35 Burst results for "Thirty Times"

Jodi Arias and the Murder of Travis Alexander

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

01:56 min | 4 d ago

Jodi Arias and the Murder of Travis Alexander

"Jodi areas. Remember her an early summer of two thousand eight the mortgage crisis in the us loomed. Large barack obama was campaigning. For the presidential election in the fall the world was looking forward to the summer olympics in beijing. A horrifying crime was going down into phoenix suburb of mesa. Arizona travis alexander. A thirty year old mormon motivational speaker of sorts would be found five days after his murder by his friends and roommates in a scene. Look like something straight out of a slasher flick. Blood was splattered on the walls of the bathroom. Where travis his body was found along the sink mirror entitled floors. He's been stabbed nearly thirty times his throat slit and he'd been shot in the head and his friends and family immediately pointed their fingers at the one person who the all thought was most likely responsible. Jody areas a slightly built attractive woman with no criminal record. Someone who did not look like the person most would connect with travis brutal crime scene. She was the woman. Travis had been dating off and on for the better part of the past year and a half and odd woman. Once you looked into the relationship. A woman who wants slept under. Travis is christmas tree after he told her she couldn't sleep over at his house. A woman who'd snuck into his house through the doggy door after they broke up and crawled naked into his bed. A woman who. The all suspected had slashed all four of his tires twice when he'd started dating someone else for over for over a year and a half travis and jodi had been involved in a highly toxic sex crazed torrid romance after meeting at a las vegas. Mlm conference in september of two thousand six and jody's jealous suspicious and sometimes downright crazy behavior toward travis set a lot of alarm bells for his friends and we'll travis him to understand how unhealthy his relationship with jodie was he would never totally break it off with her. He just seemed to have liked to sex too much so he kept inviting her back in no matter what she did and in the end he did that too many times in the last days of may two thousand eight. Jody started putting together a plan to kill him or did she

Travis Alexander Travis Jodi Barack Obama Mesa Olympics Beijing Phoenix Jody Arizona United States Las Vegas Jodie
Storms in Germany Blow Roof Off Opera House and Flood Stage

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last month

Storms in Germany Blow Roof Off Opera House and Flood Stage

"Germany is in the grip of extreme weather with the least one historic building badly damaged thunderstorms hit Germany late on Monday a differential rains pulled down on the southern and western parts of the country leading to dozens of accidents on hundreds of qualified to operations throughout the night institute guard parts of the roof and several statues of the city's historic opera house with thrown to the ground by the winds will together rescue teams were called in more than three hundred thirty times and so caught with regional train services also interrupted the house across much of the affected region felled trees about to be cut and removed by firefighters I'm Charles the last month

Germany Charles
The Introduction of Football to Spain

Everything Everywhere Daily

01:07 min | 4 months ago

The Introduction of Football to Spain

"Which i shall hereby refer to as football for the rest of the episode to appease my european listeners didn't originate in spain but it did arrive there rather quickly. In the late nineteenth century. Spanish workers and students who lived in england brought back with them. The game of football the first football club formed in spain was recreativo de huallaga which was founded in eighteen eighty nine by british workers for the rio tinto company the club's still exists today and currently plays in the second division in spain's professional league football clubs spread quickly through spain in the late nineteenth and early twentieth. Centuries nineteen to the idea was floated to have a single elimination knockout tournament. In honor of the coronation of king alfonso the thirteenth. It was called the copa de la coronation. And it was won by a team from bilbao. Which was the precursor to athletic. Bilbao the current team. Which represents the city of bilbao the next year. Nineteen thousand three. The tournament was brought back. This time being called the copa del rey. Or the king's cup. The first two copa. Del rey's athletic. Bilbao today. Barcelona has won the cup. Thirty times with alec. Bilbao winning twenty three times and real madrid winning nineteen

Spain Football King Alfonso Rio Tinto Bilbao England Del Rey Barcelona Alec Madrid
A Pandemic Winner: How Zoom Beat Tech Giants To Dominate Video Chat

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:59 min | 4 months ago

A Pandemic Winner: How Zoom Beat Tech Giants To Dominate Video Chat

"Roughly one year ago. I heard colleagues referred to a meeting on zoom. It was one of those passing references where people assume you already know what they mean. But i didn't. I literally never heard of the brand within a few days. Of course i knew as did millions of others who likely had not known before. Zoom is by no means the only way for a video meeting but the company has come out ahead during the pandemic zoom is among npr's financial supporters. And we cover it like any other company. Npr's shannon bond has the company's pandemic story chief financial officer kelly steckel berg vividly remembers one specific date. Last spring march fifteenth. Last year was the day when everything changed. Its like we woke up and almost overnight that demand grew exponential demand from companies. Trying to keep running after sending everybody home. School setting up virtual classrooms then. The floodgates opened here at npr weeded stories about fitness classes. Moving to zoom. You're going to need a broom towel. Happy hours complete with drinking games. We figured out rules for virtual beer. Pong one of our producers watched her sister get married over zoom. You may now feel your ballot. Chests by april zoom meetings were attracting three hundred million participants a day thirty times the amount just a few months before zoom was an upstart and it was going up against products from giants like google and microsoft which are both npr supporters. So how did zoom beat these heavyweights real richness to simply way easier. Jason freed is ceo of base camp. A company that makes remote work software. He told me over his preferred app. Skype he's been working remotely for two decades. He says zoom made sending a meeting link as easy as sharing a youtube video open room. You get a you moral you. Send the url around people. That's it unlike. Other video meetings people you invite to zoom. don't have to log in or download. Software freed says that simplicity meant even though. The app was intended for companies. It was really easy for everyone else to use to but zoom was so popular and convenient. It had a downside. The fbi warning about zoom bombing intruders has started crashing zoom meetings because security was so lax townhall school classes. Aa meetings. were all targets. Dennis johnson knows all about this last march. He was defending his doctoral. Dissertation on zoom in front of family and friends with an unknown attacker scrawled racial slurs genitalia on the screen. A year later johnson still avoid zoom when he can every time. Somebody called me. Dr arteaga On so it just like a nasty taste in my mouth. Researchers uncovered other security and privacy flaws zoom told users meetings were fully encrypted when they weren't the company admitted shut down the accounts of activists in china after pressure from the government. Zoom went into damage control mode. It put everything except privacy insecurity on pause for three months and it reached settlements with federal and state regulators investigating the issues. Stucco burg's zoom. Cfo says the episode was a wakeup call. It was a humbling experience for all of us but we learned a lot through it and we have come out on the other side at a stronger a better company with a stronger and more secure platform now. After a year of daily life and major milestones conducted over zoom what happens when people get vaccinated and can go back to seeing each other face to face. Daniel ives as an analyst at wedbush securities there could be a roaring twenties type field. Whose covid where people are just gonna wanna get out and just almost a pent up demand but he says zoom has made such inroads into our lives in the past year. It's here to stay so they're still time to learn how to use the mute button

Shannon Bond Kelly Steckel Berg NPR Dr Arteaga Dennis Johnson Skype Jason Microsoft Stucco Burg Youtube FBI Google Johnson CFO Daniel Ives Wedbush Securities China Government
Liverpool Crash and Burn

ESPN FC

02:03 min | 6 months ago

Liverpool Crash and Burn

"Liverpool losing to burnley by final score of one nil a late penalty for ashley. Barnes the difference and this result significant on so many levels for matches in a row without a goal in the league for liverpool a sixty eight match. Home unbeaten streak snapped. You gotta go back to early. Two thousand seventeen almost four years ago for the last time liverpool lost a premier league game at anfield. They now six points off the league lead from our perspective. We welcome in stuart robson shock his lob julian the ron robbo all start with you. What's gone wrong at liverpool. Well in the last few games the final pass hasn't been quite good enough. They played with the fluency today. They go to into some very good areas. I mean trent alexander. Arnold must have had the ball twenty thirty times inside the burnley box with time to pick out across play cross into the box and he picked out the wrong option and the movement in the box. Particularly the first of wasn't good enough. You wanted to come short at times and rather mike dynamic hawksley Was on the right hand. Side is not really a front. Bless we've moved wasn't great in the box amani trying to the runs the deliveries from trent alexander. Arnold were good enough. He should've just been whipping booze. The goalkeeper in the back four and allowing people to mike runs into it. He was trying to pick people up. So they're they're lacking confidence at the moment you can tell that guy moron and other disappointing display from the shock. It wasn't for a shortage of opportunities. Perhaps nothing more symbolic liverpool recently than that. Remiss handed an opportunity and couldn't put it in. Yeah it was a rather ridiculous defensive era that the letter again and yet a lot of ground to cover before taking the chance on and let's be honest as good. As as nick pool was all game long. he shouldn't have said a chance to we. Went for a little bit too much. Pays the crossbar kind of some some liverpool up over recent weeks. They've been getting opportunities. But i just feel too many in that squad seem to have misplaced the shooting boot

Liverpool Trent Alexander Stuart Robson Ron Robbo Mike Dynamic Hawksley Arnold Barnes Ashley Amani Nick Pool Mike
Christie calls Trump's legal efforts a 'national embarrassment' as more Republicans speak out

World News Tonight with David Muir

01:40 min | 8 months ago

Christie calls Trump's legal efforts a 'national embarrassment' as more Republicans speak out

"Trump running out of options as you suffered another defeat in court. One of the president's closest advisers. Chris christie slamming his legal team as a quote national embarrassment. Meantime the president still refusing to concede and back on the golf course this weekend even skipping a g. Twenty event on the corona virus cases sore across the country and president elect joe biden saying the delay transition of power could put american lives at risk. Abc's rachel scott in washington tonight tonight. One of the president's closest advisers blasting his efforts to try and turn the two thousand twenty election joining a small but growing number of republicans. speaking out. what's happened. Here is quite frankly. The concept of the president's legal team has been a national embarrassment. The president's legal cases continue to be thrown out for lack of evidence. His campaign and allies have lost in court at least thirty times. The latest blow out of pennsylvania were judge delivered a blistering ruling calling. The campaigns claims haphazardly stitch together like frankenstein's monster. The state's republican senator pat toomey calling on the president to accept the outcome of the election. Saying he has exhausted all plausible. Legal options and maryland's republican governor. Larry hogan saying he's embarrassed. More members of the party aren't recognizing joe biden as president-elect. I just don't think there are a lot of profiles in courage. We all know how vindictive the president can be but it appears more republicans are starting to come to terms with reality senator. John cornyn now saying it's time for biden to start receiving intelligence briefings but the president is still refusing to concede an election. He overwhelmingly

