35 Burst results for "Thirty Thousand Dollars"

Cohen memoir casts him as 'star witness' against Trump

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 3 weeks ago

Cohen memoir casts him as 'star witness' against Trump

"Michael Cohen's tell all memoir offers a blow by blow account of president trump's alleged role in a hush money scandal that once overshadowed his presidency despoil the true story of the former personal attorney to president Donald J. trump makes the case trump is guilty of the same crimes that landed as former fixer in federal prison Cohen writes about trump green lighting the one hundred and thirty thousand dollar pay off to silence porn star stormy Daniels and then reimbursing him with what he says were fake legal fees the book also quotes trump as saying if it comes out I'm not sure how it would play with my supporters but I bet they think it's cool that I slept with a porn star the White House calls the book fan fiction Julie Walker New York

Michael Cohen Attorney Donald J. Trump Daniels White House New York President Trump Julie Walker
Guide To Personal Financial Wellness by William Johnson

Optimal Finance Daily

05:02 min | Last month

Guide To Personal Financial Wellness by William Johnson

"Guide to personal financial wellness part two by William Johnson with FLEX SENSE DOT COM. Insurance. Insurance has two important functions when it comes to financial wellness one insurance protects the wealth and lifestyle that you have worked long and hard to build and to insurance protects your family's future. If you do not have anyone depending on your income then you might not need life insurance but health auto homeowners and disability are still required or good ideas to make sure that you're protected for an accident or disaster when you have a family that relies on you to keep a roof over their heads and food on the table. Then Life Insurance is a necessity. Typically, people look for enough insurance to cover their debt including student loans and. Mortgage, as well as a number of years of living expenses the proceeds of life insurance can be invested, which can factor into your calculations. For example, if your living expenses are thirty thousand dollars a year and you wanted to cover ten years of expenses in the immediate thought is the need three, hundred thousand dollars in life insurance. However, with market growth assumptions, you can buy a bit less insurance, invest the payout and get a similar level of income. When shopping for life, insurance get recommendations on agents and be sure you understand the difference between whole and term if the agent cannot adequately answer your questions using easy to understand terms about what they're recommending then find an agent can. Retirement. Retirement readiness a specific component of financial wellness is being on track to have the money saved to pay for your living expenses in retirement without worrying about running out of money if you live longer than you anticipate. When talking with someone about their desired retirement age there's one point that I really tried to drive home the day you retire you moving to another phase in your life currently you're earning income. When you're retired, you live solely off your investments and social security. This often gives people pause as their projected retirement income falls far short of what they think. They're living expenses will be if possible, wait to retire and start taking your social security, it'll give you longer to build your nest egg and less time to draw down building retirement savings is something that people do over the many decades of their career but many get started too late or hit a bump and raid their retirement savings to get around it. It is never too late to start saving for retirement and anything one saves is better than not saving at all. The two big factors to the amount of savings you'll have when you retire are one contributions and to asset allocation. The contributions are the amount of money that you have contributed to your retirement accounts up to the point that you start taking money out contributions made earlier in your career are worth more than contributions may later in your career because they've had. More. Time to grow the more years, you wait to retire the more years you can contribute to your retirement accounts. Asset allocation refers to what you have invested your retirement money into typically that is a mix of stocks and bonds. When you're younger, you can take more risk due to the longer time horizon until you retire and will hold more stocks than bonds. With our a few years until retirement, you cannot afford a downturn or recession when you need to start drawing on your savings for your living expenses. Thus you'll be more conservative and hold more bonds than you do stocks the more money you have invested and the longer it's invested, the more asset allocation affects the outcome. Estate. Estate Planning. Varies widely from person to person with everyone having different needs. At a basic level, it's setting up instructions on what should happen to you and your assets upon your death. If you have children who are minors then establishing who will care for them is the primary concern. Everyone should have an inventory of all assets, accounts and passwords. We recommend using password manager that you can keep in a safe place and that will be accessible to the surviving spouse or the executor of their estate. All retirement accounts should have a primary beneficiary and a secondary beneficiary you should have a will that covers your assets and living will to ensure that your decisions on your health are respected. Should you not be able to make them yourself? Additionally, a healthcare proxy should be specified to cover any gray area or new treatment options that are not covered by the leading will. As wealth grows in size as well as in diversity of assets estate planning becomes more complex and considerations grow. It is often worth it to consult an attorney and Accountant to walk through your options. Small steps and forward progress. Accomplishing financial wellness will take a lot of planning and effort. It is usually achieved by focusing on a single thing and working to improve it rather than trying to improve everything all at once a series of small winds adds up to a big win. That will keep you moving forward towards your financial goals and the momentum provided by each small win will keep you motivated getting in a good place with your personal finances and future planning is life changing. Your efforts are a gift to your future self put in the work today to make sure they are in the best position to be successful.

William Johnson Attorney Accountant
How She Crafted a Career Where Passion and Profit Intersect

The Goal Digger Podcast

06:24 min | Last month

How She Crafted a Career Where Passion and Profit Intersect

"Are just it is due time that you are on the gold digger podcast. So welcome to the show I had stop our early intro chatting because like we need to hit record on this this. So welcome to the PODCAST. So happy to be here. Finally, I I feel like we've been like in each other's DM's just for the last year being when when, when, and honestly there's never been a better time than this. So I am so I like divine. Niagara Oh. Okay. So I wanNa know like, tell me because I actually don't know this about you wear and when did all of this start telling me about the early days of your career before you were consulting for these massive brands and changing the world as we know it, how did this all begin for you? You know like all good stories, it began a little bit by accident I've been an entrepreneur for twenty five years I have never ever worked for anybody else. We'll wait that's not true. I worked for I worked for Clothing Company for four days. Would it? Out of college but I, I went to college at Penn state I loved feeder and performing. Arts and I thought that you know that's all I wanted to do was perform, write, and produce and direct, and then I got there and liberal arts education blew my mind and I got a degree in women's studies and a degree in classics. So now I have three degrees at gaming to make no money in. At least back then that was the thinking and so honestly, at twenty one years old I I had been so educated at Penn State, but at twenty one I'm out of college now and I take another community college class on grant writing, and this is where it started for me. I started my own company at twenty. One I learned how to write a grant to get money from businesses and my first grant that I got was five thousand. Dollars it was from an insurance company and I wanted to talk about eating disorders and body image and social issues that were affecting women at the time has always been a passion point for me and this company gave me five thousand dollars to produce my plays and take them to school and and that's how I started I literally had no idea how to pay people pay people, eleven, dollars a week because I thought it sounded better than ten. It was crazy back in back in the day like I was just ambitious in Hungary and naive and and committed and I just you know I started this company was twenty one I ran out for six for six years, and then I sold it and kind of came out here to to California trying to find my place in the media landscape and you know I was twenty seven years old landed out here. I didn't know anybody in California I. Didn't know. How I was going to parlay all of this incredible experience. I had on the road talking to students for six years, but then I wanted to move into a completely different medium and I had no training in that I just had a curiosity and that's always been a guiding force for me I love that do that five thousand dollars feel like a million dollars was probably the most essential money you've ever earned while yeah. That time if I could even just place. Our listeners Eric I'm in my mid forties, and so this is a while ago and I paid a hundred and seventy five dollars a month for rent and I you know at the time my first. So I took that five thousand dollars. That's I think why paid everybody like eleven bucks a week for people but like you know like everybody was happy to perform and get paid and and I just stretch that money as much as I could until I learned. that. I could get matching grants and I could fundraise more and so I built that business when I you know even at the time when I sold that business, I was twenty four years twenty, five years old I was making twenty five, thirty, thousand dollars year and I was living high life. I was like paid off my dad and I was living at a time even a little bit beneath my amusement gave me money to save to come out to California but. When you're new at this and I didn't know that I was really an entrepreneur I. didn't call myself that I just was trying to make the most of all this education I had gotten. Yeah. So walk me through what happens. So you get to California you WANNA, enter this media scene. You have these big visions than ideas and what I'm thinking of is nowadays, we can talk about all of these things body image and inclusivity and eating disorders and and it doesn't necessarily feel like a dirty word or something wrong or shameful back then it was very different. So walk me through what happened next yeah I felt very kind. Of alone in out there in my field of choice, you know it was a hybrid of women's issues, social issues self-help empowerment, and I was a young you know as a young woman who was trying to kind of chart my own course, and so I got out to California drove out to that quintessential road trip with friend got out to California and my Geo Prizm stayed at a hotel by the airport the extended stay America I lived there for three months and couldn't find a place to live in La like didn't have a lot of friends out here but I just have always had this dogged determination that's part of. My DNA it's part of my type A personality, and so you know I called everybody I knew I did a lot of cold calling and I did have to factors that I think helped when I got out here when I was in college I did a show for MTV news at the time where I I was able to share some of the work that I was doing on college campuses around sexual assault and sexual harassment and MTV picked up that story. So this summer I graduated I had a lot of press coverage and I had some you know offers to speak places and so I started following that path and. That helped kind of learn how to pitch myself how to talk about myself how to par lay the press that I had into the next opportunity, and so you know when I was out here, I knocked on every door I could, and eventually what I did was I went entered myself into this pitch contest at this big television production conference called Nat P. It's the National Association of television programming exacts and it was like everywhere you went like when you wanted to be Oprah Right Oprah soldier show and everybody's like selling their TV shows into syndication and I signed myself up as a solo person and I bought the wrong badge. Bought a badge that was a promoter like a sponsor bad and so I was asked to come into everybody's sweet and everybody was being so nice to me and I thought Oh my God this is. Like everybody is so welcoming when I realize at the end of the day, they thought I

California MTV Hungary Nat P. It Clothing Company Eric I Niagara National Association Of Televi Geo Prizm Oprah LA Assault Harassment
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | Last month

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. The new Vif Sea salt and pepper bars have three grams total carbs why it's in their nature after all, they're made with one hundred percent grass fed beef, and nature's Metro's three grams, total carbs, eleven, grams of protein find them in the bar borrow or at epic Bar Dot Com. Thanks also to stand for Small and American Express. If you're a small business owner head to stand for small dot com slash partner for resources, offers and tools from a growing group of companies that want to help your business get back to business visit stand for small dot com slash partner to get started. Thanks also to Microsoft, the world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help us stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat, meet, call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft dot com slash teams. Here, at life, we know that getting your financial house in order can feel painful. Now, there's this whole corona virus pandemic. The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
I Owe $94,000 to the IRS!

Ramsey Call of the Day

04:58 min | Last month

I Owe $94,000 to the IRS!

