35 Burst results for "Thirty Three Percent"

Bitcoin Will One Day Hit $1 Million

CNBC's Fast Money

02:46 min | Last week

Bitcoin Will One Day Hit $1 Million

"Bitcoin blowing through new records today. The crypto currency gaining thirty three percent. This week alone in case you missed it. Wargin creeks anthony. Poblano join us last night here on fast. Listen to what he said about. Bitcoin is headed. If you really think about the technology world we talk about ten x improvement props. Bitcoin is at least ten x better than gold in every way. And so i think that if you just think of a bitcoin product that has to expedite and mortgage cap kind of follows that that would put bitcoin at a million dollars. Coin right just two golds market cap in case you thought you heard wrong. That's a million dollars. A coin became. We're specifically talking about j. p. morgan's known on on Bitcoin from earlier in the week and they were making the point that there have been outflows from gold inflows. Bitcoin as bitcoin has ramped and so the notion is that bitcoin would be a replacement. Are you on board that because that seems to be the main driver these days For the bullish thesis on bitcoin. Yeah i think listen. It's digital goal that narrative has taken off this year among the institutional community and just to put a couple of numbers around that so we have gold. Roughly it's market. It's total value is about ten trillion bitcoins out about seven hundred billion eight hundred billion right now. That jp morgan not talked about if all of the money came out of gold into bitcoin. That would be somewhere around two point seven trillion dollars. So that's probably almost. What a quadruple from the price. From where we all right now maybe a little bit more a quadruple puts you at j. p. morgan's price at one hundred and forty six thousand. So it's not necessarily a reasonable. My only concern is when you you know. And i think pop made a great point. My concern is when you have these these these big upside targets then. People say hey. I'm gonna just going load into it here and i just. I've been doing it for years. But i remind people. Bitcoin has months where it's down thirty forty percent so you could buy a forty thousand today and watch it go to twenty thousand and that would not be unusual and we should make the point to that. Anthony made clear that you could see wild swings on the way to a million dollars a point up twenty percent or down twenty percent or thirty percent for that matter. Cape fat kate. I imagine that your clients are inquiring. I mean this has got to be on everybody's mind so how. How do you approach that honestly. Melissa bitcoin is not my joint jealous of the people who are in. It made a lot of money. I don't get. It doesn't make a lot of sense to me and why bitcoin if you say cryptocurrency generally cage supply-and-demand. If bitcoin is doing that well it will attract other crypto currencies. So i'm gonna sit on the sidelines on this one.

Bitcoin Wargin Creeks Anthony Morgan Jp Morgan Cape Fat Kate Melissa Bitcoin Anthony
25k Christmas Bitcoin?

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

05:31 min | Last month

25k Christmas Bitcoin?

"I will get you back to the markets right now and we have say a bit of an interesting little progression when it comes to bitcoin. Of course we saw some pretty quick selling off. And i'll tell you what. I did find quite. I guess what is fascinating. This morning is also doing the scandal. Just before the scan sorry was that the market was down from its highs. Twelve hundred forty five dollars and it was like oh. I looked to where it was from the hamanaka jason. We've come with a thousand bucks but it didn't really look as a blip at all on the job it's not a big candy. Who really. it's not it wasn't wild. It was now to control So you have really really interesting to see how the market has changed much in such a short period of time. Of course what we've now got is last. Wakes cattle is a very big one. It's up twenty two point four seven percent. Now that's that's the biggest bullish candle that we have had Jays for a very long time. I'm enclosing up that far that i think that is the The largest single weekly candle grain a since backing limbs that Since back in one of the twenty twenty two point. Five three yeah. I really think that was the biggest candles since back. I'm trying to find them The twelfth of february two thousand eighteen the biggest closing margin there that was twenty eight point nine percent but this shot is looking something special. Now i'm truly through all time highs. We are well and truly through twenty thousand and we could well and truly go a lot higher and tight. That wrong downside. The that may saying she buy bitcoin. What i take it would. Would you take it as is that. I believe we will move higher in time. I also believe that. We'll get some vicious pullbacks This is up. This is a very very volatile market. So be prepared. It's those pullback settle for opportunity for us it is. of course the trendies up the trendy. Strong and i'm loving it. Twenty three thousand seven hundred and sixty dollars. I want to say that again. Twenty three thousand seven hundred and sixty dollars for bitcoin. Now one point one four percent little candle on the day so fi easy extended could say pullback the next pool could lauren up to be absolutely wonderful trading opportunity and i will be keeping every close eye on that up two hundred and fifty dollars to die that cradles line on that sort of twelve and six day now. I'm just waiting to see what it does. I'd love to see a little bush candidate. But i'd love. I'd love tried on We currently at point seven percent six hundred and forty two dollars and ninety five cents loss. Wake look at did close up. Don't get me wrong but nothing. Bitcoin is percent on a theory. Yeah so it has had run prior. Obviously coming off of syrian data. You could board one dollar a start at one hundred dollars in a little bit lower. Didn't know what was ally they. Id four dollars thirty two. You could buy which just seems. I mean not i mean you very likely attacks within twelve months old Theory that's a deal so just just amazing to say it is still strong your own the weekly just not having that same gusto as bitcoin. Six hundred and forty three dollars. Rotten now ex up as fifty six point four cents up one point seven percent couple of big guys loss weight twenty percent and what currently. It's a bit of a dead dog machado. Unlock it really. That much loss wakes kennel declaw fight. Sent a pretty wild ryan range on exa play from the heart of the lilama. Just take you through what that is from the high to the low thirty three percent while very well die at one point five percents dight. Bitcoin cash right now is up. Six point eight percent and really has said goodbye to that To seven eight literally waiting for traits all of within this trend. There's been a couple of opportunities for which i did not manage to capture. I was busy fraud afternoon. Trying to get myself on a new flight and then saturday flying and yesterday while i was cropping nas moves going on We'll tell you that as far as training opportunities on bitcoin cash right now don't really see it. Last week was a very big wake for bitcoin. Cash up twenty six percent as well so it's starting to get his legs back site move quite well. Three hundred and seventy two dollars. Ninety five is what we are at right now. Like point cracking wake last week. Two hundred and a hundred and fourteen dollars forte down half a percent today. Lost weight closed up nearly forty percent. The biggest mover in the talk ten. I'm writing a pool bucks on whiting pullbacks on on the high timeframe looking at the elliott Looking at the twelve. That sort of thing. It's not there yet. There's nothing that four am want. Give us something later on but having to be patient. One hundred fourteen dollars end now. Twenty five cents ten point four percent af three dollars and twenty three cents still very slow Yesterday was up two point. Seven five percents that i currently up three percent all starting to get a little momentum with the now

Hamanaka Jason Jays Ryan Range Bitcoin
Jalen Hurts inspires Eagles to victory in first NFL start

Bet The Board

02:24 min | Last month

Jalen Hurts inspires Eagles to victory in first NFL start

"At least for one week philadelphia. Eagles fans can feel confident with the caliber of play. They got from the quarterback position and jalen hurts leading philadelphia to the outright upset as an eight point. Underdog against the seemingly unbeatable new orleans saints. The eagles offense showed a little bit of a pulse and the saints defense was nowhere to be found in the first thirty minutes where they surrendered more than three hundred yards. It's kyle shanahan could've done his job. The eagles would have been or would be right in the thickens. Visger that divisions a mess. I mean every time you want to give them credit for making strides ford. They they pull you back in and like you said kyle shanahan and company allowing washington to get the improbable win. But i digress silly. Despite the washington win increase their playoff chances by about seven or eight percent. So there's still a fighting chance you mentioned this game and that's what it came down to is getting out to a quick start. Philadelphia thought for the first thirty minutes. Did a really good job. And they control the trenches. Which is a little shocking. Because you had this. Eagles offensive line that was was really depleted. You've lost peter's as well in that's against one of the more talented defensive front fours in the nfl. The new orleans saints miles sanders woke up and decided to contribute. You'll get the eagles offense. Ten point four yards per russian. At first half fifty percent rushing success rate for explosive runs all in the first half. Doug peterson game plan to me was was pretty good. The script resolved the playcalling was decent in. the eagles. did enough in the first half to hang on for dear life in the second. Come away with that win. And and keep themselves alive defensively. I thought before what feels like every single starter for the eagles left the game in the second half. Billy did a nice job defensively in that first. Thirty minutes stanzas. Well three point six yards per play allowed thirty three percent success rate allow tastes. Him only ran at twice in the first half. He was semi accurate throwing it. What it was just really short. Four point three yards per attempt in that first half so across the board that might have been the eagles best half football. This season they were. They were fantastic in. It was certainly against a team that had more talent. It just looked like philadelphia. Wanted it more along. The lines of scrimmages

Kyle Shanahan Eagles New Orleans Saints Philadelphia Jalen Washington Doug Peterson Saints Ford Sanders NFL Peter
Calibrate your emergency fund to a crisis-prone world

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last month

Calibrate your emergency fund to a crisis-prone world

"The corona virus pandemic has Americans changing the way they save money are you saving more money than you used to for years American set aside seven to eight percent of their income but when culverted nineteen hit people started stashing away cash at a historic level in April the personal savings rate exploded to more than thirty three percent we're not saving quite as much now but Americans are still saving about double the thirty year average how much should you be saving these days certified financial planner Eliot Peper in Baltimore says the need for an emergency fund is even more important now he suggests boosting the bottom line recommendation of three months of savings to six if you have six months increase it to nine I'm ready to fall lay

Eliot Peper Baltimore
Patrols Added Citing Uptick in Houston Road Rage Shootings

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

01:04 min | Last month

Patrols Added Citing Uptick in Houston Road Rage Shootings

"Police are seeing a sharp increase in road rage. Incidents in greater houston our own matt. Harum tells us. Multiple agencies are partnering to address the problem. Houston police chief. Art author vado says more than two hundred road rage. Incidents been reported this year a thirty three percent increase compared to a year ago auto says at least six of those incidents resulted in someone dying. That's why he believes it's necessary to team up with the harris county sheriff's office and texas department of public safety to place. Unmarked law enforcement vehicles on houston freeways for reckless and aggressive drivers when we can and the law permits we will be looking to forfeit cars so those are out there acting the fool putting people at risk trying to shirt people You may be doing it on foot by the time. This process is done texas. Gps says road rage has been a major contributing factor to crashes across the state this year and there have been more road rage incidents this year compared to previous years. Where firearm is involved. I met harold in houston.

Harum Harris County Sheriff's Office Houston Vado Texas Department Of Public Saf Matt Texas Harold
Ghost of Tsushima Wins Game Awards Player's Voice

Kinda Funny Games Daily

02:18 min | Last month

Ghost of Tsushima Wins Game Awards Player's Voice

"Who shema winds players voice award at the game awards. This from wesley leblanc at iga jeff. Kelly has revealed that goes to shema. Is the game game. Awards players voice award winner this year. After three rounds of voting from fans the game awards will take place on december tenth. And it's there that awards like best narrative best direction and of course game of the year will be announced. These awards are voted on by both curated voting jerry and fans but in those instances the voting jury accounts for ninety percent of the vote while the fan votes account for the other ten percent. That's not the case for the players voice award which is which is entirely decided upon by fans. There's no weighing way. There's no vote weighing involved with with this award. So gauche seema is the game that got the most total votes out of all the other nominees. It beat out other twenty twenty releases like the last to haiti's and do maternal go sushila sauce placement in the rankings shift each round at it had a three percent lead over the last two during the second round of voting fourteen percent and eleven percent of the votes respectively and then when the when the final round began on december sixth last part to you climb to forty three percent of the vote while go see my only had thirty one percent then with just four hours to go before before the closing of the votes goes through your schema jumped up to forty seven percent in the last two dropped to thirty three percent. That was the last update. Kelly gave to gave the voting percentages before announcing tuesday. That ghosts shema is the players voice award winner of the game awards this year. M ron does this surprise. You trending that direction. I like we were talking about this a bit about games. Cassie were talking about earlier. Where we're predicting the awards. One of the things i said is less of us. Divisive but it's not devicive on critics. It is divisive among fans. So i i'm not stocked. People rallied around sima. There's a little bit of campaigning along stuff like this to like. I saw a sucker sucker punch out there on twitter like hey sima and like they were doing it pretty consistently i saw some of new haven over last of us too but not nearly as much and not as many people like i said last semester was divisive so i i'm not shocked. Goes one well. I'm not shocked to go. See what beat last of us. I am surprised that beat by that much

Wesley Leblanc Iga Jeff Sushila Sauce Kelly Seema Jerry Haiti Sima Cassie Twitter
Black Friday 2020 Sales Reports

