintendo Pellegrino Benton Arnold
"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

05:28 min | 2 months ago

"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Plane and little, and she has to do with all of that in addition to being a woman in a time when women had little to no autonomy. So she has quite a lot to overcome and Jane is resilient in the face of all that adversity. I think the resilience that I'm most moved by in the book is Jane's Moral Resilience like she would quite literally rather be starving and homeless and act outside her own values or sacrificed her independence and I think it was amazing as a young person and as you know a woman in my early thirties now to be. To have this example of someone who's committed to her own spirituality and morality in a way that honors her own passions and desires without robbing her of equity. And then quickly the second down endorsed that yet. It's so so good. And there are lots of great film adaptations as well. The. Second Book I WanNa recommend is full disclosure. By Cameron. Garrett which is a young adult novel that focuses on an HIV positive teenager whose navigating high school and all the normal things that teenagers deal with like making and keeping friends falling in love and just developing as a person and the protagonist is the black adopted daughter of two gay men, both of whom are also people of Color it's primarily a story of the resilience of HIV positive people but it also touches on the resilience of Queer folks and Black and Brown people So if there is a young person in your life that you want to. Share. Some of those important stories with full disclosure is a great book for them. Those are great recommendations and Nick I know you have station eleven on your list which really struck me I loved it. I read it a few years ago in it felt more like fiction than than I think it would feel now. Is the wonderful scary thing about that book because you know in the middle of the pandemic why not go back to a book that is about a Pandemic and flu that decimates the population. What I loved about the book was that it begins with Shakespeare, which is how I want of course, all of my pandemic post apocalyptic books to begin In this case, it's King Lear and one of the stars dies onstage, and that's how the story begins and then we flash forward twenty years out to this pandemic has literally killed most of the population that we have a traveling troupe Called the traveling symphony that is itinerant and age wander around the Great Lakes region and they are artists doing the only thing that they know how to do how precent though Emily Saint John Mandell was in her book to describe some of the things that are happening today is uncanny loved about it though is that at the.

Jane Pandemic King Lear Great Lakes Nick Emily Saint John Mandell HIV Cameron Garrett flu
"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:23 min | 2 months ago

"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Which of course is? Frightening on so many. Different levels. But that when they call you, a terrorist is just an amazing book really a resilient writer, the other. is they can't close all by Larry who was a terrific young journalist and this book stemmed after Michael Brown was killed. You know yet another young African American man who was murdered on this time, of course, by the police. So those are two books that are high on the list, but maybe weren't as popular as you know between the world in me or how to be an anti-racist, which also, of course, are wonderful wonderful books. I'd love to get your reaction to one that has really stayed with me books about ten years old now. But in this space, it's called the warmth of other suns by Isabel. Wilkerson and it's about the great migration. I think it was published in two thousand ten and tracks a number of families migrating from the south to the north over a forty year period and tells incredible stories of what people left, what people came to how they built their families, and for me was just a deep education in a piece of our history in America that I was just not taught in school at all. I don't I'm sorry. You're familiar with the fact that I got dead silence for both. I'm GonNa have to carry the torch on that one alone. I was having the the the microphone over but no the. Book came out. It was a huge huge seller. That's one bit. In all the bookstore associated with has continue to sell incredibly well, and like you say it was a piece of history that for me I also was unacquainted with and to see that Modern Day migration you say, going south to north and what had to be left behind and what they faced on that journey north. Yes you know just just incredible Wilkerson is just wonderful. Yeah and I would absolutely cosign I think that a lot of times what we're taught in schools about black history is really like all around the civil rights movement and it's like black people don't exist like much before or after nine hundred and sixty five. So it is nice to tell these other stories. So Camille to come back to you because I want to shift into fiction. Now, sometimes would a fiction book can do is give us a chance to escape but also either validate our reality or give us a way to make sense of it or maybe in this case with stories of resilience overcoming role modeling, what it means to truly tough it out you've been talking with us about little women in the past. I know you admired that book are there other fiction books that came to mind for you on this subject? Yeah. There are a couple. The first is an Oldie but a Goodie Jane, Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte Now, if you haven't read this book since you were forced to in high school I, we encourage you to crack it open again. I began my relationship with this book as I think an eighth grader and it has become over the years my favorite book of all time I mean Jane Eyre is kind of Proto feminist novel she describes herself as poor. Obscure..