"Joining me today Ramsey personality Chris Hogan. Caesar's in Chicago Hi how are you? Hey how you doing? How can we help? Okay little nervous here. first time caller first time listener. I. Last summer started listening to you. Laugh. Until far about a month ago emotionally on one hundred, thirty thousand dollars in depth, which is on ninety, four, thousand dollars. Irs I'm trying to do what I tend to To figure what's the best way to tackle this Most of most of the other stuff is car Karleena and credit card that I just weren't to Carmax this weekend and sold a vehicle which has some positive equity. Our sixty, five, hundred I. Don't know what to do with this money at this point. What in the world? How do you owe the IRS ninety four thousand? Salamanders Twenty fifteen twenty, sixteen business, you know I, I, started a business with my wife I pretty much try to manage the business myself. You know everything myself and I kinda school things up and didn't help that I had a bad accounting I concert the irs this to be issue I. If we have to file a ten forty x forum I'll try a man does taxes you know put this is in process I mean I still have to making some kind of panic because I'm getting some letters on a male as far as. Stop stuff. So you're saying that the returns were filed improperly and you may not actually Oh this money when you follow amended returns. Exactly. Okay. But if you you have, you have some money you said you had six thousand dollars from sale your car. Yes. Sixty, sixty, five now. And current him baby step two so I might stop just. You're going to spend some money right now on a tax attorney. Or a tax professional, that is a stud of some kind and If it costs you six thousand dollars, it won't. But if it costs you two thousand dollars, this is job one right now. Is You can you can take your hundred and thirty thousand and wipe out ninety four or a big portion of ninety four with some simple proper filing you don't do that yourself. That's how you got here. You go get a tax pro check Daveramsey DOT COM and click on our taxi LP's if there's not one in your area start shopping around talk to some business guys that are that are competent business people in your area ask them for advice on who a good tax attorney or a tax pro Israel and let them dig in. I I don't you don't need to do anything. You don't worry about me staff. No this is job one I R. S. Yes. Job One that's what you're doing and and Caesar make area focused. Don't come up with excuses. Pick up the phone call set up a time to go sit down, gather up, find out all the documentary going to eat 'cause you're going to have to do legwork here but trust me if worth it because it's dealing with irs. Yeah you. Sure you're a good tax professional can tell you if you need to get on an installment plan and. We need to do to get the barking dogs off your heel while you get this stuff filed. But Dude, you don't thirty seconds you get this stuff filed. Now this is an overdue time paper. and. You've. You know this is killing you and these people have unlimited freaking power. It is unbelievable what they can do to your life if they choose to cy I really really really want them To Go away. Yes I want you get the paperwork done and you don't have anything that's more important in your life for the next two of then get all of this filed as soon as possible. Don't don't drag it out three months. Don't drag it out two months file the stuff get with somebody get the work done. Yeah. You State you get you a cup of coffee and work into the work into the we hours of the morning at this done. What. You do because here's the reality some tweaking and the proper filings again has the ability to wipe some of this out. This is a this is a huge opportunity. Sounds like a good portion of it. Impugned it on him because he didn't do proper filing and they guest that's right in the irs never guesses low. It's a rule of theirs. It's written somewhere in a book I'm sure. Oh God. Penalties on this stuff and it all goes away with properly amended filing or large portion of it does. Get that the stuff you should have been working on all these long time ago. Yes. That's out of the way. Down to just forty thousand dollars a dad now go. That's right.

IRS Caesar Attorney Chris Hogan Chicago Carmax Karleena Israel
Twenty-Five Years Later, Ford Resurrects the Bronco

Business Wars Daily

04:04 min | 2 months ago

Twenty-Five Years Later, Ford Resurrects the Bronco

"If you're an offroad aficionado or even just WANNA be. This story is a big deal. After a quarter century Ford is resurrecting the Ford Bronco a direct rival to the jeep. Ford produce the Bronco for thirty straight years starting in nineteen, sixty six. The vehicle had only two doors reportedly one reason why Ford discontinued it in Nineteen ninety-six consumer sentiment was shifting toward four doors. Historians say the Bronco Developed Cult Status. After it was discontinued today, the beefy muscular vehicles, a sentimental favourite restored vintage models can sell for up to two hundred thousand dollars with a corporate unit called Ford icons. Ford is Heavily Marketing Nostalgia that division includes the Bronco, a Mustang and a new line of Ford F one fifty pick-up trucks, including a hybrid version, and soon to be debuted all electric. And Nostalgia sells, but it's far from the only reason. The automakers releasing a Bronco for the twenty first century. The company is capitalizing on a trend according to the automaker offroad vehicle, so called rugged SUV's. Twice, as popular as regular SUV's CNN reports that has engineered the new bronco models for quote hard off road driving. You know the kind that allows you to quote. Get far from civilization. An even stay there for awhile. Is the perfect escape for pandemic induced cabin fever. Get a dose of Adrenalin while avoiding the plague. It's a combination made for advertising. Heaven Kit needs to be the jeep wrangler as the Juggernaut of off road vehicles. CNBC reports that automakers have been trying to quote dethrone the Wrangler for decades. Without much success. Even during the pandemic GPS kept selling Fiat Chrysler sold an average of seventeen thousand jeep wrangler every month for the last five years according to the Detroit news last year, almost a quarter, million wrangler flew off dealership. Lots and experts say jeep owners are loyal. To a fault. Still Ford executives have moxie. They're predicting sales of two hundred thousand broncos over the next year, according to Automotive News. and. Keep in mind that the low end version of the new line. The broncos sport won't even be out until years end higher end versions of the Bronco won't be at dealerships until next spring. Ford is doing everything it can to make the Bronco enticing enough to away jeep lovers, and of course to persuade new off roaders to come into the Ford camp that includes besting the ramblers largest tires thirty three inches with whopping thirty five inch tires, Ford says a Bronco outfitted with the almost three foot in diameter tires can easily go through a couple of feet of water models also come with removable roofs and doors. Drivers can store the doors in the Bronco. For, it says. At about thirty thousand dollars, the price of the two door base Bronco comes in at only two hundred dollars more than the base price of the jeep wrangler at the top in a limited number of first edition for door Bronco started about sixty one thousand dollars, Ford began taking one hundred dollar deposits on Broncos last Monday when it released the new line I edition reservation slots sold out within a couple of hours. Still as bullish as the auto press is about the Broncos, the release comes against bleak backdrop for the auto industry. Overall vehicle sales plummeted when covid nineteen emerged shut the industry down for two months recently, both Ford and GM reported second-quarter sales declines of about thirty three percent from a year earlier jeep parent, Fiat Chrysler did even worse with sales down forty percent. And that puts a lot of pressure on Ford to live up to its promise of adding a billion dollars to the bottom line next year through Bronco Sales. And it adds pressure Chrysler to keep jeep at the top of the OFFROAD HEAP Stakes is high as the boulder strewn rocky mountains. The war between Bronco in gene. We'll be fascinating to watch.

Ford Bronco Ford Bronco Sales Wrangler Jeep Ford Camp Fiat Chrysler Broncos Chrysler CNN Adrenalin Cnbc Detroit GM
Apps like Robinhood make investing easier. Maybe too easy.

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:37 min | 2 months ago

Apps like Robinhood make investing easier. Maybe too easy.

"APPs like Robin Hood of Made Stock Market, investing easier, but at what cost from American public media this is Marketplace Tech Jack Stewart in Hollywood. Maybe. You're one of the ten million plus people who've set up an account on the trading APP. Robin Hood the company's been in the news recently as people start to take a critical look at its business model. Robin hoods the highest profile example of APPs that say they're increasing access to the stock market by making trades free. Critics say their game `fine trading with psychological nudges and push notifications, which encouraged frequent and potentially risky trades. There are few controls or limits for what could be inexperienced users in June. Twenty year old Alex, Kerns killed himself after he logged onto Robin Hood and saw what he thought was a negative seven hundred thirty thousand dollar balance Professor Vicki Bogan founder of Cornell University's Institute for Behavioral and household. Finance researches the psychology of investing. Being able to trade online is nothing new, but beyond just the. Marginal incremental convenience of having on your phone versus on your laptop. Something about some of these, APPS is that they're designed to encourage people to trade and to trade more. because. It's part of their business model. They make more money when people make more trades, and so you know when you make a trade, there's confetti in congratulations that are encouraging people to trade more, so it's beyond just the reduction in transaction 'cause it's also the way the APPS are structured to nudge people to participate more and to trade more. So I suspect what these platforms would argue is that they're just making it easier for people to access the stock market and build wealth in the way. The wealthy people have always been able to do. Is that a fair argument? Yeah, I'm very sympathetic to that argument. I actually on some level. I agree that it's always a good thing to give. Households have access to financial markets. You're exactly right in that. Participating in the stock market is. With a long term investment horizon is a way that people. Can and have been able to build wealth. But these ads cannot exist in an unregulated unchecked environment. What sort of protections would you like to see? There are a lot of things. But. The person that can Pinatubo aside as a result of seeing this negative balance was only twenty years old. And so this is a person that can't. Buy Alcohol and can trade options in a way that could get him in very serious financial leverage. And so in the same way there were some guidelines protections with the credit card act in two thousand nine limiting access for young adults with credit card to credit cards. I think we need to think about some of those types of protections as well. That's freaky Bogan. Cornell University after Alex Kuhn's death Robin Hood released a statement saying it might restrict more complicated trades from some customers with checks to make sure they know what they're risking with options trading in particular.

Robin Hood Cornell University Alex Kuhn Vicki Bogan Jack Stewart Hollywood Kerns Founder Professor Institute For Behavioral
Journalists of Color

