35 Burst results for "Thirty Six Percent"

Moderna Says COVID-19 Vaccine Protection Wanes, Makes Case for Booster

TIME's Top Stories

01:05 min | 2 d ago

Moderna Says COVID-19 Vaccine Protection Wanes, Makes Case for Booster

"Maderna's case for a covert nineteen booster shots. It's vaccine protection wayne's by thirty six percent after twelve months. According to a new study by alice park studies from cova nineteen vaccine makers and public health officials have been suggesting for awhile that protection provided by the vaccine wanes over time and a new study published on september fifteenth to a pre print server. The study is not yet. Peer reviewed researchers at medina which makes one of the two are in a covert nineteen vaccines. The other is from pfizer. Biotech report that people vaccinated within the last eight months had thirty six percent fewer breakthrough infections. The knows who were vaccinated a year ago that suggests vaccine induced. Immunity is likely highest shortly after people get their recommended two doses of the vaccine and starts to drop afterward. The modern vaccine received emergency use authorization from the us food and drug administration in december twenty twenty the fda currently reviewing the company's request for full approval aldershot.

Maderna Alice Park Cova Wayne Medina Pfizer Us Food And Drug Administratio
Jalen Green Is a Lock to Go in the Top Four

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

01:59 min | 3 months ago

Jalen Green Is a Lock to Go in the Top Four

"We turn our attention to another consensus top five. Pick former or five star prospect. Jalen green he was actually ranked second in the class of two thousand twenty. Twenty two twenty four seven sports. He's a six foot six hundred seventy eight pound nineteen year old guard from california who skipped college to play for the g. league night price of five hundred thousand dollars. He averaged seventeen point. Nine point four point one rebounds and two point eight assists in thirty two minutes per game shop forty six point one percent from field on thirteen point six tips per game. He shot thirty six point. Five percent from three on five point seven tenths per game. He was the team's leading score in best three point shooter. I've seen him as high as third in some drafts. I haven't gone forth behind k. cunningham. Jalen son evan. What more can you tell us well. Yeah he's shot. Fifty five percent from two thirty six point. Thirty six percent from three point range and sixteen games at that g. league ignite level. He does have you know yes. What more can i tell you for. Most people listening there is the allure somewhat of the unknown here. I mean only the diehard diehard nba draft have been keeping consistent tabs on jalen green whereas if he had gone to college he would quite clearly be known commodity. He would most certainly play for bruce. Pearl at auburn. Had onto college. And that would. Certainly things would have gone different. I think for the tigers last season if that had been the case green himself by the way tweeted back in may he tweeted and then subsequently deleted. Because this isn't exactly the greatest endorsement for the daily. He said i know for a fact. If i would have gone to college it would have been a different talk about. Who's going number one. He might well be right. But that's the that's the that's the status of the g. league ignite program at this point and that's to be expected by the way. But hey listen you're not gonna go number one because you didn't go to college but he got paid five hundred thousand dollars and you're going to go second third or fourth and i think that's a trade off the quite clearly jalen is comfortable with

Jalen Green Jalen Cunningham Evan California NBA Auburn Bruce Tigers
New York Governor Frustrated by Low Vax Uptake in Some Regions

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 3 months ago

New York Governor Frustrated by Low Vax Uptake in Some Regions

"New York governor Andrew Cuomo's expressing frustration with the low rate of vaccinations and some areas far Rockaway queens Williamsburg Brooklyn Rochester city the governor says he hopes that by naming the zip codes in New York that have the lowest vaccination rate still inspire local health officials to target those regions the bottom ten percent of the zip codes are below thirty six percent Cuomo says the name and shame tactic work with hospitals that were slower to vaccinate their staff at the beginning of the vaccination drive focus your resources there I'm Jennifer king

Rochester City Andrew Cuomo Rockaway New York Williamsburg Brooklyn Cuomo Jennifer King
Don't Be Lazy Installing Security Updates

Cyber Security Today

02:01 min | 3 months ago

Don't Be Lazy Installing Security Updates

"Keeping personal internet connected devices updated with the latest security patches is vital. It's even more important. These days with people working from home and using personal devices to connect to their place of work but a lot of people delay installing updates or just ignore them. In april kaspersky hired a company to survey fifteen thousand people in twenty three countries to find out why among the findings half said they put off updates. Because they're busy doing other things half put off updates to see if there are any problems reported before installing them forty four percent say downloading and installing updates. Takes too long thirty. Six percent said they sometimes have been late meeting family or friends because a personal device was installing updates have said that it's difficult to keep track of all their families connected devices so that they can keep them updated and sixty two percent of respondents admitted they need family members to help them with updates. Now you might think the putting updates by a few days isn't terrible and you're right although ideally update should be installed within twenty four hours of being notified that one's vailable but eleven percent of respondents admitted that sometimes they've delayed installing an update by more than a few months that's dangerous because cyber-crooks create maur to take advantage of vulnerable systems within hours of company announcing the discovery of fault. So here's a few tips. You may still be able to work while updates are being installed in the background check with your it department where someone knowledgeable for advice said a regular time for looking for and installing updates. You should by now know that. Microsoft updates windows and other products on the second tuesday of every month

Kaspersky Microsoft
FDA OKs 1st Targeted Drug for Common Lung Cancer Mutation

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 4 months ago

FDA OKs 1st Targeted Drug for Common Lung Cancer Mutation

"Government regulators have approved the first medicine to treat a common type of lung cancer that had been untreatable with drugs in the past the food and drug administration's approved Amgen's luma crafts drug the first targeted therapy for non small cell lung cancer patients with tumors that have a certain genetic mutation about thirteen thousand Americans are afflicted each year a study found that out of one hundred twenty four patients thirty six percent had tumors shrink or disappear and for most the improvement lasted six months or longer ludicrous is costly without insurance about eighteen thousand dollars a month and liver damage is among the possible side effects the FDA is requiring more study of the drug despite the early approval I'm Jackie Quinn

Lung Cancer Amgen FDA Tumors Jackie Quinn
AP-NORC Poll: Police Violence Remains High Concern in U.S.

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 4 months ago

AP-NORC Poll: Police Violence Remains High Concern in U.S.

"A new poll finds concerns about racial justice and police violence remain high a new poll from the Associated Press and O. R. C. center for public affairs research shows Americans are more likely than they were before the death of George Floyd to say that racism and police violence are serious problems facing the nation forty five percent increase from thirty six percent from a poll for twenty nineteen about half think police to cause harm are treated too leniently a majority of Americans sixty eight percent support major changes to the criminal justice system but only twenty four percent say tension on police violence against black Americans has led to change for the better seventy seven percent of black Americans in the poll said police violence is a very serious problem that's compared to thirty six percent of white Americans Jennifer king Washington

O. R. C. Center For Public Aff George Floyd The Associated Press Jennifer King Washington
Robinhood Will Give Retail Investors Access to IPO Shares

Geek News Central

02:05 min | 4 months ago

Robinhood Will Give Retail Investors Access to IPO Shares

"This is pretty remarkable statement. Being made by robin hood in reap ravenous saying it will give retail investors access to those shares they will not be an underwriter for companies hitting the public market but the stock trading company will get an allocation of shares by partnering with investment banks. So the question is how much and who's actually robinhood going to get them. And i could share historically been aside for you know the rich and famous high net worth people this big so this is fantastic that they're starting Access and This would sway me a back to their app especially even participate with no account minimums. Now let me say that again. You can participate in that coming with no account minimums now. of course there's gonna be limited number shares. You're going to get but this move is probably going to be antagonized while street quite a bit and we know that. Ipo stocks hop on first day average is thirty six percent in two thousand twenty so individual best author. Somebody's popular names. That you can't get access to is exciting i will i will. I will double down this. If we're actually can get in on some aikido doesn't matter how many shares you get long as you get a few to worthy worthy investment. Most of the time. If you've done your due diligence on picking a stop that you wanna purchase but a biggs is going to be the first ipo. A medical scrubs company bigs which filed its. Excuse me if i were to go. People go public and thursday will be the first company and they anticipate that up to one percent of the shares of class. A common stock offered will be at will be available for robinhood investors. So that's fantastic news. It really really is

Robin Hood Biggs
Far fewer California seniors are getting vaccinated in rural counties than urban areas

L.A. Times Morning Briefing

00:37 sec | 5 months ago

Far fewer California seniors are getting vaccinated in rural counties than urban areas

"Has only vaccinated about half of it senior population against covid nineteen. That's according to the latest data from the cdc. The sixty five and older group was deemed the most vulnerable to death and serious illness. During the pandemic but overall only around fifty six percent of california seniors have received the full course of a covid nineteen vaccine there are also discrepancies between urban and rural counties. In the more rural conservative shasta county just thirty six percent of seniors are fully vaccinated that compares with other counties like merrin just of san francisco where seventy one percent of seniors are fully vaccinated

CDC Shasta County California Merrin San Francisco
Institutions still underweight on AAPL despite strong 2020 growth

Mac OS Ken

01:20 min | 7 months ago

Institutions still underweight on AAPL despite strong 2020 growth

"Institutional ownership of apple. Shares is near an all time high according to morgan stanley analyst. Katie huber d but it is nowhere near enough and harassed mation could be helpful at this point to find out what institutional ownership is according to the site investo pedia institutional ownership is the amount of the company's available stock owned by mutual or pension funds insurance companies investment firms private foundations endowments or other large entities that manage funds on behalf of others. The site goes onto. Explain that once those institutions get into a company. They tend to stay there for a while. Not only this pulling shares out of circulation raise the value of shares outstanding. Their decision to get in can lead other investors to do the same despite being near all time highs institutional ship of apple is still under weight according to a note from hubert to clients posted on apple three not. Oh the way she and hers. Apple is likely to see revenue growth of twenty two percent in fiscal year. Twenty twenty one and earnings per share growth of thirty six percent. That's based on a few numbers. That i wish i understood but i sadly do not

Katie Huber Apple Morgan Stanley Hubert
Los Angeles Lakers go in short-handed and fall to the Brooklyn Nets