MarketFoolery

07:28 min | Last month

Black Friday 2020 Sales Reports

"In store sales on black friday where fifty two percent lower than a year ago. That should not surprise anyone online. Sales were up big also not surprise. This actually did surprise me a little bit. Though jason online sales on friday in the united states made it the second biggest day ever for online sales cyber monday last year is the biggest all time black friday this year second-placed that might get bumped down to third place after this year cyber monday. But what did you think of the reports of black friday. Yeah i mean. I think you hit on something there in to today cyber monday. I think you're right. No surprise almond spending on black. Friday grew twenty one point six percent. That was a new record. It was around nine billion dollars worth of purchases that were recorded in the forecast for today for cyber monday this year. It's slated it's it's it's slated to become the largest digital sales day ever spending is forecast to reach somewhere between ten point. Eight billion in twelve point seven billion dollars that would represent growth of fifteen to thirty five percent from last year. You no surprise really there. I think to me what really stood out and again not surprising but still stood out. Because it's just pretty darn impressive was shop by shop by his stock obviously a lot of our listeners. A lot of our members and subscribers are all very familiar with in. It's been a good year for shoplifting. Is stock up around one hundred and seventy five percent. The numbers that day chalked up for black friday really impressive two point. Four billion dollars in black friday sales that was about seventy five percent growth from last year so clearly the investments. They've been making in business all along the way or paying off. And i think the thing the thing there is because we can sit there and criticize shop five for example oh it's overvalued or you know it doesn't make a lot of sense because the business doesn't make that much money yet that that may be true but these are the type of these types of numbers that will i think afford some time i think as long as they continue to record these types of numbers the market is going to continue giving it Some wiggle room there. We've seen it with amazon. We've seen it certainly with wayfair. I think i don't think it'll be different but there were some interesting numbers. There within shop of is report that i think are just worth noting average black friday cart price. Globally was just under ninety one dollars. That was up eleven percent from a year ago so people spent a little bit more in need thing here in this mobile world. We always talk about how mobile is really leading. Four mobile sales on black friday this year. If you look at the breakdown between mobile sales and desktop it was sixty seven percent mobile versus thirty three percent desktop in last year that was sixty nine percent mobile and thirty one percent desktop so the differences is marginal but it seems worse shopping on desktop this year for obvious reasons and so the data i think but yeah it all goes back towards this digital economy that we're witnessing in it. It's it's seems like it has a lot of traction. I don't know that we're necessarily going to be going back anytime soon. I'm glad you mentioned shop five because we have talked a lot about the big retailers like walmart and target in particular the investments that they have made this year for curbside pickup for delivery all of that but worth as you said pointing out the investments shop by his made and this is a stock that i do not own i. I understand both sides of it. It is definitely on my watch. List having pulled the trigger yet. But but i understand the concerns. I understand the around valuation the lack of profitability. And maybe that's why we've seen the rise that we've seen for target and walmart this year because those are just fundamentally. I think a little easier for people to wrap their heads around. But as you said. I mean what what is the future going to be. Is it going. is it going to be well. Wants to all this is behind us. We're just to start going back to the mall now. I don't think so it's going to be more online shopping and to your point more mobile shopping. I think you are. I think you're right there. I just continued to be impressed with wayfair for example the mobile mobile numbers that they continue to record are really impressive. And that's that's furniture. Man i mean like people are shopping for furniture on their phones in regard to shop applied. I think when you when you look at the future. I don't think it's going to be one or the other. I think we've talked about this before really when we talk about target and walmart i mean it really is becoming about omni channel right. It's just meeting. The consumer wherever the consumer wants to be met in the more that companies the more that retailers are able to do this They're going to be able to take advantage of the digital economy. They're going to be able to take advantage of people wanting to actually physically go to stores In so i. I think the future is going to be a little bit of both but certainly shop. A fi is keying in on their specialty. In and i think more growth is going to be coming in. Obviously bad digital space shop is is absolutely one of the companies dictating the development of that space so even even next year. When i think it's probably safe to assume that that we get a little bit more back to normal in and the the the in person shopping experiences a little bit less risky. We'll see people wanting to get out. We'll see people wanting to go to stores and have fun with that experience But but that that. I don't think it's going to really Deter people from shopping online. I mean hopefully. I think ultimately what i'd love to see just this whole black friday cyber monday thing. I really like the fact that we're stretching and just this whole month so it's not really about fewer sales. It's just about timing right. We're just stretching over the course of a month as opposed to really isolating on on individual days. I liked to see that. Continue to wear these concepts. These retailers are not just leveraged to a couple of particular days toward the end of the year. Just real quick before we move onto our next story on that point. Are you seeing this in your own personal life. Because i have in. The last week noticed that the promotional emails i get from different retailers are basically saying. Hey our black. Friday sale is gonna last for the next ten days. It's like the subject line in the email is black friday sale. And then you look. It's like oh this is actually going through december ninth. Yeah i feel like. I've seen a lot of that just anecdotally. I do feel like. I've seen a lot more of that. I think that's that's the right thing to do again. It's just it's a bit of a different time but hopefully as we've seen throughout this whole year this year has been an accelerator for change and a lot of good ways. And maybe this'll be one more thing one more change that will witness over the course of the coming years in the i think ultimately they'll be a

Walmart Target Almond Jason Omni Channel United States Amazon
WHO Urges Africa to Prepare for Vaccine Rollout

UN News

00:51 sec | Last month

WHO Urges Africa to Prepare for Vaccine Rollout

"Is far from ready to roll out. What will be its largest ever immunization drive to beat covid nineteen the world health organization. Who has said the warning from senior. Who official matzec. Some wet comes amid increasingly promising efforts to find corona virus vaccine in her cool for african governments to ramp up readiness for the campaign. Dr moity said that planning and preparation will make or break. The unprecedented endeavor. We need active leadership and engagement from the highest levels of government with solid comprehensive national coordination plans and systems. Put in place. Insisted doctor who is. Who's regional director for africa. According to who analysis which is based on countries self reporting the african region has an average score of thirty three percent readiness for covid nineteen vaccine rolled out well below the desired benchmark of eighty percent.

Dr Moity World Health Organization Africa
Biden advisers to meet vaccine firms as Trump stalls handoff

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

Biden advisers to meet vaccine firms as Trump stalls handoff

"According to data from Johns Hopkins University the U. S. is adding about a million new covered nineteen cases a week the United States is in there in a heap of trouble Lawrence Gostin a professor of global health law at Georgetown University we've got to covert case next court cases but also hospitalizations and deaths rising actor at an unprecedented rate and Gostin is concerned that it doesn't appear like anything will change it looks very much like the White House including vice president pence's coronavirus task forces just sidelined and and I'm interested in intervening tested a couple that are up thirty three percent over the past two weeks according to Johns Hopkins University Shelley Adler Washington

Lawrence Gostin U. S. Johns Hopkins University Gostin Georgetown University Pence White House Shelley Adler Washington
What Q4 Might Look Like

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:18 min | 2 months ago

What Q4 Might Look Like

"What is Q. Four GonNa look like I think the numbers can be way lower than the one. You just mentioned way lower than thirty three percent and I think a reason for that is that number Thirty three percent annualized growth was boosted so much by the stimulus that we had by the economy opening in his partial away as it did there's a lot of work to be done. I'm quoting some economists who said that this week when it comes to the next quarter and there are so many factors weighing on growth is as we look ahead certainly, the virus is the main one we're seeing all of these records being broken as this pandemic continues to be a huge problem in this country in a huge drag on the economy. Obviously, there are mitigation measures associated with that that you know if we have to mitigate more. Could hurt the economy even more going forward that something to keep in mind and then. There's the stimulus the stimulus that we have passed and it's earlier. Did help the economy in the last quarter get back onto its feet a bit. Obviously nothing has happened in Congress there. Lawmakers returned home to their districts to watch the election results as we all will be on Tuesday and there's some hope that Congress will get its act together when they when they get back but. That hasn't happened yet, and that's certainly something that we're going to be watching and wondering about as we move ahead here and look at the prospects for

Congress
The GDP report isnt the whole story

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:24 min | 2 months ago

The GDP report isnt the whole story

"Come on repeat after me, you have been hearing or reading it all day I know the US economy. The US economy con grew at an annual rates GRUDEN annual rate of demain fill in the blank. You know it right thirty, three percent in the third quarter. Again, that is annualized or just from July to September compared to a quarter earlier growth rate was seven point four percent which sounds great. It does and Kinda is, but it doesn't get us back to where we were or. Where we might have been without this pandemic marketplace's Nancy Marshall Genzer gets his going with the output gap. We've all been there. Sometimes, we just don't live up to our potential former Fed economist Claudia Psalm says it's kind of like what happened in her house this morning when her fifth grade son had to retake virtual math test the teacher knew what his potential was but and because he wanted to get done with school and play on his IPAD, he didn't put in the time and do his best work. Some says it's the same with the economy. The output gap is the difference between what the economy is actually doing versus what it could do before cove it in recent years. GDP has been growing at two percent or more, but it just means that we know what we could be, and if we're not there yet will then we've gotta do gotTa do better even with today's strong GDP number we've only made up about sixty percent of the economic ground we lost in the first half of this year according to nationwide senior economist Benares. He says, that's partly because consumers are still avoiding risk. Your consumers are still down about a third from what they normally spend overall. Certainly, most of that's focused on the service sector with people not eating out as much. Music concerts anything that would involve large groups. Dissolution Solution here is pretty simple, less virus and more economic relief from Congress. Another Relief Bill Greg Dako chief economist at Oxford Economics says a lot of consumers relied on extra federal unemployment payments that ended over the summer as these transfers slowly faded out consumer spending activity has. Called Dako says it'll be at least another year before we get back to a normal rate of economic growth without another relief package he says, it'll take even longer I'm Nancy Marshall Genzer for marketplace.

Bill Greg Dako Nancy Marshall Genzer United States Senior Economist Chief Economist Gruden Claudia Psalm Oxford Economics Congress
US big tech dominates stock market after monster rally

Wall Street Breakfast

01:28 min | 3 months ago

US big tech dominates stock market after monster rally

"Big Tech gets a big test next week as apple facebook Amazon and Google. Parent Alphabet all step up to the earnings plate after a sizzling run for the sector wedbush securities things the reports will fuel up another tech rally into the end of the year despite the general nervousness over stimulus and the election apple is the firm's favorite thing name Microsoft and salesforce are the top cloud software picks and Z scaler is called the cybersecurity standout. There will also be some focus next week a US Senate hearing on section two, thirty immunity with twitter's Jack Dorsey facebook's mark. Zuckerberg and Google's Sundar Pichai all in the firing line. The economic calendar includes updates on new home sales, durable goods and consumer sentiment as well as what will be an eye popping Q. Three GDP report a historic thirty three percent quarter over quarter surge in Q. Three, GDP is expected to be reported to follow on the over thirty one percent drop in Q. Two despite the strong bouncing Q. Three the feds official forecast for this year is for GDP, to decline three point seven percent, which would mark the biggest single year drop since at least World War Two. Also on the schedule in the week ahead, look for some ideas to be generated out of the Robin Hood Conference and Spat Creation. Boards Town Motors Corporation could burn some rubber when it starts trading.

Apple Google Big Tech Sundar Pichai Facebook Boards Town Motors Corporation Jack Dorsey Salesforce Senate Twitter United States Microsoft Amazon Zuckerberg Official
US home construction up 1.9% in September to 1.4 million

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 3 months ago

US home construction up 1.9% in September to 1.4 million

"Home construction rose almost two percent last month the commerce department says home construction rose a solid one point nine percent at September that's after a drop in August of six point seven percent construction of single family homes last month were up just under eight percent that offset a drop in the smaller apartment sector of over fourteen and a half percent single family home construction is now at its highest level since two thousand seven construction was up in every region of the country except the Midwest that registered a plunge of almost thirty three percent I surely ocular

Commerce Department Midwest
Youths Shouldn't Be Tried As Adults, Study Says

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:06 min | 3 months ago

Youths Shouldn't Be Tried As Adults, Study Says

"New report puts the weight behind arguments that young adult should not be prosecuted in Adult Court in Illinois. The findings from the juvenile law center say youth incarceration rates have fallen in recent years as officials recognized the developmental differences between adolescents and adults. But incarceration rates have declined among young adults ages eighteen to twenty four. Reward Co author Katrina Good. Joint explains. Members of this age group are treated legally as adults despite sharing some adolescent behaviors. A have poor decision making impulsive there -ceptable that peer pressure and they're engaging in risky behavior. When we talk about raising the age, we talk about better ways to be more forgiving and supportive of emerging adults rather than punitive report calls for raising the age of eighteen for juvenile. Court. In Illinois emerging adults are represented in the justice system accounting for fifteen percent of the adult population. They also account for thirty three percent of all adult arrests despite a forty seven percent decrease and the number of arrests for this age group in the past decade.