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

37:15 min | 2 months ago

Journalists of Color

"Before the interviews I wanNA share my theory. For why all of this exploded for journalists of Color Right now? It goes back a few years. So many of us went from covering the first black president to covering Donald Trump. And ever, since trump came down that escalator, announcing his campaign back in Twenty fifteen, when he denounced Mexicans as drug traffickers rapist. When he was that he would build a wall at the border and that Mexico will pay for it. Those journalists were told to avoid using words like racist or lie to describe some of trump's worse behavior. That kind of self censorship, especially on race for a lot of us, it became untenable after we had to cover the death of George Floyd and report on that video of a black man, being choked to death for eight minutes. On top of that we are now dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, which is laying bare racial inequities across this country. And Corinthian has given a lot of us time to sit and think. Notice what's going on in the world and in our lives and in our newsrooms? You have black journalists and other journalists of color who think of themselves as truth seekers in the same way that their white colleagues, too, but very often when they tell the truth about racism when they tell the truth about. Bright, white supremacy. They're labeled as activist. Highs! They dared to bring their blackness across the newsroom threshold. PSORIATIC McDonald's has been thinking a lot about race and the news. So I asked her as a black journalist in this moment. What does she want to see change so I would say what I want is actual structural change within newsroom leadership? I do not want the equivalent of painting black lives matter on a street in yellow letters, but in a newsroom. It's visible. By that doesn't really solve anything when it comes to pay discrepancies between. White male journalists and black female journalist who do the same job have the same level of experience and one is making thirty thousand dollars a year more than the other. The other thing is that. You cannot have. Newsroom leadership that is completely made up of six Cheddar straight white men. Even. Under straight white women. Zicklin or gender straight Whiteman that power needs to be distributed more equitably. You know the other thing died. I want to see I wanNA see US cover. Race honestly. right? Race isn't just something that black people, experience or something that non white experience, attempting that everyone experience and says and so. There needs to be a baseline of literacy rate when it comes to how we talk about race with an America how it operates within American history, and how that informs. President and what world. News media has played in that way. We have to consider that. The last time that we had a pandemic, the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic. We need to recognize that. The paper of record in Chicago the Chicago Tribune. Is Basically scapegoating black people who are fleeing the American south, basically saying Oh half a million darkies are basically invading Chicago. If that's objectivity as not the kind of objectivity that I want to participate in them. Yeah, yeah, I WANNA get personal a little bit You ended up being quoted in New York Times. Article about this reckoning talking about how you didn't have a great time at the Washington Post. You've tweeted about your experience as a black woman in newsrooms. What does this reckoning meant for you? And what have you been trying to get off your chest and this moment about your experience? In some of the newsroom's that we've been talking about my hope for this reckoning. is that. There is not one more class of you know young. Ernest! Twenty two year old coming out of journalism school I'm who basically have to go through this really damaging gauntlet. We're constantly sort of questioning yourself and your own worth and I think there are a lot of really talented journalists who have been driven from the field. Because at some point, they feel like they have to make a choice between their own mental health. Or being journalist. And they just self-preservation and I cannot blame them. and that is really a shame, because think about the people that those journalists now think about the stories that they could have told. The access they could have had picked the access to walk into certain spaces at their white colleagues cannot exactly and you know one of the ways, and this is not the only way that this is important, but one of the ways that this is important is. We need them to trust us. Our job is to tell their stories and to tell them accurately and to tell them fairly. And if people are are always getting pushed out the folks who might actually be able to empathize with them who know where they're coming from right I? There's a quote from their lake when I fall where she basically expresses the you know, she's probably the only person who covered public housing who's actually lived in public housing? That, yeah, that is. Expertise right that is. Valuable knowledge so I just I want us to be able to practice our profession with humanity. Yeah, and also it's like in this moment where it seems like more than ever before. At least in my lifetime, there is such a deficit of trust. Americans don't trust institutions. They don't trust journalism. They don't trust facts. Worst argument about whether or not mask can prevent the spread of Corona virus like in this environment if newsrooms don't act in fix some of this stuff. is going to create more mistrust in the media and these news outlets will become less relevant in a moment in which I would argue. They are needed more than ever before. Yes, and you know the thing is is and I've said this repeatedly at that American journalism does have a credibility crisis. The the credibility crisis that we have I think. Actually bears a lot of similarities to. Our current sort of Voter disenfranchisement problem. Being. In Journalism, we have not spent enough time. with the very same folks who are often disenfranchised when it comes to media coverage as well right. And when we think about the press and freedom of the press is an instrument of democracy we have to think about. enfranchising everyone, we have to think about making sure that they do find us credible. The folks. If they look at the newspaper, even look at a website or they listen to the radio and their conclusion is. That these entities are not telling the truth about them in their lives and held their lives are. For them yeah for them. That's a credibility issue for us. Yeah we can fix. It failed them. That means that. We have to develop far better relationships with folks who have historically been shunned or shut out of district of media coverage are only allowed to participate in very limited ways. You know I still very much believe in that adage, the journalism exist to comfort the afflicted and afflict comfortable. Thanks again to riot, not at McDonald's the culture writer for the undefeated and also this year. She was nominated a pilot sir. My mind. I wanted to hear from other journalists of color about their newsroom experiences. And they wrote in. Here if you, my name is Lavi Cima Guy side. I'm a naturalized citizen who came to this country as a young child. I worked at a bare he a newspaper for a long time and have fond memories of my time there. I had mostly white editors, and in fact, I've only had one non white supervisor in my over two decades in journalism. My name is John. Sepulvado, I mixed. I have Mexican Irish indigenous and Black Ancestry I worked in public media for fifteen years. There are tons of horror stories. There was the white woman editor who asked me if I like dog-fighting because she quote hurt. Might People like dogfighting? There was another white woman editor told me to smile more around the office because I quote have dark features and those dark features, scared herself and other white women around the office. One time a headline I, wrote for one of my own stories, led to a newsroom wide, meeting an emotional one, where a bunch of US had to persuade top editors to let us call the president's racism what it is! The most frustrating part was that I and others had to explain to our colleagues. Why our voices were important. And partly because they reflected the communities we covered. argued. Repeat, a thousand more stories like that. But at. A point I realized. That no matter what I did no matter how good I was no matter how hard I worked. I would always be seen. As something that is not. White. And my mobile was the leave the industry. All right time for a break. When we come back, we will hear from Latina, trailblazer who refused to leave the news business. Instead. She started her own media company to tell the stories that she wanted to tell. Hey another reminder asking you all to fill out that survey for us. Okay, it is anonymous. It is short and the link for it is NPR DOT org slash I B. A. M. Survey. All one word I BAM SURVEY NPR DOT Org. Slash IBM. Filled out I'll be really happy if he do thanks. This message comes from NPR sponsor discover. Sometimes, food is more than just food. It's an integral part of the community so this year discoveries, giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott Barbecue in Charleston post office spies Birmingham back in the day bakery, and Savannah and hundreds more places in your local community all across the country. Learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Whenever you face a choice. It helps to think like an economist and this week on Planet Lenny Summer. School will start off our course in economics within workout for your brain how to decide what something newly costs for? Planet money from, NPR. People still find it really interesting salmon like I'm like no. No I. I was the first Latina in the newsroom at NPR ever to step foot. WHO WASN'T CLEANING IT? That was me right that that was that. Was this Latina? That is Maria. She's had a long career in media, not just here NPR but also at CNN NPS in two thousand ten. She founded her own company for total media. And she has a memoir. It's called once. I was you that comes out in September, but most of you probably know Maria. As the host of a very long running public radio show turned podcast from NPR and through media. It's like new USA mighty. Hossack Latino USA has been around since the early nineties. It is attributed by NPR. which is why you hear NPR in the credits, but that will be changing USA is moving. As distributor. It means nothing's GonNa Change for you. Our listener that our audience is going to get way way way bigger. We're very excited. Announcement might have been confusing for listeners, but don't worry like. She said you'll still be able to hear the show. But the Journal of Color, especially in public radio that move meant that NPR was losing a hugely influential show dedicated to covering Latino stories in the US. And from its founding NPR has been well bad on race. More than seventy percent of NPR's newsroom is white and of the sources you here on NPR's air, those voices they are more than eighty percent white. People of Color who work in public media? We have been saying for years. Fix this including Maria Hosa. We're asking the question. Are you listening? Are you hearing? And that his own ready a power dynamic that is wrong. This notion is the assumption that they the they will always have the power I. Ask Maria what Latino USA leaving NPR means for this network, but I I asked her about blazing trails. One could see your path to be one of color who found her own company as a shining success, but one could also see your path as proving that the conventional spaces in media can accommodate of voice like you the way they should you know like. I'm so proud of what you're doing, but also the fact that you have to make your own production company shows at the NPR's and the PBS's and the CNN in many ways. Don't get it and can't help people like you tell the stories that you need to tell. I was thinking about that as I was thinking about our interview Sam because. My husband calls me Aguirre, a warrior, and then as I was thinking about our conversation, Sam. I was like well. That's great i. like that, but you know what I don't want. Journalists of color to have to be warriors at into order to be able to work as To work as journalists of Contians, who can bring their entire cells into the news room? Who are going to be seen who are going to not only be seen and heard but actually. Put into positions of power to be the ones who are listening and making the decisions about. Yeah, we want that story on the front page and the headline is going to say that exactly. I want you you know everyone has been using it. Everyone's been going to twitter sharing their reckoning story, the slight the knocked in that promotion. The being told you can't do this do that. Give me one of your reckoning stories from your career when I when I come to this country, I'm born in Mexico. My whole family's born in Mexico. We're raised on south side of Chicago. You know sixties and seventies, but as Mexican immigrants we also understood the essential nature of journalism and American independent journalism and so. My father was watching. Meet the press every Sunday and we were watching the today show and we watched sixty minutes, and because of the fact that it was so American in holding people accountable and I was like that's what journalism is so long. Story Short is many years later actually a decade ago go to sixty minutes when I'm out of work and needed a job actually and. They basically like look, can you Can you come back and talk to us? When one of the old white guys get secret is really and I, said and I just remember like. Like am I supposed to laugh? It's funny. Is that a joke as being? and. As we do in the media's people of Color, 'cause we're really good at laughing things off. Like. Yeah. Banter you know the the the the the we're so smart. On. Exactly Racism! Exactly. And I got into the subway at fifty ninth street onto my apartment in Harlem and I cried on the train. and. I was just like, but I am not. You know I'm knocking to let this take me down. And that was the moment that I decided to create food. Media Winds Rams history. Takes over Latino, USA. And Expands Latino USA grows the show and let the USA's audience twenty seven years in. Is in a continual upward trajectory. You love to see it. As I. Want to ask more about what needs to happen. We are in this moment now. Where so many journalists coming forward with their stories? But it's still unclear what newsroom leaders will actually do to fix this stuff you have been on all sides of media for profit nonprofit. Give me like a checklist of the big three or four things that mass media should do right now to effectively respond to the issues raised in this reckoning. Feel like this is a moment to be having that difficult conversation, which is pushing this reckoning that we're talking about to another level. I'm going. Give you an example, Sam it brings me joy, it brings me no joy to have to ask white men in senior editorial positions how they consider my role as a Mexican immigrant woman journalist. In relation to a president who insults every single one of those things that I do? And and And basis a lot of that on his white supremacy. Which is very challenging word to even use in our newsrooms right, but yeah. I don't feel comfortable saying it. I want you to feel uncomfortable having to answer that question. Because his white supremacy does not impact you in the way, it impacts me, and I am a journalist just like you. I am an equal journalist just like you so now. You helped me to figure out. Harmon handle that because that that impacts our might quote unquote objectively, you have to be able to recognize that you do not have an ownership of activity or an ownership of the media or an ownership of public media, or it's not yours to share yeah. Did any of the issues we've discussed about. In diversity and Unfair situations that journals of have to deal within this industry. Did those factor into your business decision. To leave NPR ex. Look I've had you know NPR's my family? IF NPR calls I'm going to say when you I was absolutely and Bureau Sam he's my family. You know we hung out once, but he's. He's my brother. Because we're digesting PR so NPR's my family Mi. Familia was my first job. But You know I started a company. And I have a team of very savvy business and media executives journalists. And when they said look, we have an opportunity here in in a competitive marketplace A. Somebody PR X.. Who wants to really go big? Yeah, I will say you know they are all of these. Underground email channels and slack channels and discussion boards were journalists of color are coming together to talk about all these issues and there's been a lot of chatter about your show. What says about NPR yeah? Why am I so disconnected? Oh my God. I thought I. Thought I was like connected because I'm on twitter and I got a fat. And what folks have been saying? People who love your show Oh my goodness. They're saying well. This speaks to the larger problems. NPR has always had with content may for people of Color. They don't market it enough. They don't support it enough. You have these program. Directors at various stations put a show like yours on at not great hours. This is the stuff that people are saying. Do you I mean like to the extent that you can elaborate on it, you know. Did you feel like NPR? Neglected or didn't promote enough your type of show. So of these issues at play with the race and diversity in space like NPR. Again. Let New USA right now is growing an audience at kind of extraordinary numbers I think we're one of the few public radio programs or previously distributed by NPR. That is growing an audience at these numbers. And so the fact that. We made this decision. Says everything about. WHAT NPR. Kind of thinks. About letting USA. Now having said that I don't know you know I. Don't know the internal finances at NPR. Maybe NPR's is is really facing a a real financial challenges that I'm not privy to. And so you know, but but when you're thinking about AH, show, that has this kind of. Audience Commitment There was a point not long ago. When one of your colleagues called me up, actually she works in. She's a Latina colleague at NPR in the newsroom, and she called me up and she said. Do you think that Latino USA has been this incredibly successful because of NPR or despite NPR. And no one had asked me that and I kind of like. ooh And I said well actually despite. Despite NPR, do you think you know 'cause? There are a lot of shows not produced by NPR. Distributed by NPR. Do, you think other shows like that in your same boat that were hosted by white people or felt to maybe India leadership more mainstream. Do you think they got more support than your show did pound for pound? Yeah How does that make you feel? Like I said, that's why. I didn't. See I've been feeling this for a long time, my love. News, so Gimme a word for the emotion. Well right now I'm glad that I'm with a partnership with Pr X.. That's not gonNA units not on the table so I'm like I'm looking to the future. That's why I'm like yeah I'm all about like? It's all about the dodge this morning, boxing teacher. was making us do the we've the. We've the constant, which by the way is really really hard, and that's just how I feel is a journalist of color in a survivor Mexican immigrant woman in this like it's always like whoo. Okay well and so. That stuff that you're saying like. How does it make me? That's rolled off me a long time ago, and it is a central part of what has moved me as a journalist as a woman of color in this country is that. Is like. Oh, you're going to try to silence me or tell me that I'm not objective or tell me that I have an agenda or tell me that is not going to be successful or tell me. Okay I might go home and cry. But I'm not GONNA give up. Thanks, again to Maria Hinojosa. She's the host of the Tino USA. We asked NPR for a response to what Maria told us and they gave us this statement. We have the highest respect and admiration for the Latino USA team and from Maria Hinojosa. We are proud. That Latino USA originated at NPR member station, K. U. T., and that since nineteen, ninety-four NPR has been the program's national distribution partner today, hundreds of NPR member stations bring the show to their listening communities. We are grateful. Maria entertain who are produced a consistently wonderful show and nurtured journalist who have gone on to work all over the public radio system. We are glad public radio listeners will continue to hear Latino. USA on their public radio stations across the nation. All right now. We're going to have a chat with someone who just began working with NPR Kelly. McBride NPR's newest public editor. I WanNa talk with her. About one particular part of this entire debate, the way in which we've been taught as journalists to do our jobs that most fundamental level leads to systemically racist outcomes. I am talking specifically about the idea of journalistic objectivity. This idea that reporters only report the facts. They keep themselves out of the story, and they eliminate all biased in their coverage. A lot of folks say well. That only works if you're man and straight. And White. I wanted to find out. Why are journalism so entrenched in objectivity and whether or not this standard is fair, so I went to one of the top journalism at experts in the country I am the senior vice president at the POYNTER institute. I am the chair of the Craig Newmark Center Ethics in leadership at the Poynter Institute and I am also the public editor for NPR that Kelly McBride. Kelly has advised newsrooms about difficult journalism ethics problems for years, so it made. Made, sense to begin by asking Kelly for her definition of objectivity in journalism, it really means that you will objectively pursue the facts in order to determine the truth, and there's all sorts of things that go into that right like there's how you frame the story how you identify who you're going to interview, and then really important is who else is involved in the story. So who edits it because that the the safety nets that are created in newsrooms are meant. To help an individual program against her own bias now the problem is if all the safety nets have the same biases that that doesn't happen right and that's. That's exactly what's been happier. Also objectivity has come to mean certain different things for different journalists. There are some. Who say well objectivity means that you have to. Pretend! That kind of you don't exist, and you have to just simply say what these powerful people are saying doing. You don't provide context you don't provide analysis. It's a kind of. Totally taking yourself all the way out of it to the point where you won't even tell people if you vote or not. And I think. This is the thing for me like there's so many different interpretations of what objectivity means, yet you know that's actually kind of a confederation of two different principals in journalism, so one is the principle of objectivity in this idea that that we are pursuing the truth in spite of our own biases, and that that we actually promised, swear to God that we're going to get it right because we have all these safeguards in place, even though they've failed numerous times in the past. But the other thing is is that in American journalism in particular? It was built on this business principle of aggregating A. Politically diverse audience, and then selling that audience to advertisers, so in in Europe you see much more you see much more of the journalism coming through a political lens because that's just how the business model grew up over there, but over here especially as in different markets, you went from multiple newspapers to a single newspaper. There was this motive that was really a business motive that you would bring in the entire political spectrum and if you were going to do that, you needed to convince that audience that you in the newsroom didn't have. Any particular biases it is refreshing to hear you as a leader in the industry acknowledged that some of this is about the principles and bedrocks of our journalism, and some of it's about business, and at the end of the day for whatever reason we have ended up with a definition of objectivity. That is as much about business as it is about telling the truth and I think what frustrates so many journalists, somebody younger journalists, journalists of color or women require journalists as at newsroom leaders are resistant to acknowledge that I read NPR's social media policy, and it's couched in terms of ethics and morality and idealism. But I also know that part of it is the bottom line is. Not Do anything of the public facing person at NPR. That would possibly damage NPR's revenue streams. And I mad. They don't just say that. Yeah? They don't mean to say that they. Don't I mean that's the thing is they? Don't. They really do believe, and I actually believe also that there is. That there is a line somewhere that we shouldn't cross, and maybe it is way up the continuum on just. If you're a political reporter. You can't help people who you're voting for. Maybe the line is all the way over there. Right, because of imagine that like if you were a political reporter in you were covering. Trump's campaign and you again. I'm voting for Biden though I was that guy. Did you tell people out loud. I didn't tell folks voting for in two thousand sixteen, and I wouldn't but I think gets. Those are the ones where I think everyone can agree, but there's there's there's other things like how much of me do I. Bring to a story when I'm covering police violence against black men. Am I allowed to say that's racist. Because I know what racism is experienced, it trust me and don't make me say racially tinged. Like those, and that's where it gets murkier well. You know you know where I. I experienced this. Yeah, so when gay marriage was was a hot hot issue, right? They were different cities or states that were making gay marriage legal. The Supreme Court hadn't yet decided in San Francisco the mayor of San Francisco. made it legal and a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle on a Saturday after weeks of covering it, the City Hall reporter went down and got a marriage license, and she was taken off the beat. Wow, and as in as an ethicist, right is a journalism ethicist. I was like wait a second. That can't be right. because. She was exercising in San Francisco. What was a legal right? You don't mean you didn't tell people who'd been divorced. They couldn't cover this issue because they'd you know somehow. Defiled the sanctity of marriage by? Getting divorced. So that was, that was where realized that you cannot penalize people for who they are. That's not fair. Yeah, because you end up with the only people that are untainted enough to do all the work are people who are only straight are people who are only men are people who have only gone to college and has a certain pedigree people who are an the deaths a problem, so bias is to right. It's just that we don't well. That's the thing, but these leaders aren't seeing those. Yeah, because they look just like them. I think now what is required to speak to the Syria. Systemic issues being raised in this reckoning. Going to have to be an acknowledgement that the movement toward writing these wrongs. It's going to be in some ways painful and you should do it anyway. From your conversations with newsroom leaders across the country. Do you think they're ready to accept that idea that this might hurt that? It might not just be. A statement and everyone shakes hands, and says sure good now now I mean nobody wants to voluntarily sign up for something painful. You do it because you know that what comes on the other side is worth head. There's individuals in every single newsroom who are part of the problem. Then somebody has to tell those people that if they want to keep their jobs, they have to stop being part of the problem, and that means that they're either going to have to be quiet. Or they're going to have to change or leave. Just leave well. That's I mean if they want to keep their job right like. Yeah and I've seen people. Who are these problem, people? I don't think I've ever seen any of them. Actually chain, but I've seen some of them. Learn to be quiet and let other people lead. And then they actually become the beneficiary. Of what comes after yeah. And then I. Think also so many lessons of me too I. Think are applicable to this meteoroid. Me To kind of work. Because a lot of folks were just literally canceled and they had to go, they were shamed. They were fired. And you said you can't be here anymore. And it was painful for them, and probably all the folks that liked them in love them but like. Sometimes, it's just that yeah. So my last question for you back to these two ideals that butt heads this idea of objectivity. But also this business idea of needing to be somewhat neutral to appeal to a large audience. And reworking probably reassessing, what objectively means a newsroom? What advice would you give to newsroom leaders? Writing up that next ethics guideline for their journalist about quote, Unquote Objectivity Post reckoning. Yeah, so this is where I'm supposed to come through with something really profound and I mean I. I am I. Am humble enough to say. That I don't have the answer yet. But I'm also arrogant enough to say that I believe after working through lots of really really hard ethics problems with newsrooms that I think we are going to find the answer and I think it's going to start by. Recognizing that there is a difference between. Revealing political bias. and. Revealing lived experience. And we need to start there and say your lived. Experience should not count as political bias. Thanks again to Kelly McBride joining us and thanks to everyone who, over the last week or so shared very very personal stories about life as a person of color in the newsroom. I heard from colleagues as well. And one thing one of those colleagues told me about all of this. She said so much of this work is convincing journalist. who think they've been doing it right for so long that maybe in some ways they've been doing it wrong. And then she said to me. This phrase really stuck with me, she said. How do you argue with the fish about the water there's. I. Don't know just yet how to do that. It's pretty difficult. It seems frustrating,