Rachel Scott Chris Christie Joe Biden Senator Pat Toomey ABC Larry Hogan Golf Washington Frankenstein Pennsylvania Maryland John Cornyn Biden
Spread of Electric Cars Sparks Fights for Control Over Charging

John and Ken on Demand

02:48 min | 10 months ago

Spread of Electric Cars Sparks Fights for Control Over Charging

"Talk about the electric vehicle tax credit he proposes because people think electric cars are the ultimate panacea this. Yeah I mean and and you know you live in California. They've just decided they're gonNA fight all the fires with with electric cars in two, thousand, thirty, five, the reality of course. Yes. Electric cars are good I mean if you own a tesla and if you can afford one actually a fun beagle drive, it also cuts some few too but you need to get a sense of proportion. So he's proposing to at least get back seven, thousand, five, hundred dollars per vehicle, and of course, California throws in another two, thousand, five, hundred dollars and there are many other. tidbits fundamentally spending that much money on a vehicle that over its lifetime will cut ten tons of to. You could've bought that reduction in the north east of trading system for sixty bucks spending ten thousand dollars for something you could have bought for sixty bucks but the bad deal why do electric cars only save a little bit of carbon dioxide? So. It's do things partly, you think that each vehicle emit lots and lots of carbon dioxide over its lifetime it'll probably emit somewhere between twenty and thirty tons. So you can't save more than twenty or thirty times. Now, a lot of people then also believe that electric cars essentially serum mission vehicle. That's true when they're driving. But of course, when you charge them, you will typically charge them with electronics. At least partly from fossil fuels, also the battery is not much more energy consumption of it takes a lot more energy to produce. That's why most electric cars actually do not. A break even in their carbon emissions before they've run somewhere between. Fifty and one hundred thousand miles. I've heard the reality game that you'd have to keep your electric car for quite a few years before you hey, off the carbon. Debt of just. Building the battery. Yes and that, and that's true and again we're going to do this better and of course, we'll be to produce these with less intensive energy use and so on. We'll get better this but the fundamental point is this is not what's GonNa solve warming and certainly paying an enormous. For almost no benefit is a really bad idea. The International Energy Agency head told us a couple of years ago. People think electric ours are going to save the planet. They're wrong they. They just sent that that was the quote and the point is, yes, it's GonNa be a tiny bit not very much. Can

California International Energy Agency
Do The Last Thing on Your To Do List by Bradley Charbonneau

Optimal Living Daily

04:29 min | 10 months ago

Do The Last Thing on Your To Do List by Bradley Charbonneau

"Do the last thing on your to do list by Bradley Charbonneau of the SOUR CREAM DOT com. Mathematically it's an easy equation the joy you get from getting to do task off. Your list is huge. Even more mind boggling for the greatest Nobel Prize winning minds. It often doesn't take much to get it done. So why does one equal to? Why do we let those tasks? Linger unfinished are unsorted. Even they might bug us every single day. Maybe even a few times per day but yet we do nothing. Nothing more than wonder why we don't do them or worse. Get FRUSTRATED WITH OURSELVES. That were non doing them. The solution seems no mid is so simple just to the task. Be Done with it but we still don't do it. What is the mental block? Accountability part of it is often the lack of accountability. If no one knows what we're supposed to be doing then probabilities are high. That no one will know. We haven't done them the more people who know the harder it is void. That is if those who know are people whose opinions respect I suppose if you told the bank teller that you're going to quit smoking and then you see the same bank teller in a month and you hadn't quit smoking. You could number one go to a different teller number two stock her hours go another time. One number three till the teller. You didn't quit. Is People. Tell their friends are going on a diet or quitting smoking. Or it's why they don't tell their friends but should we be strong enough to not need accountability from someone else but should be enough to be accountable for ourselves. I guess that's where it comes down a character and inner strength in who you are. Those empty window frames downstairs the worst and simultaneously. Best part of all this is when you do finally do the task. The roared is almost incomprehensible. Two days ago I ordered greeting cards for the upcoming holiday. I'm not sure what him. E But have an inkling our D- poster-size prince photos. It took me fifteen minutes to find photos that were high enough resolution. In of course nine shots that I want on my wall the next day I picked them up the next morning. My wife and I said let's do this thing. We spent maybe forty five minutes measuring glass cleaning cutting and then taping in hanging man. We were done maybe two hours for the whole Shebang. These were windows. That used to be the windows of my kids room. I didn't know what to do with them for a few years. Then someone suggested I hang them on the wall and make photo frames. Outta them. Wonderful idea. three four years ago now he measured. The wall drilled holes installed strong hanging screws even painting quality wire hanging system to make sure we could adjust to tilt the window. Frames have been waiting for photos for years. Now stun now I walk by and stop and look at them and admire our work. Actually stop and look and admire even just for a second. We did it. Do we need to be challenged to get anything done? So what happened in the past few days? I was different from the past few years. I was challenged. I realized that seems to be my answer for everything lately but it also happens to be true. I've just been experimenting. I've been going strong on my right every day. Challenge for the past thirty plus days. I've been drinking some form of Jews for the past three hundred plus days. Are these now habits. Will I now do everything on my to do list? Only because I think that I can do them because I've done the math. Do the math as a math major in university. I like math and science. I liked it. There are definite answers as partly what I've been learning through experiments also because I can't seem to get anything done otherwise quite simple actually number one do the thing you want to do but in bite sized chunks number to keep doing it for a while say month number three see what happens. The math is quite elementary. My six year old can figure it out one plus one plus one plus one over and over again. Thirty Times equals thirty if I do one task per day for thirty days is possible. I finished thirty tasks. It doesn't get much simpler. What's holding us back? Here's what it is. Is that big number? It's the thirty. Were scared of thirty a whole lot. More Than One. So take one at a time. Just one want an added bonus for pure entertainment and much delayed gratification. Take the oldest. Dust covered really annoying item from your to do and do that. Just do that one. Then when you're done stand back and admire it

Bradley Charbonneau Nobel Prize
Nvidia to buy UK's Arm, sparking fears of chip dominance

Pivot

04:17 min | 11 months ago

Nvidia to buy UK's Arm, sparking fears of chip dominance

"Talk shortly about invidia buying chip company armed from. Softbank. The deal is worth forty billion and video said it will make it the quote Premier Computing Company for the age of Ai Invidia is best known for supplying ships at rendered images, video games, but it's so much more than Invidia has become sort of the power player in in this. Area and I know you're not a chip expert but this is the this is a critical company for a this this sermon, I wanna get into the idea of what it means for certain companies sort of owning a space and you just recently testified about single companies or or a small group of companies owning spaces, and how dangerous that is why it's It like this was a bit of an a for sale because bank has pledged to raising forty or fifty billion dollars in my understanding is they're they're not gonNA make a ton of money I think about bought this company that bought on for about thirty. Thirty or thirty, two billion just about three years ago, and they're getting a mix of stock and cash. What we interesting is it now I I've invidia. The, most impressive company I just don't know about its now got a larger market capitalization than Intel when I was in business school was considered kind of the most innovative giant company in the world. They've been blown by, and then what happens does apple still WANNA do business within video when they buy a competitor to their? To. Their chip designs so the chip bores looks like it's about to get more interesting and just. Greed. Company gets sold for forty. Billion although. That's a bit of a headline number. It was it includes performance in all sorts of other stuff that does about one point going timeout thirty times revenues, and then Invidia with A. It's got a three hundred billion on market cap with twelve billion in revenues I mean this stuff is just it as obviously very strategic that that literally exhaust might total knowledge of the chip-making space. Do you have any thoughts on this deal? Well, I think I think people don't realize Jensen Wong who's the CEO? Has had it sort of as quiet? Person WHO's super I tried to get him to come to co last year and removes like Oh chips the but I think it's really important to understand how powerful this company has become an how innovative it's bad. You know arm holdings was a designer of chips for mobile phones Softbank had struggled in this area Softbank was sort of into everything but bought it for thirty one, billion dollars a couple of years ago. So you know it needed money because of all the other problems it's having, and this is an opportunity for invidia but it's gone. It's gone well beyond mobile for. and it's it's in graphics. It's a it's been moving into self driving vehicles as an area that it's that it's moved into and so it's just it. Just it just says that you know it's going to buy up everything and like you were talking about all these opportunities that were that are a lot of the focus here is going to be on Softbank because it's been involved in so many deals that have sort of blown up whether it be. You. Know this this the overvaluation, we worker or other issues. It's been the the collapse of the Vision Fund and things like that. So a lot of people like to focus on Softbank because it's an interesting sort of ongoing traffic accident but really invidia is has quietly been. You know becoming the go-to Chip Company not just with graphics in games and things like that but artificial. self-driving another area it's moving into I. Think it's it's going to grow Internet of things and stuff like that and Softbank was just not able to do anything about it, and so I think you have to focus on invidia being on this sort of tear beyond where they started and I think people don't realize. It's one of these companies that you don't pay attention to very much like I'm blanking the other. There's another trip company that just is doing incredibly well, it's run by Lisa. Su That it's just there's there's all these companies that are holding incredibly powerful positions amd also on a tear that are very important to the future and so that you're right there's going to be a real focus on where the chip business is going.

Ai Invidia Premier Computing Company Chip Company Softbank Intel Apple Jensen Wong AMD Arm Holdings Lisa Vision Fund CEO
NYT: Your Coronavirus Test Is Positive. Maybe It Shouldn't Be.