Jane Eyre Wilkerson America writer Charlotte Bronte Michael Brown Camille Larry
"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

05:14 min | 2 months ago

"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

"That's one example. But there are several others where people with disabilities are still largely excluded is unfortunate because it would disabilities representative, very large market You know on the whole, it's twenty to twenty five percent of our population and it's a real miss from a business standpoint for a lot of small businesses to not be accessible to the whole community. Absolutely. PORTLAND, I've heard a number of arguments over the years the Beacon Hill case being just one that good design good responsiveness to the requirements of a d a good design for people with for example, a mobility disability really is good for everyone everyone benefits from those investments as Dr. Blau just said. You, know you improve your customer base, etc. So what do able bodied listeners misunderstand about the Ada about disability project protections about investments in? Disability assess that people need to understand. Folks have to look at I mean the disability community is broad. Okay. There's many many different kinds of disabilities and not all of them are mobility related but the the the family of people with disabilities is one that you could join at any time. So there may be accessibility features that you may not need now but that you may need later as a result of a change in your. Functional ability whether it be from age from a motor vehicle accident from a stroke or anything else. So if you look back at the concept that was once Kinda hot topic of like livable, communities people can understand that curb cuts don't just assist folks with disabilities who may be using a wheelchair but also mothers with strollers people that are pulling a shopping Carter's they're going to the laundry. Elevators aren't just for people who are unable to amputate, but it's also good for elders and people carrying packages. So I mean the argument of aesthetics will because this is historic and we liked the cobblestones aesthetics over accessibility has never been a valid argument for me. So if we really want to have a accessible society and access to the American dream for everyone in the communities, themselves.

Carter representative Dr. Blau PORTLAND
"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:55 min | 2 months ago

"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Difference children with disabilities how right to a full and complete education and the ADA generation kids understand that. Yeah. I would agree cartland than I think is I think as well. You know the FDA has ensured that that people with disabilities have their basic civil rights protected in that also have opportunities. A recourse of legal action if civil rights aren't protected and I think that's a very powerful thing. has changed come willingly when when when the act was signed into law did change come quickly easily and on which frontiers and wear has changed been slow to come even though it's codified now. I'd say that. I. I I'd say that I think it was incremental and we continued to see incremental change a for example, a lot of the changes in infrastructure that we enjoy. Now things like ramps and elevators and automatic door openers. You know those things weren't put into place overnight. So from the standpoint of physical access changes been very incremental and it's important to know that the ADA is more proactive than retroactive. So if you have an old. Building, that you haven't renovated in forty years that wasn't built under the premise or under the protection of the ADA. It probably still is an accessible and unless you choose to renovate it or get new permits to renovate it, you may not have to make it accessible. So early, what we really sees that new construction comes online it comes online in a way that is accessible. So we've seen slow culture change in that regard. For sure sitting here. No. Please go had. Yeah. Mean shortly after president was signed the a until into law, he also said, let these shameful walls of exclusion come tumbling down and while many of those walls have come tumbling down there certainly continued to many barriers there's areas to healthcare married to affordable accessible housing and that's a huge win for folks with disabilities they may be accessed to. The folks need a place to live, and that's still continues to be a huge problem, not only in Massachusetts but across the nation. Yeah and also thing. Oklahoma let me just yet. Let me just ask this one just following on specifically with the two of you were just talking about it makes me think of. Sorry Five Year Long Battle on Beacon Hill over sidewalk cutouts, the Beacon Hill Civic Association challenge that there was a lawsuit it took five years. Those cutouts weren't put in place until around May of two thousand nineteen. So how do we think about those kinds of battles given what you've just been? Yet I think it's a really important point and. A lot of the a lot of battles and wins as it relates to access have been hard fought over the years and there are still many ways in which you know the FDA has been very powerful and very impactful. But there are ways it's still limited to..