NPR United States President Trump Maria Chicago Donald Trump Mexico Mcbride Npr George Floyd Washington Post New York Times Kelly Mcbride FLU Bureau Sam Chicago Tribune Scapegoating Mcdonald
Steering The Ship. Building Business For Better Esports - With Bruno Santos - SVP at Ultimate Media Ventures

BIG Esports Podcast

04:31 min | 2 months ago

Steering The Ship. Building Business For Better Esports - With Bruno Santos - SVP at Ultimate Media Ventures

"Mean it's a super common thing. Right I talked to people at a KPMG I talk to people at other big accounting firms, all traditional businesses, and they say hey Christina game in my whole life. How do I get into the sports market? I mean for me. It's always hard for them. Because I say to them and I mean, we'll get into gaming receivables to cash later, but a lot of time I decided and look. These companies need someone with your expertise, but they don't have enough money to pay for someone with your expertise, so like what would be your if if someone from kpmg approach to the currently earning. Eighty to one hundred and thirty thousand dollars a year waking to co position and says hi. Burn I WANNA leave it on facebook. Like what would be your recommendation like? How could they get into the market? I? Mean I am more of. kind of like conservative investment personality so I, would say start small, you know you'll your legacy from a stark from from small perspective, and like let the company grow with the space I think there's a lot up growth to be gained route gaming, these sports and No one that's. Good enough to start heart and start from the top. Just you gotta you gotTa. You gotta pay. Dudes by you know understanding your community understanding your your base, and there are the ones who really help you kind of grow, and it takes sometimes time. It takes longer than people think I think there's a lot of. Misunderstanding on you know because of the boom of gaming and eastwards, General that anybody can come in and you know. Get Big really fast and I think that's the biggest misconception I. Think you just you know you start. Small and consistent you know slowly. You're going to grow verse. That's the same for any streamer any youtuber. Just you know it's consistent time put in a time over time. Put on on the business itself. Yeah. I agree I. Think it's a hard. It's a hard sell sometimes to be like. Hey, you know. Leave your corporate job high flying, and then guy and volunteers social media manager for a t three's team. That doesn't have a single financial sponsor. It's a bit of a hard pill to swallow a lot of time, but that's you know that's the suggestion and. If you if you're a true. Like for example if you're director and you have. All you skew saturated breach that seventy or mark of experience in your business you probably. Is Wise enough. In Organiz enough to manage your time to basically put two hours of your day into that visits that is probably equivalent of a ten hour of a new entry level person that's going to try to come up with new ideas so I think you know if the person is really passionate really wants to come in. Is it just a little bit about a time? And you know and maximize your. The into the business being open minded because it's a lot of different approach to the Gaming East sports business that you know that's rare different than the traditional, which sometimes core related, but also different. I think that's kind of what makes it the growth, even faster for someone. That's just brand new. Yeah Yeah that definitely makes sense and it's the same. It's the same way that anyone who comes to want to get to the industry. It's what I tell them you know. I started off as a player and a commentator and to start doing more start asking for more jobs. I was combining battlefield to them I said Hi. Be playing a lot of counterstrike souls can I go home and tight that too and I said well. If you want to do it, you can do it so I did that. And then they said you know. Marketing manages left. Who wants to do it? I said I'll do that as well as volunteer, but and I would to get that experience, and like you said on the ground like you really need a lot of that on the grand experience you know, get your hands dirty and really try it out and the like to to frame like a lot of conversation today. Before we started recording this, and before we went live on link Dan you and I were talking a lot about gaming versus a sports, and literally even in a meeting this morning. I was explaining exactly what this is, and I feel like I probably explain it at least three times a week, so for those people listening gaming, versus as bullets is like sport versa leisure activity, so if you'll just kicking a football with your friends down at the beach. That's not sport. That's just A. A leisure activity. That's having fun the same way that if you're just playing candy, crush my ball. Fine, your son, daughter or cousin is playing for not on the IPAD. You're just playing a little bit of data to solely Q.. That's not a sports. That's gaming. It becomes a sports when it's a structured competitive nature of play

Kpmg Facebook Organiz Director DAN Football
Adding Style or Updating with Temporary Wallpaper