No Agenda

02:45 min | 11 months ago

NYT: Your Coronavirus Test Is Positive. Maybe It Shouldn't Be.

"The new. York. Times The New York Times has admitted. That the corona virus test could possibly be a piece of crap. Headline, a headline. This was I couldn't. You recall a week ago. I just I think it was a torture devices torturing device sticking it. To wrote. A week ago I said CDC published a chart where everything is down to zero. You can't even see deaths or anything. And that was the CDC website and know it's like no one really paid much attention to it. But then finally New York Times came out when was this published? I think. Yeah. Yesterday your corona virus test is positive. Maybe it shouldn't be. The usual diagnostic tests may simply be too sensitive and too slow to contain the spread of the virus. So the article. Says, something that we've discussed. I think we talked about months ago where they're spinning the you know the the little piece that they have the. The the DNA segment or the sequence they they looking for that. So they're taking your DNA in they're spinning it. Thirty Times to replicate it to see if if the viruses in their thirty times is what most say is is what you should be doing. But the New, York Times, as I think pretty sure we discussed on the show maybe months ago. Is. Doing thirty seven to forty times which really every single health professional says, yeah, that's too much. You're going to get too many false positives. Now, what the New York Times does is they tried to spin that and say, well, thank God we've got the rapid fifteen minute test coming up. That's completely accurate data that'll get us back to back back to work in the meantime if you look at the numbers. It means the testing is overstated by a possible factor of ten, which is exactly what we said before, and now the death rate is also only six percent. Of that total one, hundred, eighty, three, thousand number. The CDC is publishing this nation on their website and they say table three shows the types of health conditions and contributing causes mentioned in conjunction with this in does. In. Corona Virus Disease Twenty nine thousand nine for six percent of the deaths covid nineteen was the only 'cause mentioned for deaths and conditions or causes in addition to covid nineteen on average there were two point, six additional conditions or causes for death. Is MOGUS. Everything is bogus.

The New York Times CDC York
Fires In California And Colorado Cover The West With Smoke

Environment: NPR

02:35 min | 1 year ago

Fires In California And Colorado Cover The West With Smoke

"There are nearly a hundred uncontrolled large fires burning across the western US right now in California Colorado Oregon and other states the fires have forced tens of thousands of people to flee their homes and the smoke is affecting millions as NPR's Nathan. Ross reports that is especially worrisome during this pandemic. Stephanie Christianson is a pulmonologist or a lung doctor as she puts it who's already on the frontlines of covid nineteen. She's an assistant professor at the University of California San Francisco and over the last few days and week as fires exploded around the bay area filling the air with acrid smoke sheet and some of her colleagues started asking each other. Every apocalypse packers now is it feels kind of like we're. Doctors it wasn't exactly what to expect. Going into this, the smoke from California's fires and others is blanketing most of the western US blurring skylines and creating haze from the west coast to as far east as Kansas and in that smoke is something that Christians, and says is definitely not good to be breathing particularly during a respiratory pandemic an air pollutant called PM two point five. It's this particulate matter which is really really tiny thirty times smaller than the diameter of a human hair. So it's really really small and that means that it can lodge deep into your lungs where Christians says, it can cause A. Whole host of problems that can increase the risk of as exacerbating COPD exacerbations, heart disease issues, and she says potentially cove in nineteen the viruses new enough that most of the research into links between it, an air pollution like smoke are preliminary but Christian says they do know enough to speculate that smoke inhalation could make the virus worse and it's worrying health officials and researchers all across the western US I was initially really worried about wildland firefighters Luke Montrose is an assistant professor of community and Environmental Health at a very smoky Boise State University, and served transition my thought now. To today's the first day of school at Boise State and the first day of classes for a lot of schools K. through twelve in the West in normal times. MONTROSS says during Smoky Fire Seasons schools can keep windows shut but in a year like this closed the windows and potentially increase the concentration of virus that could be spreading around the school because you're trying to reduce the amount of toxic wildfire smoke a situation he says where there's really no good choice. Out NPR news.

United States Assistant Professor Smoke Inhalation California Boise State NPR Stephanie Christianson Ross Boise State University University Of California San Francisco Nathan Montross Oregon Professor Of Community And Env Luke Montrose Colorado Kansas
Procter & Gamble Posts Biggest Yearly Sales Gain Since 2006

CNBC's Fast Money

02:40 min | 1 year ago

Procter & Gamble Posts Biggest Yearly Sales Gain Since 2006

"Let's get the shares of procter and gamble. Also talking tape today, the company posting, it's the largest annual sales gain since two, thousand, six strength and the home care unit. That's like dishwashing detergent and all that kind of stuff all the stuff you do at home laundry detergent. PK? Well. Clyde gene right I mean, this one was a no brainer. Not only that is that you in early in the pandemic in most places, it was really difficult to get these products. So people bought extra, they hoard it, they put it in their pantry. So and I still think that actually could happen a bit I'm not convinced that we are done with covert I, mean the film mention that board is not thinking of thinking that there's not going to be a resurgence and that's not my. My view at all I think this this ball. We could have another very big resurgence. So I think this would actually go right into procter and gamble not only that let's remember we've had a pretty weak dollar proctor and gamble multinational should do fairly well. Is there any concern that if the economy gets rough that people aren't going to be paying up for cascade or some of these other brands and they'll they'll sort of down go down market? So to speak in terms of price. Yeah. I. Think People by two case point when people were hoarding. When you go into these stores, you buy anything that's on the shelf, and if they don't have a proctor and gamble products, you buy whatever's there. But obviously, stock price people reach for that investors reach for what they know and they know proctor. This is a p seventy four. Guy Do you pay a pe of seventy four for the seller of Tech Company and deter I? Mean it's a higher multiple than than apple. Look forward, I think forward, if you look at it against next year earnings to your point about trailing I mean it's a twenty, twenty, five years numbers, which you know it's expensive I mean the to your point, it's not cheap, but it hasn't been cheap for a while and I think if I'm not mistaken, it probably made it or close to an all time high today. Today. So people are definitely paying up on out on the risk curve evaluation carve, which is fine, and so your point, it's not and that's not to be Glib, but there will come a day when we look at each other and say, can you imagine people paying close to thirty times forward earnings for procter and gamble? We'll be shaking our heads and but we're not the. Market Right now. Kimmy like this quick. I actually, I was just thinking if I came up with anything less than cascade, my wife would leave me. So when I come home with with White Label Brands, I'm in trouble. proctor and gamble loves me I. Think the multiple is absurd. But this multiple been absurd for two years. Okay. Didn't just code for the stock to actually not make sense valuation. So I wouldn't buy it, but I wouldn't short it. All right.

Procter Gamble Clyde Gene Proctor White Label Brands Apple
Developing long duration energy storage

The Energy Gang

05:48 min | 1 year ago

Developing long duration energy storage

"What a year it's shaping up to be for. Storage manufacturing has taken a hit and some projects are getting delayed for obvious reasons Our analysts that would mackenzie say that. The coronavirus crisis will trim twenty twenty forecasts for Battery Installations. Globally by almost twenty percent. But they still expect it to be a record year and the projects that caught our eye are not going to get built this year but they do show the strength and resiliency of this market a few examples here. A coal plant in North Dakota is going to be replaced. In part with a one acre battery array that uses a new technology capable of discharging for a hundred and fifty hours. That's more than thirty times longer than a lithium ion batteries. The Electric Utility in Hawaii just awarded contracts for sixteen projects that add up to more than three gigawatt hours of storage and those will replace an oil fired. Coal-fired Power Plant in California Southern California Edison signed contracts for seven hundred seventy megawatts of batteries. Many of them paired with solar projects to replace aging gas plants plus in China more hybrid wind solar and battery plants are starting to emerge and wood. Mackenzie expects rapid growth in batteries within China in the coming years. It's the country will lead Asia. This lead Dan Foley who would McKenzie's head of energy storage to proclaim to our journalist at Green Tech Media The utility energy storage market is blowing through milestones faster than we can report them for example those Sei projects are together worth two hundred megawatts more than the entire twenty nineteen market says Fin Foley. So let's go through these. I think we should focus on the bright shiny objects I. What do we know about this form? Energy Project Catherine mentioned this at the end of a recent show so catherine what is Great River Energy who is form energy and what kind of battery could emerge from. This relationship is a great river. Energy is the largest generation and transmission co-op and what that means is it generates and provides power under long-term contracts to a bunch of member. Co Ops like twenty eight member Co ops and this is how a lot of the COP system is formed in the US where they're small co ops that are often serving rural communities. They are very much about keeping costs low for their customers and customers. Own the CO OPS. They are customer owners but then they sign up for long term agreements with these GMT providers. Because it does save the money in the long run and a lot of these. Gmt providers we've seen have these long term contracts For old coal plants and so great river energy is one of those GM GMT's and they made a decision a while back to shut down coal a coal plant call strip and they have been thinking about. How are we going to backfill it? And what are we going to use to do that? And so they've certainly been deploying a lot of renewables and they just recently entered into this agreement with Form Energy and forum is a start up Led by Matteo Harm. Yo who came out of TUSLA. He was the energy storage guru there yet mingchang. Who's an MIT professor? Who has been really another brains behind storage and Ted Wiley who co-founded Aquaman and energy storage company and there are a couple of other. Mit folks. Billy Woodford and Marco Ferrara and there. It's just a team of incredible minds. Who decided to try to calm at storage by thinking about it it as potentially being able to replace all of these Uncaught non cost effective coal plants and so their technology seeks to be super cheap long-duration Nontoxic something you would find everywhere to be able to you know. Put together a type of a flow battery that could just replace the footprint of any fossil fuel plant so that is their goal. And that's what a great river energy has decided to take a bet on. Let's talk about the tech first and then the rural cooperatives piece second jigger. This is a battery. We don't know much about but they call it an aqueous air battery. What does that mean well? Basically in it uses more abundant materials. Because what you find is as that the metals wondering yeah we'll water but also the metals they're using or quite Easy to find and so it's aluminum zinc magnesium etc right. And so so what you find is that they have this ability to use low-cost materials right and they're able to Store lots of energy so when you think about this ad. Matteo talks about this in his interview The way that Lithium. Ion Batteries work is that you can actually charged quickly and discharged quickly but at the same time basically to charge it as to discharge it. And so what you find. Is that these batteries It's around like sort of being able to constrict the nozzle and only making it one megawatt right because you can imagine that you could make a lithium ion battery that's a hundred megawatts incised but only dispatch one megawatt at a time and then make it last one hundred fifty hours now. The problem with that those. It's a super expensive way to get one hundred fifty hour battery whereas this is a much cheaper way. It's it's similar to sort of Etienne redux batteries and others were the basically have this. The fluid that that holds the charge can be expanded at a very low cost. The fuel cell that converts that fluid into energy that's utilized is the expensive