Adult Court Illinois Juvenile Law Center Katrina Good
Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

Scientific Sense

44:57 min | 3 months ago

Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new Ideas Affect Society? And, help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense. Dot? Net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense dot com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen Dot Info. Mike yesterday's Dr Mark Hoffman, who is a research associate professor in the University of Minnesota Against City. He is also chief research inflammation officer in the children's Mussa hospital in Kansas City. Kiss research interests include health data delayed indication sharing initialisation Boca Mark. Thank you for inviting me. Absolutely. So I start with one of your papers Kato you need the use by our system implementation in defy date data resource from hundred known athlete off my seasons. So Michio inflicted. Data aggregated for marketable sources provide an important resource for my medical research including digital feel typing. On. Like. Todd beat to from a single organization. Guitar data introduces a number of analysis challengers. So. So you've worked with some augmentation log and in almost all cases be used. Data coming from that single macy's listen primary care behavioral. Or specialty hospitals and I always wondered you know wouldn't be nice. Get a data set. That sort of abrogates data from the radio on-ice. Asians but a lot of different challenges around that. So you wanted to talk a bit about that. I'd be happy to the resource that we've worked with. Is primarily a called health fax data resource. It's been in operation for almost twenty years. And the the the model is that organizations who are. Using these Turner Electronic. Health. Record. Enter into an agreement was turner they agreed to provide data rights to sern are. The identifies the date of affords aggregated into this resource. And certner provides data mapping, which is really critical to this type of work. It also the aggregate the data. And for the past probably six years. Then, they provide the full data set to especially academic contributors who want to do research with that resource. And I've been on both sides of that equation Lead that group during my career there, and then now I have the opportunity to really focus research on that type of data. So before we get into the details smog so e Itar Systems. So this is. Essentially patient records. So he gets dated like demographics out family history, surgical history hats, medications, lab solves it could have physician nodes no snow. So it's it's a combination of a variety of different types of data, right? A couple of things on the examples you gave it includes demographics. Discreet Laboratory results Medication orders. Many vitals so If access the blood pressure and pulse data. It does not include text notes because those can't be. Automatically identified consistently. So. We don't have access currently to TEX notes. Out of an abundance of caution. That his Hobby Stephen, physician writes something down they could use names they could use inflammation that could then point back to their. Patients Makita Perspective been the data's aggregated, the primary issue shoe that date has completely the identified, right? Correct. So. So yeah. So the data that we receive there's eighteen identifiers. Hip requires be removed from data. And those include obvious things like name address email addresses are another example One of the. Things. That is also part of the benefit of working with this particular resource. The. Dates of clinical service are not allowed to be provided under hip. White is done with this resource that allows us to still have a longitudinal view is. For any given patient in the data set the dates are shifted by A. Consistent. Pattern that for any given patient it can be. One two three four five weeks forward or one, two, three, four or five weeks backward. But that preserves things like day of the week effect. So for example, you see -nificant increase in emergency department encounters over weekends and you don't WanNa lose. Visibility to that. but it also allows us to receive. Very, granular early time stamped events in so. We can gain visibility into the time that a blood specimen was collected, and then the time that the result was reported back. And so we're able to do very detailed analyses with this type of resource. Right right and I don't know the audience our market is fragmented. Tau himself e Amorebieta providers out there. and so two issues. One is sort of. Standardization as to how these databases are designed and structured and others even that standardization that the actual collection of the data. In itself is not standardized played. So vk CAV vk potentially lot inability coming from different systems. Correct and that's part of what the paper that you mentioned Evaluates so. Often, night you out in the field in conferences you hear. Comparisons kind of lumping all organizations using one. Vendor lumping all using another together but as you get closer to it, you quickly learn that. It's not even clear. It's within those. Vendor markets. There's variation from organization to organization in how they use the e Hr and so. Because the identities of the. Contributing organizations are blinded to those of us who work with the data. We have to be creative about how we. Infer those implementation details, and so with this paper, we describe a couple of methods that We think move things forward towards that goal. Yes. So I'm not really familiar with that. So you mentioned a couple of things here. One is the the merge network. So this initiative including electric medical records and genomics network and pc off net the national patient, centered clinical research network support. Decentralized analyses that goes disparate systems by distributing standardized quotas to site. So this is a situation where you have multiple systems sort of. Communicating with each other and this net folks at allowing to sort of quickly them In some standardized fashion. So In this type of technology, there's janitorial core models. One is the. Federated or distributed model, the other is a centralized data aggregation. So there are examples including those that are mentioned in the paper where. Queries are pushed to the organization and. They need to do significant work upfront to ensure that there are standardizing their terminologies the same way. And once they do that upfront work than they're able to perform the types of queries that are distributed through those. Federated Networks. With. Okay. So that just one click on so that the police have standardized. So all on the at Josh site, then they have like some sort of a plan slater from from Stan Day squatty do all the data structure. And in many cases, they work through an intermediate technology. that would be. In general, consider it like a data warehouse. And so the queries are running against the production electric. Health record. That has all kinds of implications on patient care where you don't want to slow down performance. By using these intermediaries They can receive queries and then Follow that mapping has occurred. Than, they're able to to run those distributed queries. Okay. And the other model is You know. You say the g through the medical quality, improvement consortium and sooner to the health facts initiative. So this says in Sodas case, for example, in swags. This is essentially picking up data from the right deals, clients and Dan standardizing and centralizing data in a single database is that that is correct. One benefit of that model is that Organizations who for example, may not be academic and don't have the. Resources to do that data mapping themselves by handing out over that task over to the vendor you get a broader diversity of the types of organizations so you can have. A safety net hospitals you can have. Critical access rural hospitals, and other venues of care that are probably under represented in some of those. More academically driven models. And clearly the focus on healthcare about I would imagine applications in pharmaceutical out indeed to right I. Don't know if it s use and bad direction there has been some were performed with these data resources to. Characterize different aspects of medications, and so it does have utility in value. In a variety of. Analytical contexts. I was thinking about you know a lot of randomized clinical trials going on into Kuwait context and One of the issues of dispatch seem development toils that are going on that one could argue the population there are not really well to percents. it may be number by Auditees, men, people that deputy existing conditions. and. So he will serve at my come out of facedly trial. granted might work for the population. Tried it minority have sufficient? more largely. So I wanted this type of well I guess we don't really have an ID there right. So clearly, you don't know who these people are but they could be some clustering type analysis that might be interesting weight from It's very useful for Health Services Research and for outcomes research for you know what I characterize digital phenotype being. they can then guide. More, more formal research. you know you can use this type of resource to. Make sure. You're asking a useful question and make sure that there's likely to be. Enough patients who qualify for given study. Maybe you're working on a clinical trial in your casting your net to narrow you can. Determine that with this type of data resource. And is the eight tiff date who has access to it typically. So for this data resource on, it's through the vendor so. You need to have some level of footprint with them. which is the case with our organization. They're definitely a broadening their strategies. So they're. Gaining access into health systems that aren't exclusively using their electronic health records so. It's exciting to be a part of that that process. and to again work with them to. Analyze the data. I think. To the example you gave a formal randomized trials. In key part of what were growing our research to focus on is because this is real world data. You learn what's happening in practice whether or not it's well aligned with guidelines or formal protocols. And doing that there's many opportunities for near-term interventions that can improve health outcomes simply by. Identifying where providers may be deviating more from. Best Practices in than taking steps through training and education to kind of get them back towards those best practices. This data is a fresh on a daily basis. It's not. It's because it's so large and bulky? Typically we've received it on a quarterly basis in since it's retrospective analysis that's not been a major barrier. But. mechanistically, on onto soon aside is data getting sort of picked up from this system that it's harvested every day and then it's aggregated bundled and distributed on A. On a different timescale. Okay okay. So. From again, going to the, it's our system designed issue and implementation You say many HR systems comprised of more news at specific clinical processes or unit such as Pharmacy Laboratory or surgery talked about that. But then then people implement them this of fashion right they they implement modules by that can be a factor or sometimes they may want. One vendor for their primary electronic health record, but another vendor for their laboratory system. and so that's where you don't see a hundred percent usage of every module and every organization. And detailed number of different you know sort of noise creating issues in data one. This is icy speech over from ICT denied ten. and I don't know history of this but this was supposed to be speech with sometime in twenty fifteen. That's correct. So there is A. You know. There's a date in October of Twenty fifteen where most organizations were expected to have completed that transition. When I see with researchers who aren't as familiar with the you know the whole policy landscape around `electronic health records that? you can imagine researchers who assumed that all data before that date in October is is nine and all data after that date would be icy the ten. While we demonstrate in this paper, is that that transition was not Nearly, that clean and it was a much more, you know there are some organizations who just It the bullet and completed in twenty fourteen, and there are other organizations that were still lagging. In. Two Thousand Sixteen. Potentially because they weren't as exposed to those incentives in other things that you know stipulated the transition so. Part of why were demonstrating with that particular part of that work was that. you know these transitions aren't always abrupt. Yeah and and and so that is one issue and then you know a lot of consistency inconsistency issues fade. So we see that in in single systems and one of the items note here as you know if you think about the disposition code for death. you could have a right your race supercenter, right? It's a death expire expedite at home hospice, and so on. if this is a problem for a single system, but then many think about aggregating data from multiple sources this this problem sort of increased exponentially. Absolutely. So one of the challenges with documenting and and finding where you know if a patient has A deceased that. There's just multiple places to put that documentation in the clinical record. The Location in the record that. We have found to be the most consistent is what's called discharge disposition. By as we show in that analysis, that field is not always used document that and so if you're doing outcomes research and one of your key. Outcome metrics is death. And there are organizations that. Aren't documenting death in a place that successful. You should filter those out of your analysis before moving forward. And so part of what we wanted to promote is the realization that. That's the type of consideration that needs to be made The four. Publishing. Your data about an outcome metrics like death that. You're not. If you're never gonNA see that outcome it doesn't mean that people are. Dying in that particular facility, it just means it's not documented in the place that successful. Right. Yeah. So you know you on your expedience. Unique Position Mark because you you look at it from the from the vendor's perspective you're in an academic setting you're also in practice in a hospital. What's your sense of these things improving the on a track of getting getting this more standardize or it's camping in the other direction I think in general there is improvement I think The. Over the past eleven years through various federal mandates, including meaningful use and so forth. Those of all incentive organizations to utilize. Standard terminologies more consistently than was the case beforehand. I think there's still plenty of room for improvement and You know it's it's a journey, not a destination, but I think things have improved substantially. I was wondering there could be some applications of artificial intelligence here to In a clearly TATECO systems and you'd like the most them pity human resource intensive Yvonne to get it completely right. So one question would be you know, could be actually used a Dick needs to get it maybe ninety nine percent white. And that the human deal with exceptions I definitely think that that's an exciting direction that You want those a algorithms to be trained with good data, and that's a big part of what's motivated us to. Put this focus on data quality and Understanding these strange nuances that are underpinning that date has so that. As we move towards a in machine learning and so forth. We have a high level of confidence in the data that's training those algorithms. Right. Yeah. I think that a huge opportunity here because it's not quite as broad as NFL, not natural language processing it is somewhat constrained. that is a good part of it. The back part of it is that is highly technical. and so. you know some of the techniques you know you can have a fault tolerance in certain dimensions such as you know, misspellings lack of gambling and things like that. But as you have Heidi technical data, you cannot apply those principles because he could have misspelling the system may not be able to. Get, sometimes, and that's where you know I think. It's totally feasible to use. Resources to you know when you're dealing with. Tens of millions of patients and billions of detailed records. Using a I'd even identify those patterns of either. Inconsistent data or missing data it's also very powerful just to. kind of flag in identified. Areas that need to be focused on to lead to a better analysis. Greg Wait Be Hefty. Use that information somehow did is a belt of information that you know and so it just filtering into decision processes that the are really losing it. So hopefully getting improving in that dimension I've jumping to another paper bittersweet interesting. So it's entitled rates and predictors of using opioids in the Emergency Department Katrina Treat Mike Dean in Young Otto's and so so this is sort of a machine learning exercise you have gone through to locate you know coup is getting prescribed. OPIOIDS water the conditions for the Democrat not Nestle demographics but different different maybe age and things like that gender. and and then ask the question desert has some effect on addiction. In the long term rights. So that project To great example of team science though. We. Assembled a team of subject matter experts in neurology pain management. And Data Science and. The neurologist and pain management experts. Identified an intriguing question that we decided to pursue with data. In their question was. Based on anecdotal observation and so we thought it'd be interesting to see how well the data supported that. Observation is that. for youth and young adults Treated or admitted into the emergency. Department. With a migraine headache that. All too often they were treated with an opioid. And so we Use the same day to resource that we were discussing earlier. To explore that. Question. And using data from a hundred and eighty distinct emergency departments. We found that on average twenty, three percent of those youth and young adults were treated with. An opioid medication while they were in the emergency department. In general, it should be almost zero percent in general. There's really Better medications to us, four people presenting with a migraine. and. So this fits into obviously the OPIOID crisis it. it demonstrates the. Scenario describing that. You know using real world data. You can identify patterns of clinical behavior that. Don't match guideline. And the good news is that the? correctable and so through. Training and communication there's great opportunity to. To, manage this. Really. Striking. So fifteen thousand or so inevitably the encounters. And nearly a quarter of this encounters you say involved inoculate. and these are not just Misha and Congress right. It is not filtered down to migraine encounters. Okay. Okay. So these fifteen thousand just might in encounters might vein being repeating disease So once you. If you make a statement and. This or not Easter conditioning issue here. So you get your pain, you go to an emergency department and you get treated with an opioid you get quick tactical relief. From pain. auditing condition expect that in the next episode. So you can say we didn't pursue that particular question, but that is Definitely key part of. Managing the OPIOID crisis is that drug seeking behavior and so Part of our goal was to quantify that and use this as an opportunity to educate providers that. You really shouldn't be treating migraines with an opioid in there are better alternatives and. So we we felt that this was an important contribution to that national dialogue, but we didn't specifically pursue the question of whether the patients we analyzed. Within. Encounter show up Subsequently. With the same symptoms. Right right. Yeah you it develop into period when problematic patterns of drug use comedy. FEST MERGE THE PREVALENCE RATE OF OPIOID misuse estimated to be two to four percent and debts in each goofy just young adult drew from overdoses are rising. and. You say that literally prescribe IOS has been slumping loose future opioid misuse by thirty three percent. Betas Mehta say really huge number. I think just validates the importance of this of this work. Interesting mark. I don't know you exploded on data. Last the question if you look at the aggregate data, it'd be flying opioid. Misuse. what percentage of the total number. Actually started from. You know some sort of medical encounter has mike or some sort of. related encounter that could be completed otherwise was three a bit opioid. in that encounter documented resulted in that misuse. So what so If you look at the active misuse problem that we have today. do you have a sense of what percentage of that goal is actually started I? Think the exciting thing about this type of research is for everyone questioned that you pursue you have. You have ten new that you can pursue. We haven't. Delved into that specific area, but it's It's very ripe for further analysis and A considerable part of where I end my colleagues and our time as. We do this type of work to get an initial analysis published. And then You know in my leadership role I just WANNA. support people like my colleagues on this paper Mark Connelly Jennifer Bickel. in in using data to. Support their research into identify those follow. I mean, he tests policy implications. So it's sweet important work. and. If you find it direct relationship here than you have to ask you know from from a medical perspective what is right intervention? maybe is not just added of care just best practice but clearly should be the bay You know things should be looked at you say you're American Academy of Neurology has included avoidance of using opioid to treat gain one of stop top flight choosing wisely recommendations. For high-value duck in this gives Really evidence to to support that. The other thing that's really intriguing is this level of variation from site to site in. Some Sun facilities are very much aligned with the guidelines. Others are at the you know well, above twenty three percent. And that gives an opportunity for a really precision. conversations about you know, where does our organization stand on that spectrum? Yeah that's a that's an interesting avenue to right. So you know one could ask he says some sort of push sliced Intervention if we can fly goal of patients who who had gone an opioid sexually don't have an addiction problem. that as you know Anna, the kofoed does. if you can fly those type of patterns than you can think about. A customized within electronic health record systems. There's. The ability to provide decisions poor. There's certainly phenomena called pop up fatigue were physicians. You know they don't like having so many pop up windows but at the same time. It's Within the capability of an e e Hr to do that if then logic if patient has. migraine medication order equals opioid. encourage the provider to pause and reconsider that. Right, right and so this is supervised machine learning type analysis where so you have. you have number features that comes directly from each else. So each sex race ethnicity. insurance type. Encounter prostate suggest duration. time of the year and so on. and you have labeled data in this case I guess you have able tater because you would know if op- inscribed on trade. Okay and so are the two questions here. One is to ask the question given a new patient and those features. you could assign a probability that that patient will be prescribed will. Definitely. Impress the data from that predictive Minds. Right and then can you so that data definitely tell you if the patient is going to progress into some sort of an addiction issue. So. Earn Predicting Substance Abuse. So. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. There's additional diagnosis codes that document. whether a patient has a history of substance abuse disorder. and. So it would be feasible to. Identify the with those diagnosis codes in than really look at their prior history. Of What other conditions were they treated for? What medications were they give in? to develop that model. One of the things in this case that helped with this study is that just in general, it's not advised get. So there are other things that are much more of a gray area. Or whether opioid is as useful, but in this case. The really not. Considered. To be helpful for migraines compared to other options and so that help us have a fairly clear cut scenario to do this work. Yeah. This this won't be the data like you say once you do something like this, you have been other things you could. You could stop asking. So unquestioned that that been to my mind as you know, how did they hugged the actually prescribing opioids? Is it the patient asking for it all so? Off that was another scoping thing with this project is focused on what happens within the emergency. Room. So it's it's. Really, medication order in administration that happens. In that emergency room setting. Whether or not the patient. was. Requesting that you know if they came in and said, this has worked for me before. Can I have it again? we don't have visibility to that. Right. Right. And so from a practical perspective So the the analysis that you did slightly ended up with the Family Clyde power we think it is. Compelling. Pretty compelling. So as as a new patient gets into e D either high. and what I mean by that probably is if there is a history of substance abuse property. the physician has really think twice about. The use of may be the well, and in this case, even without that history. Just because it's not considered to be an effective treatment. You know encouraging them to pause in that decision making. In this particular case is as effective as wall. Right. So looking forward. In if you think about both of these issues, one is the data quality data aggregation data standardized recent problem in the the right of Utah Systems have did that the talked about? And then if we can get to a level that we can look at cross a large data set. Beacon, ask. More. US specific questions, treatment. Optimum treatment type questions. subpoenaed. US The mark big think B be hunting. Certainly, the volume and variety of data that we're able to work with will be even greater I, think the. Opportunity To. Look, holistically at how upstream data capture. Effects Downstream data. Analysis. example I frequently give is if we have a Aggregate Data said we identify. Ten patients whose way in that data such shows up as being. Something that's completely infeasible. let's say they're documented is being. Fifty year old person who weighs two pounds. Clearly air. What's important is? Creating the process to communicate that back upstream. Because that clinical decision. Support. Many drug dosing things are evaluated using weight based logic and so. That same logic that's Evaluating the appropriateness of dosage. It's going to be running against an incorrect value in that may or may not always be visible. So I really am intrigued with that holistic opportunity. In it I am I remain just we have three or four additional papers coming out. About other examples where Provider behaviors not aligned with Best Practices and I'm just excited about you know when you compare that to how long it takes to develop a new drug or how long it takes to. To a really long term research. This research has the opportunity for a pretty quick turnaround on an effective intervention. A really that. Other so much that right. Providers. been taught in a no, but they're. Not always using that in practice and so to help them. Identify, those topics in just modifying behaviors is. In the scheme of things, it's a very straightforward way to improve. So. You know the entire spectrum from essentially getting the data. Right or cleaner like you know Missa mischaracterized or miss input data like wait or something like that. To to get. Better diagnosis better treatment modalities. policies there and from a femme perspective clearly inflammation therefore clinical trials. I was even thinking about drug interaction type. Inflammation. I haven't been involved in the former de for awhile but. Typically, this type of data doesn't get back into automatic processes that fast but I think that is all I know there's strong interest in Pharma in. Working with this type of data there a again looking at real world behavior. This is an excellent resource for off label medication use at. you know where Pharma's Always interested in repurposing existing medications the. Regulatory Processes, much more straightforward for that because the safety is already been. Evaluated and so. The. Significant Opportunity With this, there's also just exciting. Patterns of you know. What are those unrecognised correlations? That's where the machine learning opportunities are really exciting where. You know we're not always asking the right question. And the data can show us what we should be. Yeah exactly. So if the machine a sort of red flags something or create hypotheses. that Cubans have missed sometimes, those types of things are extremely powerful. because maybe that sometimes it's countering tutor. and so we all look at data with an Incan bias. The beauty of machines that at least on the surface began deploy Michigan. This volume of data. Techniques like machine deep learning can recognize those subtle but consistent associations. Wait quite. Excellent. Idea this has been great mark Thanks so much time with me. I enjoyed it very much. Thank you. But