Lakers Nation Podcast

05:44 min | 7 months ago

Los Angeles Lakers go in short-handed and fall to the Brooklyn Nets

"Lakers dropped the game to the Nets got blown out was not pretty wind up losing this one. It was 109 2098. Ouch out not good. We're going to break down exactly what happened and put a little bit of context into it. What does this mean for the Lakers moving forward now that you've lost this was a game that a lot of people look forward to a lot of people had this game marked on their calendars did the Lakers maybe not and there's a lot of different things for us to to get into here the team didn't play. Well, there's no question and we'll talk a little bit about that. But I think where we need to start is that the Lakers were down two starters and yes, it's fair to mention that the Nets were also Down Kevin Durant. That's a giant loss. The Lakers were down Anthony Davis age. A giant loss. They were also down Dennis Schroder and I thought that was a bigger loss than he would be on most nights because the Nets defense is so poor. I think schruder would have had a very good game tonight. Just living in the paint getting to the rim creating Havoc. He would have made a difference out there for the Lakers certainly, but unfortunately was not able to go do to contact tracing with all the cobit stuff going on. So, you know, that was that was definitely unfortunate. We certainly didn't get the kind of finals preview matchup that people have been thinking we would get from this game because you're missing those star players. I don't think we got a very good representation of who the Lakers are as a team. I also don't think we got a great representation of who the Nets are because they're so different with Kevin Durant, but we did find out that the Nets love to shoot lots and lots of threes and make a lot of them tonight. Let's finish the game shooting just 46% from 3, but that doesn't tell the whole story. They were 50% or better for almost the entire game. It was until the end that they dropped off doing a great job generating open Thurs. And the Lakers Defenders were struggling to get out there and get a hand up and they were knocking them down. Joe Harris ridiculous 647 from 3 for 21 points. I said, this is a pregame video game. But one thing that they couldn't do was allow another guy to get going if Kyrie gets his points if James Harden gets his points you're going to live with that you're going to try to make life as difficult as you can on them, but you can't allow another guide to get going in and this game Joe Harris certainly did again dropping 21 points and then you gave up 15 to Timothy Loma Carrboro 2015 points to TLC not great. They're from the Lakers side of things LeBron. James had to pretty much do everything 32.8 board 7 assists 33 minutes glad that he only played 33 minutes. No reason for you to burn him out in this game when it was clearly won. The Nets were going to win especially once they got into the second half LeBron 146 from three three of six from the line, okay? One of the only other guys in double-figures was sixteen and ten. So we got a double-double Montrezl Harrell with ten points. Nobody else really did a whole lot out there. Nobody else did did much on the offensive end. You had nine points from k c p but just 145 from 3 West Matthews who started and played some shooter 144 shooting o of two from deep in 24 minutes Mark assault eight points did shoot for 3:00. So I'd like to see them in four to five threes a night did shoot for hit two of them. So you'll take that but the Lakers on the night shooting just 27% from 3 that slide from behind the three-point line at one point. They were third in the NBA in 3-point percentage and they have dropped dramatically since then and in fact last game they were up just about forty percent from three against the wolves and that was the first game in a while they'd been even better than league-average from deep and that's usually about thirty-five thirty-six percent tonight shooting just 27% That's with me rounding up. That's not good enough that will not get it done 6 a.m. Turnovers on the night as well. That's not a good sign either pretty much everywhere things could have gone wrong for the Lakers. They they really did ten offensive rebounds compared to 8 to the Brooklyn Nets. The brake pads are terrible rebounding team. That was a place where the Lakers needed to dominate 24 free throw attempts for the Nets compared to just 14 for the Lakers each and every spot along the way where the lake she really needed to win that particular area free throw attempts 3-point percentage turnovers, the Nets came out on top and because of that they won the game and wanted thousand Ali so I wouldn't be taking your questions and comments, but I guess before we get into everything. How much do we really take away from this knowing? There's no Anthony Davis knowing there's no Dennis Schroder knowing that the Lakers how many times tonight did we see the Lakers throw out lineups that we've never seen before with five men groups that literally have not played a single minute together yet. Not played a minute. That matters and I know we get some people who say it always but you can't make excuses. You can't you know, you have to go out there and win every single game. I'm just telling you what happened in the game. We saw the Lakers defense breakdown thought that was the Nets offense was really good part of that was the Lakers energy wasn't there part of that was also that they were playing an unfamiliar groupings and defense being something where everybody has to be on the same page. You get defensive breakdowns like this when you throw a line up together add necessity, I don't blame Frank Vogel here. You have no shooter. No Anthony Davis your entire rotation changes and you're winding up throwing out these kind of bizarre lineups out on the court and that's going to create defense of break that breakdowns. It's going to lead to open looks because you guys aren't used to knowing exactly where they're going to switch off their defense of responsibilities are it's a tough situation to be in and so I don't want to make excuses for the Lakers energy. I think they should have played with more energy with more Pace should

Lakers Nets Dennis Schroder Kevin Durant Joe Harris Schruder Anthony Davis Timothy Loma Carrboro Lebron Montrezl Harrell West Matthews James Harden Kyrie Brooklyn Nets James
Student Loan Forgiveness: Democrats Debate How Much To Cancel

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:31 min | 7 months ago

Student Loan Forgiveness: Democrats Debate How Much To Cancel

"Five million americans have student debt and president biden has promised to do something about that. He's proposed cancelling up to ten thousand dollars per borrwer. Democrats in congress are pushing for more though fifty thousand dollars per person. Here's npr's listen Joe biden has made it clear one point six trillion dollars in federal student. Debt is a problem but the question of how much of it to cancel is still on the table. Let's take a look at the plan. The president supports cancelling ten thousand dollars in debt per borrower or. Who have the lowest suit deaths are the ones who struggle the most adam. Looney is an economist. At the university of utah he says not all debt is the same borrowers who completed. A bachelor's often have higher debt burdens but are able to pay that debt back. The ones really struggling are the ones in default. When you're in default government can take your tax refund part of your paycheck when you get older. You can even lose part of your social security. Roughly eight million borrowers are in default and most of them have less than ten thousand dollars in debt. The amount that you borrow is largely dependent on how many years you will often students who drop out after a semester or a year or two just on accumulate very much dead. If you never got that degree you can't get a job to help pay off that debt. Looney argues that anything higher than ten thousand cancellation runs. The risk of awarding borrowers. Who don't need help. He points to research that shows thirty. Six percent of student debt is owned by the top twenty percent of income holders but income is different than wealth household was student debt. Tend to have the least amount of wealth. That's the value of all your assets minus debt. Now let's take a look at the plans to cancel fifty thousand dollars in student at senators elizabeth warren and chuck schumer among those behind. This idea. they say a more forgiving cancellation policy is also about racial justice. And would target gaps in wealth especially among black families. Black households are more likely to have student debt and more of it than white or latino families. The debt crisis in is dish. Proportionally impacting borrowers of color and communities of color. Black borrowers in particular ashleigh harrington the senior policy counsel at the center for responsible lending. So when we talk about cancelation we have to start their black borrowers. She says can struggle even if they get their degree. Thanks to racism. In the labor market more debt cancellation would give them a up. You have families were the color who have never been able to build wealth. They don't have intergenerational wealth fender having intergenerational deck many black and latino families missed out on ways to build wealth in the past like homeownership and job training programs due to racist policies researchers who study and talk to student. Loan borrowers say now student. Loan debt is thing. That's holding them back in a forthcoming report. The center for responsible lending black borrowers. Who would have all of their debts. Raced at fifty thousand was forgiven. Have median assets worth just seventy six thousand dollars in most cities. That's not even a house and of course there's the pandemic we are in the list of a crisis it and so we're for the place where count out. Inauguration gonna cut it regardless of the dollar figure most advocates. For cancelling say the thing that makes it so appealing is it can be done by the president through executive action without congress. President biden has long said he'd prefer to use legislation but in early february. The white house signaled it was willing to consider doing it with the flick of a pen.

Looney Joe Biden Biden University Of Utah NPR Ashleigh Harrington Congress Elizabeth Warren Chuck Schumer Adam Center For Responsible Lending Center For Responsible Lending President Biden White House
Murphy, Clark lead No. 9 Virginia past Georgia Tech 57-49

AP News Radio

00:28 sec | 7 months ago

Murphy, Clark lead No. 9 Virginia past Georgia Tech 57-49

"Trey Murphy the third scored eighteen points and ninth ranked Virginia closed on a sixteen five run to beat Georgia tech fifty seven forty nine he A. Clark added fourteen points to help the Cavaliers overcome a forty four forty one deficit in the final six and a half minutes Clark Murphy key to closing run with big three pointers Virginia missing only one of its final nine shots from the field Jose Alvarado scored eighteen points but Georgia tech was held to just thirty six percent from the field on eighteen of fifty shooting I'm Dave Ferrie

Trey Murphy Georgia Tech Clark Murphy A. Clark Virginia Cavaliers Jose Alvarado Dave Ferrie
What Is Your Back Catalogue Worth?

You Are The Media

08:33 min | 7 months ago

What Is Your Back Catalogue Worth?