Great River Energy Form Energy Mackenzie Matteo Harm MIT China Dan Foley North Dakota Catherine Asia California Lithium United States Edison
AP Exclusive: Admin shelves CDC guide to reopening country

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

AP Exclusive: Admin shelves CDC guide to reopening country

"You the CDC are now monitoring official told chief the AP mark Lowcock the guide says was the supposed peak to of be the published pandemic last is not week expected but scientists to hit were told the world's it poorest would never countries see for the three light to of day six months the trump box administration he says has been there's closely already evidence controlling of the incomes release of of guidance plummeting and information and jobs during the disappearing pandemic food but supplies White House press falling secretary Kaylee and prices McEntee soaring says the focus and children is on missing states vaccinations the governor led and effort first meals of all let since me emphasize the original that the president up here on has the twenty said fifth the governor's of March make the decisions the U. as S. to as how to one move billion forward dollars and we encourage has them been to raised follow to support our phased approach efforts the across lack of real thirty time seven public fragile information countries to from tackle government experts Colby has nineteen struck many current the and former updated public appeal health officials includes nine as dangerous additional vulnerable at countries Donahue I'm Washington sorry I shockingly

CDC Kaylee President Trump Colby Donahue Official Mark Lowcock White House Secretary
AP Exclusive: Admin shelves CDC guide to reopening country

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

AP Exclusive: Admin shelves CDC guide to reopening country

"You the CDC are now monitoring official told chief the AP mark Lowcock the guide says was the supposed peak to of be the published pandemic last is not week expected but scientists to hit were told the world's it poorest would never countries see for the three light to of day six months the trump box administration he says has been there's closely already evidence controlling of the incomes release of of guidance plummeting and information and jobs during the disappearing pandemic food but supplies White House press falling secretary Kaylee and prices McEntee soaring says the focus and children is on missing states vaccinations the governor led and effort first meals of all let since me emphasize the original that the president up here on has the twenty said fifth the governor's of March make the decisions the U. as S. to as how to one move billion forward dollars and we encourage has them been to raised follow to support our phased approach efforts the across lack of real thirty time seven public fragile information countries to from tackle government experts Colby has nineteen struck many current the and former updated public appeal health officials includes nine as dangerous additional vulnerable at countries Donahue I'm Washington sorry I shockingly

CDC Kaylee President Trump Colby Donahue Official Mark Lowcock White House Secretary
Howard Friedman Discusses His Recently Published Book, "Ultimate Price, The Value We Place on Life"

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

08:42 min | 1 year ago

Howard Friedman Discusses His Recently Published Book, "Ultimate Price, The Value We Place on Life"

"Air was originally guest motivated by thinking more and more about the September Eleventh Victims Compensation Fund and I was acutely aware of the fund. At the time I'm I'm a native New Yorker who was living in D. C. In that really started this whole thought process for me about how human lives valued and my professional career alive. It has involved health economics in research. We're we're constantly looking at questions of what is the value of particular procedure or drug. And how can that be measured? So I started really with the victim's compensation fund and then connecting the dots and building that four and ironically my Book structure followed by exact thought process in opens with the September Eleventh Victims Compensation Fund and then connects that thread over to the civil courts in which it was constrained by and then later to talk about criminal courts regulatory agencies in the for profit companies. Okay thank you. We'll get to that in a minute. Let's just go over some of the theory and application so before we get to another examples you provide. What in theory is intent is intended in placing monetary value on a life. Well it really depends on the purpose so I almost have a carve back and say you know as we look at. What is the purpose and perspective of the calculation? The valuable life plays a different role. But usually you have situations where you have limited resources and you're trying to allocate them in what would be deemed an optimal matter and what is optimal becomes almost a philosophical question. But if you're trying to let's say save the most lives you would make one choice. The most life years different choice The most quality adjusted life years a different choice. If we're talking about health if we're talking about doing this from the point of view of a for profit company they're trying to maximize their profits and they're worried about. What is the cost associated with making a product safer and the benefits in terms of? What would they have in terms of reduced regulatory fines losses in civil courts and damage to brant? Kay thank you. So let's get into the calculation. There are variables typically considered in attempting to sum total. You discuss formerly. What's charmed the concept of the of a statistical life so what are typically some of these variables that go into calculating Value on a life. So let me let me describe that value of statistical a little bit more because Some people may not be as familiar with it. This is a calculation that was developed by economists in a few different ways In some cases they look at people stated preferences doing surveys and asking people how much risk are they willing to take on for an additional amount of money. That's one way to do it. other calculations look at wages. They looked at people who are working riskier professions. And how much more would they get paid or looking at how much someone was willing to pay in real world dollars to reduce their risk by buying safety products so with all these different methods the result? Is that the regulatory agencies all use the same number for all lives. Call it roughly ten million dollars. There's a little variation by regulatory agency but it's a very large number and what the regulatory agencies would do is if they're considering for example a new regulation for less arsenic allowed in the water or less pollutants in the air then. They would look at the costs that implies to society usually Companies we have to pay more in order to keep the water cleaner or maybe it's the local municipality and in the benefits in terms of how many lives are saved how much less morbidity and to convert the lives saved two dollars they would use this value of statistical life. So that's where it appears usually in the conversation regulatory agencies and it's a large number large in the sense that far more than people would typically earn in a lifetime so in some senses it's a numerator denominator in that it's its value over costs for example So the way it's estimated is a dollar per risk. That's really how they come up with this value of statistical life It's it's it's not really an individual base but it's really very much about how much someone would pay to avoid. Let's say an extra one in ten thousand risk of dying of cancer for example you and it's all applied using from a regulatory perspective so they're looking at societies costs not individual costs right. Okay okay thank you. Let's get into a couple of examples that are arrested and you mentioned courses of Victims Compensation Fund relative to nine eleven. I thought this was a fascinating conversation So this was explained. Explain to me how why this came about. And then how is our? Our dollar amounts calculated four to pay families of those who died on nine eleven. Absolutely so this is It's an a unique situation. So there had been previous terrorist attacks in the United States and certainly a horrendous amount to murders in which the government did not set aside a fund but for September eleventh. A large pool of money was set. Aside and can the Feinberg was assigned as the special administrator of the fun he was giving some restrictions he was told he must consider economic impacts when he makes offers families and if the families of the victims accepted an offer they would receive money by also simultaneously signing a contract agreeing to not sue the airlines and other entities so he did have freedom he could create a calculation and he had a formula yet a in which the minimum value of life was two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. And it's important to note that in civil court there is no minimum so this is saying that he asserted because he he felt that it was necessary. That families would be offered something no matter how old the person was or what they were earning. He also incremented based on salary but he capped the salaries. He said no matter what you are earning. I'm only going to assume you. Earned a Max of a little over two hundred thousand a year and by capping it he. He also asserted something. Which is that. He wasn't going to allow for astronomical ratios. He added some extra factors. Like the number of dependents. A person hat. The net result is the range of payouts. To the families of the victims was from two hundred and fifty thousand to over seven million. That's a thirty times range of course heading up. Those caps in place had he not restricted the maximum income and had he not put a minimum value. It would have been massively more salary alone in the United States already. Minimum wage will only yield you about fifteen thousand a year while there are executives of some of the largest companies in America. Earning hundreds of millions of dollars so this was the calculation. Now it's important to note that it wasn't really loved by the public. It was actually quite controversial only a few years. After he completed he himself said that given the opportunity he would have paid the families of the victims the same amount of money and he said it would have been easier to implement it would have been fairer and it would have been more accepted by the public fast forward to the Boston Marathon bombing of just a few years ago. There was a victim compensation fund this time. It was private money. Some no constraints were placed on In this case again Kenneth Feinberg so he was administering that fund as well and in that case he did exactly what he said he thought was appropriate. He paid the families of the victims. The same amount regardless of age regardless of what they were earning regardless of any factors.

Victims Compensation Fund Kenneth Feinberg United States Boston Brant KAY America Administrator
Australia is doing well, but where are we heading next?

Coronacast

10:12 min | 1 year ago

Australia is doing well, but where are we heading next?