Home Space and Reason

06:53 min | 3 months ago

Adding Style or Updating with Temporary Wallpaper

"Discuss home aesthetics, specifically, adding character or updating things like kitchen, cabinets and bookshelves using temporary wallpaper. Note that this is also a renter friendly suggestion in the event that you don't own your own home yet. Also this is a concept to chew on for updating a space without completely overhauling it. When we built our home I, really wanted a different color island than our main bank of Cabinets. But Alas are upgrades were already fast, approaching thirty thousand dollars and I decided that it wasn't something I had to have at least right now. Fast forward five years, and I was still toying with the idea of painting the back side of the island. That faces are living space. But man painting is so permanent. I mean I know you can undo it, but it's difficult to undo if we wanted to return to stain cabinets at some point. So I kept stalling. Thinking on it rolling it over and over in my mind. then. I was paging through instagram recently, and I saw post by chasing paper and had an epiphany. Why couldn't I simply use temporary wallpaper on the one side imitating tile, which would add both color that I desired and a pattern to for just one hundred and seventy five dollars and four hours of our own labor. We have a refreshed kitchen that I am loving so very much. Remember there's no such thing as perfect even with custom built cabinetry, so our biggest lesson was that when we measured are island from countertop to the baseboard top. There was a variance of of an inch from the left side to the far right side, so we had to cut the larger size and then trim it after hanging it to accommodate the imperfection. The chasing paper product is basically like a giant sticker. We peel off the backing starting at the top and gradually pull it down from behind as we work our way out pushing the air bubbles out and smoothing it from the center to the edges. We were challenged as we got to the left and the far right side, because we couldn't use a razor blade to cut vertically on the edge of the island without scraping the would. We opted to tape it up with masking tape, so we kind of did it like a mock hang while the backing was still on it, so we can draw a vertical cutline and cut it before peeling the backing off one person held up a large cutting matt against the wallpaper to hold it in place, while the other person drew a cutline on the edge of the backside. Sure enough once we pulled it away, the top and bottom were not a perfectly straight line, so if we had simply measured it and cut it. It would not have been as precise. We have custom cabinets, and they look perfect, but they are not actually because there's no such thing as perfect and sometimes things are off here and there a sixteenth of an inch. We also put temporary wallpaper in the back of our Bilton bookshelves, many years back to add depth and interest. We love it, and now that five years has passed. I'm thrilled. I could change it out easily and put up something different in their without repainting. Temporary wallpaper rocks my friends. It's worth noting though that it does best on smooth surfaces, which means walls that have texture are going to be less wallpaper friendly, and you'll likely see the texture visible through the wallpaper. Since we did the back of our Bilton bookshelves and the back of our island, neither were walls, so we didn't have to worry about the wall texture. There's no glues or mess necessary. There are several companies out there offering wonderful modern patterns and designs. Here are a few that sell it although I'm sure there are more. Chasing paper is who I bought from WHO got and West. Walls need. Love Spoon, Flower Wall, candy it's West Elm. Temp Paper Blick Walter `natives, new paper by wall POPs Carter in Maine and Kate Zaremba. Company of course I will put a list on the facebook group page. If you're not yet a member, look up, home, space and reason. We have a few extra bits leftover from our main project and are thinking of lining the inside of a couple. Small nightstand drawers it upstairs. For a lovely little surprise inside when you open it up I've also seen people. Put this in the back of cupboards that have glass on the fronts, so the POPs of color offset the dishes and adds color to the kitchen. Now. Let's talk about what you'll need. You'll need to start with some simple green cleaner to wipe down the surface a few hours before to make sure it's dust, free and goop free, sticky, free grease free all the stuff. It needs to dry, complete Li like for reals. Maybe even do this a day before if you have the patience to wait. You'll need a long metal straight edge for cutting an EXACTO BLADE, sharp and new and a large self-healing cut. Matt often found in fabric stores. I use mine all the time. We also ended up using masking tape for making sure. Our measurements were right before committing to taking off the backing. And we also used a thin sharpy to make that line. We used a credit card a few times for pushing tiny edges up into the corners where fingers wouldn't fit. We also used a work light from the garage for shining directly directly at prospect since there was some shadowing from the countertop overhang.

Facebook West Elm Matt Kate Zaremba LI Carter Maine
RV Rentals Booming as Nervous Vacationers Become COVID Campers

Business Wars Daily

02:24 min | 4 months ago

RV Rentals Booming as Nervous Vacationers Become COVID Campers

"Perhaps this should come as no surprise to me. Memorial Day always feels like the first day summer but it came around quietly last weekend in days gone by the holiday would mark the point when we'd start taking summer vacations and gearing up for a lot of travel. Not so much this year. With the economy just tentatively re opening so how can we get away will in our own isolated homes on wheels? Of course I'm talking about? Rv's here sales of recreational vehicles are booming dealers. Tell us so. Our rentals of our visa campers sure. Rv sales typically get a boost. This time of year is people's thoughts turned to warm days and starry nights but this summer a brand new set of customers shelling out big bucks to travel the country on four or more wheels. There people who are too nervous to rent hotel rooms or to hang out in crowded cities and do not want to sleep in tents Bloomberg is calling them covid campers. Maybe you're one now. You can't be blamed if in the past you thought. Rv's weren't cool as Bloomberg noted the height of RV sales happen back when Richard Nixon was president in nineteen seventy two but our love affair with exploration didn't end interest. Grew again a few years back. In two thousand seventeen travelers bought a half a million. Rv's and then sales drooped once more until now in March when dealerships were closed RV sales fell twenty percent Bloomberg reports but dealerships. That are now open. Can't keep up with demand camping world holdings a publicly held. Rv retailer said. The first weekend in May was the company's biggest weekend in its history. The Motley Fool reported its stock price nearly tripled since the beginning of May camping world and many local dealers are selling to cova campers like Mike Roads and his wife Carol. The couple told Bloomberg that they'd been planning summer trips to Germany and New Zealand among other places but now they don't want to stay in hotels so they put a wash on their global adventures and instead bought a thirty thousand dollar travel trailer and used a Toyota. Pick up to pull it. The skittish couple is in very good company. Only seventeen percent of Americans feel comfortable staying in hotels or resorts right now and even fewer would take a domestic flight. That's according to a late April survey by M. G. Y. Global for the. Us Travel Association. The Wall Street Journal reported. But let's say you have no. Rv experience or you have no intention of spending thousands to own a motor home. Well two big

Bloomberg RV Us Travel Association Richard Nixon Cova M. G. Y. Global President Trump Toyota The Wall Street Journal Mike Roads Germany Carol New Zealand
Paul's Religion

5 Minutes in Church History

04:25 min | 4 months ago

Paul's Religion

"Welcome back to another five minutes in Church history for this episode. I am sitting here with a book in my hand. It is J. Gresham Megan's the origin of Paul's religion. It was first published in nineteen twenty one and that was when it was copyrighted. And this edition. Looks like it's from nineteen twenty five and autographed. It says with warm regards. Day Gresham Megyn October. Six Nine thousand nine hundred twenty seven. He gave it to George Fisher and George Fisher. Meticulously underlined and put in margin notes throughout this whole book. Sometimes you find books with notes and they stop after the first chapter to these notes. Go all the way through. Well that's the particular book but let's talk about this book Paul's religion. This book originated in lectures. In fact. There's a page here at the beginning that says the James Sprint lectures in nineteen eleven Mr James Sprint of Wilmington North Carolina gave to the Trustees of union theological seminary in Virginia. The some of thirty thousand dollars since increased by his generosity to fifty thousand dollars and it goes on to say that the purpose of that money was to set up a lectureship and in nineteen twenty two twenty one the lectures the sprint lectures were given by the Reverend. Dr John Grissom the year before the lectures were given by G Campbell. Morgan from London. The Great London pastor and the year after making the lectures were given by none other than the honorable William Jennings Bryan the nineteen twenty one thousand nine hundred ninety two lectures just three years before Brian would get into that courtroom in Dayton Tennessee. Well let's talk about mentions sprint lectures. He gave it the title the origin of Paul's religion there were actually three views floating around testament scholarship of the origin of Christianity. You see these New Testament scholars. German English turn of the nineteenth into the twentieth century. Made a distinction between the Jesus of the Gospels and the religion of Paul and they saw Jesus as one who talked about behavior ethics and made religion essentially how we live. Paul's the great systematize her and turned all of those systems of behavior into belief codes that you had to believe. And so that was the argument there was the Jesus of the Gospels the religion of Paul. And so where did? Paul's religion come from while German scholar Adolf von Harnack argued. That Paul was not a foundation not building on a foundation of the Gospels but was his own sort of mix off of the gospels. Harnack did not like Paul. He didn't like John Either. He only liked this synoptic gospels and then not even all of them and he certainly didn't like things like the Apostles Creed Harnack said Paul Deified Christ and turned him into somebody that Christ never claimed to be. There was also the German scholar of Rada and he said that Paul founded the Christian religion on certain Jewish elements from the enter testament period. But certainly not from Jesus and then there was another scholar boo set. And he said Oh wasn't founded on Judaism at all. Paul founded his religion on the Greek Pagan religions. Well Megan did not agree with that at all. An in this very scholarly book which was about three hundred pages when it was done. Amazing wanted it to be five hundred pages but the publisher said No. That's too much But in this very scholarly book Mason makes the case that the origin of Paul's religion is from Jesus himself the very end. This is what made us Paulin. Ism was not a philosophy. It was not a set of directions for escape from the misery of the world was not an account of what had always been true on the contrary it was an account of something that had happened and what had happened was the death and resurrection of Jesus. Megan says this he loved me and gave himself for me. There lies the basis of the religion of Paul. There lies the basis of all of Christianity. Well that's Mason on Paul's religion and I'm Steven. Thanks for joining us for five minutes in Church history

Paul J. Gresham Megan Adolf Von Harnack Mr James Sprint Gresham Megyn George Fisher Dr John Grissom William Jennings Bryan Trustees Of Union Theological Mason Wilmington Great London John Either North Carolina Morgan Virginia Tennessee Rada Brian Publisher
COVID 19 Travel News

The World Nomads Podcast

09:23 min | 5 months ago

COVID 19 Travel News

"Welcome to the war nomads podcast. We'll be keeping you up to date travelers information about Coronado answering some uplifting news views to inspire you and keeping smiling took I. It's true with you. Those topics energy analyst in lockdown in Paris. Thought I feel Italy. What is happening on? Well social distancing and wearing masks is still required in Italy. It has said child to lockdown while at least most of their structures there in face to of locked down where they can leave their homes for less urgent reasons including exercising impacts and visiting relatives and some of those people have been locked emphasis being like eight ten weeks. Jesus came to get outside. Wouldn't you? Yeah we'll what other? Headlines have forced to speaking of face masks it's now compulsory to wear a face mask on. Moist. Us Airlines American Airlines United Delta and Frontier Airlines. Join jetblue in the order. Look after initially signed Feis Moss provided protection the CDC changed its mind and recommends they used to prevent people who are affected. But don't know it from spreading the corona virus hints. The idea of wearing face masks when you are apply no in the terminal a look speaking of American Airlines. They've posted a whopping two point. Two billion dollar loss for the three months of the years I fought but that saying it's not the end for the add that side. I've got six point. Eight billion in the quantity for the current quarter and government is another Money that's coming in. I reckon they'll rise that to eleven billion in liquidity into the second quarter so then Guyana and talked soon we would hook. One of the world's most popular tourist sites has had a ninety nine point five percent drop in visits in April. It's Cambodia's ankle what which normally takes in seven million dollars a month in phase but with just six hundred fifty visitors last month the takings were poultry thirty thousand dollars to there that suicide for that economy. Yes they rely on older people all around ankle. What who yes yes. That's that's not even taking into account that loss of money for all of those people there as we NI- tourism and travel with temperatures of GDP. This people survive exactly but pre convert remember though talks that they were going to restrict the number of visitors to anchor. What because of tourism. Yeah two point six million people in las GSA. It's probably yeah. It's bad for the people who try to make a livelihood from around it but You know maybe it's time to reset on those things in control nights. I love finally. I've got some good corona virus needs for you Beijing's Forbidden City is. I've been to the public for the first time. Since January twenty fifth Visited THEY TEMPERATURE. Take him when they come in and I have to show that. They are covered free and healthy vira verification. App on their fine and there's a sign of things to come in the future. I think we're all going to have to get something some sort of verification that we covered fray before we can go into public places in travel bets the new. GonNa use air quotes new normal. You know they got. I can't I lane. Show is a journalist and photographer. Who prior to the pandemic would travel nine months out of the year beautiful? But he's currently in lockdown in Paris. I lived here for the past five years in so I it feels like home and gives them American. I didn't want to be in the US with the healthcare. They have it kind of sucks because most of my family's stuck in Seattle in it's been just messed it. Actually you doesn't yeah So Seattle was one of the first places where it was pretty bad or like Seattle area So I have like neighbors who are doctors who have their first doctors to fall. Ill And I was back home in February. Visiting my parents can also do an assignment and I had an injection and I try to go see a doctor. And it was the prices just exorbitant. Like thousand two hundred dollars just to get a doctor to look at my. I get a prescription so I just can't even imagine what it's like to deal with co bit right now as an American. So you're in lockdown which means you can't even go to restaurants and enjoy food no so everything is closed except for the essentials. They're quite strict about it. Because the cops. I live in the center of Paris and the cops have been actively I guess. Checking with people I went out yesterday for the first time because my laptop screen shattered on over the weekend. Which is so unfortunate. Never happened once. My life and Apple France has no way of fixing it side to find like a third party person of exit and I went out for the first time yesterday and it was terrifying. Explain that what was terrifying about it. I I'm reporting a lot of stuff for US news source new sites right now and so. I'm really up to date with like everything. Cove it And so I was reading a report from Finland about how like even sixteen might not be enough of distance. So it's a bike a four kilometers away yesterday to drop off my and people outside. Were not respecting social distancing A lot of people aren't wearing masks. Their parts of the city with half open produce shops and it was filled with people I was biking to dodge other people on the streets. A lot of cars have stopped respecting driving rules. I don't drive never driven in my life so I don't know what they are but I know for a fact. You should not be you turning wherever you want. I was on my bike. Like dodging cars as well It just seems very foreign world outside. It's society I don't recognize anymore now. You're also photographer. Are you documenting any of this? Not only for you sort of personal history but the back in the US. So I did a story. Few weeks ago for business insider about the first few days of walk down so yes I was documenting actively I'm still shooting from my window I just. I don't feel comfortable at all going outside. I've severe asthma even before this started like I'm always sick with like my lungs. I I just don't want to be outside right now I'm trying my best. I have a food diary with those going on of the foods. I'm eating at home Documenting life in my fifty square meters apartment as much as I can buy also fell like this crippling anxiety Trying my best to balance it out and I've been reading a lot about like why creatives don't feel very productive right now or anyone. Actually I was reading about grief at the beginning of how we're grieving like the old world and society we used to know. That's a bit much but now I've really under I think that's what it is like. I go through these weird cycles. I've never experienced really before. The other part is that my partner and I are in lockdown together. And he's a very logical person in. He's just doing what he has to do going to work from his off from our couch every day on like he's just like it's out of my control whereas I'm like spires really on my own. How do you think travel is going to change? Eilly the thing. The weird thing is that I travel so much so in the past three or four years. I've graduated from photography school. I was travelling like nine months of the year. And it's weird. I have like a background in conservation. Biology some all about being ECO friendly. I was just like Kinda gross out by how much I was traveling. Bozo where the The travel world was heading towards it was just too much like all these people taking weekend trips like for me. Traveling is about really understanding place and it requires time and so I told all editors I would not be traveling as much this year and so for me. It feels just like the perfect storm like I now don't have to explain to everyone. I'm not traveling as much. I've ING moving forward. We won't be traveling as much. We'll be chopping in a more thoughtful way. Which is a good thing definitely. I'm worried about all the people I've written about who works who make their income off tourism. That's one of the scariest things for me. And I have lots of family. Also still in Korea and Korea's kind of ahead of everyone else with the pandemic I would say and even they who have mostly under control people aren't moving as much So I think we won't be traveling for like a good year until the viruses totally controlled which means we have a cure or vaccine.