"What's asiapac. A low worth has an intrinsic value to you as well as the audience. You're creating for go back catalogue is when you create work. This not just focus on what's current but takes account of the longer term. It's content that pertains fairly because there's something universal and perennial about it in this way. Not only is it valuable to others. It also helps manual position in the marketplace. Currently there's a flurry of music. Artists alina back catalogs. The lives of bob dylan new young secure of done it even dolly parton thinking about pissing beat to be head so if you build an audience share content defines. Its home of your audience. Your back catalogue can also become something. That's desirable catholic. A work is your audience can always access. It's worth the grows and evolves alongside your audience. You can become a self replenishing goldman in times of new clients have improved that you'll someone who does the work and potential clients getting comfortable with your approach. A website that shares one or two articles every now and then feta video and if you four-page e books does not come across as high value however one of the back catalogue of regla audio writing and video content posted over a period of time suggests is a place of value to us on a u. at the media online in two thousand and twenty joe pelosi said to everyone but anyone michelle content if it went tomorrow. If not your content you have a problem a back cutler means you invite days that you share today but also track record that shows. You're someone who keeps and has kept on giving me never become irrelevant by choosing to rest for used in the past with touring on home to the ever-growing increase in streaming. We're seeing a trend for music. Artists selling the rights at back. Catalogues artists unrealized by a cashing. In on the value of songs they produce david as uk based rotea fund. Hypnosis is obtaining the rights to artists from blondie to mark ronson in the sky article musical journalist. David sinclair said. If you're talking with the idea if you're a rockstar. If you bob dylan you're thinking to yourself. This might be time. He's getting twenty using comp one year right that in a lump sum in sakir who sold the rights to one hundred. Thirty five songs to hypnosis. I'm humbled that songwriting. And given me the privilege of communicating with others being a part of something bigger than myself autism now handing over the word ridden and shed over the years for fake off certainly does not mean tied in this context. This story of selling bank catholics chimes with how we in the beats a bass bass produce work for an audience. It proves that when you work is relevant to others this more reason to keep going the blog articles you produced back in two thousand nine nineteen. Maybe didn't get many views when they were first published. But that doesn't mean the not value sitting within your overall bank of work similar to music artists. Your job is to keep plane so that you keep developing your audience when people find you they can then join the dots and get a more complete picture of y you share is relevant to them. Those articles that received little traffic into nineteen are important in the context of your overall efforts. A moment in time should not be your only anka booting up a back catalog of which shows in your work over time making it easier for people to make a decision on whether to buy or subscribe. Starting the a space that people can visit but also record of how you've developed in the music industry return longevity. What about you. How will you know wherever you're back catalogue is where something it won't be. The same. ballpark is bob. Dylan's three hundred million pounds. When he sold his six hundred songs universal music for how we find out. If what you share has worth you would. Immediate has been around every week apart from some short breaks since october. Two thousand thirteen almost eight years. Now here's why building a back. Catalog of content provides vani in both the short and long after the first one. Is this over time. People see the value provide be prepared to play. The long game is so important. I wonder where ought be now if i hadn't been producing content every week for you at the median. I reckon it would be somewhere where i am today when people recognize. Your work is something that they can get behind you have a license to develop momentum secondly it can support your wider efforts. Your back catalog makes it easier to introduce for new initiatives. The one thing that has remained constant from me has been my writing. This was the tree. I planted back in twenty thirteen and new branches of grown. It made introducing in person and then online live events easier. Don't think of the word you produce in isolation look at it as a way to connect your intentions and third lake is greater use beyond the immediate space producing a back. Catalog extend your scope by this. I mean what stance a piece of work in one channel can extend into other formats. For instance blogs have become talked topics for other people's podcast. One single article became a webinar in april. Twenty twenty on your first ten email subscribers the next point is that it becomes and it brings people closer or from people. The proof of the work. You've already done helps you by helping them. Make a decision go back catalogue in contrast to say tha that competitors whose output may be more sporadic demonstrates perseverance. Next point is that it contributes to sales while message of this. You the media online. That i'm talking to you now is not around selling your business based on your content. Your work can be indirectly related to revenue for instance. The world you produce can also present a way to sell products and services but in a way that isn't merely emphasizing for instance being a trusted business increases the impact. You can make and this links to one of the aspects of what the month of learning represents a recent podcast looked at the impact of trust. Next is your were becomes a reference and search to your back catalogue can become a place for us to take from an somewhere. Search engines recognize websites. We've over three hundred and eleven index pieces of work c. Two hundred and thirty six percent more traffic than no sign of not too many pages and this is ups ball. What this means. Is that the better. Your ongoing work is indexed. There is more for a search engine to look through and support your search rankings ultimately ultimately want visit us to stick around on your site for that you need to offer work they will enjoy and lastly grow from it. The more you practice delivering something the better you become by learning. How the audio space works. I've become a better speaker by sharing a short video every week for the of the media weekly email. I think become a better presenter by writing every week. I've become a stronger writer. Whilst as an emphasis on creating roughness never forget this contributes to your own personal development. Let's roundup similar to writing and sherry music. You just put all your effort into a once a year christmas. Oh you have to keep introducing new material. That can stand the test of time all comes down to having that ability to keep going is what you're creating talking to be worth. Something is what you're producing contributing to your overall message actions in commercial delivery to give you the freedom to play an experiment. Why if your entire back catalogue disappear tomorrow but people let you know what they show concern. You're back catalogue is your commercial worth directly and indirectly and it's important to keep on playing for the audience as you show up to it

Joe Pelosi Bob Dylan Rotea Fund Sakir Alina Dolly Parton David Sinclair Mark Ronson Goldman Cutler Blondie Michelle Autism Dylan David UK BOB
Cases of Flu Are Down Globally

Quick News Daily Podcast

04:08 min | 7 months ago

Cases of Flu Are Down Globally

"Job. Maybe next time you're here you can present. That would be getting green jobs. So i'm just asking when that happened. Richard trumka who is a friend longtime friend of joe biden says about that day one eastone. He says i wish he. The president has paired that. Were carefully with the thing that he did. second by saying. Here's where we are creating jobs. So there's partial evidence from richard trumka. Well you didn't include all of his interview. Would you like to include. How about this. The international union of north america said the keystone decision will cost one thousand existing union jobs and ten thousand projected construction jobs. Well what mr trump. Also indicated in the same interview was that president biden has proposed a climate plan with transformative investments and infrastructure and laid out a plan that will not only create millions of good union jobs but also helped tackle the climate crisis. That guy was peter doocy from fox news and i always hate his questions because he takes four ever to get to the point he just beats around the bush because his conscience is fighting him the whole time and at least that's what it seems like. It's like that tiny little part of them that still has morals and ethics is trying to tell him. He's being deceiving and a bad journalist. But pete here just wants at fox news money one of the more unexpected biden policies. I would say. Just because. I never thought he would actually do. It is that he announced on friday. That trump wouldn't be eligible to receive intelligence briefings anymore. This is the first time that a former president has been cut out of these briefings. But we've never truly had a president trump have we biden explained in that norah o'donnell interview saying quote. I just think that there's no need for him. To have the intelligence briefings. What value is giving him. An intelligence briefing. What impact does he have at all other than the fact that he might slip and say something and he also said that has shown quote erratic behavior. Well that certainly the polite way to say that. He's been acting crazy honestly if he didn't read them well he was president. Why should he get them now. I mean the way. I imagine it. They practically had to create puppet shows and plays to get him the information that was in those briefings like they probably had to act it out for him. The man doesn't or possibly can't read so the story here as promised is about the flus really bad year sir remember. I talked a couple weeks ago. About how bad well not. How bad how good for us it was that. This year's flu season is almost nonexistent. In that was in new york city as it turns out that sort of the case. Globally this reporting from the atlantic followed a doctor from the mayo clinic in rochester minnesota. And they just sort of talked it over with them. What they're seeing in. Why we might be seeing this really good flu season for us. He said on december first that they began testing all patients with respiratory symptoms for covert and the flu so thousands and thousands of these tests have turned up positive for covid but out of the twenty thousand flu tests that they've run which is ten times. The usual number zero have come back positive for the flu since early fall. Eight hundred thousand flu tests in the. Us have been done and only fifteen hundred have been positive. That's point two percent for context. That's about one hundred times so last year. We had a hundred times more cases at this time when we had done. Eight hundred thousand tests back then. The flu positivity rate was anywhere between twenty and thirty percent twenty and thirty percent a lot of other respiratory viruses have disappeared as well well disappeared in quotes because they're still out there somewhere including ones for the common cold. Obviously the reason for this is the number of restrictions and precautions that we've had to put in place social distancing masks etc and all of those help because the regular flu and covid spread in pretty much the same ways however covert spreads more easily because it can be passed on by people who don't even have symptoms in front example just look at all these super spreader events. That didn't happen before. It's not like if you went to the movie theater and just anyone had the flu. You al- suddenly got the flu. There are also differences at the macroscopic level. Like how it sticks to the particles that we exhale when we breathe or talk like cova sticks more easily so is easier to transmit of course doctors

News For Students Student News College News College Student Us Politics Us News Politics The Daily Daily News News Mike Lindell Brad Spangler Tony Blinken Joe Biden Today Cardinals Last Week Monday February Eighth Lloyd Sixteen Days Forty Two Million Yesterday Goodell New England Fifty Nine Million Thirty Thirty Six Percent Twitter FLU Richard Trumka International Union Of North A Mr Trump President Biden Peter Doocy Fox News Biden Donnell Norah Pete Bush Mayo Clinic Rochester New York City Atlantic Minnesota
We Finally Know Exactly How Bad The Pandemic Has Been for Airline Pilots