Gill Eappen Mike Yesterday Dr Mark Hoffman Children's Mussa Hospital Turner Electronic Certner Migraine Inflammation Federated Networks Stan Day Squatty Michio Kato University Of Minnesota Makita GIL Federated Kansas City
Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

Scientific Sense

44:57 min | 3 months ago

Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new Ideas Affect Society? And, help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense. Dot? Net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense dot com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen Dot Info. Mike yesterday's Dr Mark Hoffman, who is a research associate professor in the University of Minnesota Against City. He is also chief research inflammation officer in the children's Mussa hospital in Kansas City. Kiss research interests include health data delayed indication sharing initialisation Boca Mark. Thank you for inviting me. Absolutely. So I start with one of your papers Kato you need the use by our system implementation in defy date data resource from hundred known athlete off my seasons. So Michio inflicted. Data aggregated for marketable sources provide an important resource for my medical research including digital feel typing. On. Like. Todd beat to from a single organization. Guitar data introduces a number of analysis challengers. So. So you've worked with some augmentation log and in almost all cases be used. Data coming from that single macy's listen primary care behavioral. Or specialty hospitals and I always wondered you know wouldn't be nice. Get a data set. That sort of abrogates data from the radio on-ice. Asians but a lot of different challenges around that. So you wanted to talk a bit about that. I'd be happy to the resource that we've worked with. Is primarily a called health fax data resource. It's been in operation for almost twenty years. And the the the model is that organizations who are. Using these Turner Electronic. Health. Record. Enter into an agreement was turner they agreed to provide data rights to sern are. The identifies the date of affords aggregated into this resource. And certner provides data mapping, which is really critical to this type of work. It also the aggregate the data. And for the past probably six years. Then, they provide the full data set to especially academic contributors who want to do research with that resource. And I've been on both sides of that equation Lead that group during my career there, and then now I have the opportunity to really focus research on that type of data. So before we get into the details smog so e Itar Systems. So this is. Essentially patient records. So he gets dated like demographics out family history, surgical history hats, medications, lab solves it could have physician nodes no snow. So it's it's a combination of a variety of different types of data, right? A couple of things on the examples you gave it includes demographics. Discreet Laboratory results Medication orders. Many vitals so If access the blood pressure and pulse data. It does not include text notes because those can't be. Automatically identified consistently. So. We don't have access currently to TEX notes. Out of an abundance of caution. That his Hobby Stephen, physician writes something down they could use names they could use inflammation that could then point back to their. Patients Makita Perspective been the data's aggregated, the primary issue shoe that date has completely the identified, right? Correct. So. So yeah. So the data that we receive there's eighteen identifiers. Hip requires be removed from data. And those include obvious things like name address email addresses are another example One of the. Things. That is also part of the benefit of working with this particular resource. The. Dates of clinical service are not allowed to be provided under hip. White is done with this resource that allows us to still have a longitudinal view is. For any given patient in the data set the dates are shifted by A. Consistent. Pattern that for any given patient it can be. One two three four five weeks forward or one, two, three, four or five weeks backward. But that preserves things like day of the week effect. So for example, you see -nificant increase in emergency department encounters over weekends and you don't WanNa lose. Visibility to that. but it also allows us to receive. Very, granular early time stamped events in so. We can gain visibility into the time that a blood specimen was collected, and then the time that the result was reported back. And so we're able to do very detailed analyses with this type of resource. Right right and I don't know the audience our market is fragmented. Tau himself e Amorebieta providers out there. and so two issues. One is sort of. Standardization as to how these databases are designed and structured and others even that standardization that the actual collection of the data. In itself is not standardized played. So vk CAV vk potentially lot inability coming from different systems. Correct and that's part of what the paper that you mentioned Evaluates so. Often, night you out in the field in conferences you hear. Comparisons kind of lumping all organizations using one. Vendor lumping all using another together but as you get closer to it, you quickly learn that. It's not even clear. It's within those. Vendor markets. There's variation from organization to organization in how they use the e Hr and so. Because the identities of the. Contributing organizations are blinded to those of us who work with the data. We have to be creative about how we. Infer those implementation details, and so with this paper, we describe a couple of methods that We think move things forward towards that goal. Yes. So I'm not really familiar with that. So you mentioned a couple of things here. One is the the merge network. So this initiative including electric medical records and genomics network and pc off net the national patient, centered clinical research network support. Decentralized analyses that goes disparate systems by distributing standardized quotas to site. So this is a situation where you have multiple systems sort of. Communicating with each other and this net folks at allowing to sort of quickly them In some standardized fashion. So In this type of technology, there's janitorial core models. One is the. Federated or distributed model, the other is a centralized data aggregation. So there are examples including those that are mentioned in the paper where. Queries are pushed to the organization and. They need to do significant work upfront to ensure that there are standardizing their terminologies the same way. And once they do that upfront work than they're able to perform the types of queries that are distributed through those. Federated Networks. With. Okay. So that just one click on so that the police have standardized. So all on the at Josh site, then they have like some sort of a plan slater from from Stan Day squatty do all the data structure. And in many cases, they work through an intermediate technology. that would be. In general, consider it like a data warehouse. And so the queries are running against the production electric. Health record. That has all kinds of implications on patient care where you don't want to slow down performance. By using these intermediaries They can receive queries and then Follow that mapping has occurred. Than, they're able to to run those distributed queries. Okay. And the other model is You know. You say the g through the medical quality, improvement consortium and sooner to the health facts initiative. So this says in Sodas case, for example, in swags. This is essentially picking up data from the right deals, clients and Dan standardizing and centralizing data in a single database is that that is correct. One benefit of that model is that Organizations who for example, may not be academic and don't have the. Resources to do that data mapping themselves by handing out over that task over to the vendor you get a broader diversity of the types of organizations so you can have. A safety net hospitals you can have. Critical access rural hospitals, and other venues of care that are probably under represented in some of those. More academically driven models. And clearly the focus on healthcare about I would imagine applications in pharmaceutical out indeed to right I. Don't know if it s use and bad direction there has been some were performed with these data resources to. Characterize different aspects of medications, and so it does have utility in value. In a variety of. Analytical contexts. I was thinking about you know a lot of randomized clinical trials going on into Kuwait context and One of the issues of dispatch seem development toils that are going on that one could argue the population there are not really well to percents. it may be number by Auditees, men, people that deputy existing conditions. and. So he will serve at my come out of facedly trial. granted might work for the population. Tried it minority have sufficient? more largely. So I wanted this type of well I guess we don't really have an ID there right. So clearly, you don't know who these people are but they could be some clustering type analysis that might be interesting weight from It's very useful for Health Services Research and for outcomes research for you know what I characterize digital phenotype being. they can then guide. More, more formal research. you know you can use this type of resource to. Make sure. You're asking a useful question and make sure that there's likely to be. Enough patients who qualify for given study. Maybe you're working on a clinical trial in your casting your net to narrow you can. Determine that with this type of data resource. And is the eight tiff date who has access to it typically. So for this data resource on, it's through the vendor so. You need to have some level of footprint with them. which is the case with our organization. They're definitely a broadening their strategies. So they're. Gaining access into health systems that aren't exclusively using their electronic health records so. It's exciting to be a part of that that process. and to again work with them to. Analyze the data. I think. To the example you gave a formal randomized trials. In key part of what were growing our research to focus on is because this is real world data. You learn what's happening in practice whether or not it's well aligned with guidelines or formal protocols. And doing that there's many opportunities for near-term interventions that can improve health outcomes simply by. Identifying where providers may be deviating more from. Best Practices in than taking steps through training and education to kind of get them back towards those best practices. This data is a fresh on a daily basis. It's not. It's because it's so large and bulky? Typically we've received it on a quarterly basis in since it's retrospective analysis that's not been a major barrier. But. mechanistically, on onto soon aside is data getting sort of picked up from this system that it's harvested every day and then it's aggregated bundled and distributed on A. On a different timescale. Okay okay. So. From again, going to the, it's our system designed issue and implementation You say many HR systems comprised of more news at specific clinical processes or unit such as Pharmacy Laboratory or surgery talked about that. But then then people implement them this of fashion right they they implement modules by that can be a factor or sometimes they may want. One vendor for their primary electronic health record, but another vendor for their laboratory system. and so that's where you don't see a hundred percent usage of every module and every organization. And detailed number of different you know sort of noise creating issues in data one. This is icy speech over from ICT denied ten. and I don't know history of this but this was supposed to be speech with sometime in twenty fifteen. That's correct. So there is A. You know. There's a date in October of Twenty fifteen where most organizations were expected to have completed that transition. When I see with researchers who aren't as familiar with the you know the whole policy landscape around `electronic health records that? you can imagine researchers who assumed that all data before that date in October is is nine and all data after that date would be icy the ten. While we demonstrate in this paper, is that that transition was not Nearly, that clean and it was a much more, you know there are some organizations who just It the bullet and completed in twenty fourteen, and there are other organizations that were still lagging. In. Two Thousand Sixteen. Potentially because they weren't as exposed to those incentives in other things that you know stipulated the transition so. Part of why were demonstrating with that particular part of that work was that. you know these transitions aren't always abrupt. Yeah and and and so that is one issue and then you know a lot of consistency inconsistency issues fade. So we see that in in single systems and one of the items note here as you know if you think about the disposition code for death. you could have a right your race supercenter, right? It's a death expire expedite at home hospice, and so on. if this is a problem for a single system, but then many think about aggregating data from multiple sources this this problem sort of increased exponentially. Absolutely. So one of the challenges with documenting and and finding where you know if a patient has A deceased that. There's just multiple places to put that documentation in the clinical record. The Location in the record that. We have found to be the most consistent is what's called discharge disposition. By as we show in that analysis, that field is not always used document that and so if you're doing outcomes research and one of your key. Outcome metrics is death. And there are organizations that. Aren't documenting death in a place that successful. You should filter those out of your analysis before moving forward. And so part of what we wanted to promote is the realization that. That's the type of consideration that needs to be made The four. Publishing. Your data about an outcome metrics like death that. You're not. If you're never gonNA see that outcome it doesn't mean that people are. Dying in that particular facility, it just means it's not documented in the place that successful. Right. Yeah. So you know you on your expedience. Unique Position Mark because you you look at it from the from the vendor's perspective you're in an academic setting you're also in practice in a hospital. What's your sense of these things improving the on a track of getting getting this more standardize or it's camping in the other direction I think in general there is improvement I think The. Over the past eleven years through various federal mandates, including meaningful use and so forth. Those of all incentive organizations