United States Paris Seattle Italy Coronado American Airlines Airlines American Airlines Uni Analyst Korea Cambodia Feis Moss Beijing Jetblue Las Gsa Finland Guyana Apple CDC Frontier Airlines Asthma
Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway reports nearly $50 billion loss

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 5 months ago

Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway reports nearly $50 billion loss

"Warren Buffett's company reported a nearly fifty billion dollar loss on Saturday because of a huge drop in the paper value of its investments AP correspondent Shelley Adler reports even the very successful Warren Buffett is not immune to the financial woes that come with the corona virus Berkshire Hathaway says it lost nearly fifty billion dollars or over thirty thousand dollars per class A. share during the first quarter normally some forty thousand shareholders will be heading to Berkshire's annual meeting at this time but buff it plans to lead in the breezy aided online a version of it Berkshire is sitting on a pile of more than one hundred and thirty seven billion dollars in cash because Buffett has struggled to find major acquisitions for the company

Warren Buffett Shelley Adler Berkshire Hathaway Berkshire
Buffett's firm reports nearly $50B loss as investments drop

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 5 months ago

Buffett's firm reports nearly $50B loss as investments drop

"Even the very successful Warren Buffett is not immune to the financial woes that come with the corona virus Berkshire Hathaway says it lost nearly fifty billion dollars or over thirty thousand dollars per class A. share during the first quarter normally some forty thousand shareholders will be heading to Berkshire's annual meeting at this time but buff it plans to lead in the breezy aided online a version of it Berkshire is sitting on a pile of more than one hundred and thirty seven billion dollars in cash because Buffett has struggled to find major acquisitions for the company recently actually after

Warren Buffett Berkshire Hathaway Berkshire
Fan sues Woods, caddie, claiming he was pushed 2 years ago

Dan Proft

00:26 sec | 6 months ago

Fan sues Woods, caddie, claiming he was pushed 2 years ago

"Them on the week that Tiger Woods was supposed to defend his masters title instead comes word that he and his caddie Joe lacava are being sued from an incident at the Valspar championship two years ago Brian Bruso was a fan at that tournament and is alleging that Lacob I shoved him as he was trying to take a selfie with woods perusal claims he suffered physical wounds losing his ability to earn income and has had ongoing health problems the Russo is seeking thirty thousand dollars in

Tiger Woods Joe Lacava Brian Bruso Russo
Fan sues Woods, caddie, claiming he was pushed 2 years ago

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 6 months ago

Fan sues Woods, caddie, claiming he was pushed 2 years ago

"On the week that Tiger Woods was supposed to defend his masters title instead comes word that he and his caddie Joe lacava are being sued from an incident at the Valspar championship two years ago Brian Bruso was a fan at that tournament and is alleging that Lacob I shoved him as he was trying to take a selfie with woods perusal claims he suffered physical wounds losing his ability to earn income and has had ongoing health problems the Russo is seeking thirty thousand dollars in damages woods finished in a tie for second at that tournament and both he and Lochaber are named in the lawsuit I'm David Shuster

Tiger Woods Joe Lacava Brian Bruso Russo Lochaber David Shuster
Answering Your Questions of Stimulus Relief

Clark Howard Show

08:27 min | 6 months ago

Answering Your Questions of Stimulus Relief

"Wants to know she said I heard if you're on social security and you receive less than thirty thousand dollars per year you will not receive the stimulus money. Is this true? I have not seen anything saying that anywhere. So if you're talking about the twelve hundred dollar helicopter money I have not seen that the the senior citizens that will not receive it or senior citizens that are claimed as a dependent of someone else like. Let's say an adult child provides a lot of your care and Pays for more than half of your costs. And they may claim you on their taxes than you would not be eligible and they would not receive any Any helicopter money but if you live independently. I know of no reason why you would be eligible for the money. Doug has a question about his stimulus. Jackie says I've heard rumors that the cove in nineteen stimulus checks are going to be deducted from twenty twenty income tax refunds if a refund is applicable. Is that correct? No this is that something that I it a couple of days ago. I said I was going to have to read up on because we had another question about how this is affected in terms of taxes. And this is like money. Falling out of the sky it is Essentially a non taxable gift from the taxpayers collectively to you as an individual tax payer and the twelve hundred bucks per individual and a couple twenty four hundred. The five hundred per dependent child That money is just money. That's yours to us into spend as you need or to save for the event that Finance become more difficult for you over time no tax will be do chem I right. Michael says that he is self employed. He has no employees and he heard that there is no provision for people like him. What do you suggest I do? Is there any program that I can apply for help? Okay what's actually different? This time is there is assistance to people. That are self-employed self-employed individuals who've had their incomes. Crushed or eligible for what I think is the first time ever for unemployment compensation. The unemployment compensation will continue for Roughly I don't know if it's going to be sixteen weeks or seventeen weeks. I haven't seen final wording on that. Is Unemployment compensation you apply for with your State Unemployment Insurance Group And we have all the agency information for you with direct hyper links for all fifty states on our update to filing for unemployment on Clark Dot Com. We also have a deep dive story on it that we did not right but we linked to act. Clark DOT COM on applying for unemployment. So people that are self employed people that are independent contractors people that are GIG workers all three categories that under virtually every state law would be ineligible for unemployment compensation and all three categories. You are now eligible under the third stimulus Bill Joe Clark. Shane says I own some rental single family. Homes Have Fannie Mae backed mortgages under the new federal legislation. If my tenants can't pay rent will I have any loan payment forbearance if I can't pay the mortgage on those rental homes and if yes will how will that forbearance work? I am so glad you asked this question. Because I've been looking for the answer for people who have rental properties underwritten Indirectly by the federal government now. The legislation is clear that owner occupied properties. You're able to ask for forbearance for twelve months. I have not found anything that gives me a definitive answer yet for people who have rental properties because even though this is the first time we've had on the show. It's the third time I've been asked the question this week. By people off off the show people have been asking me who have rental properties that. They're worried they're tenants aren't going to pay is therefore available for them in what is essentially a Investment property not a personal residence. And hopefully that answer will emerge after this is adopted signed by the President and the regulations are issued. But for now I don't know Khem Sachs says now that the government is halting student loan interest in payments for six months. Does that mean that if I choose to make payments that the payment will go straight towards principal? There's no wording on that yet you know. There's no interest is going to be charged. But I've had a number of people ask me you know if I if I've got my job everything's fine. Just keep paying my student loans as agreed and am I gonNa get burned by doing that by missing the interest holiday so is best. I can tell you will not get benefit of the interest holiday if you continue to pay although that could change because I need to. I need to step back a second and explain something. And that is when the Congress passes a bill and then the president signs it into law. A lot of what's in there is worked out later by administrative agencies by the real various federal agencies so in the case with student loans it will be the US Department of Education that will ultimately issue guidance. On what will happen with something like somebody who says hey. I don't need a holiday. I'm going to keep paying amount. Do you get the benefit of no interest is an additional amount reducing your loan. That's the kind of thing Balhaf to decide because there's nothing I could find in what I've read. I've read that part of the statute that addresses. What happens if somebody voluntarily continues to make those payments so these kind of questions will be answered over the next several weeks? We only have a lot of areas more general information. Joe Clark. Brad has a question that might fall under exactly what you were. Just mentioning with the clarification from the different agencies but he says that his wife has automatic payments I in loans so we'll the grace period where the loans don't need to be paid. What will those automatic payments just cease for the time being and then start up again in October? That seems to be the plan because again the education department's going to have to make that happen but their intention is to cease all collections on loans for that period of time to be essentially no billing for loans and many people have them set up as automatic so there are two ways. People do automatics. If you have a bill pay service set up with your checking account and you just automatically pay certain bills every month. You will have to discontinue that if you're doing it for student loans because that would continue to go regardless of the actions of the US Department of Education on the other hand if your federal student loan servicer drafts here account each month. That's the activity that will likely automatically cease. So that's a distinction with a difference. It's very important that if you don't WanNa make your payments that you discontinue automatic bill pay and let me emphasize again. This is four federal student loans. Private loans are not included at all to this point. Private student loan providers are doing basically pretty much nothing for borrowers all. The action has been at the federal

Us Department Of Education Self Employed President Trump Bill Joe Clark Federal Government Fannie Mae Doug Joe Clark Khem Sachs Jackie Congress Shane Michael Principal Balhaf
"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:04 min | 11 months ago

"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Thirty thousand dollars thirty thousand dollars then the IRS came to collect started getting letter after letter lean it been filed against me and they were gonna basically like hang me a completely out to dry he had to do something that's when I reached out to optimal tax relief Patrick's life quickly got a lot easier very easy pretty much hands off you know they picked up the ball and ran with it and how to go I couldn't believe it I had to ask like two or three times I saved an incredible amount of money is Patrick feel about optima couldn't be happier definitely helped me optimal tax relief the best place to call they're the best in the business do it Patrick did and call optima tax relief for a free consultation call eight hundred seven oh nine fifty nine sixty six eight hundred seven oh nine fifty nine sixty six eight hundred seven oh nine fifty nine sixty six optimal tax relief am entertainment and enlightenment well we want you to know we want you to know that Canada is very very consistent you know they just they just hired prime minister and reelected him even though they had multiple photos of him in black face not a problem to worry about don't worry about it get all tied up in knots over political correctness however when it comes to an absolute Canadian legend yeah stuff that doesn't even doesn't even compare does that isn't even in the same neighborhood even the same town or state as Justin Trudeau yeah he has about twenty minutes to live we'll give you that story next Graham freeze all right if you're a veteran have you taken care.