Airplane Geeks Podcast

06:00 min | 8 months ago

We Finally Know Exactly How Bad The Pandemic Has Been for Airline Pilots

"We see in plane and pilot magazine. We finally know exactly how bad the pandemic has been for. Airline pilots and the numbers here are pretty staggering and eliminating max indeed. I was really quite stunned to take a look and see. Just how bad things are. I mean we all know that the airlines have been hit disproportionately hard here during the pandemic that know some pilots have been out of work. This was a survey done by goose. Which is a pilot. Recruitment firm not for birds but for a and they found that nearly half of all pilots worldwide. Either looking for work or on furlough which was shocking to me. They said that thirty percent of the people surveyed were out of work and looking and other seventeen percents that they were furloughed awaiting further news and additional. Six percents said they were still employed with their airline. But we're doing non-flying works pretty stunning. Half half the pilots Basically out of work or looking for work in this comes from a survey of two thousand five hundred ninety eight pilots. This survey was open for four weeks just to kind of set. The timeframe in it closed october thirtieth twenty twenty and it was anonymous survey thirty questions and the survey was designed for pilots of all ranks. First officers second officers and cadets in some of the data in this is just really really fascinating and we'll have a link to the survey report which was done in conjunction with flake global. And a you just peruse some of this and find some really really interesting interesting things but By way of demographics of those almost twenty six hundred pilots forty-three percent of the respondents were in europe. Nineteen percent from the middle east and africa eighteen from asia pacific Twelve percent from north. America six percent from south america and two percent from china. So it's pretty Pretty global in the survey touches on things like pilot retention pilot job security employee engagement even Stress mental health wellbeing things like that so Some really really interesting statistics Couple of the ones that i like. Maybe if you guys saw some things that piqued your interest but one of the questions was when do you think aviation will make a full recovery to pre covid levels and not. Surprisingly only ten percent said up to one year the biggest spike was up to two years. Thirty four percent of the pilots thought up to two years but twenty eight percent up to three years and longer than that twelve percent four years. Ten percent five years and six percent said they thought it would never never be the same So that's the pilot's perspective. No one was. Do you think your mental health has been affected by the pandemic and here there is a direct correlation between the age of the pilot and the pursuit pilots that group in In how many of them thought that their mental health had been a acted for those pilots. Fifty five to sixty four years old thirty. Two percent thought their mental health had been affected for pilots forty five to fifty four years old but younger thirty six percent when we go down to thirty five to forty four year olds forty four percent of them thought. Their mental health has affected in the twenty five to thirty four year old group forty-nine percent and pilots under twenty four years old fifty eight percent of them thought their mental health had been affected by the pandemic so. I thought that was a really interesting result. I wasn't totally surprised by the The differences once. You mentioned the difference. I thought okay but it's the younger folks are having a tougher time. Think about someone who's twenty four years old this may be the first In a bad thing that's happened to them in their in their career folks are in their mid fifty s have probably gone through multiple things in the past and probably a better able to to ride through a downturn whereas you know young folks just not have that cushion of You know savings built up to right through. Its doesn't surprise me but still it's a large large number folks nearly six percent under a twenty-four saying mental health. Been impacted the the demographics of the respondents in terms of gender. Was you know the numbers are kind like the same numbers we've seen for a long time. Almost all male four percent female in one percent preferred not to say. I'm not sure why they would prefer not to say in. An anonymous survey but four percent identified themselves as female Which really kind of hope that that number would be coming up. Ron wouldn't when you're looking at programs With youth today. do you see more. young girls. Becoming interested involve is that number higher than four percent. I hope well Here were making a concerted effort to make sure it's higher than four percent Right now we're preparing for Air venture and we've got A program within the air venture program called girl venture We've also got One for adults named Women's sore And between those two we really want to invite women to get more involved and engaged in aviation and so We see a higher than i would say. Four percent level here

Asia Pacific South America
Harden, Durant help Nets break away late, beat Heat 98-85

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 8 months ago

Harden, Durant help Nets break away late, beat Heat 98-85

"The nets exploded down the stretch and beat the heat ninety eight eighty five strong defense keyed the Brooklyn rally in the fourth quarter they held Miami scoreless on ten consecutive possessions that sparked a fifteen to nothing run as the nets were able to beat the heat twice in three days James harden scored ten of his twenty points in the fourth quarter and talked about his strong finish they want manning a few possessions and you know I got I got loose a little bit so you know my team is no give me confidence to shoot the basketball be aggressive in us that's it he playing shorthanded as Jimmy Butler and Avery Bradley remaining Kobe protocol shot only thirty six percent they were paced by BAM ID bowel who had twenty six points and ten rebounds might make you so

Nets James Harden Brooklyn Miami Jimmy Butler Manning Avery Bradley Basketball Kobe
Do Some Fabrics Make Body Odor Worse?

BrainStuff

05:47 min | 9 months ago

Do Some Fabrics Make Body Odor Worse?

"Of athletic wear and outdoors gear is labeled with claims. That it'll help wick away sweat and keep you spelling as fresh as if you just stepped of the shower in this episode. We look at how those claims can possibly be true and how they can sometimes fall through. Pay their brain steph. Lorraine bogo bomb here. If you're preparing for a hike especially one that involves sleeping under the stars. Every last than you pack should be questioned. Will you need rain gear. One walking stick or two which freeze dried. Snacks are actually tasty enough to eat. One essential rule from experienced hikers is no cotton clothing. Clothes made of cotton can act as a sponge. The material soaks up sweat and holds moisture next to the skin which eliminates the insulating effect of the cotton skin irritation and eventually leads to copious amounts of body odor body odor isn't a personal affront. Temperature becomes high enough to cause certain. Glands secrete fluid onto the surface of the skin is at risk for emanating at least a little bit and it isn't without purpose sweat produced by the akron. Glands that cover most of the body helps regulate body temperature while the milky or fluid released by the epa korean glands. The armpits and groin area is a signal that the body is under stress. African glands are primarily responsible for body odor and although akron. Glands secrete primarily odorless sweat. The smell produced by this sweat changes over time perspiration acts as a magnet tha bacteria on the skin and these bacteria use it as fuel to multiply. When the growing numbers of bacteria metabolize sweat they produce a smelly byproduct commonly called body odor. Clearly cotton isn't the right choice for working up a sweat. Since it can actually make body odor worse. But what about other types of fabrics do all fabrics increase a person's propensity to develop body odor the key to using clothing to prevent or lessen body odor lows in the fabrics ability to release sweat quickly before bacteria can begin to feast on it. There are natural and man-made fabrics that expertly wick moisture away from the skin to the edge of the material where it can evaporate other fabrics however we'll trap moisture in the fabric. And on the skin and make body odor worse a fabrics ability to transmit and released moisture is known as breathe ability. Which is the common term for the moisture vapor transmission rate or mvp tr. The mvp are calculating. How many grams of moisture move through a square meter of fabric in two thousand four hours. Generally the greater the mvp are the less likely the fabric is to absorb and retain odor causing moisture. You may be thinking great. Now all i have to do is find clothing label breathable and be. Oh we'll be a problem of the past not so fast. There's not an industry standard regarding breath ability nearly any label can carry the term usually preceded by words like or extremely. This means you'll need to arm yourself with information about specific fabrics rather than relying on label hype as a guide natural fabrics created from the fibers of animals. Bugs or plants are a good place to start. You'll want to steer clear of one hundred percent cotton fabrics because they take a long time to dry and will allow body odor to bloom. In the meantime this is largely. Because one hundred percent cotton fabrics are composed of fibers that swell with moisture and thereby reduce the pores of the fabric of other natural fabrics absorb and release sweat quickly including hemp fabric woven from these stem fibers of the cannabis. Sativa plant and linen women from flax stems. Well it sounds counter intuitive to wear wool to prevent body odor. This natural fiber is an excellent choice will absorb up to thirty six percent of its weight in moisture without feeling wet and will dry quickly. We'll also releases minute amounts of body heat as it absorbs moisture so it will help keep you cool. Plus we'll is naturally antibacterial which means you can wear it. Sweating it and keep wearing it sometimes. For consecutive days without reading when it comes to making body odor worse synthetic fabrics tend to trap odors at a greater rate the natural fabrics although many of these manmade fabrics like polyester are quick to wick moisture away from the skin and equally quick to dry. Their construction can up the stink quotient within the wave of synthetic moisture waking fabrics are notches designed to pool. Manute amounts of sweat as it. Transfers from the inner layer to the outer layer of the fabric. The concept is a good one as the moisture will generally evaporate once it reaches the fabrics outer layer. The problem is that as sweat collects in the nooks and crannies of the fabric on its way to freedom. It is devoured by bacteria that have themselves made home in those same recesses. This traps body odor. Within the fabric to reduce rowdy odors look for static fabrics that haven't an added antimicrobial ingredient for example the addition of silver polyester or spandex fibers can help prevent body. Odor from accumulating silver nanoparticles. That's particles so small that eighty thousand of them could fit within. The diameter of a human hair can be integrated into synthetic fabric when they get wet. The silver nanoparticles released silver ions that initially slow the growth of odor causing bacteria and eventually kill them off. Altogether some fabrics are infused with a different type of odor inhibiting agent molecules of volcanic ash. The ash molecules have a pore size that similar to that of an odor molecule when the to meet the odor molecule is adsorb and trapped within the ash molecule this prevents the odor molecule from releasing its characteristic smell until the fabric is washed in warm water to prevent body odor. Look for clothing made from fabrics. That will help keep you dry and have the added might of antimicrobial helpers and don't forget the antiperspirant or

Lorraine Bogo Akron EPA
Small Loans, Large Cost

After The Fact

05:16 min | 9 months ago

Small Loans, Large Cost

"This season. we're going to be telling you about states of innovation literally stories about states that are taking new and creative approaches to problems and finding solutions make lives better in this episode. We look at ohio. Many people live paycheck to paycheck and sometimes accumulated bills. Outstrip that paycheck. For twelve million americans. This episodes data point. The answer is to turn to payday loans. But sometimes a small loan turns into a problem. The notion of giving somebody is super high cost loan but then forcing them to repay it. Really quickly is actually the biggest part of the problem. A three hundred dollar loan with a fifty dollars in fees that comes due in two weeks that takes more than one. Third of a typical borrowers paycheck. Even before you account for taxes. Nick bork directs spews work to inform effective consumer finance protections. Those fees. He mentioned add up quickly altogether. An average annual percentage rate of three hundred ninety one percent. That's a far cry from the national average for a personal loan today at nine point three percent. But that's not the only issue something that people don't always understand. Is that people who use payday. Loans are actually banked. You have to have a checking account to pay loan because that's how the blender secures the repayment. The payday lender has access to your checking account. So they get paid first. Then you can't pay your mortgage than you can't pay your rent then you can't pay your car payment and so what do you do you go back to the payday lender and get another one. That's how the cycle starts. Nick explains how these loans came into existence. Haiti loans have been around for about a generation and about thirty years ago. Lawmaker said well. We wanna find a way to get credit to people who are living paycheck to paycheck. And we've got usery rates baked into our legal code. Almost every state has usury laws on the books. We're going to give an exception to payday. Loans to allow them to go higher than that but in exchange were going to force these loans to be really short so people. Don't get into trouble if you're in the situation of having to get paid alone in the first place and then two weeks later you lose a third of your paycheck. Well it creates what a lot of people refer to as the cycle of debt and this is how something that is supposedly a two week. Short term loan for the typical borrower ends up being a three to four month experience often five or six months by the time they get out of that debt. They've effectively borrowed. Say three or four hundred dollars which is typical. But they've paid five hundred dollars or more in fees more fees than the amount of the original loan. A number of states are starting to look at ways to make these loans to safer for consumers. Can you talk a little bit about what's been happening. And what makes some of these new approaches a little innovative in this area ever since payday loans came onto the market. It's been sort of like an experiment. And how do we make short term. Loans liquidity loans available to people who have damaged credit. Scores are living paycheck to paycheck. It hasn't worked very well and until recently the states that allowed payday loans haven't really figured out how to make it work better by trying to protect people from getting into too much trouble and make them short term loans. We're actually harming them. So let's change the law and let's give people more time to repay. Let's change the pricing structure. A little bit so yeah. It's going to cost more than a credit card. But it's not going to be four hundred percent and add a few more protections and you know now three states have done it and it's worked out really well well. Let's talk a little bit about the hallmark of what makes good change in this world. What are some of the hallmarks of of a successful innovative way of fixing this. That we've seen work in. Colorado or ohio were numbered. I can talk about this all day and the details really matter but fundamentally it's simple the state's law has to be changed so that a payday loan must be an installment loan that people pay off over several months and every payment that you make pays down part of the principal. It's it's calm analyzing installment loan. It's the way that installment loans usually work and on top of that you have to change the pricing structure. What we've seen in the states work really well. Is you limit the interest on the loan to thirty six percent or less but you also allow a reasonable monthly fee to help the lender cover their costs and continue making credit even to people with very damaged credit histories. The typical payday loan borrower has a five seventeen credit score. But if you have interest up to thirty six percent and a reasonable monthly fee colorado ohio virginia. They've shown that you can still make credit available and then third you just need. A couple of simple safeguards prevent lenders from enticing borrowers to refinance their loans. And that sort of thing so in two thousand eighteen when ohio past reform law. They did the things. I just mentioned. They required the payday loans to amortizing installment loans and they implemented a twenty eight percent interest rate cap plus a reasonable monthly fee.