to utilize. Standard terminologies more consistently than was the case beforehand. I think there's still plenty of room for improvement and You know it's it's a journey, not a destination, but I think things have improved substantially. I was wondering there could be some applications of artificial intelligence here to In a clearly TATECO systems and you'd like the most them pity human resource intensive Yvonne to get it completely right. So one question would be you know, could be actually used a Dick needs to get it maybe ninety nine percent white. And that the human deal with exceptions I definitely think that that's an exciting direction that You want those a algorithms to be trained with good data, and that's a big part of what's motivated us to. Put this focus on data quality and Understanding these strange nuances that are underpinning that date has so that. As we move towards a in machine learning and so forth. We have a high level of confidence in the data that's training those algorithms. Right. Yeah. I think that a huge opportunity here because it's not quite as broad as NFL, not natural language processing it is somewhat constrained. that is a good part of it. The back part of it is that is highly technical. and so. you know some of the techniques you know you can have a fault tolerance in certain dimensions such as you know, misspellings lack of gambling and things like that. But as you have Heidi technical data, you cannot apply those principles because he could have misspelling the system may not be able to. Get, sometimes, and that's where you know I think. It's totally feasible to use. Resources to you know when you're dealing with. Tens of millions of patients and billions of detailed records. Using a I'd even identify those patterns of either. Inconsistent data or missing data it's also very powerful just to. kind of flag in identified. Areas that need to be focused on to lead to a better analysis. Greg Wait Be Hefty. Use that information somehow did is a belt of information that you know and so it just filtering into decision processes that the are really losing it. So hopefully getting improving in that dimension I've jumping to another paper bittersweet interesting. So it's entitled rates and predictors of using opioids in the Emergency Department Katrina Treat Mike Dean in Young Otto's and so so this is sort of a machine learning exercise you have gone through to locate you know coup is getting prescribed. OPIOIDS water the conditions for the Democrat not Nestle demographics but different different maybe age and things like that gender. and and then ask the question desert has some effect on addiction. In the long term rights. So that project To great example of team science though. We. Assembled a team of subject matter experts in neurology pain management. And Data Science and. The neurologist and pain management experts. Identified an intriguing question that we decided to pursue with data. In their question was. Based on anecdotal observation and so we thought it'd be interesting to see how well the data supported that. Observation is that. for youth and young adults Treated or admitted into the emergency. Department. With a migraine headache that. All too often they were treated with an opioid. And so we Use the same day to resource that we were discussing earlier. To explore that. Question. And using data from a hundred and eighty distinct emergency departments. We found that on average twenty, three percent of those youth and young adults were treated with. An opioid medication while they were in the emergency department. In general, it should be almost zero percent in general. There's really Better medications to us, four people presenting with a migraine. and. So this fits into obviously the OPIOID crisis it. it demonstrates the. Scenario describing that. You know using real world data. You can identify patterns of clinical behavior that. Don't match guideline. And the good news is that the? correctable and so through. Training and communication there's great opportunity to. To, manage this. Really. Striking. So fifteen thousand or so inevitably the encounters. And nearly a quarter of this encounters you say involved inoculate. and these are not just Misha and Congress right. It is not filtered down to migraine encounters. Okay. Okay. So these fifteen thousand just might in encounters might vein being repeating disease So once you. If you make a statement and. This or not Easter conditioning issue here. So you get your pain, you go to an emergency department and you get treated with an opioid you get quick tactical relief. From pain. auditing condition expect that in the next episode. So you can say we didn't pursue that particular question, but that is Definitely key part of. Managing the OPIOID crisis is that drug seeking behavior and so Part of our goal was to quantify that and use this as an opportunity to educate providers that. You really shouldn't be treating migraines with an opioid in there are better alternatives and. So we we felt that this was an important contribution to that national dialogue, but we didn't specifically pursue the question of whether the patients we analyzed. Within. Encounter show up Subsequently. With the same symptoms. Right right. Yeah you it develop into period when problematic patterns of drug use comedy. FEST MERGE THE PREVALENCE RATE OF OPIOID misuse estimated to be two to four percent and debts in each goofy just young adult drew from overdoses are rising. and. You say that literally prescribe IOS has been slumping loose future opioid misuse by thirty three percent. Betas Mehta say really huge number. I think just validates the importance of this of this work. Interesting mark. I don't know you exploded on data. Last the question if you look at the aggregate data, it'd be flying opioid. Misuse. what percentage of the total number. Actually started from. You know some sort of medical encounter has mike or some sort of. related encounter that could be completed otherwise was three a bit opioid. in that encounter documented resulted in that misuse. So what so If you look at the active misuse problem that we have today. do you have a sense of what percentage of that goal is actually started I? Think the exciting thing about this type of research is for everyone questioned that you pursue you have. You have ten new that you can pursue. We haven't. Delved into that specific area, but it's It's very ripe for further analysis and A considerable part of where I end my colleagues and our time as. We do this type of work to get an initial analysis published. And then You know in my leadership role I just WANNA. support people like my colleagues on this paper Mark Connelly Jennifer Bickel. in in using data to. Support their research into identify those follow. I mean, he tests policy implications. So it's sweet important work. and. If you find it direct relationship here than you have to ask you know from from a medical perspective what is right intervention? maybe is not just added of care just best practice but clearly should be the bay You know things should be looked at you say you're American Academy of Neurology has included avoidance of using opioid to treat gain one of stop top flight choosing wisely recommendations. For high-value duck in this gives Really evidence to to support that. The other thing that's really intriguing is this level of variation from site to site in. Some Sun facilities are very much aligned with the guidelines. Others are at the you know well, above twenty three percent. And that gives an opportunity for a really precision. conversations about you know, where does our organization stand on that spectrum? Yeah that's a that's an interesting avenue to right. So you know one could ask he says some sort of push sliced Intervention if we can fly goal of patients who who had gone an opioid sexually don't have an addiction problem. that as you know Anna, the kofoed does. if you can fly those type of patterns than you can think about. A customized within electronic health record systems. There's. The ability to provide decisions poor. There's certainly phenomena called pop up fatigue were physicians. You know they don't like having so many pop up windows but at the same time. It's Within the capability of an e e Hr to do that if then logic if patient has. migraine medication order equals opioid. encourage the provider to pause and reconsider that. Right, right and so this is supervised machine learning type analysis where so you have. you have number features that comes directly from each else. So each sex race ethnicity. insurance type. Encounter prostate suggest duration. time of the year and so on. and you have labeled data in this case I guess you have able tater because you would know if op- inscribed on trade. Okay and so are the two questions here. One is to ask the question given a new patient and those features. you could assign a probability that that patient will be prescribed will. Definitely. Impress the data from that predictive Minds. Right and then can you so that data definitely tell you if the patient is going to progress into some sort of an addiction issue. So. Earn Predicting Substance Abuse. So. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. There's additional diagnosis codes that document. whether a patient has a history of substance abuse disorder. and. So it would be feasible to. Identify the with those diagnosis codes in than really look at their prior history. Of What other conditions were they treated for? What medications were they give in? to develop that model. One of the things in this case that helped with this study is that just in general, it's not advised get. So there are other things that are much more of a gray area. Or whether opioid is as useful, but in this case. The really not. Considered. To be helpful for migraines compared to other options and so that help us have a fairly clear cut scenario to do this work. Yeah. This this won't be the data like you say once you do something like this, you have been other things you could. You could stop asking. So unquestioned that that been to my mind as you know, how did they hugged the actually prescribing opioids? Is it the patient asking for it all so? Off that was another scoping thing with this project is focused on what happens within the emergency. Room. So it's it's. Really, medication order in administration that happens. In that emergency room setting. Whether or not the patient. was. Requesting that you know if they came in and said, this has worked for me before. Can I have it again? we don't have visibility to that. Right. Right. And so from a practical perspective So the the analysis that you did slightly ended up with the Family Clyde power we think it is. Compelling. Pretty compelling. So as as a new patient gets into e D either high. and what I mean by that probably is if there is a history of substance abuse property. the physician has really think twice about. The use of may be the well, and in this case, even without that history. Just because it's not considered to be an effective treatment. You know encouraging them to pause in that decision making. In this particular case is as effective as wall. Right. So looking forward. In if you think about both of these issues, one is the data quality data aggregation data standardized recent problem in the the right of Utah Systems have did that the talked about? And then if we can get to a level that we can look at cross a large data set. Beacon, ask. More. US specific questions, treatment. Optimum treatment type questions. subpoenaed. US The mark big think B be hunting. Certainly, the volume and variety of data that we're able to work with will be even greater I, think the. Opportunity To. Look, holistically at how upstream data capture. Effects Downstream data. Analysis. example I frequently give is if we have a Aggregate Data said we identify. Ten patients whose way in that data such shows up as being. Something that's completely infeasible. let's say they're documented is being. Fifty year old person who weighs two pounds. Clearly air. What's important is? Creating the process to communicate that back upstream. Because that clinical decision. Support. Many drug dosing things are evaluated using weight based logic and so. That same logic that's Evaluating the appropriateness of dosage. It's going to be running against an incorrect value in that may or may not always be visible. So I really am intrigued with that holistic opportunity. In it I am I remain just we have three or four additional papers coming out. About other examples where Provider behaviors not aligned with Best Practices and I'm just excited about you know when you compare that to how long it takes to develop a new drug or how long it takes to. To a really long term research. This research has the opportunity for a pretty quick turnaround on an effective intervention. A really that. Other so much that right. Providers. been taught in a no, but they're. Not always using that in practice and so to help them. Identify, those topics in just modifying behaviors is. In the scheme of things, it's a very straightforward way to improve. So. You know the entire spectrum from essentially getting the data. Right or cleaner like you know Missa mischaracterized or miss input data like wait or something like that. To to get. Better diagnosis better treatment modalities. policies there and from a femme perspective clearly inflammation therefore clinical trials. I was even thinking about drug interaction type. Inflammation. I haven't been involved in the former de for awhile but. Typically, this type of data doesn't get back into automatic processes that fast but I think that is all I know there's strong interest in Pharma in. Working with this type of data there a again looking at real world behavior. This is an excellent resource for off label medication use at. you know where Pharma's Always interested in repurposing existing medications the. Regulatory Processes, much more straightforward for that because the safety is already been. Evaluated and so. The. Significant Opportunity With this, there's also just exciting. Patterns of you know. What are those unrecognised correlations? That's where the machine learning opportunities are really exciting where. You know we're not always asking the right question. And the data can show us what we should be. Yeah exactly. So if the machine a sort of red flags something or create hypotheses. that Cubans have missed sometimes, those types of things are extremely powerful. because maybe that sometimes it's countering tutor. and so we all look at data with an Incan bias. The beauty of machines that at least on the surface began deploy Michigan. This volume of data. Techniques like machine deep learning can recognize those subtle but consistent associations. Wait quite. Excellent. Idea this has been great mark Thanks so much time with me. I enjoyed it very much. Thank you. But