ADA FDA Beacon Hill Beacon Hill Civic Association Oklahoma president Massachusetts
"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

04:08 min | 2 months ago

"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Games in his possible. Especially when you have to put a couple of teams on the shelf, you're already talking about a condensed calendar. So there's limited time. The League has already said there. Okay. If they get to the end of the year and teams have not played an equal number of games, they'll deal with that At that point, they would just ranked teams by winning percentage versus actual numbers of wins But really in the long term, if this becomes a problem more than one team has a huge outbreak like this. I. Don't know how they make it work. Yeah once again, a bellwether right for so many other things I. Think a lot of people are watching to see if they can pull this off. All right. I, just WanNa have seen a lot of people say if a multibillion dollar organization like baseball with thousands and thousands of tests being run over the course of a few days can't handle this. How does that change our thinking about college campuses and schools and things like that? I think you're absolutely right people are watching this pretty closely. Exactly exactly and we will continue to before we let you go though I must torture you we drive around the collar teams. Now, let's talk about the socks. The sucker nobly, it's been ugly and it's an issue that we talked about last year. We talked about in the off season it's pitching. They have no pitching starters or bullpens are they don't have enough anyway they have a pretty solid lineup which is interesting and. You would think that okay they should be able to hit their way into wins and maybe they will in the long run over the course of the season. But so far you can tell that the lack of pitching has really weighed on the offense I wanNA play a cut here from zander. BOGART's WHO's known as being incredibly upbeat. He's a real leader in the clubhouse. He's a guy who's always kind of giving positive affirmation of folks in get your next time. Let's go do this. This is what he said after the loss on Monday there's stuff. You know. Obviously. It's not just like one wrong. You know as a corporate and then they just find a way to add on some more before we can kind of get some going and gets up. And you see the video that goes with that he's shoulders slumped. He is depressed and you can tell this offense is putting extra pressure on themselves knowing they don't have the pitching to hold the other team down hitting a baseball is often called. One of the hardest things to do in professional sports. That's why if you can do it three out of ten times, you're considered really good and so if you have that added pressure of now, you have to produce runs or this team will lose that really starts to weigh on you makes it even harder. All right. So Chris, we've got a little less than a minute left. So let me just ask you because that was depressing. Rays of hope to leave us with with the restive titled Towns Pro Sports Teams I do have a little bit of hope, and this is something people are kicking baseball for not doing the NBA and the NHL have created bubbles players to bring their seasons back both of which will start towards the end of the week here I think that is a at least the best hope that we have to try to get some normalcy going in the world of sports..

BOGART baseball Chris NBA NHL
"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

05:57 min | 2 months ago

"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Kind of a bellwether for whether some normalcy is possible during a global pandemic, the number of New England Patriots football players opting out of the two thousand twenty NFL season due to the corona virus is now to six including star linebacker and defensive captain, Dante hightower and the red. SOX are off to a miserable start to their coronavirus shortened season jumping four of their first five games with one of their starting pitchers out due to coronavirus complications. The world is watching and not just the games to see who will win in the match up between professional sports and the coronavirus. So here to give us a read on what's happening is Radio Boston's Chris. Derek? Chris. Welcome. Back. Thanks for having me spoiler alert the news is not good on that front. Well. Yes. So let's start with football and I'm going to ask you about the Patriots players opting out the same question I've been asking. So often during this pandemic, how big a deal is this? So I'm going to answer your favorite question with probably your least favorite answer, which is it depends I think you mentioned? Were we're still in the midst of obviously of global pandemic and I don't think anybody really knows exactly what the future is going to bring. We've heard a lot of talk about a possible second wave in the fall and we're going to be seeing college students returning to campuses and a lot of places kids going back to schools in some places So I think it all of this discussion really depends on what the next few weeks in the next few months bring for us. We may not even have a football season. So with that huge caveat at the beginning of the answer. I would say on the field it is actually a pretty big deal for the Patriots, just because of the names. Of the players who have said they were opting out this year you mentioned Dante High Tower is basically the quarterback of the defense. He's the guy who's out on the field calling the plays for the defense moving guys around when they need to move. He's one of the true leaders on this team coach Belichick has made him Mr February for all of his big plays in the postseason in super bowls. you also Patrick Chung who's kind of unheralded. But I think a big contributor who never really gets the recognition he deserves for the kind of flexible. He plays on this team You've got marcus cannon who's been a pretty steady presence on the offensive line, Brennan? bolden. WHO's a special teams contributor. So you've got some pretty big name players who have said they will not be playing this year for the Patriots. And clearly players who understand what the impact is of opting out. So what are they saying about this decision about why they're doing it when they know what it's GonNa do to the team? Yeah totally, and it depends on the individual player. So in Dante hightower's case, he just had a child about a month ago and he says, he thinks it's the right move for..

