34 Burst results for "Thirty Meter"

The Hills are Alive

Your Brain on Facts

04:58 min | 2 months ago

The Hills are Alive

"It was an ambitious project that though it failed would become part of the iconography of a decade in september nineteen ninety one the first term residents moved in to biosphere to a three acre volume built to be an artificial materially closed ecological system biosphere one being the earth itself a texas oil billionaire. Funded it to study. How people might one day be able to manage a self sustaining ecosystem for life on mars. It proved to be a lot harder in practice than it was on paper. The oxygen levels would drop too low. The crew didn't really know how to grow crops for food. Their pollinator soon died out and the ants moved in not just any aunts crazy ants. My name's moxy and this is your brain on facts. They go marching to by two. They're the subject of to cgi movies from nineteen ninety. Eight and a picnic wouldn't be complete without them today. We're talking about ants. This topic comes to you by popular demand to social media comments an email. That's a new record. So thanks to rachel. A prodigious and kate from strange animals podcast. We really should think about ants more often than we do considering how many of them there are. I've often enjoyed dropping the fact that the ant population is equal to the human population by weight. But is it. The claim comes from one thousand nine hundred ninety four book journey to the ants by harvard university professor and a german biologist. They based their estimate on the estimate of a british entomologist who calculated that the number of insects alive on earth at any given moment was one million trillion. If ants make up one percent of the insect world that's ten thousand trillion according to the book individual workers weigh on average between one two five milligrams according to the species when combined all ants in the world taken together way about as much as all human beings. So if you're going to play on a seesaw with a bunch of ants you would need about a million of them on the other end to balance you out assuming you weigh sixty two kilos or about one hundred and thirty seven pounds which i will tell you. I don't with around thirteen thousand ant species worldwide. There comes a lot of variety. They range from smallest less than one millimeter long to over fifty millimeters or two inches. That's the aptly named titanic mira gigante so weights vary too but experts seem to agree the average weight of an ant is less than ten milligrams but even among experts. No one really knows how many aunts there are in the world. A bbc documentary claims. There are not ten trillion ants but one hundred trillion though it still suggests that the total weight of the ants equals the total weight of humans. Even by the author's own math their calculations are wrong. If we estimate that the seven point two billion humans on the planet weigh a combined three hundred and thirty two billion kilos or three hundred sixty six million tons and ten thousand trillion aunts weighing an average of four milligrams. Each we get only forty billion kilos or forty four million tonnes or about nine pounds of human for every pound of ants even if we allow for the smaller human population in one thousand nine hundred eighty four and the smaller humans. It's still back of napkin. Math at best one expert does say that the numbers might have inaccurate at one time. Probably about two hundred and fifty years ago. We must also remember that. Humans are getting fatter all the time. We're not just increasing in population we're increasing in fatness. So i think we've left the ants behind another way to try to wrap your head around. How many aunts there are is to look at the biomass of them. One of my favourite weird history and animated rant youtube channels sam annella compared the biomass of several animals and visualized them as spheres literal animal planet's for example. If all the blue whales in the world could be mushed together like plato. They'd make a spheroid about one hundred and forty meters or four hundred and fifty feet across blue. Whales are huge but there aren't very many of them. In contrast the chicken planet is more than twice that size three hundred and thirty meters or eleven hundred feet across their small. But we've read a lot of them. The math was tricky enough. What with trying to come up with a density for each animal. But sam found order of

Titanic Mira Gigante Harvard University Rachel Texas BBC Sam Annella Youtube
beirut explosion latest news