Gill Eappen Mike Yesterday Dr Mark Hoffman Children's Mussa Hospital Turner Electronic Certner Migraine Inflammation Federated Networks Stan Day Squatty Michio Kato University Of Minnesota Makita GIL Federated Kansas City
A tale of two direct listings

Equity

11:11 min | 4 months ago

A tale of two direct listings

"Hello, and welcome to equity shot are quick hit on breaking news I'm Natasha Mascarenas and today joining me to talk about a tale of not one. But two direct listings on the same Damn Day is Danny Creighton. How are you Danny doing? All right this is exciting. You know we went from a world of no direct listings to an occasional direct listening to multiple direct listings in the same day. So it's an exciting exciting morning. We can finally stop breaking up spotify in slack whenever we say the L word and reinvention Asana, and pollen tear, which are the two news heads we got today it's zoo of curiosities. But lots of great stuff to talk about where where do you WanNa start you WANNA. Start with Asana or palate here. What's more interesting to you I think I have to start with pollen tear and my big question is you've been tracking it through every. You know crazy filing, your high level thought was this a successful debut on the Stock Market for? Today I think it's a definitely a success. You know the stock from January two, thousand, nineteen onwards trading at around five to five, fifty, a share, and then in the last two or three months that price jumped to about nine dollars and sixteen cents as of September first, and so you know when when the reference price came out yesterday from the New York Stock. Exchange which was quoted at seven dollars and twenty five cents. A lot of people were like, wow, that's like a significant drop from nine sixteen like what happened particularly also last week we had the Wall Street Journal reporting they were looking for a ten dollar referenced price. You know none of those numbers were really good but look it's trading. Now it's live as we're. Doing the show, it's ten dollars and sixty one cents a share I'm. So it's better than all the numbers we heard before and it's up fifty percent on day one. So so part of me feels like this reference value was actually chosen precisely to give it a pop on day one you know if they were targeting ten bucks on Day One, this is sort of what they got and so a little bit of a lower reference price might have given them a little bit more of A. Psychological boost on on day one. So I, I think overall to success. Do you. Can you talk me a little bit about how we're trying to value the company right now I feel like I'm seeing a bunch of different numbers out there. Do we have an understanding of its fully diluted market value? We do there's still a little bit abate mostly because Peletier gives multiple numbers for the number of care. So it gives us one point six, billion shares outstanding two point one fully diluted two point one billion fully diluted than two point five billion fully fully fully diluted and so. I would say that its current share price, we would call it around twenty, four, billion in evaluation, which is an uptick from its its last rounds. Again at you know for a seventeen year old company to have the sort of strong debut on Wall Street I think it's pretty good. All things considered. Okay. Cool. I'll put a pin in Pailin tear, but I do want to talk about their lock-up period later, run me through Asana numbers I. saw it opened at a five point two billion value. Yes it's on a similar story. So yesterday, The New York Stock Exchange released a reference value of twenty one bucks per share. It zoomed straight out onto the public market. So it debuted, it's currently sitting at twenty eight dollars a share up thirty three percent on day one so far it's up to about I. Think it peaked at five point, two billion, and as of now is more like three point five, three point seven, five, billion market CAP. But again, that's actually significantly higher than his last valuation, which was an inlet late twenty, eighteen around one and A. Half billion dollars so either oke across the board I think both of these issues you know there's always a lot of risk drake listings. As you pointed out Natasha there haven't been that many is this sort of a novel mechanism. They're still a little bit unclear and exactly how they work, and so it's great to see again similar to slack spotify you know these are two enterprise. Companies to again totally different from the more consumer is random companies particularly spotify, which has tens of millions of consumers who might be retail investors buying into the stock. Most people haven't used the Sauna and certainly must people haven't used Pailin tear and so to see the kind of strength on the markets and the first day is is enticing for other companies considering the direct listing model. Right There I feel like pollen tears total customer base was what one? Hundred Fifty, company, hundred, twenty-five customers. That's a lot of customers Doing Gospel distanced. Something it's probably my favorite statistic about the company and I think I saw Dan Prime tweeting the other day that you know it's no longer going to be a secret of company. So we can stop calling it as such. This is the end of that right that confrontation about pollen tear for. So long we've been having well I, I will say. This about an hour ago. So may not be true today. A ASANA has an investor relations page like a standard like every company who publicly trades Peletier does not like it actually does not have as as of an hour ago that I looked up I could not find an investor relations page for here, which which tells you everything you need to know about the company I, feel like that is like in a beautiful one sentence or describes his relationship with investors, but but I think you're absolutely right you. Know despite the fact that only one, hundred, twenty, five customers despite the fact that took seventeen years three hundred grew it's growing from seven hundred, forty, three, million in revenue last year in fiscal year twenty, nineteen, it gave a revenue projection for twenty twenty about one point, five, billion to it's a growth company. It's SAS more and more SAS today than it was in the past where it was more services driven. So again, it's a positive story despite all the kerfuffle around its governance the last couple weeks do you Do you feel like the direct listing method might now take on more popularity. I. Mean. Maybe in some way, but can we even is? Is it enough of a success? You'd think that other companies might follow suit now that it's not just spotify that that did this. I think the more the merrier right I think Palentinian particular raised capital round back in. July right which was sort of what I was told from some insiders essentially the IPO that was the IPO and then direct listings just the actual market exchange. So I think we're GONNA see more companies taking this approach of bifurcating the capital, raise the float that you would normally do a IPO and just the actual just GonNa Start. Trading today and you know I think that that allows you more time to create the right narrative the right story of and also separates what is a a pretty intense kind of crisis driven process the road show getting the company ready the SEC filings separating out at out you don't put all your eggs in one basket. You can do it in stages and I think more and more companies undertake that approach going forward. My question to is and I'm sure our listeners are curious is with all direct listings. There's no shares offered by the company when the when it debuts and so when we see these prices I, guess how much of them are they vanity metrics much of their HABITA- goals, how important are they for us to care about and think about? I wanted to be precise. So there are no new shares offered by the company. So there's no dilutive in an IPO generally have fifteen, maybe twenty percent new shares offered to the public. There are no new shares but many of the insiders have to pay taxes capital gains they actually do have to sell shares. So you know so far this morning already thirty five, million shares of have already been traded and We have on Pailin tear thirty, two, hundred, and thirty million. Shares sold today, right? So already, there's a market, there's clearly tens of millions of shares being sold. So these prices are real or Israel as any other IPO in which people are you know figuring out what's going to happen? You know the next checkpoint for both of these companies is gonNA come in a couple of weeks when they report their next quarterly earnings and I think by then you'll start to see the analysts get comfortable the companies understand the next steps and what's happening after. And you're speaking with Dustin Moskovitz later today the founder of Asana. So any questions on that? You can kind of tease out right now. Well, I was told. The pure folks. About our stock imagery because apparently no longer has sideburns to. Join, the Line of people that complain but it's like you know there's the old line about taking a haircut. Up Thirty, five percents of they actually gained hair on the market today speak. Clearly. sideburns maybe somewhere else. But? No I. THINK WE'RE GONNA be really interested because some unique company in which its founders, Dustin Moskovitz who Justin Rosenstein, who both met each other at facebook actually majority of the company outright right. We just never see or very rarely see tech companies where the founding to CEO's and and COO own like outright majority like not just a majority of the voting because of class, a class B shares but they just outright own about thirty two percent of the company I believe doesn't owns thirty six. Percent of the company outright and just knowns around sixteen point, one percent and so to me like I'm just curious because it's just a different path for a company it was a slower growth company capital much more efficiently grew much more methodically and the founders sort of maintained ownership over time in a way that most other founders do not think the other. The other thing to put out here is Asana has no lockup though the similar to spotify Ed to black as listing all the shares are available for trade to anyone. Who any insider anyone who owns a share of on this morning can put it on the market and sell it Here is the complete opposite pallares pioneering this new kind of fusion of the IPO and the direct listing one would argue maybe the worst of both of those processes but actually a direct listing with a lockup and so only roughly twenty eight to twenty nine percent of pollen. Tear shares are even available for sale at all with the rest in lockup and market standoff agreements that will expire over. The next calendar year. So you know there's a lot more to wait on right. There's not as much liquidity with Pallares could actually harm the stock price. They might be a little bit inflated right now because there's limited number of shares available for trade, we'll have to watch and see but again, it'll be interesting to see if other companies start to do a directing the lockup because clearly Palin tear has not suffered tremendously using this model. So again, another tool in the tool chest and uber do something similar with lock-up period. mean. They did like all IPO's. Underwriter from a bank, they have lockups in place mostly to make sure that there's not a mass rush to the exit. They don't want hundreds of millions of shares at any price willing to be sold. They WANNA, kinda manager coming out because they're putting oftentimes their own money up through the green shoe at stake, and so again, that's what made direct listings unique is that there wasn't this lockup employees are free to do on day one through whatever they don't have to wait six months as is customary. So again, we'll see kind of where the the system lies in the future. As you know, the New York Stock Exchange also got approval to do a direct. Listening with a capital fundraise so we've gone from this world of like there's an IPO and that's the only way to go public to. You can do a direct listing, a direct listening with a lockup, a direct listening without lockup address listening lock-up in a capital fundraise like you can do anything you want. You know it's it's the it's the Netflix of going public. So to speak I, see the headline now airbnb goes public through a through a pollen tear style direct listing. It's just going to happen and it's going to be horrible but we will be back here to talk about it as always every shareholder gets a free party house for one night so. That'll be the new innovation going on there, but but that's a sonnet that is Pelham Tear Ford they an and we'll have more to come in the next week.

Spotify Natasha Mascarenas Pailin Dustin Moskovitz Danny Creighton Founder New York Stock Wall Street Journal Airbnb Peletier SEC Dan Prime New York
Residential building giant posts surprising 3rd-quarter profits

MarketFoolery

02:34 min | 4 months ago

Residential building giant posts surprising 3rd-quarter profits

"Going to start today with homebuilding Lenore corpse third quarter profits came in solidly higher than Wall Street was expecting I know shares are down a little bit but. I don't know Jason I mean Lavar gross margins are improving and the low interest rate environment certainly helps. Yeah it's absolutely helping and I mean we we've certainly seen signs that the housing market is not not only stable but really flourishing, which is kind of interesting to try to square in this in this. Time but but hey, that's that's housing right? It's it's one of those things that everybody needs. These results I was really impressed earnings were up thirty three percent on relatively flat revenue I. Mean Anytime you have a company that can do that I mean you got at least take note and try to figure out what they're doing to see if they can't. Keep on doing it. If you look at the numbers that deliveries of thirteen thousand, eight, hundred, forty tunes that was up just two percent they new orders. Of a little bit better than fifteen, thousand, five, hundred homes that was up sixteen percent. Dollar value of six point, three, billion dollars was up twenty percent and also a strong backlog backlog dollar value of close to eight billion dollars up four percent, and so all in all, what we're seeing what management noted is that the fundamentals in the housing market are very strong in that supported, of course, by record low interest rates. As, well, as a relatively undersupply, relatively continued undersupply of new and existing homes. You know anecdotally I will say like we're in the middle of refinancing our home here and you know what comes with refinancing a home as you get the appraisal to make sure that the value the home is, is there so that the bank and can? Crunch the numbers correctly in in certainly if it seems like valuations in our area are continuing to go up and I would imagine. They're seeing seeing that in a lot of places and then it'll be really interesting to see here as. The pandemic continues as companies start to reassess how they. are handling their workforce I. Mean If more folks start fleeing big cities for suburbia that absolutely has the potential to continue pushing up the demand for for these homes, which ultimately pushes up the prices put pushes up the. Performance for companies like Lenore, in being the largest home builder out there by revenue I mean certainly this another quarter of excellent.