Patriots Dante hightower Dante High Tower football Chris SOX Boston NFL marcus cannon Derek Belichick Patrick Chung Brennan
"thirty year" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"thirty year" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"As a twenty to thirty year old white male average height with a medium build whoever's doing it just stops ms eventually you're gonna get a call one way or another police would like to remind everybody to lock their cars they say if you see something to say something keep your eyes open when the warm weather over the weekend and then the bacteria levels in our state beaches agreed once again and after that heavy rain in the middle of last week because the rising bacteria but the annual governor's bay day on Sunday was a big hit been celebrated here in the ocean state since eighty nine that followed a massive oil spill and started as an effort to showcase Narragansett Bay but also to highlight the vulnerability of our water waste to governor was that Russia will beach in Narragansett we just heard a cut from that in Jay's newscast parking at state beaches yesterday was on the house tin roof it was free state officials said that all state beaches that had been closed last week were re opened so that's good news just in time for the governor's bay day Alex and ani what is going on city of Providence is looking for a new sponsor for the downtown skating rink because the jewelry company company Alex and ani not going to be renewing its naming rights after its contract expires this coming November so the signs will stay in place until then Alex and ani city centers been the name of the ring for the last five years city official says the signage will be changed in that naming rights request for proposals well that's already been released so they're soliciting proposals now to rename the downtown skating rink the Alex and ani skating like well at least it'll be the Alex and ani skating rink until late November over the weekend something you might have missed in Coventry the police advised anybody who had contact with the raccoon or other wildlife in the area of beach street in Coventry to contact the animal control officer or the state health department because that raccoon is tested positive for rabies to make sure your pets and you know their shots are up to date too because you never know what's out there police were called to the area on Thursday of last week because a raccoon was attacking a cat there the raccoon was killed and taken to the health department for testing for rabies and the tests came out positive that cats being treated at a local animal hospital for AV rabies exposure to police also advise people to check the rabies vaccination certificates for their animals and if it's not current to contact your vet do that please okay and this happened in the town of Coventry in west Warwick account across country ride to honor a fallen soldier made a stop here in the ocean state as we hear from Alexander Leslie and I witness news writers with a tribute to fallen soldiers Memorial torch motorcycle ride have been on the road since July fourteenth we begin on the west coast in Eugene Oregon we like the memorial flame and it stays lit all the way across the country this summer the group is traveling through seventeen states.

thirty year five years
"thirty year" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"thirty year" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"This week's guest on the economists asks our interview show was the businesswoman Ursula burns. She made history ten years ago when she became the first black woman to run a fortune five hundred company, but progress has been slow. The second was appointed just last month. Mrs burns revealed why she's changed her mind about using quotas to achieve equality. I've been in business for almost forty years. And we have been talking about this problem where half the population. We're not anywhere near half we're not even ten percent. They're more CEO's named John than there are women. You know, you heard all of that stuff, we have been pushing against this thing for, for a long time with the belief that if we just let them alone and give them the facts that they that system will change. Don't you get it if we just kind of lay it out, and give them the survey because the? They who are giving the facts to don't believe it's urgent enough to change it. That's why say, maybe what you do is to start mandating things saying level both level of a big company. Yeah. Think board levels starts. I I think. think. I should it be half forty percent. Give me a number. That's reasonable you do the study of available people whatever the heck it is. And you start mandating companies to get you say, basically, we.