Monocle 24: The Briefing

08:43 min | 6 months ago

beirut explosion latest news

"Some exercises in perspective the IRA bomb which severely damaged Canary Wharf in London in Nineteen ninety-six was estimated at just over one ton of ammonium nitrate Timothy McVeigh's bomb which demolished a federal government building in Oklahoma City in nineteen ninety-five was just over two tons of the same material. The boss which erupted in Beirut's port on Tuesday was estimated at two. Thousand seven hundred and fifty tons of ammonium nitrate. One of the biggest peacetime non nuclear explosions in history as Bhai. Route begins the barely imaginable task of cleaning up and is understandably enough growing tear gas was fired yesterday at protesters near the parliament building I'm joined. Now by Lila Milana, Allen France twenty four's correspondent in Beirut Leyla. First of all, you have been visiting the port which was the epicenter of the explosion. I can't begin to imagine where you would even describe such scene but I'm going to ask you to have a crack at doing that the scene is as you say, almost indescribable does smoke still rising from the charred MBA's off. Destroyed packing crates destroyed shelving and it says every kind of. Utility things you'd expect to see in shops. Twisted. Washing machines on the floor items from pharmacies because this of course port, this is the one thirty functional in Lebanon imposed everything and everything was stored than in the center. You have the remains of these enormous grain silos that carried the grain for the majority of the country completely destroyed and parts of them. Still collapsing there you have a aid workers desperately trying to dig people of rubble that's thirty meters deep, and the conditions are horrific temperatures of thirty degrees baking hot sun. The air is thick and brown the smell acrid burning metal and plastic. It really is post-apocalyptic and this goes on for over a mile. Entire poor is just smoking twisted metal and daybreak. Nash. have. You got a clear sense of how widespread the damage across Beirutis. How far can you go from the blast without seeing broken windows? So it. was about nine kilometers where we're still doing things like breaking windows the impact of it and having people. That's it really has spread incredibly far, and it's an uneven spread as well because. What's happened is that the grain ciders positioned in a certain way which meant that it protected half of the city of West Beirut, which historically has in many disasters. Conflicts actually born the brunt of of problems in Beirut and actually deflected the majority of the blast towards the East and the south, which is why a famous areas like Gymnasium Ohio Asha fear completely The buildings there obliterated and one of the concerns now is a lot of. Buildings the older buildings in Beirut the few buildings left in the east of in pre-civil war, which were much loved already, quite delicate on the point of collapse yesterday as people were trying to clear the streets constantly civil defense volunteers trying to pull people back away from these buildings with balconies hanging down stone starting to crumble because of course, that's a huge dangerous. People are still sifting through rubble trying to find loved ones that buildings could. New Buildings that had not yet collapsed could collapse on top of the other issue is that the new builds a lot of them are concrete and speaking to an engineer what can happen with concrete is that with a shockwave blast like this concrete cracks easily under pressure and so that can be in tunnel cracks there that you don't know about in can't be seen from the outside, but the make the building unstable and because there's really been. Very, little help from the government with people trying to go back into their homes, clear up and see what they can retrieve and whether their homes are still livable. Many people going back into very unstable buildings and some living there because they have no other former shelter. So a real risk of further injury as buildings might potentially collapse over the next few days very similar to the aftermath of an earthquake, which is what this is compared to. A among the people who was serving the damage in Beirut yesterday was of course, President Emmanuel Macron of France undertaking a extraordinary spontaneous visit. How is that being received? I mean, it's it's understandable enough that Lebanese politicians don't want to interact at a personal level with the public at the not only for their own safety but is it being regarded as strange that the first high profile politician to to take a walkabout should be the president of an entirely different country? Well, it is strange, but it's not being regarded as strange. I was down on the street yesterday when McCone was was walking through glad-handing the crowd I mean, he really was you know playing up to it and was supposed to be going to Baabda Palace, the Presidential Palace to meet with politicians and delayed that for an extra hour on the schedule to stay with Lebanese people in the streets of course, playing up very much. The fact that he was there to see them he'd said before the visit my main priorities to go and be with the people of Lebanon. And extend, solidarity's to them, and then after that I will be dealing with the political varieties speaking to them. So in the streets, he was absolutely mobbed by people he's hugging people shaking hands with them people coming up tim saying, please don't give those politicians any money that corrupt criminals we don't trust them and he responded to one woman I know you don't trust them graffiti everywhere saying don't give one. Euro. To those Michael help us. So he really did make himself as I say a man of the people yesterday I spoke to a couple of young women afterwards. WHO said to me? That man was more of a leader to us in fifteen minutes than any of our politicians have been where all day no one has come to see us where are they wears the help and later in the day after a lot of commentary that. The. Obviously. Lebanese politicians feeding quite shamefaced one. The justice minister did come down to the streets to try and speak to people clearing up and she had water thrown in her face and chanting protest. Immediately, they're not welcome and that people absolutely fading that the government has no interest in safety in their health in their wellbeing and their ability to rebuild hiding away from them as everybody marshals together to try and get things. Back to nothing like normal but something livable at least just to follow that up finally, regular listeners may recall that you and I were speaking on Monday talking about the resignation of Lebanon's foreign minister and that seemed like a pretty big story at the time He's probably ruin his timing at this point but have you seen or heard anything in terms of actual messaging attempts to help or anything from the alleged government of Lebanon or d you kind of assume that they've all got to the point where they just realized the games up nobody really wants to hear from them anymore. It's quite extraordinary. There is honesty nothing happening in terms of that what the government is doing a lot of finger pointing at each other and previous administrations about who's to blame for this they've put everybody associated with the report under house arrest and saying that they're going to find the perpetrators. But of course, everybody's saying somebody else's the perpetrator on what we know so far it seems that for six years has been ongoing negligence at the highest. Level where a several reports were were built up by the head of the port and have customs sent to the government center the Prime Minister's Office the judiciary about the fact that this was a ticking time bomb and something has to be done completely ignored. So the government is going on about this investigation saying they'll find responsible meanwhile three hundred, thousand people in Beirut homeless, five, thousand injured hundreds still missing, and honestly all you can see on the streets is volunteers. The. Lebanese. breath volunteers, obviously with their ambulances civil defence wanting tears, young people armed with spades and rooms marching down the street just going into people's homes into buildings and sweeping up what they can and moving onto the next one cleaning up themselves. They all said to me of course not here we wouldn't expect anything else from them with the only people who can help ourselves and today international aid. Groups coming in different countries, sending their own firefighters medical support in, and still a complete absence of the Lebanese government anywhere except the poor area learn Milana Allen in Beirut thank you very much for joining us.