IRS Patrick Canada Graham optima prime minister Justin Trudeau Thirty thousand dollars thirty thousand dollars twenty minutes
"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:49 min | 11 months ago

"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Thirty thousand dollars thirty thousand dollars then the IRS came to collect started getting letter after letter lean it been filed against me and they were gonna basically like hang me a completely out to dry he had to do something that's when I reached out to optimal tax relief Patrick's life quickly got a lot easier very easy pretty much hands off you know they picked up the ball and ran with it and how to go I couldn't believe it I had to ask like two or three times I saved an incredible amount of money is Patrick feel about optima couldn't be happier they definitely helped me optimal tax relief the best place to call they're the best in the business do it Patrick did and call optima tax relief for a free consultation call eight hundred seven oh nine fifty nine sixty six eight hundred seven oh nine fifty nine sixty six eight hundred seven oh nine fifty nine sixty six optim with tax relief there all right here on the ACO day radio program Monday edition on thanks for playing all that good stuff coming up on the show today anybody kill anybody else or attempt to kill anybody else for a chicken sandwich over the weekend we may just have to make a list of people who didn't holy crap and there's a bunch of like race angle stop in here because in at.

IRS Patrick optima Thirty thousand dollars thirty thousand dollars
"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Pay thirty thousand dollars as a fine perform two hundred fifty hours as community service and then after prison one year of supervised release Craig figure can extend seventy newsradio statement from Hoffman says she accepts the court's decision knows that she broke the law the actors apologized to her daughter husband family man the educational community long with students to work hard to get into college and their parents for the sacrifices they make while supporting their kids of man says she's learned a lot about flaws during the entire process and is promising to live more honest life and be a better role model for her daughters what role if any did Felicity Huffman celebrity status play in her sentencing today the federal court judge said Felicity Huffman's punishment is the right sentence here but former federal prosecutor now white collar criminal defense attorney Jacob Frenkel says this is likely the most difficult sentence the judge has ever imposed I think the judge was trying to strike a balance between sending a real message in connection with this case at the same time showing that there is a place for leniency when a person does show contrition and I do think the prosecutors were far too heavy handed in their approach to the sentencing Frankel says the judge realized that this case is a bass line and if Huffman didn't get jail time it would send the wrong message to the many non famous people also tied to the scandal Chrissy Bruce can extend seventy newsradio of men will likely get nothing more than a taste of prison fourteen days is really hit it might take quite a bit of that time just a processor in so by the time she gets there finds out where she's going to be living learns the rule should be out again loyal ally professor and former federal prosecutor Laurie Levenson she may very well go to a minimum security facility so that picture of her behind bars may not apply at all it might be much more like a camper farm type situation former federal prosecutor Jean Rossi says another actress caught up in the college admissions cheating scandal Lori Loughlin may end up facing a more sick. sentence if she pleads guilty or gets convicted Loughlin and husband Mossimo generally are accused of paying half a million dollars to get their two daughters in the U. S. C. S. crew team recruits it's more of a sophisticated scheme more devious war duplicitous Levinson agrees others may face more time pointing out Hoffman got a two week prison sentence after pleading guilty to paying only fifteen thousand dollars to help boost her daughter's SAT scores club give this guitar KNX ten seventy newsradio there's reaction to Felicity Huffman sentence from students at U. F. C. one of several universities involved in the scandal most of students I spoke with felt like it's a slap on the wrist I think she should have been punished more I think.

fifteen thousand dollars thirty thousand dollars two hundred fifty hours million dollars fourteen days one year two week
"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"There are three or four places that have old car collections and they really in Los Angeles you can't sell a car like this an alley in Arkansas in anywhere the prices sometimes our core easy I remember going in once and looking at Mercedes convertibles chests mood as could be it was like a hundred and thirty thousand dollars for a car that was sixty years old and then that's yeah there are a lot of word car shows like the minimum Auto Show yeah that sometimes that Johnny using it really it really great there is a huge classic car show last weekend the right here at the Jersey Shore and really the cars are so pristine only reproduce fine it's just an answering service it's a really cool too exciting hi television news the question is will there be a big little lies season three this is the second one but the first one was supposed to be what one season one and done and then they yeah and now so what happens now is we only got two episodes left of season two and they're consulting with the original writer of the book aren't they are they are she said that if if they do a third season she won't be able to be involved because she's writing her next book which has nothing to do with this series so not sure I I don't know how there's only two episodes left I don't know how they could ever wrap up the entire story line in two more episodes so I hope it doesn't end on a disappointing note for the fans because it just feels like this is flown by how many episodes in each season like you said six six yeah yeah rap if if you wanna see big little lies on Sundays nine o'clock on HBO HBO show the other there these the Netflix people they have their big emphasize the the episodic adventures continued seems on Sunday night they started Sunday and how you make a choice watched them footnote important for down hill good day a city on a hill and and you know there are other things but it's all Sunday night at nine o'clock but having said that Jennifer what we have going between now and Sunday night that looks good well it you've got down on Sunday night celebrity Big Brother I know everybody's going to be tuned in for that new episode of the good fight as well CBS is the destination on Sunday nights on the networks that starts at eight o'clock of course in big little lies they also going on naked and afraid also a pic of their back with the excel version that's at eight o'clock on discovery on Sunday night that's this weekend tonight if you're home and looking for kind of a low key evening can check out agents marbles of shield at that's on ABC tonight brand new CBS continues love island at eight o'clock and otherwise you've got the news programs got dateline NBC you've got twenty twenty so go out tonight see a movie IBM this summer what do you want is it actually celebrity Big Brother regular yes brother notice so I remember anybody that we mail room do you know who jade goody is now at the end they are everywhere lazy doing some sort of racist rants but I'm not sure who she is exactly yeah some people make a smile some people smile with us and we look at ourselves in the mirror do you smile some smile and they don't feel good about this my other people's mind they look younger they seem to have a bright way about ten people big smiles seem to live longer it was not about that some of the older people you know they have really great smiles so let's have that kind of a feeling going forward Joey using the tools of powers wives a little tubes of fabulous the material in them is.

Los Angeles thirty thousand dollars sixty years
"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"Into thirty thousand dollars. You see how I'm doing that? Yeah. That's three dollars a month for nine years. If not include that baby step two and just work. I would be in baby steps six, and I would just let it right? A little while if it gets within striking distance. And you know, let's say the value comes up a little the mortgage comes down a little reach over and pay ten grand get rid of it. I'm not do that paying thirty grand get rid of it doesn't sound like fun. Do you want? Why I'm saying that? Yes. But I'd set it by step six, and let's just go ahead on attack the rest of the stuff as well. Until your husband. Thanks for service. We appreciate him Barbara's and Minneapolis. Hi, Barbara, welcome to the Dave Ramsey show. Thank you. It's an honor to talk with you. And I just gotta say I if you at eagle. Church last month in Minneapolis and safety for buying past about crooner shoot. Oh, you love pastor, Bob. He's a great friend. That's right church. We were honored to be there. How can we help? My husband has scored eight I work fulltime. We're both in good health. Employer. Does also as a benefit at the EPA -tunities purchase long-term parents. And I've heard you talk about the minute. You turn sixty should be securing that. For you is you know. Looking at buying that at our ages now younger and healthier. No. Okay. Because if you take what you're going to pay for it now and multiply times twelve from forty.

Minneapolis Barbara Bob Dave Ramsey EPA thirty thousand dollars three dollars nine years
"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"About thirty thousand dollars despite a lottery funded scholarships for students heading to top universities or technical colleges. State newspaper in Columbia reports. Lottery funds are legally required to be used to boost education spending overall but state lawmakers instead cut higher education funding by four billion dollars and replaced it with lottery money. Former governor Jim Hodges says the lottery can't keep up with the legislature's education cuts propping record tuition hikes causing much of that student debt North Carolina voters next month will. Side on six proposed changes to the state's constitution, including one dealing with hunting and fishing more from WBZ's Brett Johnson the wording on the ballot says constitutional amendment protecting the right of the people to hunt fish and harvest wildlife either for or against at first glance, you might think it's a useless amendment because hunting and fishing, which are major activities in the state aren't exactly in danger of disappearing anytime soon, and you won't be alone in thinking that backers say guarantees the traditions and will stop any possible future temps to eat away at the ability to hunt or fish. The also say this is the best way to manage and control wildlife. Critics claim the amendment is nothing more than an attempt to get conservative voters to the ballot box when they normally wouldn't show for a mid-term election currently twenty three states, including California already have some sort of law on the books guaranteeing the right either fish or hunt or both Brett Jensen WBZ news. The former NFL star known for the catch in a nineteen Eighty-one NFC title game when he played for the forty Niners. It's being honored at Charlotte high school alma mater later this. This week special ceremony will be held Friday.

WBZ Brett Johnson Brett Jensen Jim Hodges Charlotte high school Columbia North Carolina NFL legislature NFC California thirty thousand dollars four billion dollars
"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Thirty thousand dollars or more so it's all a matter of yeah they'll working under full retirement age and it doesn't matter what benefit you're receiving now disability has a different set of rules that the little more restrictive and a little more lenient at different times in different ways with disabilities a different way but any other social security benefit that you're receiving if you are working and you're under full retirement age that's the key there's going to be an issue if you're making more than roughly seventeen thousand dollars a year yeah now that's all you're making a seventeen or less and by the way this is earned income this is not a rental income this is not if you sell a you know a security ira distributions pensions those don't count it's only it's only w or net self employment schedule c and putting money into the 401k does it reduce the earnings for this test now it's you'll see it in the box w two if your spouse is working and you're the one receiving social security benefits that's not the issue if your spouse is working and they're receiving a social security benefit and they're under full retirement age and year receiving a benefit from their work record now you got a problem to even though you're not working because you're getting a benefit from the other person who is working who is under full retirement age and is having their benefit cut professor plum said they're gonna ask for all of it back now the good news if there is any good news is that i don't believe there's any any interest tacked onto this no attritional teas they will just say they pay us back what you gave us because really this is money you're going to get later on anyways you're still alive when you're there to collect it says if you didn't get it and so when you do become eligible for it it's not going to be reduced for taking it early because you paid it back in you didn't basically take it early so when you say how much do you want back they will be like the guy vacation at mechanic holding a ranch she'll say all of it all of it and and they will detect what they'll do if you only lose part of it you know maybe you lose the fat you're getting fifteen hundred but you have to pay it back twelve thousand dollars they'll withhold the entire fifteen hundred dollar checks starting january where they're doing it and tell you reach the twelve twelve thousand and then they'll start paying your benefiting now if you want to get your benefit you can always write him a check and they will say thank you very much here's.

plum professor seventeen thousand dollars Thirty thousand dollars twelve thousand dollars fifteen hundred dollar 401k
"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Thirty thousand dollars or so in that context that sounds pretty good but if you put it in context of what you can actually get a trust four right from it good attorney the exact same thing i mean to me a fair price for a living trust that includes the trust or will powers of attorney healthcare surrogates pour over wills and everything that goes in that is right around nine hundred dollars so and i realize you know our of all attorneys the different that fees are selling them that for we more pay than in our day to day thrilled life about me talking which about it one but do you think i does would the say most damage that that you probably to your financial paid future too much well right the money or talks if you're considering news website doing in this says more than that about nine the hundred fees dollars you're that doing are attached too much to your retirement you can go online accounts and get them kristen for so a couple why of hundred are these bucks fees a month saying any you wanna worse do that than the other right fees we but find ourselves it's essentially paying just a it's these a days mike document owners a few reasons that helps but you i avoid think one of the probate biggest things and about just be it careful is out there people but it are is important unaware it of is them important and so that if you look at where probably the most retirement dollars all it's going to be in 401k's and a lot of people are looking at the 401k it was pretty easy to set up they ask you if you wanted to participate hopefully they're matching dollars that you put in and your money is allowed to sit there and grow tax deferred until you need to take it for income preferably after age fifty nine and a half because then you don't get the penalties through the irs but also you're required to take distributions by seventy and a half eventually have to do that my my point in mentioning those those dates as it's a long period of time and so if you have unnecessary fees or unnecessarily high fees at your unaware of and.