Ursula burns Mrs burns CEO John forty percent forty years ten percent ten years
"thirty year" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"thirty year" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"For both of us. I guess it was a life changing experience. And I think we both issue in particular is you book in Chinese on the Chinese language service of the BBC a lot, and it was a sense of loyalty to an audience in China, that seems like a bygone age now we often talk now of how gentlemen has been largely forgotten in China, the success of the communist party in racing suddenly, public discussion of this, but also it seems memories whole generation has grown up now has heard almost nothing about this. But then, you know I go back to Beijing. And from time to time I meet people, and they asked me, how long have you been in China? I say that it goes back to the nine thousand nine hundred and it becomes clear that I was there in nine hundred ninety nine and then suddenly, the conversation will turn to that. Question. It's clear that for those who were there for those who did experience it. It's still grips their minds just as much as it does our. Tianmen might live large in the minds of those who witnessed it. But Beijing continues to cover up the crimes and censorship efforts ramp up whenever the nursery approaches this year has been no exception. University.

China Beijing communist party BBC Tianmen
"thirty year" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"thirty year" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Today, marks thirty year anniversary of the Inman square crackdown. In April nineteen Eighty-nine demonstrators mainly students began together TNN square to mourn, the death of who done relatively liberal communist party leader soon. They began calling for political reform. The protests spread beyond the city and the government's patients began to wear thin, late Sunday afternoon, military headed gulped is, again, flew over the square of heavenly peace, dropping leaflets bowling on the protesters to leave yet with fists clenched, the students pledged to stay on to the Dan. In the early hours of June fourth Chinese troops rolled into Beijing firing at crowds of people who blocked their path. Hundreds if not thousands were killed. Two.

communist party TNN Beijing thirty year
"thirty year" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"thirty year" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"Is you know, it's interesting. I mean, it's thirty years, right? And the median age of China right now is thirty eight so a significant number of Chinese were not born. One channel score was happening. And the Chinese government has been extremely successful at wiping out. Any recollection of the ideas of the movement in any recollection of actually, you know, what happened? And so there's this remarkable documentary attack man, where they show pictures of the tank man to whom you referred earlier to Beijing University students that are like what's this is the guy doing performance, art? What is this? They have no idea of those images and of the importance that those images had to their country back in the day. And so the question is if you know something wiped out, so successfully will it ever have any residents again amongst the people of China. I don't know. I think we probably will at a certain point. There has to be a reevaluation of this. But people have thought it was going to happen. A lot earlier than it has so far that hasn't happened yet. The Chinese party state has a remarkable ability to really manipulate the minds of people in China still to this day, John I wanna thank you for coming on today to talk about the thirty th anniversary of gentlemen. Thank you. Thank you for having me, Sarah. John palm. I is a former reporter for the press and the Washington Post. He's also the author of the book the beautiful country and the middle kingdom American China seventeen seventy six to the present first person is produced by Dan Ephron, edited by rob Sachs. I'm Sarah Wildman, and I'm your host. Panoply..