Lenore Jason
"thirty three percent" Discussed on Social Pros Podcast

Social Pros Podcast

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"thirty three percent" Discussed on Social Pros Podcast

"To twitter had increased by thirty three percent year over year but our engagement had dropped by that same percentage we had eroded our reach down two point zero zero one organically because we had just been loading the channels else with content from every part of the business at any given moment on any given day <hes> to do free marketing right. Hey Hey we already got this content. From this digital ad were post. Were sharing this month. Let's hosted and by the way let's also post not only twitter facebook and leaked in an instagram while we're at it and boy will just increase our reach exponentially so we have finally reached that point thanks to a lot of rate work by our divisions who are mark managers had known where this needed to go but this was really about helping leadership ship and the enterprise and corporate teams understand just how much more effective they could be with some paid. Hey targeting <hes> and how helpful it could be if we could start using those channels organically to build that brand rapport and what they're trained to do on the back end more more is less is sort of the situation that we found ourselves in and I think it's a great point. Jan is one of the things we tell our clients. All the time is that you know it's unlike other types of marketing and that if you have a strategy that's older than a year. You don't really have a strategy at all right. You're just you just might as well do random things because what worked in twenty eighteen certainly in two thousand seventeen..

twitter facebook instagram thirty three percent
"thirty three percent" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"thirty three percent" Discussed on KGO 810

"Wildcats Wildcats come in twelve and four three zero in conference once again, this is a very good Arizona deemed Todd, but they don't have a dominant player like they've had in your tasks. Well, they certainly don't have a dominant player in the dominant big and they've always had the Andre eight and last year before that was part zoo skin, rich, just dominated paint. They beat you up and played early physical style of play. Now, they're still physical athletics. But they don't have the rim protection that they've had passed. They're not a typical Arizona rebounding team, basically, even for the year on the boards. That's good news for the bears, and they have struggled shooting the basketball the shooting thirty three percent from the and as a team a shooting only forty five percent. So without the bigs. Now, you gotta go diff-. Different direction when you have big guys in their scoring around the rim and shoot a sixty percent. A team you're gonna shoot close to fifty or better why they don't have that this year and so a much different booking Arizona team that we've seen in years past. And what's the coaches line? Big never gets tired. Big is big from tip to whistle. That's so you know, you look at some of those pieces of what they are. They have won five in a row, but you know, what some of those games have been a little bit closer than you would give imagine I think, you know, artif- our joke between us in a little bit of a surprise that UC Davis game at home where they just squeaked that one out. Now, they're on a little bit of a run. But the games have been tied to their credit. They figured out a way to win those. But, you know, not not the dominant piece that we've seen in years past no man, because you know, in large part because they're recruiting got disrupted by what happened with.

Arizona Wildcats Andre bears Todd basketball Davis thirty three percent forty five percent sixty percent
"thirty three percent" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"thirty three percent" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"This to yourself it's crazy the last financial crisis Gal was, down thirty six. Percent the s. and p. was down thirty eight percent the NASDAQ was. Down forty three percent folks if you lose twenty. Five percent of your funds in a financial crisis and the next. One is going to be big you have to. Make back thirty three percent of, your retirement funds how long it's gonna take you. To do. That if you lose. Thirty three percent guess what you have to make. Back fifty. Percent that's insane you can't do this you can't run. With the boys on Wall Street it's dangerous they will eat you up. Every day of, the, week you can't do this get into the fixed annuity with a fixture. Nudity you're earning five six. Seven or eight percent per year to build. Up your lifetime income base while your money is insured a fixed annuity is safe and. Fix nudity it's insured by a very large, and how you rated. Insurance company and it's very conventional you could take all your funds, at turn close the account walkaway you could. Pass on. Your funds to your Beneficiary very conventional but. You gotta get outta the risky, stock market the price earnings ratio is thirty two which should be. Sixteen it's double what it should be it's crazy folks you gotta get out get into the. Fixture duty catch safe get insured fixed index annuity is. Are designed to meet long-term needs for retirement income. They provide guarantees against loss, of principle accredited. Interests and offer the reassurance of a death benefit for your beneficiary early. Withdrawals may result in loss of principle and credited. Interest to the surrender charges any distributions may be subject to ordinary. Income tax and have taken prior to age fifty. Nine and a half ten percent, tax penalty all mentions of sixteen percent..

Thirty three percent thirty eight percent thirty three percent forty three percent sixteen percent eight percent Five percent ten percent
"thirty three percent" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"thirty three percent" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"Whether you go Kito whether you go, you know, thirty thirty three percent protein thirty three percent carve started three percent fat. Whatever you do, whatever is is the vehicle or method would which you choose is just a means to an end and minute fasting. Okay. I'm gonna cowers in here and I'm gonna go empty fall while and okay if your body, you know response to that and then good. But to me at the end of the day, we all use things that are going to help us mentally to accomplish the task at hand. So whether it's intermittent fasting or car backloading or whatever the hell it is is just a means to an end. But at the end of the day, dude is how many calories have you taken in? And that's part of the reason why for a long time, especially coming down from three hundred thirty pounds. Why the Keita genyk diet worked for me because I was able to stabilize. I was able to make a little bit more sense of. How much food I was taken in. Whereas if I'm left, if someone says, hey, you know back then if they said you could have some carbs, those car, the rice turned into pizza, you know, and and it turned into ice cream and everything else you can think of butter fingers with dipped and peanut butter. Which sounds fantastic by the way. On another cycle of different diet. That might sound good to me. But right now it doesn't. Yeah, you focused in pretty good now. I'm good. I'm good as soon as soon as I make up my mind to do something, then I'm that I'm good, but it's it's kind of like being half and half out, like I said, you know, out to golfer about maybe two months from the gym. And so when you start getting back into GM, it's just like, 'cause. You too. May I gotta get the momentum going again, been doing this stuff since you were twelve. And how old are you now? Yeah, so it's just it's just but it's getting back getting back into the routine. And so back in the routine now everything's easy is just cruise control and you've been doing it for decades. So it makes sense to pull stuff out every once in a while is Louie. And in all, obviously, you know, like if if you're trying to be mindful of your body composition and only X-factor out of everything that is factored, the only x. fact thing is alcohol man. Hey, man, I'm not getting results. I want to pull that x. factor out because that's the thing that you have. No, you know. Okay. This Sam drinking, drinking four Margaritas. I am going to die, but I'm drinking four Margaritas. Well, you're dumber and shit because you ain't lose no weight drinking, you know, four Margaritas. So take that out and you'll start doing well. What's your favorite thing to do nowadays? I see a lot of a lot of times I see pictures of your like four wheelers and your dog and a lot of stuff like that. What some of your favorite things that you love to do today? Man, riding my folders and my side by side and. I'm exploring Nevada. I'm on a different places to ride and my dogs minor like the love of my life. Yeah, dog guy and just I was just now I'm on a kind of on over and program kind of follow, you know, Mike's temple and a little bit as far as you know, one body part of week, I know might gets up early. He's one of the first guys and goals every day, right? Because my day it's busy and I'll get scattered rain in right now is a heat wave and is no training at damn heat is onset duty. Piss on it..

Mike GM Nevada Louie Sam thirty thirty three percent three hundred thirty pounds thirty three percent three percent two months
"thirty three percent" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"thirty three percent" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"This to, yourself it's crazy the last financial crisis The. Dow was down thirty six percent the SNP was down thirty eight. Percent the NASDAQ was down forty three percent folks. If you lose twenty five percent, of your funds in a financial crisis. And the. Next one. Is going to be. Big you have to make back thirty three percent. Of your. Retirement funds how long it's gonna take you to do. That if you lose. Thirty three percent guess what you have to make backs. Fifty percent that's, insane, you can't do this you can't run with the boys on Wall Street it's dangerous they will eat you up every day of the week you can't do. This get into the fixed the duty with a sixty nudity you're earning, five six seven or. Eight percent per year to build up your lifetime income base while, your money. Is insured affixed to do what he is safe and, it fixed. The nudie gets insured by a very large and, highly rated insurance company, and it's very conventional you could take all. Your funds. At term close the Count walkaway you could pass on your funds to your beneficiary very conventional but you gotta. Get outta the risky stock market, the, price, earnings, ratio, is, thirty two which should be sixteen double what it should be. It's crazy folks you gotta get out. Get into the duty kick save get. Insured fixed index annuities are, designed to meet. Long-term needs for retirement income they provide guarantees against loss of principle accredited. Interest and offer the reassurance of a death benefit. For your benefit early withdrawals many resulted in loss of principle and. Credited interest to the surrender charges any distributions maybe. Subject ordinary income tax and have, taken prior to age fifty nine and. A half. Ten percent. Tax penalty all nations..

Dow Thirty three percent thirty three percent forty three percent twenty five percent thirty six percent Eight percent Fifty percent Ten percent
"thirty three percent" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"thirty three percent" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Why risky deal like getting a check in the mail on thirty three percent loan could that be a risky deal i mean that is i mean if it was the evil coke brothers doing something like this they they might have an argument to say look we the terms are disclosed maybe you think we should write them in larger font but these people on every broadcast on cnn and msnbc to be fair this is the washington post with an extensive analysis and they i mean they did they really dove into this now look i know what beating up on tim geithner does for the political discussion at this moment now because now he's a capitalist and now it's okay to go after him wasn't okay to go after him when he was using turbo tax was it okay to go after him when he's in the obama administration making the arguments about how evil predatory lending was now these out of there and he's a businessman i guess you can go after him but that being said give credit to the washington post here for actually doing a little bit of work and exposing i think i don't know if it's anything illegal but something really ethical anyway but critical sure so you know who has a better idea to help the poor is richard branson yeah he's got a great solution to poor people and that's to send him free money just give them free money not from tim geithner but from from the government and the government just has a wellspring of money and i i don't know comes from they've just got so much money and they just give it to people so that's great so this is a good idea those is that the group that bring the prince those green pieces of paper with the president's on them yeah yeah those are really cool those are cool over and over and over us prayed it and give it to people's long as they have paper yeah they had to get ready you do have to have the environment is so important to keep trees available for us to print money so he's he's also another guy that's on the basic income just you you just get a basic income bandwagon she's failing becoming prevalent though there's a lot of talk of it yeah they fail finlander denmark finland finland that did it and they have the transaction it was amazing there's a podcast that featured this maybe ninety nine percent invisible i think it was maybe and they did a whole thing on universal basic income first of all you know nixon advocated for this yes which is kind of amazing i mean nixon the republican right every huge conservative that not only did universal basic income and experimented with it in the united states by the way but also wanted to ban all handguns so but other than that we're real hardcore conservative they're just he becomes a conservative after the scandal right you know he was seen as mean and look he was a republican as opposed to a democrat he was more conservative than some people in the country obviously but the idea that he was some ideological conservative is insane he was a progressive republican big time so anyway he wanted to do that finland decided to try to do it and they had an interview with a woman who was on the basic income give away from the finnish government and it was interesting what they decided to do they didn't they you know the idea here in the the concept of the podcast was to say what a wonderful way to design policy instead of going out and just like passing let's say obamacare they didn't certainly didn't use that as an example parts you pass obamacare what they say is all right like try things give you know maybe you you try odom mccarron one community maybe you try it over ten thousand people spread across the country and that's what finland decided to do they did a lottery and in a way a real lottery in which they gave away money as universal basic income to a bunch of people just a few thousand is a.

thirty three percent ninety nine percent
"thirty three percent" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"thirty three percent" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"John august thank you you are correct the lawyer is absolutely wrong writer at your lawyer couldn't be more wrong i wish i could see your lawyer right now to look them in the eye and say dear lawyer i know you meant well but you're wrong here's why when you write the statement you are essentially saying look i believe i deserve tele play credit because i believe i have met the threshold for credit that's how our credits work you hit a certain threshold you earn a credit in film it's we use percentages which is kind of a game but essentially what we say is okay if it's an original project if you're the first writer your threshold is thirty three percent of the final shooting script if you're subsequent writer it's fifty percent for other movies that are out of everybody's threshold is the same if you can show the you've written a minimum of thirty three percent of this movie then you have earned credit at that point you have a choice you can say i've earned all of the credit because i wrote ninety percent of the script you can say you know what i believe i deserve credit and just because i'm fair minded person i also think writer be should get credit but that's i leave it up to you or you can simply say i'm not here to tell you anything other than this my contributions meet the test for tele play credit i'm not saying they meet the test for sold credit you guys can determine how the rest of that is portioned that's up to you all i'm saying is the only argument on making his i've hit the threshold that is absolutely fine so your lawyer was super wrong and i gotta say people at home don't ask your lawyers these questions they're not dumb i'm not blaming they're not done and a lot of lawyers are pretty good with our credit stuff but why would you ever ask your personal attorney whose job is not say to be a lawyer administrating the credit system of the writers guild which is its own subset of jurisprudence when you can just call up your union four free the people you pay dues to say i have a question and they will give you the definitive answer which in this case i assure you would be your.