"We thought we'd start today by taking a bit of a look about where Australia currently stands. It seemed to be a lot of ideas on control measures popping up. But we don't really seem to have a clear direction on where we're heading pam. Scott Morrison still says when many weeks away from restrictions being lifted the state government seeing less willing to open things up soon. What's the broad thinking? Well the broad thinking is that with say forty or fifty new cases a day which is where we're going so that's an increase of forty or fifty forty fifteen new cases every day. They stay infectious for a week or two maybe even three so that becomes an infectious pool of people that so every fifty exit from that pool but it slowly accumulates and that pool can become a very large number very quickly and there was a day. Nobody knows exactly the day in the end of November beginning of December when there was only one person in the whole wide world with what we came to be known as covered nine hundred only one person bat to an animal to a human being. And that's only four and half months ago and is now nearly two million people infected over well over one hundred thousand people have died four and a half months from one single person. So if you've got forty people fifty people every day and you lift restrictions and you don't quite know what those where you live restrictions and don't have a plan for it it becomes really quite tense to nor too because we could we could slip out of control incredibly quickly with doubling times every two or three days and that would be not good and it's called a second wave so in international terms we. We're no becoming one of the poster child's we talked about Taiwan South Korea Hong Kong. And as we said yesterday the hope would be. But you've got to be deliberate about it that you get down to new cases and some of the states in Australia are getting down to almost that level where there is just tiny tiny numbers. Scientists showed a Western Australia. They're almost at that point now where they're getting new measurable community spread and Western Australia. They're measuring everybody in theory. They're testing everybody. Who's got a call a cord? So here's here's the thinking I I suspect which is they're scared to lift it off because they know there's GonNa be very hard to button people back down and countries that have had to do that. Find it very difficult. You let people out so there's gotta be a plan and schools daycare might be the first things that you open up and we can talk about that in a minute based on research then you might open up workplaces. There's enormous pressure just to open up now as there is in the United States. And when there's still a fair bit of virus around you just don't want to do that and the states are at the front lines you think about federation like ours is that the the Commonwealth sets policy. They received money through taxation in distributed. The KOMO's doesn't run anything. It's the states that run stuff run. Education system healthcare system. They're the ones running the stuff and so the states are the front line and the states tend to be more aggressive and assertive than the Commonwealth. Because they are at the frontline the interesting thing. When you look overseas is that the metric that you'll see when you watch the news or the newspapers is the number of deaths each day. Have you noticed that? Teagan people and say well you know a good day today? The the the number of deaths in Italy has fallen off in New York City. And so on which is good news. So the the reason they're doing that and not quoting death rates a lot of our conversations early on in Corona Caswell. What's the mortality rate? Is it three point? Six percent three point four percent one percent less than one percent. In many ways the proof of puddings in the number of deaths that you get it kind of is a reflection of the of the amount of corona virus in the community two weeks ago. And when you start to see the desk falling away it means that two weeks ago something was happening because people were in lockdown. That's usually the reason getting better at testing while the death star to disappear. But as you've seen in a couple of places you see deaths flicking up again. It's very very fragile. And that's why politicians advised by their medical advisers. Just being very very careful but let's say we got it under control industry. Let's say we eliminated or almost eliminated it. Here if the rest of the world still in the throes of a pandemic what would normal even look like here. Normal could be everything a lot of things except for overseas travel. I can't see a point in anywhere anywhere anytime soon where you're going to allow travel you. You're going to lift the borders and allow planes to fly in from Dubai. London India an American because they will just get the epidemic back. So I think we have to accept as a nation that the borders are closed for quite some time. What sometime is it depends on where vaccine emerges over there are treatment emerges and so on. There are a couple of game changers around. So let's assume there's nobody coming in from overseas then the question is do you allow free movement between states. Well I think if every state is at zero then you would probably start allowing people to move between states so you can corn holiday to Queensland or whatever it is so but everybody's got to be Zero of New South Wales has got a lot of cases. People are not going to want people from New South Wales to be moving around the country similarly for Victoria. So then you try to get your local economy back on its feet and so you allow schools and big care to come back which releases parents to start going back to work and then you might allow people to go back to work in non essential occupations and then after a month or six weeks you might allow restaurants to open with social distancing and then sit and watch with massive testing very expensive testing tens of thousands of people the person positive or nobody positive. And if you manage to keep the lid on it then you just slowly let things go back. But I think we'll still be social distancing for some time to come but we'll be able to get out more whether there'll be football matches before two thousand people with theaters will reopen with a two thousand people. I think those are things for the future and not immediately but we can start going back to work and getting some of the basics of the economy going one should down to one two three single digit numbers or zero. Well one of the things we do in credit cost is answer questions from audience and someone asking about death rights and why the death rites differ between countries and between economies and between East and West. What do we know what we know is that you see twenty two thousand deaths in the United States? When was the last time I looked ten thousand deaths in the UK? I think it's almost pointless to talk about death. Rates Something Business. Who want the restrictions lifted? Now say all well you know if it's under one percent this is not something to worry about is starting to seasonal flu. Well try telling that to one of the twenty. Two thousand families have lost somebody in the United States. It's almost academic high mortality rates for for this and and as we've said before the actual case fatality rate depends on. How many people you know in the community who actually have the virus in the United States. They haven't a clue in it's they don't really have a clue so it's really hard to know what the actual rate is and we talked about the diamond princess one of the cruise ships giving a rate of one percent and vein depends on how the mortality rate is going to be higher in countries. Where they don't of intensive care units where you can't go to hospital and get oxygen. It's going to be higher when people are malnourished in poor poor environments and then the numbers Luke large because the numbers infected incredibly large. So it's almost pointless. We know that it's probably ten times more on average maybe thirty times but somewhere in that range more than seasonal flu and large numbers of people are dying and the potential is for our hospital system to be overwhelmed as indeed. It has been in New York and parts of Italy a lot of jurisdictions in Australia looking at school from high in term two but nominee this new research at showing just how effective school closures Aaron Can Charlie spread there. This was a group that published in the Lancet. And they've taken available information from the SARS one epidemic as well as what we know from recent school closures in Hong Kong China and elsewhere and try to come to an answer and where they landed was wonders. Not sure at the moment what the contribution is. Kids are not big spreaders but they do catch the disease. They don't get fever. A lot of the time which means new teen temperature at school is not necessarily going to work so two to four percent contribution to total deaths from SARS in other words the contribution of the children have to spreading it to other people maybe ten percent contribution to the pandemic but again and then you've got the social costs of Closing schools and I think that where they landed with an editorial is that if you reopen schools. It's going to make a bit of a difference. Not huge to the pandemic but schools need to be really careful about hygiene and social. Distancing are going to reopen so in summary most models that they've got if all schools were open preschools and so on they would contribute maybe two to four percent increase in the number of deaths from covered nineteen because they've spread it to their grandparents and other places and maybe about ten percents of the total spread of the virus. So that's the story. And maybe if you then put it in social distancing schools lots of hygiene you could minimize that risk even further.

United States Australia Commonwealth Sars Western Australia Scott Morrison Italy Taiwan South Korea Hong Kong New York City Corona Caswell Dubai Komo New South Wales UK Fever Queensland
Where is Nick's Galaxy S20? Also

Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

09:02 min | 1 year ago

Where is Nick's Galaxy S20? Also

"Have every right to wind because I'm the one who has who's using the s twenty ultra right now and you're still waiting on your give us a little bit of the story that. I want to give you the floor to like talk about like your your Samsung situation. I think everyone Samsung Situation. Is Different. Like I I went to the launch event. I didn't see you there. Because everyone's launch events are different You guys had a unique room to the side where everyone could go and get videos and pictures in peace. While I was in the main hall with I think like four thousand people in that room trying to get video and pictures And unfortunately it was terrible lighting right all the the lighting was horrible and you've been to launch events multiple times where the lighting is just bad. Essentially they find a the darkest facility they could ever find with no natural light at all then they turn down all the lights and then they proceed. Put Spotlights on the devices so you have this incredible like three thousand to one contrast ratio between. What's dark and what's light? Then into that mix they throw in blue like Samsung's blue neon color. They have led lights with blue shining here and there and it's just horrible especially that blue because cameras don't like that blue at all and so whenever you all of my photos to actually caught that blue makes it look like there is no contrast to that at all. It's either one solid blue like there's no gradient to it at all and it's just horrible but as far as devices go. I'm still without a Samsung Galaxy. Flip I'm without a Samsung Galaxy s? Twenty ultra which everybody in the world seems to have or at least a select few. Unfortunately I'm not on that list So you'll have to enlighten us about the amazing things that this phone can do. Well besides my you know our with the phone at the launch event a week and a half ago. I'm I'm still sitting here like everybody else without a phone. Well it's funny because like we we talk about like the creative side Youtube and of tech blogging quite a bit To give a peek behind the curtain. You and I both have published what we'll call complaints video. Okay I have. I have this thought that I should stop saying the word complaints because it creates such a visceral reaction like I might change it to like the word concerns instead especially if it's a phone that's not released yet because people can have this notion in their heads but obviously youtube rages very potent and very real thing But Yeah we we actually have talked about it a little bit and now that I'm actually using the phone. I have to admit that and this is my final review always is whether or not my complaints or concerns actually pan out and I got to say so far maybe like three of five three or five or still three five actually have panned out. They have been problems. Like I don't like the color selection of s twenty ultra. It really makes me upset when they show so much love to the other phones but the one that everyone really wants you kind of just stuck with what they give you which is usually black and the thankfully though they send the gray one out to people so it actually looks a little bit different but I just immediately put like a case on it anyway. The front facing camera is okay so I did take some forty megapixel shots with the front facing camera and they seem quite highly detailed after all when you use the sensor for whatever reason. Samsung can't tack on their software on top. So it's not it doesn't have the beautification doesn't have any of the extra stuff is just raw photo. And the same goes for the one hundred eight megapixel front facing camera. I would love to see like more than one. They're like we're putting six seven eight cameras on the back of phones. Why can't we get a little bit more for the front so that that is still a complaint that I have but yeah like my main thing is just the price I'm still. I'm lucky enough to be able to use this fun and be able to send one out but I still can't shake the feeling that a lot of what. This phone has is Bo guarding at all? Because it would be great to have the one eight megapixel on the smallest phone. Just there's no reason. Yeah and there's no reason because Xiaomi came out last fall with essentially the same sensor Samsung and Xiaomi collaborated on the sensor. I think the one. That's in the ultras a little bit different than the ones Xiaomi released. But you know it's been a couple of months so it's gotten a little bit better. Yeah but this Xiaomi phone was what you know an eight hundred dollar phone yeah and it and it had. It's palpable in terms of not palpable. It's more accessible in terms of he feel and handling and whatnot. And you don't need a telescopic lens like you just don't and it's a nice party trick and I'll admit that ten times zoom on the ultra has been kind of. Nice tweet yesterday about how I wanted to do this whole story in video and just say like you ever walk in just you know. The streets are in nature or anything like that you see a squirrel and you. WanNa like run up to it and it runs away when you get within like like ten feet of it. Yeah Ten fifteen feet. And they're gone right. Yeah exactly I saw one in the Burrito which is where I went to get like neutral shots and I stood there now. Oh there's a squirrel over there is a fat one two and I was just like okay. Let's see what happens here so I went five times. Okay not too bad ten times. That's better thirty times and IT WAS RIGHT UP. On the the Squirrel filling the screen phillies screen and the problem. Though is that the moment you get over ten times you start it's digital zoom or hybrids and whatever you WANNA call it and it it starts to lose quality so it's like how useful can something like that truly. Be You know if if Samsung any other manufacturers do these zooms are trying to tell you that. Oh you know those people with the huge like safari lenses on Lars. You can have that on the phone and no you. Yeah exactly well. And so like the last couple days as everybody got the s twenty ultra they. Everyone was posting their pictures of you. Know Ultra wide standard ten x zoom. One hundred zoom and I I was going through everybody's pictures and clicking on them and of course they're all uploaded to twitter which already compresses the file. So you're not getting the full resolution. But I I went to look at the files and looked at their ten x zoom and then looked at their hundred x zoom and then zooming in to the ten x zoom the picture quality. The resolution was the same. Because that's actually what it is as two hundred x zoom so. I'm like this marketing thing that they're having with the one hundred. X Zoom is just horrible because they actually print it on the back of the phone. It says doesn't it say one hundred x on the camera and it's like I can. I can take any phone and crop in and say one hundred x right. It's not and with my video that I did about the you'll have an ultra actually called it. Ta- five reasons why you shouldn't by this phone and one of them was for the hundred x zoom because it's just a marketing gimmick. That's all it is thought the tenax looks good. I like I I really WANNA try. The ten acts in a certain situations like my daughter. She's eight years old. She just started playing basketball this last year at the community center. She's on a little team and where we have to sit while we're at their practices and their Games is. I'm hundred fifty feet away from where they're actually playing because they're you know it's three courts and they're one court over and so. I can't get really close having that ten x zoom in that situation for recording video as she's playing her game would be amazing on a smartphone. But other than that. It's like you know. When would I actually be using ten x zoom you know on a day-to-day basis if I'm on vacation that's one thing like if I'm going out and you know trying to get picture of some attraction or something that we're never gonna see ever again and trying to get that photo but other than that you know? There's there's not that many situations were ten x zoom actually comes in handy. That's why you don't see it that often even with actual DSL are zoom lenses. It's really not fair that often. And if it is it's really