China Sarah Wildman John palm Chinese government Beijing University Washington Post Dan Ephron reporter rob Sachs John I thirty years
"thirty year" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"thirty year" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"And so this is happening at the same time, you have the country opening up to western influences opening up to western ideas, and it was this marriage between significant discontent in the lower levels of society with on opening of minds among the elite among the student population. And that created the potential for real instability at the same time. You also had within the party different factions jockeying for positions one faction believed in faster economic reforms and more westernization another faction that really oppose that as well. So you had you had to basically all the raw materials for real problems going from ADA nine students start to gather an and lobby the ability together without being monitored by the party. How do they do that? I mean, are they watched over are there? How does that happen? So what was starting in in as early as eighty eight in fact, even earlier than that? But eighty eight was really the beginning is that people wanted to form organizations that were not under the control come his party because one of the issues in China was that the party controlled everything. And there was no such thing as a right to organize freedom of sociation was is not part of Chinese communist party platform on the students. Basically that was a main demand that the student unions would not be run by the party. And so in universities such as Beijing University ching hall university Nanjing university Fudan, which is another major university in Shanghai students began to have these natch. Organizations formed and have these specically democracies what they called salons where Chinese liberals were invited to speak about democratization process about freedom of association and other freedoms the US Bill of rights statue of liberty the history of democracy, and in the west, and this type of interaction between Chinese students and some Chinese liberals really intensified eighty nine and the trigger, of course, for the demonstrations was the death of party secretary by the name of who y'all bond who died in April of nineteen eighty nine and who was somewhat of a symbol for westernisers in China. He is a guy who basically came out against chopsticks. He said using a knife and fork was more efficient, but he also was very important in rehabilitating, hundreds of thousands of Chinese intellectuals who've been purged during the anti rightist campaign in the mid fifties. But also the culture of Lucien from nineteen sixty six nine hundred seventy six and. How did you have access to them? I mean, did you already knew people from when you were studying in China, did you have greater access? So. Ahead lived in Chinese dormitory for a year and a half. And so when I went into these dormitories, I kind of felt like I was home, and that I think subconsciously resonated with the people there. I mean, I would like sit on their beds and kinda hang out like I hung out in my own dorm room six or seven years before. So I was a little bit younger. I spoke pretty decent Chinese. And I just kinda realized that they were like my classmates earlier jet. I mean a later generation, but they were very more my classmates their rooms looked and I think more importantly smelled like the room. I lived in an engine university for unit half. If for me, it wasn't as exotic as it probably appeared to many other western correspondents who hadn't had that experience. When you say, they weren't later generation that students that you described earlier are actually plucked back out of countryside and given the chance to go to school where these students who had expected to go to school. Yeah. These were students generally speaking who had gone through high school. So this is just their life experiences significantly different from the life experience from their elders and describe the energy of these meetings, these early meetings on campus, it was just full of this sense of possibility. And a real search for a new set of values for their country. A lot of patriotism deep love of their country and deep desire in the sense of what direction are we gonna take? And anything is possible. That was the overriding sense. You got was optimism about what China could do and we're trying to go..

China Beijing University ching hall bond ADA Shanghai US secretary seven years
"thirty year" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"thirty year" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"From foreign policy. I'm Sarah wild Mun. And this is first person this week an inside account of the TNN square massacre. Thirty years ago this month student protests rutted in Beijing posing one of the most significant threats to the rule of the communist party in China's history. The demonstrations lasted two months and grew to include a range of citizens all demanding reforms in the country. For the first time in huge numbers. The ordinary men and women of Beijing the old and the young professors and taxi drivers have joined the student protests lending, their support to what is now taking on all the appearances of a peaceful popular uprising against the oppressiveness of communist rule campaign for China's renewal in an atmosphere of freedom and democracy, the focal point of the protest was Tiananmen Square. The heart of Beijing within a few weeks the government declared martial law and then in early June the world watched in horror as Chinese military tanks rolled in the streets of Beijing on the way to Chinaman's square. They fired indiscriminately at protesters there were reports of tanks rolling over students. The noise have gun five rose from all over the center of Peking, it was unremitting. On the streets leading down to the main road to ten on men square furious. People stood in disbelief at the glow in the sky listening to the sound of shots in the midst of all this chaos was John Pomfret who covered China for these Tosi press of the time hit an advantage over his fellow foreign correspondents. He had studied in China spoke Mandarin fluently and had many contacts in student movement. He joins us today. John, thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. So we're coming on the thirtieth anniversary of the TNN square massacre. But I want to actually start with how you came to China in the first place. How did you come? So I went to college wanting to study neuro physiology. Okay..