Nick Bork Ohio Haiti Nick Colorado Virginia
"thirty six percent" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"You can disagree with the style at times, and you can still be a reasonable person in analyzing you know what he really is, as we have said to call him to call him a Nazi to call him a fascist to call him a racist to call him. A homophobic is completely ridiculous. Especially since here's the point. Eric, we all know his forty year, you know, forty fifty year history in the public eye. He's anything. But an everybody knows that. Yes. L knowing the media knows it when they do it, they know that it's bull, and they do it anyway. And it's not working for them to see the, the, the pull the other day. Favorability ratings with African Americans thirty six percent. Tell me any Republican president, that's ever been close to that in, in the in the last thirty years. Right. Right. You see African Americans at his rallies. Wall Street Journal going to Harlem the day after saying, well, we voted democrat, but we understand why people like him because he talked about eight talked about things that we actually care about the funny thing is wanting to both for him. Right. We voted we voted for her, but she was talking about stuff that had nothing to do with us. And he was talking about stuff that here at home related to us stuff at home. Things were concerned about right? And so, look, this president is, is far from being a Saint, he is at times, untruthful. Yeah. And he does things that I wouldn't do in terms of, you know, going after whatever celebrity or. But the point is, there's certain labels that certainly do not apply in those become dangerous. We talked about that one time if you believe he's Hitler, you believe he's capable of taking out large groups of people that's dangerous. Eight six six ninety redeye. Tips, from JJ Keller and associates Inc. On inspections, the CBS has six different levels of roadside inspections. All with different levels of detail. The more drivers.

president Eric Hitler Wall Street Journal JJ Keller Harlem CBS associates Inc thirty six percent forty fifty year thirty years forty year
"thirty six percent" Discussed on First Things First

First Things First

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on First Things First

"And I'd like to their gannet also meant they were taking easier and smarter ones. Like when you're taking fewer threes. It's because the unguarded one to they're they're the corner threes there the Russ doesn't take a lot of those corner threes because he has the ball in his hand so much. We doesn't get the easiest three. But the other thing Russ. Has to improve on. And I feel like this point you've been making her as long as I've known. You see is the attitude that I love from him on the court though. Brooding anger it extends everywhere. And while I don't care about the media stuff everyone that covers that team in their season post mortem has talked about how eight has that organization has taken on his personality in a negative way. The organization the locker room is tense. The locker room is on edge, the locker room has a brooding feel to it that it does not win that that doesn't if he's out when Paul George was taken over the reins they said there was a distinctive shift in the locker room. When Paul George got hurt and Russ took back control of that team. And it was pre-game and post game. And I don't know that that is the best way to approach your your job. If you will over a long eighty two game season. I think by the time you. Get to the end of it. Some guys are worn out mentally. And so those are the two things the shooting and his approach to the season that Ross has to improve on to be the player that I believe he can be and should be and you shouldn't care about the media stuff because it's all a part of what he's supposed to do. Because part of his leadership is they're not asking those backup players the questions after the game. So your job is to give a message that is consistent with the organization and the team so rough Russ he suffocates this team. It's hard to play with them. Not only on the court. But off the only time, I see Russ smile and light is when he talks about his kids, and he needs more than that. All right. So this energy that he plays with typically two thing that is the thing going to get you your success. It's also going to be thing that lead to your demise. And with Russ it doesn't make sense for him too. Nice that okay. I'm gonna prove my shooting you shot thirty six percent in the playoffs. All right. Won't you be a little more aware of the shots that you're? Taking because I believe he can get a lot better because I played a lot of basketball. I still play I'm still playing into leagues. But I can't play the way I used to be able to play I used to build above the room thirty eight inch vertical. I'm Dunkin on everyone in there, man. I gotta try to get me some easy layups. I gotta try to get me a pin down. Get a pick. Get me an open shop. I got young guys chasing. After me. I can't do two things that I used to be able to do I'm aware that when the game starts Russ is not aware of good shot three years ago in NBA is not a good shot. Russia's favorite shot is a million miles an hour. Twice a million miles an hour. He drives straight at you. He goes to the right or left. Elbow in pulls up for a fifteen. Seventeen foot. Diagnosed jump shot that might have been a good shot five years ago. But an NBA analytics all these smart people, I got around me, they will tell you that is not a good shot and for him not to be aware of that that can say whether it's a good shot or not to everyone knows. You know that I know that. So you can't tell me that the scouting report. Isn't this exactly what he's going to do? So if he doesn't change his game and all his shots or the shots that used to be good shots. And they're not is this the next Carmelo Anthony could he can eat play himself. How not it's no forget the I don't wanna say forget..

Russ NBA Paul George Carmelo Anthony basketball Ross Dunkin Russia thirty six percent thirty eight inch Seventeen foot three years five years
"thirty six percent" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

"Listen, I have a lot of opinions, and I felt years ago that I would buy more credibility with you the audience if I admit every Monday at this time, we make a lot of mistakes things. Don't always go our way, we call it where Colin is. Right. We're calling is wrong. Here we go where Colin was right. Well, Russell Westbrook. I didn't buy and three years ago. I wasn't a hater. I just don't think he's built for the playoffs. He's non adaptable. And I think that's what the playoffs are all about. I think he's got a certain rigidity that it's fine in the regular season. I think he's a bit of a stat patter. But I never bought into the MVP because of the triple double. I don't think that makes you valuable just makes you talent. Did he shooting thirty six percent in this series? But still taking twenty shots a game for a while this regular season he scaled back on the shots, but he becomes Westbrook points rebounds. Assists are all down in the playoffs. I think he's just too fragile to rely on a motion only, I think he's a remarkable talent. I'd voted into the hall of fame. There is an Iverson quality that I enjoy Iverson got to one finals. But in the end on this I've been more right than wrong that I don't think you can build around him. I don't think he's a number one. I think he's wildly entertaining. He's worth the price of admission. But right now, I don't think he's worth the price of his contract where Colin was wrong. I said throughout the course of the year. I didn't buy Denver and I didn't buy Toronto. Now Orlando is a really weak playoff team. But the one thing I like about Toronto we all knew that after the derozen trade ally Leonard's better than derozen. So they upgraded, but my whole thing with them as I could never trust the team where Kyle Lowry was your second. Best player will he's not anymore. Pascall Siaka is their number two guy. He's an emerging young star. Fred band fleet is planned his butt off and gets real minute and can score and Kyle Lowry sometimes is irrelevant feel like the fourth best player on the team. They've got size and by the way in the second half of the season Salcombe average twenty game seven rebounds and shot. Almost fifty five percent. So lowery. Now is not the guy they depend on. Because I just don't think how's the gone a guy that I trust in the playoffs and Toronto not that I can get past Philly. I don't think they're good enough to get to the finals. But with the emergence of their young players. I think they're tougher than I thought two months ago where Colin was right. I never bailed on the Celtics. I kept hearing. Oh, they're struggling in the regular season. And I kept saying listen, they've got ingredients. That will prevail in the playoffs. They got a great head coach who's good situationally. They've got one of the best closers in the world in Cairo Irving, and it got playoff experience. I don't give a rip if. In Tuesday night in January. They go to Memphis and get blown out the playoffs are all about ingredients. And they've got the three key ingredients you need to advance in the playoffs. Great head coach great closer offense of -ly and experienced in these crisis games, by the way, they hadn't won four straight since January. Now, they go to the playoffs and win four straight. I never sold. My Celtic stock and seemingly everybody else did where Colin was rock and take a right for this. But I'll take a wrong. Russell Wilson did sign a contract last week long term very expensive to stay with the Seahawks. I told you a month ago I had heard that he was willing to leave his wife CRN him like the idea of New York for her career. And then he made up kind of a make believe deadline in the Seahawks. Folded because my belief is because they knew he was not bluffing. But since he signed all take a wrong. I think Seattle made the right move. I do worry about Seattle going forward because unlike Green Bay with Aaron ROY. Rogers contract. I think there's a lot of really really good young Packer players going forward..