Samsung Youtube Xiaomi Basketball Phillies Twitter BO
"thirty times" Discussed on Sports Wars

Sports Wars

10:25 min | 2 years ago

"thirty times" Discussed on Sports Wars

"Shoot thirty times a game if you wanted to beat Isaiah Thomas in the overly physical pistons, he had to spread the basketball wealth now as the nineteen ninety one regular season ends Jordan, and the bulls are on the cusp of the NBA's elites today, we conclude our four part series on the battle between two basketball legends, Michael, Jordan, and is aimed at Thomas. This is episode four greatness. It's may twenty seventh nineteen Ninety-one the morning of game four of the Eastern Conference finals as Ahah Thomas picks up the Detroit Free Press. The local paper and flips to the sports section is.

Isaiah Thomas Jordan Detroit Free Press basketball NBA bulls Michael
"thirty times" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"thirty times" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Do life. Two thousand sixteen within forty three hundred people were killed in crimes involving large. Which way twenty to thirty times as much as passenger car can cause severe in any event random. Distracted truck drivers defective. Equipment. Jason has been helping eighteen Wheeler accident victims. Two zero six five six one thousand. Our traffic updates go the extra mile. So you don't have to we tell you where the problems are in the most efficient ways to get around them with traffic every ten minutes mornings and frequent updates all afternoon. News Radio twelve hundred w away. I. To talk to George Nath. Call the wildcard line eight one eight five zero one four one zero nine the first time caller line is eight one eight five zero one four seven two one to talk tool free from east of the Rockies. Call eight hundred eight two five five zero three three from west of the Rockies toll free. Call eight hundred six one eight eight two five five this is coast to coast AM with George Knapp. The great.

"thirty times" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"thirty times" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"And if I actually ask you in a minute later, what brand was it, you won't know. Literally and Vader media's doing to Super Bowl this year. I didn't get my hands in it. I kind of wanted to watch next year. I will sell a brand the following Super Bowl ad. It'll be a human being full face on the camera, and that human being will repeat the name of the brand thirty times, and I'll be the entire commercial, and it will be the winner of the Super Bowl because nobody will forget the brand. We'll see it depends on how much cloud I have an ear. Eventually I'll have enough that they'll just do whatever stupid thing I come up with the for now, maybe not yet. But it would work. You remember that beyond say was that you remember that the kid farted? And that was funny. But you don't literally remember the brand. And that's the purpose. All time. You remember the? Yeah. Exactly the car opera upper Winfrey when she gave cars to everybody. Nobody know what branch. I surely don't. Wow. But that was the point. Nobody had any car was was about. Everybody remembers that it was over whoever's closest to the consumer always wins. That's the game. That's why personal brand matters that shit doesn't go away. So it's always a good thing to do in parallel. You can do Sally the salsa dancer while you put out content about event marketing, you know, what What I mean? mean, it's an an game. And what I don't want people to do is hold onto resources when the attentions underpriced. All those. Expand on it. Because if I'm giving you look at you. I would love to dig up all the eastern paeans that came over to Manhattan and thirties and forties worked their faces up build something and then saved and sat on cash, but Manhattan property was so under priced so instead of buying a second building they set on cash that cash is worth the same amount today that building three hundred thousand thirty eight million. The attention is so underpriced right now. Look, I'm a second rodeo guy. I figured out Google an Email. I did. Well, but the reason I'm the guy in the social media world is I know how much I left on the table. I'm not doing this time. Got it. Twenty fucking people on my team. Because I know it's going to go away. And then I have good track record that I may be good at Alexa and voice, but I might not. When you can buy real estate at an underpriced.

Vader media Manhattan Winfrey Alexa Google Sally
"thirty times" Discussed on Blogging the Boys

Blogging the Boys

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"thirty times" Discussed on Blogging the Boys

"This guy's more of a corner is more of a cover guy. He's not a center fielder center fielder, you know, you want your best athletic corn defensive backs on on the edges. You don't wanna guy. Yeah. You'd like to have a tremendous player. You like that Earl, Thomas back with the Cowboys would out, but yeah, you want your best, you know, you're, you're, you're, you're, you're players that can make plays on the edges and not the Senate fill it. And to me, it tells me that Krista shar looked at by Jones's and you're gonna you're going to be my cover GATT. When did you on. Young play man to man or whatever coverage it is. We need you out the edges covering best, some of the best receives in the National Football League. So do you think the offense could benefit from from a naked? I, I mean, you know, maybe Scotland Eoghan is, you know, we've said the word naked a lot more than I thought we would well with the naked afraid left turn. We took, you know. You know, maybe whatever, that whatever the dress down version you want to do as far as looking at someone evaluating. I don't know how much how much leash there is for Scotland a hand, but this this week and again, I don't like for offense coordinator to change just because they have to because some as whereas on 'em yeah, it's gotta be within their their realme. Thanks their, you know, they're, that's their type. That's the type of play calling. Yeah, it does a lot of different play collars in the National Football League that that you look at all these different high profile offenses that really like to get the ball out creativity, Scotland a hand doesn't seem to be that. He wants to be a guy that has a player like Zeke Elliott. They can carry it thirty times if you're going to carry thirty times to football within thirty times, split him out this and things like that. But you know with what you have the, you know the tools and your that you have. In in the toolbox us, you know, tied in different things are on screw -ther, that certain things, it make it where everything is working properly. You know earlier this week, Michael Irvin your former team. It was on ESPN San Antonio Madison work over there, and he, he, he said that this offense is a lot like y'all's and I don't. I'm not trying to say y'all. Offense was bad. I mean, you're often speech where it's up, but y'all's offense might not necessarily be what it was today. You know what it was then just because the league is different to the choice brought up earlier accent. But I mean, do you see that to you? See somebody who practiced against the? Do you think that the current Cowboys are trying to beat that offense trying to be the offense that just grinds it out? Or is that just something that you know people are saying and might be a little bit wrong about? I don't. I don't think anyone can replicate those that that offense and nothing against. You know what Michael Irvin I mean, I respect his opinion, but. I gotta disagree with him on that because it's totally in. He knows his probably his mission and maybe he wouldn't say it. I'm trying to think of where that's coming from because yes, I get it. You have a good running back. You supposedly supposed to have the best offense align a national football. It's easy, connect those dots. Sure. Yeah. We'll look at the production now. If you look at yardage with what we did back into now, so on, may we've made the point about Troy not being this for, you know, throw for four hundred yards per game and maybe that, but it's we're talking twenty. Five years are Jay, but you didn't. You don't have to do that now, do you have. You. You don't. You balance is more on of attack in in and and being able to throw the football downfield and you know, and there were times whenever Troy was able to throw the ball down to the down the field, Alvin Harper, Michael Irvin or Jay Novacek mean we had guys, it could make place that's the difference. And that's why disagreed..