attorney irs kristen 401k Thirty thousand dollars nine hundred dollars
"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"And thirty thousand dollars was paid out from came in after the inauguration so this is after president donald trump is sworn in so this russian oligarch is pouring money into the account at and t is pouring money others are pouring money into the account for what purpose and he's someone who's also been questioned by muller and number of others that's what also makes it interesting because it's not just like russian like you're having russian dressing it's someone who muller seems to be interested in and it's after as you point out the timing i think is so important because that's after everyone has been i'm talking about you know the potential russian collusion and russian money and all these different things you would think the last thing you do russian putting money into account now a lot of people were going to approach people close to donald trump especially after he unexpectedly got elected president and the united states because they want favors there are lobbyists in washington a registered lobbyists you better believe that people were pouring money into their coffers thinking they could influence the new administration but michael cohen is not a lobbyist he's not a registered lobbyist so you would have thought it would have been incumbent upon michael cohen remember says i will do anything to defend this president to the day i die that when that company owned by the russian oligarch approached him and said hey we'd like you to represent us you know for our needs the immediately michael conway said you know this is become enough of a problem for the president and all during the campaign russian connection rushing connections the last thing i wanna do for donald trump and his family because remember he staunchly always says i defend the family's honoring name is that i'm not gonna take this money i might recommend the russian oligarchs business to lobbyists in washington but i'm not going to personally take his money because he looks back well i am looking for to.

donald trump muller president united states michael cohen michael conway washington thirty thousand dollars
"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Dental malpractice attorney there's plenty of them the problem is that for thirty thousand dollars you know what i think that's worth it because it's one of those i wish it was one hundred thousand dollars then you can get a lawyer i wish you were talking i wish you were talking to me with no teeth and it's all the fault of a doctor and you're you're all shrunk indian on your your cheeks and you look one hundred fifty years old that would be a better case legally but what are you gonna do definitely a dental malpractice you start looking around and start talking to people who have sued dennis before all right okay okay sounds like a decent case is just how much the what is the dent david david welcome hello if you've been working there longer i would've feel a lot better about a potential case here and are used like a regular white guy.

dennis attorney david david one hundred thousand dollars one hundred fifty years thirty thousand dollars
"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Cost thirty thousand dollars now most likely it's gonna use brute force that's the trial and error method to decode encrypted data it's gray box foreign churches wide by four inches deep by two inches as to cable sticking out of the front basically two iphones can be connected at once connected for about two minutes after that they're disconnected not yet cracked sometime later the phones will display a black screen along the pass code along with other information and so like it variety can take three magazine days or longer hollywood for six they digit also have passcodes some areas now where if if it's you're a four leers to set digit you could pass pose code some of your stuff there they can and break then into hopefully an iphone somebody guests would contact how many ministry you and return things can take and then a four then you'd digit be pass up to code you to negotiate put the the agreement phone in the in royalties this box and how so on many and so minutes forth before but it's it totally but it's decoded it's such a great well thing they say right about now six that and a half minutes that's all here it takes you are in san antonio you're speaking creating of apple music if you have an apple people watch are here's saying another how great great it is use aside a from just better tracking testimony your steps of all in is your that the activities kids are singing it afterwards and and maybe getting your text messages and your phone calls right on your wrist if magin if you're not only are you tracking your heart rate but you know when you're sleeping gaga with that person i used you to know what hate i'm talking those about isn't that terrible and they start stays a snoring mother and then suddenly you hit them like hey knock it off k then they roll over and then they and then they start storing again like an hour later well imagine if that was no longer the case you're gonna get your special someone a brand new apple watch and you're going to download something called the sleep cycle for iphones they'd actually it was a snore detection about a year ago and they were trying to tell you whether or not snoring is going to affect your sleep quality and but now it's has a different sunday afternoon person.

hollywood san antonio apple thirty thousand dollars four inches two minutes two inches
"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"And thirty thousand dollars giving it to the inflatable macy's day parade flotation device known as stormy daniels and they say that he didn't tell the bank the real reason why he wanted the money did he have the equity in his property will apparently did the bank given the money now they're threatening to put them in prison torkham outta is for thirty years thirty years now liberals released cop killers and less time than that multiple cop killers they love cop killers i don't know what it is with the left and cap coast well actually i do they love cop killer cops they hate the military except the north korean military they loved them if you're of the enemy of the united states they love you they love ethel rosenberg who was executed in the electric chair and that's a good thing because she was guilty as hell sorry i got to that earlier i'm having a flashback ghastly plume of smoke thing again because i love that when ethel rosenberg was executed in the electric chair for being a communist traitor and handing nuclear secrets over to the soviet union so that they could more effectively menace the free world and freedom and liberty loving people everywhere when she was executed i they gave her a jolt or juice but it didn't take her out they started undoing straps and realized she was still gasping so they put the straps back on and give her two more jolts ghastly smoke rose from her head catchword here earlier we were hypothesizing because joy reid at msnbc was theorising she was thinking out loud if you can call it that on msnbc with a couple of compatriots there who also have shaved rivera t shirts at home hypothesizing that when the fbi comes to arrest president trump which in their fertile imaginations they believe will come about someday that president trump might barricade himself inside the oval office and not allow the fbi to arrest him or something like that they live in crazy land they really do and so to compliment that i started hypothesizing that that.

daniels united states ethel rosenberg soviet union joy reid msnbc fbi trump president thirty years thirty thousand dollars
"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Thirty thousand dollars to adult film actress stormy daniels who claims to have had an extramarital affair with donald trump several years ago greg clugston washington how will the us respond to a suspected chemical attack on syrian civilians president trump is promising a quick decision the president says he'll probably make the call by the end of today just what the us will do after what he called a heinous attack that killed women and children nothing's off the table nothing's the military appears in position to carry out any attack order the us donald cook is underway in the eastern mediterranean after finishing a port call in cyprus the destroyer carries tomahawk cruise missiles which the us used a year ago in striking a syrian airfield after another alleged poison gas attack saga megani at the white house facebook ceo mark zuckerberg will personally accept responsibility for the cambridge analytica privacy scandal during congressional hearings this week in remarks prepared for delivery before a house committee on wednesday a contrite zuckerberg says facebook didn't do enough to protect users personal data he says it was in his words by mistake he goes on to say i'm sorry i started facebook i wrote it and i'm responsible for what happens on another issues luxembourg will also tell lawmakers the company was too slow to spot them respond to russian interference of the two thousand sixteen campaign capitol hill correspondent wally hindes reporting on wall street that out by forty six points more on these stories at townhall dot com if credit card debt has you down nonprofit trinity debt management can help trinity will consolidate your accounts into one easy to manage monthly payment put a stop to late fees and drastically reduce your interest you'll pay thousands less than you originally old it's not a loan it's a way to become debt free and possibly improve your credit score so call trinity and talk to a certified counselor they'll explain that proven program to you with no pressure just practical solutions and hope for tomorrow are you ready to pay off your credit cards in less time for less money then call for a free no obligation debt analysis and become debt free for.

daniels donald trump president us mediterranean cyprus mark zuckerberg facebook greg clugston washington donald cook ceo cambridge analytica wally hindes Thirty thousand dollars
"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hundred thirty thousand dollars to president trump by wire transfer to account designated by the president his lawyer michael cohen says the initial payment was made from cohen's personal account without trump's knowledge so why offer to pay the money directly to president trump instead of to his lawyer because that assertion is ludicrous this suggestion to the american people that this torney went off half cocked negotiated this agreement at it drafted by him in a manner that required his client signature and now he wants people to believe that mr trump knew nothing about it and that the attorney then us one hundred and thirty thousand dollars of his own by from home equity line he borrowed the money according to what he now claims most recently in order to make this payment on behalf of a billionaire running for the us residency it's absurd it's ludicrous the letter says that if the settlement is nullified then your client stephanie clifford would be able to quote us and publish any text messages photos and or videos relating to the president are there text messages photos and videos i'm not going to confirm or deny that yesterday you tweeted to be cleaned dispel the rumors the paternity language in the nondisclosure agreement is boilerplate there are no paternity issues here so by the same token to be clear and dispel rumors is the language about photos and videos boilerplate are their photo and video issues here i stand by my prior answer michael avenue thank you for joining us today thank you michael avenues the lawyer for the porn star stephanie clifford who performs as stormy daniels after the school shooting in parkland florida president trump said quote we will act we will do something today we have a better sense of what that something is the white house's new plan on school safety includes support for a bill in congress that would shore up the background check system it urges states to pass laws that temporarily take guns out of the hands of people judged to be dangerous and it renews president trump's call to arm teachers and other school staff on a volunteer basis what the plan does not include some measures trump had floated that pitted him against the national rifle association npr national political correspondent mara liasson joins us with more on that from the white house now.

president michael cohen mr trump attorney us stephanie clifford daniels congress mara liasson white house florida national rifle association npr national political corresponde Hundred thirty thousand dollar thirty thousand dollars
"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on TalkRadio 1370AM

TalkRadio 1370AM

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on TalkRadio 1370AM

"We have thirty thousand dollars in debt okay yep um than the formed do you have debt other than the land yes we have trappers and cattle and how much is road on the truckers internal tractors just twenty eight thousand cattle 16000 and are they with the same bank as the land back paddle is the packers are not occur and this venture to the side with the tractors and the cattle is different than the fourth generation farm so different pizza ground an detector an acquittal are on the family farm the piece of property is a different judge cook ground what is the piece of property worth not as much as we have out on what's worse and probably somewhere around two hundred fifty thousand and two and what do you think it'll boito using it will bring 250 what are you will two hundred seventy two and on what i is this with one of the farm institutions or is it was just a local bank now we have it finance um backed it put the local bank backed by the armed services agency and there is a prepayment penalty if we were to sell it all a pizza which we would still oh any way if we sold at all okay um they're gonna take the cat two is the problem because they're they're what they're doing is um they've got the stuff cross collateralised danicelle they've got a s they've got to set up where they can pull the string on whichever end they want to pull it on it sounds like on it it sounds like a really rough piece of paper in terms of your rights were probably all gone uh i'm guessing but that's i've been in that situation in russia fish property in off the money went into the thing because they pull that string show um bellen even if we if we really quick aided everything farm why huh we would still be and the other form that you own or the other forms fourthgeneration needle only at do you and the mortgage our personal mortgage is there but it's only a piece of the property the the.

packers russia thirty thousand dollars
"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Thirty thousand dollars gift his bill online i just deadly showers the turcoman luna my runup was unable to return fouled molina he's known as john are copy one on now john r factor bow the weather's girl at a lesser plan ceo's job in goma implied this is a gray death unknown nomo snowden vogel in ground shells are former calgary to her role in amman marcus smart dahmer's relief yossi sarid six a former surged search party roland garros you'll baby now he rudy him guinean unit we do senior deputy abruptly superfood has that valet at week the last a to win fifteen thousand dollars when we kick up at least bid teams joints in a row morning dj charisma i hit the disabled to get through through this traffic at five fifty with the young california jappie january probity he at all i got that gives the going.

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"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"thirty thousand dollars" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of up to thirty thousand dollars elizabeth blair npr news washington the pentagon says there are thousands more us troops serving in afghanistan than previously acknowledged lieutenant general frank mckenzie director of the joint staff says the pentagon last disclosed eighty four hundred us troops serving in afghanistan and that number was too low it didn't take into account troops serving in a temporary capacity the current total horses murmur in afghanistan is approximately eleven thousand this is not include any potential future adjustments the secretary to finance me make in order to accomplish the president's new strategy for south asia the trump administration plans to deploy another four thousand thousand us troops to afghanistan a wildfire burning in northern california has destroyed at least ten homes and scorched more than thirty one hundred acres it only began a few days ago fire officials have arrested a man and accused him of leaving a campfire unattended i'm korver coleman npr news support for npr comes from npr stations other contributors include whole foods market supplying drilling ingredients frozen sweets and beverages for labor day gatherings recipes for labor day meals are available at whole foods market dot com whole foods market we believe in real food the boom boom.

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