Colin Russell Westbrook Iverson Celtics Toronto Kyle Lowry Seahawks Russell Wilson Seattle MVP Packer Pascall Siaka lowery ally Leonard Rogers Denver Orlando Green Bay Aaron ROY Memphis
"thirty six percent" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"No, we work with them on strategies to really generate anywhere between you'll really one and three percent a month. Let's multiply that out over a year. Twelve months about twelve to thirty six percent a year. The question is, you know, what are you doing in the markets consistently? Do you have a plan? Do you have a goal every? Single years. Our goal just to make money or hope when you open your entity your statement, you're in the green, you know, that's not really a plan. That's a wish and most people out there over the years. It's very difficult to wish her procrastinate your way to retirement you need to have a plan to get there. You know, Ron I know spent years in the in the financial industry, you know, why don't you talk a little bit. How able to help student, you know, really plan for retirement and help them and chief, you know, the radar returns they so desperately need. Well, first of all you have to understand where you are. You know, it's kind of like going on a trip. If you don't know where you are. And you don't know where you're going to get it's going to be very difficult if not impossible to get there. So really the first step is to determine where you are. Right now. Very first thing when someone comes in as you know, let's take a look what is your. What is your biggest challenge? Where are you at right now, what is your financial situation? How does that look right now? You know, I like to call it. The lifeline whatever age you are today. That's where you are on your life line right now. And if we go back to the beginning, which was your date of birth. We have to just cross that out. There's nothing that you can do to change that. So wherever you are right now with the dollars that you have accumulated. I mean, that's it. There's nothing you can do about the past. So we can only look forward. What that lifeline is going to allow you to discover that his okay, here's where I'm at. Let's take a look at number one. Do I have enough money's coming in to live the lifestyle that I want right now, do I need to supplement the income that I have, you know, whether it's your job, whether it's your business, my taking all the trip. So we take all the trips that we want and the places that we really want to go, and I like to talk about three buckets there's the income bucket. There's the wealth. Buck. And finally number three is the dream bucket. And you know, once you have enough income coming in and you start the the excess income so that at the end of the month, you have more money than you have mon-. We can start then filling up the the wealth bucket at once that wealth bucket starts filling up now we can generate an income off of some of those monies and between the the income bucket in the wealth bucket..

Buck Ron thirty six percent Twelve months three percent
"thirty six percent" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Now, we work with them on strategies to really generate anywhere between you'll really one and three percent a month. Now, let's multiply that out over a year. Twelve months is about twelve to thirty six percent a year. The question is, you know, what are you doing in the markets consistently? Do you have a plan? Do you have a goal every? Single years or goal just to make money or hope when you open your entity your statement, you're in the green, you know, that's not really a plan. That's a wish and most people out there over the years. It's very difficult to wish her procrastinate your way to retirement you need to have a plan to get there. You know, Ron I know that years in the in the financial industry, you know, why don't you talk a little bit. How able to help student, you know, really plan for retirement and help them achieve. You know, the radar returns they so desperately need. Well, first of all you have to understand where you are. You know, it's kind of like going on a trip. If you don't know where you are. And you don't know where you're going to get it's going to be very difficult if not impossible to get there. So really the first step is to determine where you are. Right now. Very first thing when someone comes in as you know, let's take a look what is your. What is your biggest challenge? Where are you at right now, what is your financial situation? How does that look right now? You know, I like to call it. The lifeline whatever age you are today. That's where you are on your life line right now. And if we go back to the beginning, which was your date of birth. We have to just cross that out. There's nothing that you can do to change that. So wherever you are right now with the dollars that you have accumulated. I mean, that's it. There's nothing you can do about the past. So we can only look forward. What that lifeline is going to allow you to discover there's okay, here's where I'm at. Let's take a look at number one. Do I have enough money's coming in to live the lifestyle that I want right now, do I need to supplement the income that I have, you know, whether it's your job, whether it's your business, am I taking all the trip. So we take all the trips that we want the places that we really want to go, and I like to talk about three buckets there's the income bucket. There's the wealth bucket. And finally number three is the dream bucket. And you know, once you have enough income coming in and you start the excess income so that at the end of the month, you have more money than you have mon-. We can start then filling up the the wealth bucket, and once that wealth bucket starts filling up now we can generate an income off of some of those monies and between the the income bucket in the wealth bucket..

Ron thirty six percent Twelve months three percent
"thirty six percent" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:44 min | 2 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Polling is out since the government shutdown began twenty four days ago to break it down for us and a disgust several other big developments. I'm joined by our politics Monday. Do oh that's Amy Walter of the cook political report and tamra Keith NPR. Hello to you both and happy Monday. So let's talk about this poll, we have Tam both the Washington Post and Quinnipiac university did some polling wrapping up just in the last few days, and as you can see in the post poll fifty three percent of the public is saying the president and Republicans are to blame. Only twenty nine percent say the Democrats in the Quinnipiac it's fifty six percent blaming the president and Republicans thirty six percent, the Democrats what does that say to us if anything about where the chips are falling after this shutdown is in its twenty fourth day. I think it's not entirely surprising. That this is where the numbers are it somewhat aligns with the way peop-. View the president generally. And also, it's. The president before the shutdown. Started said that he meet proud to shut the government down to get his border wall. He has done absolutely nothing to change that narrative. The only thing that is possibly working in his favor. And this is a a small thing it's a sliver, but under the hood on the Quinnipiac poll there were a couple of areas where the public opinion has shifted slightly now the minority of people it's still a significant minority, but more people now support building a wall along the Mexican border then did year and a half ago. It's still only forty four percent, but that's up a fair bit from a year and a half ago. Similarly, whether they believe that undocumented immigrants contribute to crime more than American citizens, which is not true. But it was twenty two percent in April of two thousand eighteen and now it's up to twenty nine percent. So the president is. Shifting at least a little bit though. It's a small amount of people toward his viewpoint is that contradictory. Emmy now, I think he's what's happening is Republicans are shifting the most on those issues. But overall, if you think about what what strategies going into this debate would the president likes to see happen, right? What would he like to come out of this battle over the border wall one that the wall would become more popular? And while there has been some shifting. That's true. And the Washington Post poll showed the same thing. It's still at best gets about forty two percent approval rating. So the walls not really much more popular than it's ever been you ask voters who's to blame. They blame the president. You would think that they would he if are in the White House, you want to see the blame shifted to Democrats even making the case about whether this is a crisis. Some Quinnipiac also asked that question about do you see this as a crisis and about forty five percent of voters thought it was a crisis. But even among those who saw it as a crisis only a third of the. Those said building a border wall is gonna fix it. So your whole strategy behind shutting the government down was to make the wall. More popular popular, make the Democrats take the blame and get folks concerned that there is a real crisis on the border that needs to be solved. He has done. None of those things. Republicans are still with him. That's basically what he's always what he's got. All right. Let's talk about the other big story. We're grappling with today. And that is a disclosures that the president whether he was taking information paper away from the interpreters questions inside are the government about whether the president might have been working for the Russians on top of everything else. What are the political repercussions of this? So the the difference between these articles coming out four months ago. And these articles coming out today is now in the house. There are committees that can act on it can can use their subpoena power to try to get this information. They're exploring the Democrats are exploring how they might be able to gain access to these interpreters who were there at the meetings with Putin unclear whether they'll they'll make it very far. But this is now the ground has shifted for the president. Now these stories come out, and he can go out on TV and stand on the lawn and shout over that helicopter and say I. I had nothing to do with Russia. But then Democrats in congress in the house will follow up, right? And they've already noted as such Eliot Engel, the new chair of the foreign affairs committee saying we're definitely going to hold hearings looking at the Putin Trump relationship, Adam Schiff this weekend also tweeting suggesting that yes, we're going to try to get testimony from this interpreter in Helsinki. So we've always had three elements here. One was the news reports and leaks that have been part of the sort of Milia here for a long time about Russia and the president the investigation Muller's always been there. But we don't know anything that's going on there. So the new thing now is congress, and that changes, the dynamics about this story, it makes it harder to kind of push it away by just blaming it on on the fake news. What happened in November matters. It's it's changing the landscape. So very quickly. You mentioned tweets, Amy. The president was in the White House this weekend. There was a snowstorm in Washington. He did a lot of tweeting. I'm not gonna I wasn't gonna. To use the term tweet storm. But I could I will say that. But what I want to ask you about is some of the language in the president's and singling out at one point Nancy and cryan Chuck can end the shutdown in fifteen minutes. If Elizabeth Warren offered referred to me by as as polka. Did this commercial lease referring to a commercial she'd get around her announcing looking at running for president. And then finally he talks about lion James Comey here lumping together all the stories that we're following lion. James Comey and on and on. I guess we're accustomed to this these labels these names, but. What seems different now in this. I think started in the two thousand eighteen campaign is that Democrats are no longer taking the bait on these. They don't feel any need to respond to the president doing this. You saw every candidate in the Twenty-eight campaign focus on healthcare. They didn't react to the president Elizabeth Warren in her opening video never mentioned the president one time she's been on the road. Now going to Iowa New Hampshire doesn't talk about the president unless she's asked about the president. She didn't respond to this tweet. And and what the president wants and what he's done in the past with those tweets as to engage in that battle. And then the media's focus is all about right? It's it's this. He says this this side says that and then we we move off the bigger topics. That's right. And if it's only one sided it's less of a few and each one of these candidates has to calculate how they're going to deal with the other thing that's come up late today. And that is the Senate majority leader Tam. Mitch McConnell has issued a statement. I wanted to come from high levels of Republicans in congress condemning what Steve king, the Republican congressman from Iowa who got a lot of attention last week when he had made a statement about white supremacists. In an essence said how how how could something like this be offensive some Republicans have made mild statements, but now to have Mitch McConnell saying this is unwelcome worthy. And he said anybody if he doesn't understand why white supremacy is offensive he should find another one at work and in the house, they are discussing possible censure or other ways of rebuking the statements. It's remarkable in some ways because Steve king has been saying things like this for years and years and years and years, and and then he would just sort of continue on this seems a little different this time. But Republicans haven't been they've they've said it's wrong, Amy, but they haven't been full-throated in their willingness to. I do. A sort of this fringe character for so long. Let's Steve king. He says these crazy things, but it doesn't matter. Well, now, it does because we talk a lot now about white, nationalist and white supremacists. And we saw the reality of that in Charlottesville. This is no longer. Just a cookie fringe thing. This is very very serious and should be taken very seriously. Walter tamra, Keith. Thank you both here. Welcome. And now to our news. Our share.