Michael Irvin Cowboys National Football League football Scotland Zeke Elliott Troy Jay Novacek Thomas San Antonio Madison coordinator Alvin Harper Jay Earl Senate Krista shar Jones four hundred yards Five years
"thirty times" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

The Dan Bongino Show

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"thirty times" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

"Thirty times more simple math. You see what I'm saying? Sure. Dollar bought this in the past, what you what you're your Lear about you one US dollar. Now your money's in the can the country's economies falling apart. Now it takes thirty of them. Now you gotta go scrounge up thirty times more to pay off those loans. We've already seen this around the world. We saw it with the East Asian countries, Mexico folks, surreal problem. I'm saying that because you're going to see, I believe this. Capital flight get worse and worse, which I'm not again, I'm wishing ill on any country around the world. Having a global economic, Chris doesn't help anyone. I'm just saying with this emerge and it hasn't spread like contagion yet just to be clear, it's really an emerging market phenomenon. Now, I'm just saying that because the good news on a Friday is this money is finding a home. It's finding its home here, which is going to result in heavy investment in American companies, heavy investment in a workforce, heavy investment in training in capital in real estate. You're gonna see a lot of investors scooping up homes. I think if we can just please, and I'm not using the Lord's name in vain year. Please give some divine inspiration to the some of these guys up on the hill who are just chumps and cannot get a hold. If we can just get a hold of our spending situation Redon Horwitz's piece. It is a scathing scathing review of this GOP budget, which is no different on substance from a liberal Democrat budget. None. If we could just get a hold of this. Outrageous spending situation, ladies and gentlemen, we could be looking at a couple of decades of United States, economic prosperity. We have not seen since the mid eighties, but we have got to get a cap on this spending because this emerging market crisis and worldly crisis not gonna last forever sooner or later these countries are going to get their act together. They always well, they don't always, but most of them do. When they do the United States may not be that option anymore. And when that funds money, when that flow money dries up, we don't want to be the ones charging thirty percent interest rate for mortgage. Our economy would be he would throw a monkey wrench into everything. It would explode everything. The good news is where the best option, the bad news. We may not always. We have got to get control of this, uh, spending situation. I didn't even get to Adam Schiff. I had so much more stuff on that, but no folks I'll off to get some money. It's really if you wanna watch my Henry TV show tonight five thirty dot com. I'll try to pick up the rest of great part about having to shows this. You're right the other. Hey, thanks for a great week. I appreciate all the new subscriptions on YouTube on itunes on iheartradio it's all free folks. It means a lot to us helps us move up the Charleston. Thanks for joining my Email us at opening our emails really means the world to be thanks to everybody. Email me back. I appreciate it. I will see you all on. You just heard the Dan Bongino GIO did more of an online anytime at conservative review done comb. You can also get Dan's podcast on itunes soundcloud and followed in on Twitter, twenty four, seven at dbongino.

Redon Horwitz United States Dan Bongino GIO Dollar US Adam Schiff Mexico GOP Lear Twitter YouTube Chris Charleston thirty percent
"thirty times" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

The Smoking Tire

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"thirty times" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

"One thirty five i thirty time i is a lot of car yeah i had a black member you did i was a cool company m was so fast really like nice handling one twenty eight i two didn't you know just the one m okay yeah i have driven to twentyeight i m sport press car couple years ago that was pretty good yeah nice steering and good balance it was a lot of fun new 'em twos really good to the m two is great car really really really get serious with like a six hundred fifty am foremost somebody should somebody should something like that i remember the way to the dining to come after you left yeah at least they soften they did the correct thing with shocks over there n fifty five motor has been around long time even his era too so and now they're still doing those that that reminds me someone someone else asking about that later i just made a couple of four hundred horsepower in twenty four cylinders what is an n twenty four cylinder turbomotor and to twenty eight oh yeah wait really yeah four horsepower big turbo it's awesome because the two twenty eight is really nice yeah and it's so light and hannah phenomenal car four hundred pounds stored horsepower on race gas drivable what do you what does it make on three fifty pretty good i bet that's a great little the car lease it and daily i two engines in a box on the shelf really and yeah what extra you know capacity panel handle two gs in a corner and what isn't engine that cost ten thousand dollars is all because it's a four cylinder thought that as many.

hannah four hundred horsepower ten thousand dollars four hundred pounds four horsepower one m
"thirty times" Discussed on BiggerPockets Money Podcast

BiggerPockets Money Podcast

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"thirty times" Discussed on BiggerPockets Money Podcast

"The audio and i have listened to this probably i don't know thirty times i actually love it and you know i mean it combines both helping me learn spanish and learning about money and you know even though i don't follow everything the dave ramsey says anymore because it was the catalyst that thought me learn about money you know i consider it necessary reading or listening for everyone so with that title one more time for the show news yeah lot transfer bossio into counter they sued the narrow okay okay get that will be at the show it's and along with the english version if you choose to to listen in english and then there was actually a second book as well that i you know i fell in love with this book and this is a lot more recently and i realized when i was reading it it was describing everything that i had already been doing and that would be grant card owns the ten x rule right and so basically what he's saying in the book is you know for success you have to give ten times the amount of effort has to originally thought was necessary in order to ccomplish any goal and looking back on not just you know my financial story but my weight loss story absolutely one hundred percent true and i recommend that book for anyone who is trying to you know reach the next level it was the spanish language title.

dave ramsey one hundred percent
"thirty times" Discussed on BiggerPockets

BiggerPockets

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"thirty times" Discussed on BiggerPockets

"The audio and i have listened to this probably i don't know thirty times i actually love it and you know i mean it combines both helping me learn spanish and learning about money and you know even though i don't follow everything the dave ramsey says anymore because it was the catalyst that thought me learn about money you know i consider it necessary reading or listening for everyone so with that title one more time for the show news yeah lot transfer bossio into counter they sued the narrow okay okay get that will be at the show it's and along with the english version if you choose to to listen in english and then there was actually a second book as well that i you know i fell in love with this book and this is a lot more recently and i realized when i was reading it it was describing everything that i had already been doing and that would be grant card owns the ten x rule right and so basically what he's saying in the book is you know for success you have to give ten times the amount of effort has to originally thought was necessary in order to ccomplish any goal and looking back on not just you know my financial story but my weight loss story absolutely one hundred percent true and i recommend that book for anyone who is trying to you know reach the next level it was the spanish language title.

dave ramsey one hundred percent
"thirty times" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"thirty times" Discussed on KOMO

"Six thirty time for abc news coming to the defensive is nominee to head up the cia on twitter he calls jean hess bell the most qualified person for the job and says democrats oppose her because quote she's too tough on terror questions have been raised about haskell's involvement with enhanced interrogation techniques more than thirty homes have now been destroyed is the killer way of all kaneohe on hawaii's big island continues to erupt abc's qena whitworth is there another crack in killer way of volcano causing continuous eruptions lava skyrocketing three hundred feet in the air as hours everything in its tax threatening more and more homes each day at least seventeen hundred people have been evacuated and now this morning at dangerous new health threat potentially toxic levels of sulfuric gas viewing into the air causing shortness of breath and skin irritation about a week after a caravan of migrants arrived at the us border with mexico attorney general jeff sessions will be talking about immigration this afternoon in san diego i'm cheri preston abc news the northwest scully all news station komo news one thousand fm ninety seven seven six thirty one right now it's the inevitability of a monday morning fifty two degrees in downtown seattle under mostly cloudy skies along with gregg hersholt i'm manda factor here the top stories from the komo twenty four seven news center you've heard a lot of talk about this controversial tax that could dribble jasser drastically altered the look of many seattle neighborhoods tonight you get a chance to weigh in the city is planning to talk about rezoning parts of some iconic seattle neighborhoods for larger complex is like a one hundred and sixty unit building along rainier avenue south some city leaders want to extend those affordable building options and this could transform mount baker beacon hill georgetown and columbia city to name a few some longtime residents we spoke to worry about being squeezed out this is all happening as the city council faces the first vote on what's known as the proposed head tax for big businesses in seattle that i vote is actually for committee later on this week and that money of course going to find a portable housing projects and for the homeless crisis as well so that i buy a committee expected on wednesday could go to a full city council vote by next monday meeting on the rezoning plan that lee stole mentioned starts at six o'clock tonight at franklin high school a.

lee mount baker gregg komo san diego jeff attorney mexico us cia jean hess twitter franklin high school seattle cheri preston abc hawaii kaneohe haskell
"thirty times" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"thirty times" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"News time six thirty time for news with rick worthington good morning news brought to you by capita credit union now there were about one hundred two hundred people that turned out of that public meeting tuesday evening on the proposed baseball and soccer stadium that the city would like to build at the corner of shoreline in americana the meeting though was not very organized and it wasn't very productive due to a great deal of people shouting and there was no microphone there was no seeding will the atlantabased developer that wants to build a stadium as greenstone properties in they're represented by an attorney that's here in boise jeffrey wardell he was invited to join nate shelman here on six seventy to take calls and maybe do a better job of answering questions in the setting where you know it'd be easier to get full answers and maybe a little more detail and sebaq and forth he was asked about the deal and about the taxes the model that we're working under the worked on with with c cdc in the city of boise an additional sixty five million dollars worth of new development which is what greenstone proposes with the office component the parking garage the retail and the residential components will generate an additional million dollars of taxes over twenty years so those are tax dollars that don't currently exist taxes will continue to be paid because the thing that most people don't know and understand is that saint luke's does not a portion of the property down there is owned by saint luke's and is is is not on the taxable portion though is owned by saint luke's in a joint venture and that property's paying taxes saint luke's pays taxes on a significant portion of that site right now so they wouldn't be collecting taxes on the stadium but you say they'd be collecting taxes on the buildings they'd be collecting texas on the on the rest of the building's going forward now there's a lot more to that conversation you.

developer attorney jeffrey wardell nate shelman boise greenstone saint luke rick worthington baseball soccer texas sixty five million dollars million dollars twenty years
"thirty times" Discussed on FrazlCast - A World of Warcraft Podcast

FrazlCast - A World of Warcraft Podcast

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"thirty times" Discussed on FrazlCast - A World of Warcraft Podcast