China Beijing John Pomfret Tiananmen Square Sarah wild Mun communist party Tosi Thirty years two months
"thirty year" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"thirty year" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"Morning everybody is the envy angela ye shall amina we are the breakfast club staff ask e hello this hey kim what's course the free okay so i am forty five and i am dating a thirty year old okay i'm trying to figure out how can i get her he's so immature of course senior but he's really sleet but i'm getting a little like i'm raising my son you cannot force somebody to be more mature than what they really are there's a lot of things in life that people kind of have to go through to learn just like we did you know when we were young we had to go through certain things to grow up you can't tell somebody what to do they have to live experience and grow from me so there's going to be certain things that he does listen part of the reason why you like him is part of the reason why you don't like him i'm sure there's a lot of things about him being thirty and sweet and young and untarnished in the way that you know somebody oh there might be you probably really liked those things about him but you know what comes with that is the fact that there's a lot of things he hasn't experienced so in some ways he is immature so you do have to be patient because that's just who he is is part of the process yeah and one more thing like i don't drink i've never done any drugs number small anything and when you when you started dating him he was drinking right well we only saw each other on the weekends told me that he doesn't drink the week listen to him that you don't drink you know sometimes people have to if that's what a person does like is who they are he if he can accept the fact that you don't drink because sometimes i'm sure he's like damn i wish maduro could just have a drink with me and loosen up right so i think for both of you you know the difference is is probably where together in some ways because do attract but then you can't get mad at those differences and try to change a person because that's when you guys really won't get along right thank you all right you're welcome good luck ascii eight hundred five eight five one zero five one if you got a question for ye call right now with the breakfast club good morning she soon money com no have you been two.

kim maduro amina thirty year
"thirty year" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"thirty year" Discussed on Unorthodox

"And so when you're married to somebody and they're the narrative that way it's really hard on the secular person kind of dealing with the narrative of their believing spouse but it's also really hard for believing spouse because the secular person now represents an existential threat and so it was that was the process of becoming as you put it post christian was also a process or was it literally just waking up one morning i come done now like i said like thirty year process but i know but the moment you had the realization where the still some hang up some things you the moment i had to realization ultimate wasn't a moment is like inspires like us the guy guys like with the very end but the very very it was sudden well the very babies dying for years but the very very yeah yeah very end that should matters the very end wasn't deciding believe in god the very end was realizing that i didn't want to spend the rest of my life pretending that i did but you know you know like my there was nothing laughed for a long time but i didn't do the math to connect that with the rest of my life and the stuff i was doing like and so the bike crash was this thing where i was like oh you're going to die really soon what do you want to do with the rest of your life and and what should you do with the rest of your life and i became i became really convinced that what i needed to do was to try to create communities and an opportunity for people to have all those wonderful things that they get out of being jewish or they get out of being event gel christian to feel like you're part of a tribe a bunch of people that are committed to making the world a better place together that you have some rituals that you get together they help each other raise each other's kids all those things like like people who leave religious communities oftentimes fund himselves alone in a very very kind of cold world and they can't find the other people that want to pursue goodness in a secular way so you don't feel any resentment towards people who still are believers.

thirty year
"thirty year" Discussed on Savage Lovecast

Savage Lovecast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"thirty year" Discussed on Savage Lovecast

"Oh thirty year old bisexual left or here and i have a question about after i know after shows chinese in the cape community i'm not really a king stir yes i'm curious about aftercare when it comes to just foca or the nilo or nonkey whatever sucks recently i talked to the good friend of mine after years of knowing each other and it was time but i felt like after we slept together there was of and it was lacking in the aftercare departments it's made me think a lot about what my needs are after hook up with someone and feel really horrible what else they feel safe and seen and good i'm really sexually active but in all my sexual portrays i haven't talked much about that nor have i felt like it has much well i'm just wondering if there's sort of a precedent for this of other people of how they bring things up like this when you're hooking up with someone for the first time how you go about saying hey after will cost it'll you know i in to really good to me it's we interact in this way um and the best way to kinda bring those needs alcohol also honoring though when you hook up with someone they don't like how much they owe you how much do that on um and if this isn't happening much can we sort of start and i care revolution more homebrew long time and now officially doing this podcast for a long time and what are the changes i have noted in sort of the council and culture couples counseling cultured psychotherapist culture psychoanalyst culture sex relationship bob research culture all these people really coming around on kinky people in kingston and the king community and kinky sex and looking now to kinky people not just no longer regarding kinky desires as abberant or or or sicker perverted or nonnormative we now know that when it comes to human sexuality deviance is the norm but looking to the way kinky people in can culture kind of organizer relationship to negotiate the relationships and.

kingston thirty year