president Republicans Amy Walter White House Steve king Washington Quinnipiac university Elizabeth Warren Tam Keith NPR Washington Post congress Putin James Comey Emmy Russia Mitch McConnell Iowa Eliot Engel
"thirty six percent" Discussed on KTKR 760AM

KTKR 760AM

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on KTKR 760AM

"The rich Eisen show. Eric in Cleveland, Ohio. You're here on the show. What's going on Eric? What's going on? What's on your mind, sir? This poll question, honestly is mind boggling to me because we've seen presidency NAM's before we've seen good college prospects before and we've also seen maybe the best rookie season ever from Baker Mayfield. So I don't even know how people are even considering choosing to uh or the Clemson guy over what we just saw from Baker Mayfield this season on on the field in the NFL. I've got to agree with you wanna talk about ten years. One guy's already done it in this year. I am however Eric concerned right now because the current coaching situation, it seems like he and Freddie kitchens or attached the hip, I know, he's being you know, interviewed for the head coaching job. I'm I'm concerned that he's going to he's not going to be with the team next year right now, Eric and I'll explain why a little bit more. A moment. But. That that's the way for top talent to have a problem in the NFL is they they constantly have change different offensive coordinator going to be as thorough whoever's coming in. If it's not kitchens will be his third in a year and thanks for the call Eric, and I'll I'll give it a little bit more voice later on as to why think kitchens might be gone. One guy's six six. Yeah. There's six feet. That's why Trevor Lawrence six six. It's unreal. I cannot believe us playing high school football. How does the poll question currently stand right now he buying stock up for the next ten years? Trevor Lawrence fifty four percent any 2018 NFL rookie thirty six percent. Ten percent for two. Oh, man. Who I again, I'm told there's there's one team or two in the NFL that are gonna tank for him. He's a weapon Russell Wilson. Just take a look does what to their roster and removes themselves of all different types of veterans and clear some quarterback situation for him. Another great call by Chris Fowler last night on a national championship game. Nothing beats this when Alabama for some reason decided to take off the field and then go for a fourth down. But. The play wasn't working in Fowler. The great call. For. Boulevard from forty yards, and it is a fake. Office max backup quarterback. The Tigers were thinking we were thinking. And Chris.

Eric NFL Trevor Lawrence Russell Wilson Chris Fowler Baker Mayfield Freddie kitchens NAM Cleveland Ohio Tigers Clemson football Alabama ten years fifty four percent thirty six percent Ten percent forty yards
"thirty six percent" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

People's Pharmacy

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

"We turn again to Dr Steve nece and chairman of the Robert and Suzanne Thomson's department of cardiovascular medicine at the Cleveland Clinic, his book is heart for one one. Doctor Nissen people have a terrible time analyzing risk and benefit. And so when they think about statins, and they hear oh, a tour of Staten lowered the risk of having a heart attack by about thirty six percent over five years, they go. That's great. That means that of a hundred people a third didn't have a heart attack. If they took medicine pretty good odds. Maybe maybe two thirds didn't. But a third benefit. But that's not actually what happened is it? That's not exactly exactly now. Look, let's let's let's think about how you can help people understand this. Okay. So have you take somebody who's who's risk is one percent? And you lower their risk by a third. It goes from one percent that's one out of hundred two point six six percent. That's a very small benefit. And that's why in the discussion, I emphasized that the higher the risk the more the priority to treat. Now, you give me somebody who's got a twenty five percent risk over the next few years of having an event and you lower their risk by third. That's a big deal. And so I I explain that to people really really carefully. I tell them what I think their risk is I don't tend to use the HA ACC risk calculator. I use something called the Reynolds risk score which was developed by some very thoughtful people that for example, believe it or not the ACC HA guideline. Risk calculator does not include family history. And if you talked to any physician who's been around for any length of time, you see patients where they come in. And they say look every man and woman in my family has had a heart attack or bypass or or something bad happen. You know in in their forties and fifties those patients, no matter what the risk score looks like our high risk because genetics are really important here. And what I like about the guidelines is they tell you now finally to consider those other factors and making a decision. And that's why a formula approach using a risk. Calculator is always a risky business. Deca steepness in. Thank you so much for talking with us on the people sperm Masih today. It's.

Doctor Nissen Staten Dr Steve nece Cleveland Clinic chairman Suzanne Thomson Reynolds Robert one percent twenty five percent thirty six percent six six percent five years
"thirty six percent" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"My dad and I run a small tree Taylor that we bought around this time last year for five hundred thousand dollars didn't have thousand last year what we thought it was a good idea to buy it because they're really familiar with the industry because we also distributor so fast forward past all the discussions. Here's how we ended up paying two thousand. We had one hundred thousand and they account receivable from the owner of the retailer that was put the purchase business which left us with four hundred thousand left the day. One hundred and fifty thousand range for us to pay the owner over time period of eighteen months. We have fifty thousand the pan that and it should be gone in about six months and the remaining two hundred and fifty thousand from business contact of ours. We call them up. Tell them about a situation the next day. You're at two hundred fifty thousand dollar check and you're on our way other than money came with just a phone call. He gave up to fifty thousand thirty six percent interest rate and currently for only paying interest on the money. So because we have to pay. I think my headphones are messed up. Did you say a thirty six percent interest rate, thirty six percent. I can't breathe. Okay. Sound like so easy? No. Wonder if so easy. I don't know. It's it's. What in the world made you think thirty six percent was a good idea. Because of the revenue that the business polls in its, we're pulling in about one hundred and ten thousand a month in revenue, and we're able to keep up with the loan Rabo to pay back the one hundred fifty thousand where current with everything, but it's just that money and interests could be better used for investing in the business elsewhere. Okay. So one eight gonna pay it off. There's no term on that too. A lot that when you're going to pay it off, I'm sure he doesn't want you to pay it off. But when are you going to get rid of this mess? We were planning on either paying fifty thousand. We're paying now and it should be on the success and most are paying that aggressively. Market in this business because you told me you're making a million to gross. That's about right? Yeah. And so what's your, what's your net. About Stras hundred thousand. Okay. And so why is it taking six months to pay fifty grand. Would you set it up to be paid over eighteen months? We started. Okay. Stop if I had five hundred thousand dollar income and I had a two hundred and fifty thousand dollar loan at thirty six percent interest. It would be paid off in less than a year. Would not have that crap. You make a ton of money. Why are you sitting with his dad at ridiculous interest rates. Because we also have very high expensive with a two run the ask you what your net was. You said your net was twenty. You met your gross profit, not your real profit net. Mcgirt net profit net. Taxable income is what a year. Oh, we're about just about breaking even. Just about breaking even when that means you have ten percent Marga. Oh, lord. Okay. So how can I help. So we have about fifty thousand less to pay on the first one. Yeah, I original owner and we'll be able to fly. We'll be able to apply eight thousand three hundred thirty three every month. Yeah..

Marga thirty six percent eighteen months six months fifty thousand thirty six perc two hundred fifty thousand dol five hundred thousand dollars five hundred thousand dollar fifty thousand dollar ten percent
"thirty six percent" Discussed on The Young Turks

The Young Turks

03:58 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on The Young Turks

"So for whatever reason. Will the guidelines were you can't charge military members in annual interest rate of more than thirty six percent. So it's not a tough standard. Thirty, six percent interest rate is gained tick, Donald Trump bankrupted Taj Mahal because he took an interest alone that Ed to high interest rate, you know what? It was fourteen percent and it was totally untenable and unsustainable. But yeah, they're willing to charge that to our service members into average American citizens, and we're keeping him down to thirty six percent it. We didn't have this law. They sometimes charge up to three hundred percent. So then the other provisions, they can't push them into force arbitration because force arbitration is Reagan favor of corporations. Oftentimes they can't require them to a lot Porsches a paychecks to pay back their loans. So that means they would just start taking it out of the servicemembers checks if they couldn't pay it back, but they might need that money for family for the food for their family for rent. Otherwise they might be homeless, etc. But they would just. Grabbed their paychecks and the military lending act prohibited that okay. And then last one was creditors can't charge a penalty for early payment. Now that's mental if I have the money and I'm willing to pay you so I don't have to keep paying that reveals interest rate. Why can't I just pay you? They said, no, I'm going to charge you a penalty for being good guy and paying your head of why because they want their interest. Yes, because they want to rob you blind. So the military lending act is great. And what what is it? It's regulation to protect veterans and servicemembers. So then on top of that, it was a regulated in a way that they didn't wait for your life to be ruined. They were proactive. So what did that do? How much did that save? Let's go to graphic six. Okay. Proponents of the system say that it worked out well and they say that the agency says it delivered more than a hundred thirty million dollars in relief to servicemembers says to twenty eleven. And handle more than seventy one thousand consumer complaints. From the end, their families is also taken enforcement actions after scuppering lenders that broke the law. So several layers of regulation that you see there, what is the point of regulation? It is just laws meant to protect you. So you'll regulation so that your local plant can't put toxic liquid into the nearby stream which your kids swim it. That's a regulation. In this case, you regulate the predatory lenders, so they don't prey on a servicemembers. That's regulation. You could do it before in the middle and after, and there's different gradations of it and now make Malvina in the Trump administration said. Don't worry about it. Let's see if they catch him afterwards. They'll catch him for a lot less. That's one hundred thirty million dollars. Those lenders are going to rob from our servicemembers. Do you support the troops or don't you support the troops? And the reality is progresses actually care about them. They're American citizens and they signed up to protect us, etc. So we want to protect them and what do conservatives say? And I don't think it's real conservatives to be fair to conserve. I think it's the corrupt Republican politicians they go. Yeah, I don't give it game about those. People say punchline for us that ripping you put on your car support, our troops, don't care. These guys pay our bills bankers, pay my bills bankers. Go rob him, go rob them. So they say the hundred thirty million dollars because you didn't bankers pay with all their army of large. They pay one hundred thirty million dollars because they didn't do it. So they're gonna do it again and they're going to rob him again because they just took the cops off the street. That's what these. Guys are Mick Mulvaney is one of the most corrupt people we've ever had in government trained as swamp might ask. This is exactly what the swamp is and by the way the military lending act is wonderful. Why doesn't apply to all of us? Yeah, it's a great point. That's a great point..