"More part of coltie iras are open deflate exciting we're in it this year expansion i'm not ready my fox mount there's what you have there get off either me you just need run through sir marce more you'll get the the little i've done the training thing over thirty times rochus either i didn't get mine from the training honestly i think i was doing something just like world quest or something it dropped so i don't think you have to only get it from the weather training on the weather training i think initially it was the initial launch hit was but i think they've fixed it so you can get really anywhere in sir marks know for fact i'm pretty sure i was doing the world quest where you have to guide the little kitties back to its mom finish the quest or doing something there and i picked it up and people in chat got it from the misery just yeah see i thought it was the emissary well i think it also dropped in in the summa with the training i i'm thinking it's one of those items that because it dropped initially enough in the training became the stigma that it always dropped exactly that like so many thought people thought that you could only get from the weather training because people got it from whether training i unlocked all the quest here now i do the weather training every time it comes up and it's the same way where people still think it's gonna put gnomes but they thought the learn and in a kind of put in kiki stuff because it's kind of warcraft but it's also many workday players were invited to an event and we found out that it that is the workout three petitional happening every twenty seven twenty eight and it'll be featuring a number of classic competitors.

sir marce emissary
"thirty times" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"thirty times" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"A ton of bills that your legislature is up is posing than pondering over and we'll tell you about them it's important stuff and more importantly now it's so easy so much easier than it used to be to testify or submit uh you know you have fought steer lawmakers and they need it they love it when you do that form or with them a six thirty time poor 630 report let us go to our friends our media partners at duckie itv and this is a new voice for us we wanna to to the program and a welcome to us taja uh this is this is actually let me tell you something mrs limited we'll just let her introduce your are so herself and then we'll talk about a good morning good morning antigia where lee with your island news update a warning by the department of health to stay out of the water after three different beaches on oahu because of high levels of bacteria found sandies hunnam obey amnuay minallah closed in protest results to show back three levels have dropped say lawmakers have drafted a bill that would require rental shops to attach a warning checklists on snorkels according to the legislator snorkeling has have iit's most feel activity a let us visitor drowning rate is thirteen times the national average f approved the bill will take effect immediately harbor police officers filed a complaint against the state claiming new policy requiring them to turn in their guns at the end of each shift puts them in danger they saved they confront criminals onduty they're afraid they won't be able to defend themselves if confronted off duty and shoupo the union representing honolulu police officers filed a complaint over the reassignment of their president to ninety ma follow ma follow was moved out of the pierre support unit and into midnight patrol in waikiki chief bollard says her decision was part of her promise to reorganize and after nearly three decades the.

duckie itv lee president bollard department of health honolulu pierre waikiki three decades
"thirty times" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"thirty times" Discussed on WLOB

"Hhs and the ad council russia's president vladimir putin now says he was a terror attack wednesday's explosion at a market in saint petersburg russia four people were hurt no claim of responsibility so far two simultaneous attacks are now reported in afghanistan's capital city cobble twenty five people reported killed dozens more injured us spy satellites have reportedly captured photos of chinese ships selling oil illegally to north korea at least thirty times since october united nations security council is limited oil imports to the north and barred natural gas shipments in response to kim jongil builds nuclear missile program secretary of state rex tillerson in an op ed published in the new york times identifies north korea as the greatest security threat to the us he also writes that defeating terrorism remains one of president trump's highest are these than tillerson says he remains optimistic about the power of the palme seed resolve conflicts all the a few days until the recreational use of marijuana becomes legal in california the state scrambling to get ready lorry ajax is head of the bureau of canada's control which gives state licenses to recreational marijuana retailers microbusinesses distributors and testing labs four already at a few hundred we keep getting more and more applications you'll probably thea sometime in 2018 a few thousand licences issued some cities are still hammering out there rules you need city approval before you can get a state license and the state is only issuing temporary licenses for now after which business owners will have to apply for an annual license and that is going to be a more iq and could investigation were they'll be fingerprinted will be doing background check leaders in some counties like orange kern and shasta have voted not to allow recreational sales in unincorporated areas jessica rosenthal fox news.

marijuana jessica rosenthal bureau of canada secretary of state kim jongil natural gas afghanistan president shasta california Hhs tillerson trump new york times oil imports united nations security counci north korea saint petersburg russia vladimir putin russia
"thirty times" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:21 min | 4 years ago

"thirty times" Discussed on KGO 810

"Surprise this weekend there dave i mean the la rammed that our a horrible team and they like clobbered who they even play the clobbered him indianapolis that's who was yen in indy said what happened any enable there's a quarterback issues at the i think in these a mess in general anyway i don't know every time the patriots neither crush them so i don't think they're they're good i mike producing thirty time the patriots sorry raids they couldn't mary's lower love hayes jasbir blah blah too good brady go get i did not realize matthew stafford was the highest paid player in the nfl how man yeah this why is that well i mean there are several re the structures of the salary cap are kind of odd uh and i mean some people make mistakes in overpay for certain players but also with the nfl contracts not really being guaranteed contracts at certain times you'll have trains players being i mean detroit did win on like the patriots so the sandy the lions lines it's sub 35 23 i am lines and never win the election i mean they never win the super bowl but they they had a good team with that last year leading a team of the year before that it really i mean that they're they've always been not always put lately in the math used africa in general fair to me that there are terrible terrible fifty one million bucks this but it's not article made me so angry all guarantee too much my true to money andrew luck indianapolis colts twenty seven million bucks and they got clobbered by the head of what's the right term for there iran apples rams hapless thank you who did i mean but did the culture agree team and teams can drop off really quickly like a bit of an injured quarterback like the colts do with andrew luck alarming julian adam any nominee he's out big deal at the big deal so adam anatolia clearly a tastes drying the thank you really this morale of the team skims who she lost is like you said now one loss just like you said they'll just true dave said it danger and just i mean he's really going willingness oakland raiders crushed tennessee raiders are on the way up white they finally it'd be a real surprise on the.

dave tennessee andrew africa detroit nfl mary raiders oakland patriots adam anatolia colts indianapolis super bowl lions matthew stafford brady
"thirty times" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:56 min | 4 years ago

"thirty times" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Two thousand the s p five hundred index was trading at close to thirty times s and p five hundred earnings now when you think about a mobile of thirty times earnings in the context of the s p five hundred and you look at that history which shows us that over the last halfcentury year in the sixteen to sixteen and a half average area you saw a market in january of year two thousand there was trading at virtually two times the average multiple last halfcentury now that is truly an extreme and you remember what happened after january of year two thousand while there was a major bear market and that bear market continued until the final successful test of the lows was achieved in march of two thousand three so there is a textbook example of how valuation can play into market direction you're looking at a multiple that's almost two times the historic norm you're looking at an extremely high valuation model and what happens you see the s p five hundred over the next couple of years declined close to fifty percent yes and p five hundred between the first quarter of year two thousand and the fourth quarter of year two thousand two came down close to fifty percent that's a dramatic decline and that's the kind of a decline we saw following that extreme measure of the un mission in january of year two thousand so it is a good idea of very very good idea to pay close attention to valuation that is why we include valuation in the principal factor said we analyse in the market timer investment letter one of the principal factors we analyse in terms of our stock market timing methodology is valuation we also look at other things of course and we look very closely at things like the economic cycle we look at things like monetary policy and we also monitor sentiment to give us an idea of which direction investor psychology is going at any given point in time and that's how we look at it i'm bob brinker this is america's money program money talk money talk my name.

bob brinker america principal stock market fifty percent
"thirty times" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:48 min | 4 years ago

"thirty times" Discussed on KOIL

"Of year two thousand the s p five hundred index was trading at close to thirty times s and p five hundred earnings now when you think about a mobile of thirty times earnings in the context of the s p five hundred and you look at the history with shows us that over the last halfcentury year in the sixteen the sixteen and a half average area you saw a market in january of year two thousand there was trading at virtually two times the average multiple last halfcentury now that is truly an extreme and you remember what happened after january of year two thousand while there was a major beer market and that bear market continued until the final successful test of the lows was achieved in march of two thousand three so there is a textbook example i'll held valuation can play into market direction you're looking at a multiple this almost two times the historic norm you're looking at an extremely high valuation model and what happens you see the s p five hundred over the next couple of years decline close to fifty percent yes and p five hundred between the first quarter of year two thousand and the fourth quarter of year two thousand two came down close to fifty percent that's a dramatic decline and that's the kind of decline we saw following that extreme measure of valuation in january of year two thousand so it is a good idea of very very good idea to pay close attention to valuation that is why we include valuation in the principal factor so we analyse in the market timer investment letter one of the principal factors we analyse in terms of our stock market timing methodology is valuation we also look at other things of course and we look very closely at things like the economic cycle we look at things like monetary policy and we also monitor sentiment to give us an idea of which direction investor psychology is going at any given point in time and that's how we look at it i'm bob rancour this is america's money program.

bob rancour america principal stock market fifty percent
"thirty times" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:48 min | 4 years ago

"thirty times" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Of year two thousand the s p five hundred index was trading at close to thirty times s and p five hundred earnings now when you think about a mobile of thirty times earnings in the context of the s p five hundred and you look at that history which shows us that over the last halfcentury year in sixteen to sixteen and a half average area you saw a market in january of year two thousand that was trading at virtually two times the average multiple last halfcentury now that is truly an extreme and you remember what happened after january of year two thousand while there was a major bear market and that bear market continued until the final successful test of the lows was achieved in march of two thousand three so there is a textbook example of held valuation can play into market direction you're looking at a multiple that's almost two times the historic norm you're looking at an extremely high valuation model and what happens you see the s p five hundred over the next couple of years decline close to fifty percent yes and p five hundred between the first quarter of year two thousand and the fourth quarter of year two thousand two came down close to fifty percent that's a dramatic decline and that's the kind of a decline we saw following that extreme measure of the un mission in january of year two thousand so it is a good idea of very very good idea to pay close attention devaluation that is why we include valuation in the principal factor so we analyse in the market timer investment letter one of the principal factors we analyse in terms of our stock market timing methodology is valuation we also look at other things of course and we look very closely at things like the economic cycle we look at things like monetary policy and we also monitor settlement to give us an idea of which direction investor psychology is going at any given point in time and that's how we look at it i'm bob rancour this is america's money program.

bob rancour america principal stock market fifty percent