John august writer attorney thirty three percent ninety percent fifty percent
"thirty three percent" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"thirty three percent" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Okay quick break to talk about one of our sponsors health accu health accu is a life insurance company and you might be wondering why are we talking about life insurance well they've got a program set up that we think is pretty novel it's new in many ways is that if you're living in active healthy lifestyle in i don't know you're running you're lifting weights you're getting after it you're eating healthy foods that they're going to say basically that you're going to have lower cost to them and so they're going to pass that savings on onto things pretty cool so if you're getting after it and you're putting the right stuff in your body you're eating well you're thinking well you're basically conscious of your health they've got a application that you can go in submit to see if you basically have what it takes to be part of the program so the definitely worth checking out and that's why we wanna talk about it with you so punch over to health i q dot com forward slash funding mastery to support the show and see if you qualify there's a series of questions that you take so see if you qualify and just a quick note fifty six percent of their customers save between four and thirty three percent on their life insurance so maybe that you head over to help i q dot com forward slash finding mastering check it out okay so i wanna go back to the structure of your program for minute the backlash that we got to what is what is training practice look like sit down deep breathing and then word you take folks.

thirty three percent fifty six percent
"thirty three percent" Discussed on Anxiety Slayer

Anxiety Slayer

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"thirty three percent" Discussed on Anxiety Slayer

"Finding some humor yeah releasing some of the stuff and i wanna talk more about this and how we can process some of these negative emotions and things when we come back today's anxiety slayer podcast is sponsored by health iq if you listen to inside slayer regularly you know we're health conscious we often recommend healthy nutrition walking in nature yoga and an overall fitness plan for your mind body and soul with our love for health and wellness we found a usbased life insurance company who wards their clients with exclusive special in lower rates for being mindful and health conscious health iq tells us that they can help you save between four and thirty three percent on life insurance because people who are physically active have a lower risk of heart disease cancer and diabetes compared to people who are inactive health i saves you money on life insurance for choosing to live a health conscious lifestyle that's pretty cool checkout health i q for a free quote and please mentioning zayed's slayer you can go to health i q dot com forward slash anxiety slayer for more information hey michelle before we went to the mid break we were talking about how to process are negative emotions and i'd love to have some feedback from you about that topic in this is great because i i wanted to share with you what my whole take on eggs i feel like anxiety is an actual emotion from my the adult share model what i say is is the physical manifestation of unfilled emotions.

michelle zayed thirty three percent
"thirty three percent" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"thirty three percent" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"In a thirty three percent bracket in a 25 percent tax bracket of joy were seventy two grand not a million if it's a tax deferred ira you may think oh i got a million dollars tax deferred but when you take out that money only about six hundred and fifty thousand of that israeli your money the other three hundred fifty grand belongs to uncle sam and i've talked about that in previous segments so i preferred tax free accumulation or the thrust now the third force a lot of pilot let's forget about in order to get an air plane off the tarmac you must have drag and be able to drag yeah you're gonna have friction you've got to have dragor else the plane will never get off the ground or airborne now can i suggest that you will never sore financially and last you learn safe positive leverage that is the ability to own and control assets with very little or none of your money tied up or at risk in that asset and this is what i was talking about a few minutes ago where banks borrow our money at one percent and they turn around and put it into insurance institutions usually rated about six notches higher in safety than they are and they earn five or six percent how much more spy than one they pay ten thousand in interest to us and they increase the safety and they earned 50000 an interest that's five times are five hundred percent that is their pain interest which is a drag to make five times that you can do the same thing if you're listening to me right now and you've got a bunch of money sit in a banker credit union because you think it's well at sefa i don't know where else to put it folks you could probably be making five times or more the rate of return and it can be taxfree instead of attacked as earned investment in a baker credit union this is making some sense well i want to introduce the subject at i'll go into it more detail in the next segment but there's four phases of retirement planning there's the contribution phase where we contribute money for our.

ira five hundred percent thirty three percent million dollars one percent six percent 25 percent
"thirty three percent" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"thirty three percent" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"In a thirty three percent bracket in a 25 percent tax bracket it's only were seventy two grand not a million if it's a tax deferred ira he may think oh i got a million dollars tax deferred bit when you take out that money only about six hundred and fifty thousand of that israeli your money the other three hundred fifty grand belongs to uncle sam and i've talked about that in previous segments so i preferred tax free accumulation or the thrust now the third force a lot of pilot forget about in order to get an air plane off the tarmac you must have drag and be able to drag yeah you're gonna have friction you've got to have dragor else the plane will never get off the ground or airborne now can i suggest that you will never soar by nn chilly and last you learn safe positive leverage that is the ability to own and control assets with very little or none of your money tied up or at risk in that asset and this is what i was talking about a few minutes ago where banks borrow our money at one percent and they turn around and put it into insurance institutions usually rated about six notches higher in safety than they are and they earn five or six percent how much more spy than one they pay ten thousand all erzen interest to us and they increase the safety and they are in 50000 an interest that's five times or five hundred percent that is their pain interest which is a drag to make five times that you can do the same thing if you're listening to me right now and you've got a bunch of money sitting in a banker credit union because you think it's well that safe i i don't know where else to put it folks you could probably be making five times or more the rate of return and it can be taxfree instead of attacked as earned investment in a banker credit union this is making some sense well pat i want to introduce the subject at i'll go into it more detail in the next segment but there's four phases of retirement planning there's the contribution phase where we contribute money for our.

ira five hundred percent thirty three percent million dollars one percent six percent 25 percent
"thirty three percent" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"thirty three percent" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Fbi on this shooting down in florida are now every sign was missed only thirty three percent of americans are blaming guns so the american people seem to get this it's interesting that you know all these groups that went out and started attacking the nra well are now hearing from nra members that are saying him in a pretty loud voice okay you not received understanding who we are a who the people that i've known in the nra my life every single person that i know every single one by the way trump is speaking at a summit on the opioid crisis public kellyanne gave me an update on that last night i i've been watching the show on net flex i digress here for a second i was watching the show a and it goes from cleveland two at all lanna to mexico and the production of heroin this is this is why obio uses so scary because if you don't you we now are producing there was one particular county in ohio where they're like producing per capita six hundred forty two oxycontin pills per person and insane amount per year now here's the problem if you take invite get him percocet oxycontin i've never taken one of those pain tells of my life i will say i fear little in life they scare me they scary because of what i've witnessed in my life in oh you take one pill for legitimate reason ziege out a bad back you had an operation anyway and the next thing you know smart hardworking intelligent people they're hawked like that it happens it's carry it happens and we're handed these things are out like they're candy and if anyone is ever in a hostile you know what it's like it all you have to do is say the with all my back oh it hurts and they want to give it to you with no questions as winter fact by law they feel they have to as a means of.

Fbi florida nra cleveland heroin ohio mexico thirty three percent
"thirty three percent" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"thirty three percent" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Hey folks support from today's show comes from health i queue health iq believes that the best way to improve the health of the world is to celebrate the healthconscious through social and financial rewards fiftysix percent of health iq customers say between four in thirty three percent on their life insurance these savings our exclusive to health iq like saving money by being a good driver health iq gets you lower rates on life insurance for living a health conscious lifestyle that was the problem when i bought my health insurance i think i was only like five years out from smoking or maybe i was less than five and you need to be like five or ten out but it's all of your super if you if you actually take care of yourself this is a great situation for you physically active people have a 34 percent lower risk of allcause mortality 56 lower risk of heart disease 22 percent decrease in cancer mortality compared to people who remain inactive to see if you qualify get your free quote today at health iq dot com slash majority or you mentioned the promo code majority when you talk to a health iq agent that's health iq spelt like the word health and then the letters i and q dot com slash majority to get your free quote all right folks just a heads up we're going to be alive again know the next o three days four days and then next week we're going to be doing our best out if you have a bestof suggestion email us at majority reporters gmailcom put in the subject line best of if you have like oh i have four great.

life insurance health insurance thirty three percent fiftysix percent 22 percent 34 percent five years three days four days
"thirty three percent" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"thirty three percent" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"They can score they play really good defense and they come from behind to beat golden state last night there four days zero and shot her bad they shot thirty three percent golden state shot forty percent the biggest difference here's what draymond green brought up after the game as they got that align thirty eight times that boston uh and the warriors line nineteen time twelve point scored by the golden state and thirty three by boston from the free throw line and that was the difference because they shot horribly in this game so you and take that for boston i mean coming back and winning this game a lot of it because of free throws but shooting that bad and still coming back and win that game i i'm i'm sure a lot of people are surprise i don't think many people you see hayward go down other going fourteen game winning streak again i keep saying it's going to level out at some point the lose what see because they keep winning but man they they're making it very interesting for all of us who keep saying it's going to be golden state in cleveland in the finals again the foul shots for what it's worth boston took twenty five in the second half golden state took 8 foul shots career having with seven for seven from the line and clutch time yesterday golden state only made five foul shots in the entire second half and then as you mentioned steph curry was asked afterwards about the possibility that instead of his annual visit to cleveland in the rock and roll hall of fame i they might spend some time in boston this june very very likely now nicholson roberson beat cleveland who's done it three years in a row and see where the weather's ray here in june so now it is about equal in boston and cleveland in.

boston cleveland steph curry hayward rock and roll hall of fame nicholson roberson thirty three percent forty percent three years four days
"thirty three percent" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"thirty three percent" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Already on thirty three percent higher but a constant construction boom blumenthal a constant acquiring girth will be lowered from we are great better chrysler capital were heard and that the press couldn't get the right age groups in puerto rico say many people are feeling desperate without enough food and water and gasoline needed to run generators atms on the island are set to be running low on cash russian president vladimir putin is traveling to on at today for talks with turkey's president npr's peter kenyon says syria and northern iraq are expected to be on their agenda under a plan for syrian deescalation zones initiated by russia iran and turkey the syrian opposition stronghold of it live province is supposed to be under turkish control turkey's ability to quell violence and russia's recent airstrikes in the province are likely to be discussed so is monday's kurdish independence vote in northern iraq which turkey says will result in sanctions i'm dave mattingly npr news in washington twenty minutes past six now and joe mcconnell has more information about our commute this morning joe the crashes hey worst has turned into a sigler which means is going to be there for at least another thirty minutes blocking elaine southie between east redid ninety the left lane is blocked it's backed up was already backed up to thirty eight outs to solid stop and go and they ride in valeo not really slow but there is still a crash eighty eastbound at redwood with the car off into a ditch the westbound side is sluggish in slow but just the routine as head of the car keita's bridge than picks up in slows good from highway four just pockets of slow into rich with joe mcconnell for kqed thank you joe will check back at the bottom of the hour his report.

joe mcconnell kqed dave mattingly president russian puerto rico chrysler keita elaine southie vladimir putin washington iraq russia iran syria peter kenyon turkey thirty three percent thirty minutes twenty minutes
"thirty three percent" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"thirty three percent" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Or angry ten percent enthusiastic thirty percent satisfied thirty three percent dissatisfied twenty six percent angry who to blame president trump of course quinnipiac said that a majority believe that trump has helped to change the attitudes about the media for the worse the question was do you believe that president trump has changed american attitudes towards the news media for the better or for the worse or hasn't president trump had an impact on the american attitudes towards the news media for the better twenty two percent for the worst fifty two percent no impact twenty percent folks the news media has been lying to you the american people for the wall for a long time but in the trump era it's been the last year and a half way i they tried to make it where he couldn't get the nomination once he got the nomination they tried to knock what came down from being elected since he's been elected they tried to knock him down from becoming president once he became president they tried to knock him down from doing his job all in this time lying to all of us about what's going on everyone at nbc news whether it's msnbc or national nbc news abc cbs cnn they all know that the russia collusion stories fake but they're doing it to try to undermine him and then as mentioned earlier we've got barack obama trying to undermine the president in undermining the president they are undermining you and they're not bringing you the news that actually affects yes you as i said earlier president trump has been given speeches all this week did you hear about it and now that the call me hearing is done have you heard about it today no all you hearing about is jeff sessions being the next target all you're hearing about is the possibility of tapes did you know that there is a terrorist attack in iran where isis gunman killed seventeen people not of the concert not on the restaurant not mcafee at the iranian parliament they went into the parliament building in england this is akin to westminster abbey over there and gun people down in the parliament you can't even find it anywhere did you know that north korea tested a missile did you know that they tested other missile.

trump news media president barack obama england westminster abbey north korea nbc msnbc russia iran thirty three percent twenty six percent twenty two percent fifty two percent thirty percent twenty percent ten percent
"thirty three percent" Discussed on WMEX 1510 AM

WMEX 1510 AM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"thirty three percent" Discussed on WMEX 1510 AM

"Angry or angry ten percent enthusiast thirty percent satisfied thirty three percent dissatisfied 26 six percent angry who to blame president trump of course quinnipiac said that a majority believe that trump has helped to change the attitudes about the media for the worse the question was do you believe that president trump has changed american attitudes towards the news media for the better or for the worse or hasn't president trump had an impact on the american attitudes towards the news media for the better twenty two percent for the worst fifty two present no impact twenty percent folks the news media has been lying to you the american people for the while for a long time but in the trump era it's been the last year and a half were i they tried to make it where he couldn't get the nomination once he got the nomination they tried to knock him down from being elected since he's been elected they tried to knock him down from becoming president once he became president they tried to knock him down from doing his job all in this time lying to all of us about what's going on everyone at nbc news whether it's msnbc or national nbc news abc cbs cnn n they all know that the russian collusion story is fake but they're doing it to try to undermine him and then as mentioned earlier we've got barack obama trying to undermine the president and in undermining the president they are undermining you and they're not bringing you the news that actually affects you as i said earlier earlier president trump has been given speeches all this week did you hear about it and now that the komi hearing is done have you heard about it today no all you hearing.

news media president barack obama trump nbc msnbc cnn thirty three percent twenty two percent 26 six percent thirty percent twenty percent ten percent