Donald Trump Mick Mulvaney Ed Taj Mahal Trump administration Reagan Malvina one hundred thirty million dol hundred thirty million dollars thirty six percent three hundred percent fourteen percent six percent
"thirty six percent" Discussed on Mac OS Ken

Mac OS Ken

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on Mac OS Ken

"Of the ongoing battle between phone and the end royd phones on the hardware side called the max says iphone made up some ground on its robot brethren in the states last quarter and pulled even with phones from samsung that's according to new estimates from consumer intelligence research partners or crp from april through june iphone accounted for thirty six percent of smartphone activation in the us samsung also saw thirty six percent of activation 's the next closest phone maker in the states was l g it took twelve percent of the quarters active asians mike levin partner and co founder of c i r p was quoted in the piece is saying apple improved in part at samsung's expense who share back the declined relative to both last quarter and last year and a quarter without any significant phone launches samsung had market share only equal to apple's a year ago samsung headey considerably greater share of sales this might be neck and neck race between apple and sammy the us will stay the home of the end royd the p says the i r p expects android and i o s to eventually split the market with iowa taking one third and android will stay out the other twothirds turning now to the software side apple world today says ios apps store is still mopping the floor with google play in terms of apps sales not the googles not making money that going to ask them.

samsung us apple iowa mike levin partner co founder sammy google thirty six percent twelve percent
"thirty six percent" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Everyone reading into that yeah i i feel like it was a mistake that somebody who didn't realize edited documentary something weird chinese regulators approved the sale of to shape this chip unit to bank capital two sheep memory is the number two producer of non ships in the world all antitrust approvals have now been received that was a that's a big deal china was holding up and it was looking like they may not be able to sell that it's a big deal for toshiba because of westinghouse bringing them down so that's that's another another significant move in the whole chinese tariffs international trade relations situation finally the website finder dot com dot au says it survey shows the average amount spent on a mobile plan in australia has declined from forty eight dollars a month to forty four dollars a month drop is attributed to fewer people paying off the cost of their handset as part of a mobile bundle twenty six percent of australians were on a mobile bundle this past year down from thirty six percent last year that makes total sense to me from the from the people i know i i think that you know the main bill of the main people in that bill appropriately still just on a two year plan and they they upgrade when the till you plan ends up but i know a lot of people on the sides there that kind of no to upgrade all the time have totally gone prepaid and moved to their own devices outright and then on the other side of that spectrum there are the people who are just holding onto their iphone six or whatever it was because it's still a very good device and and they've taken that opportunity to drop down to a lower tariff yeah i i mean i do it with my mom where i send the phone that i've been using to her because i always buy it unlocked and it gives me that flexibility i don't have to worry about it being locked or unlocked or anything it's always mine i've paid it off because i buy it outright and then i can buy a new one myself and it's always fun to watch the accounts catchup as we moved the sim card it'll be a couple of months where it'll be like we don't know what device you're on and then they'll finally figured it out somehow.

china toshiba westinghouse producer australia forty eight dollars forty four dollars thirty six percent twenty six percent two year
"thirty six percent" Discussed on The HT Guys

The HT Guys

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on The HT Guys

"So they already sell their own webcams or or connected yeah cameras right amazon clipping i saw here is siren i wish apple would create something like that for their home kit i don't see anything like that i had z wave siren that you could just trip if you wanna do security now i have no way of making noise if somebody were to break into my house when i was away from home the most i can do turn all the lights on and that's a pretty big deterrent to it's like three in the morning and also an all the lights inside and out go off in my house looks all lit up like a christmas tree i think that could draw some attention and they if somebody's in the house a probably wanna leave the next thing i think we just have some lights flashing cameras and i think even if you don't have a camera people thinking ono my pictures been taken and that might also get them to leave and you know you maybe you could play some sort of siren noise out of an echo or echo dot instead of obviously sirens going to be louder but yet make some sort of loud siren noise out of the echo dot in the system all right so along these lines smart home device sales are projected derives thirty six percent over twenty seventeen sales reaching four point five billion overall and many companies such as intel are struggling to find out how products fit into this market the mark van reports in a forbes post that until now well positioned for success in smart home and consumers will directly benefit from it over the next several years and you know what until i read this article i didn't even realize intel has not been involved in any of the smart home stuff what intel products are there for smart home they may sell some components which they may or may not i don't know but they're not making any devices for smart home.

apple intel mark van thirty six percent
"thirty six percent" Discussed on Lights, Camera, Podcast

Lights, Camera, Podcast

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on Lights, Camera, Podcast

"Prince no no that one was critically panned i'm thinking what can you tell me the lower distribution of the top five is like thirty five percent or forty percent so number only six of them have above a forty percent prince persia was number six at thirty six percent no one of them was a recent movie with jason hankins oh damn jason diggers video game movie see this one you're going to over think this one because you're gonna say oh yeah that is video game but you're probably thinking too much along the lines of like doom tomb raider like ram now an atari game or something like that now now it's recent it's recent and it's based off a recent game one other hand yeah mobile game oh angry birds yeah angry bird yeah and you're right i didn't i didn't consider that one i didn't i didn't hate the angry birds every i was i was at best buy last night looking for in oleg oh led tv which i didn't realize you're still so expensive and this dude was some best buys have that magnolia like side center which is like their premium tv and sound products near the tv set up and then they had the chair set up some dude would just sitting there in chair watching the dvd intro loop to angry birds over and over sounds like horror they can't even like press play for the six thousand dollars tv i guess the lead tv's do look great man i'm trying to convince my wife she was like hey let's get a new tv doesn't have to be that expensive and i'm like at this point there's no point not buying led tv because look how black the blacks are it just looks phenomenal and then like three thousand dollars so i don't know guys anyway back to the video game it's not need for speed in the top five because that one was shit on pretty hard with aaron paul screed.

Prince persia jason hankins aaron paul screed forty percent three thousand dollars six thousand dollars thirty five percent thirty six percent
"thirty six percent" Discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

CNBC's Fast Money

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

"Fan pede wounds thirty six percent of like long like that according to filings to filings at sixty seven percent down i won't say because i won't stampede and see i i'll come into the looking at us percent of twenty seven somebody's wrong did you not wrong because you can see my ten k filings see i'm just right i was on the nasdaq flawed even nasdag you free float of six million from your you got i asked him like in from third party i said the inflammations liquidity there are seventy six million shares when we got list thirty million shares are not listed on nasdaq nasdaq only classic on ships are listed mike thirty million class b common stock which is not listed at all so i would have seventy six million my cfo because i asked him to move back to the united states he said i must act on oddball because i have my obligations then said after the view these inova near going he agreed to return his two million shares because obviously view the ships for the future performance so my lord is forty four million ships and forty four million shares i didn't feel one point one five million shifts and there is an independent consultant we have given two million shares since september eleventh singer freely let me consult is there an independent consultant for you see we are there on record there's a quote are not timing being on that i'm just sitting on september eleventh shaves or issued on march levin six months for anyone but sociology.

cfo united states independent consultant levin sixty seven percent thirty six percent six months ten k
"thirty six percent" Discussed on You Are Not So Smart

You Are Not So Smart

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on You Are Not So Smart

"Threat to the nation's wellbeing and thirty six percent of republicans said the same thing of democrats and there are some good explanations for this and social science but the strange downstream consequences of forming group so easily and then immediately engaging in favoritism in bias based on group membership is that once one's identity as defined by the tribe to which he or she belongs compromise and agreement on policies and laws in decisions and judgments and notions of what is and is not true we will naturally become more and more difficult as our ability is signal to others to which tribes we belong increases and that is what we're going to talk about after the spring hello i love being able to learn about anything the interests be whenever and however i want and with the great courses plus i do that it's great having the flexibility to once lectures or stream the audio with the great courses plus app now i talk about the great courses all the time because this really is just the greatest sponsor we could ever have because this is everything you've ever wanted from the internet you can brush up on spanish in the car you can explore ancient history will making dinner you can improve your understanding of the solar system while taking a walk you can set the playback speed just like a podcast you can easily toggle back to the video for visual context whenever you want to do that now the great courses blesses so many cool courses they're always taught by a leading professor they're field is not just one course it's like 30 lecturers inside that course is not just one thing and the great courses plus gives you unlimited access to thousands of the.

professor thirty six percent
"thirty six percent" Discussed on CNN's The Daily DC

CNN's The Daily DC

02:23 min | 4 years ago

"thirty six percent" Discussed on CNN's The Daily DC

"Party they want to represent them in congress fifty one percent said democrats and thirty six percent said republicans and that kind of spread a fifteen point spread on that question historically if indeed that were to maintain itself throughout much of the altered that would represent a potential wave that's right i mean i remember asking some smart republican strategist a few months ago that question specifically wind as the congressional ballot really start to worry you because democrats usually have a little bit of an advantage air there are saying eight nine ten points starts to become old boy we are in jeopardy of losing the house did they say win in the election cycle they think that like holds and takes form and is hard to change impression off there were fears but to be honest with you so much changes with president trump right and this republican congress that i i don't hold people to conversations had months ago but around now a arouna headed an headed into next year the thought was if republicans had not passed something big um they would be in serious trouble to tax reform looks like they might pass it but uh it does not poll as a popular um issue or or or measure right now either so there's no real indication that that could save them so on that point let me ask you do you in your sense i know you talk to these folks all the time that are planning for the campaign strategies a heading into next year due democrats think that they're going to be able to more successfully run against the tax bill if it passes or the healthcare peace that had gone down which seemed to have galvanized a lot of democrats and helped energize their base over the summer when that was sort of imploding on republicans yeah the healthcare bill is one where they feel a lot more confident in part because there are some certainty there they know how to message that successfully they know how to have that conversation with voters and eventually seen obamacare numbers of change it has become a lot more popular than it used to be now the president obama's no longer in office on tax reform they talk a good game they see the polls they understand that it could be a positive for them politically but to be frank and this is the democratic view right yet.

congress the house democrats obama president frank thirty six percent fifty one percent