West Beirut Lebanon Government Beirut Leyla Lebanese Government New Buildings Canary Wharf Lila Milana Timothy Mcveigh Oklahoma City London Prime Minister's Office Baabda Palace Beirutis Allen France Milana Allen Nash. Gymnasium Ohio Asha
That history should not repeat: Hiroshimas storytellers

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:16 min | 6 months ago

That history should not repeat: Hiroshimas storytellers

"Seventy, five years ago, this week, the B twenty, nine, bomber, Nola gay dropped little boy, the world's first use of an atomic weapon. At Eight fifteen in the morning of August six Japanese time. The first atomic thumb has done enemy talk. It detonated over. Hiroshima immediately killing around one hundred and forty. Thousand People I'm was aimed to explode about zero point. In the city at the junction of. Untold River. Three days later, another stroke sake. As Japan marks the anniversary, it hopes to keep the wartime memories alive using the stories of people who survived the attacks. On all. Holland. But the average age of survivors is now over eighty three. But those. This'll be the last chance to hear from those witnesses during a major anniversary. August sixth nineteen forty five was supposed to be a day off for seventeen year old. Takeo to Toco. No Snyder is the economists Tokyo Bureau chief. She had made plans to meet two girlfriends at eight fifteen owning at a train station on the west side of Shema. She was running late, and then she stepped outside, she saw flash and heard a bang. Which you regained consciousness, she found herself lying thirty meters away a mushroom cloud rising over the city. People with charts skin peeling from their arms rushing over a nearby hillside. Mr K. Ohka left's to look for her mother. and. Found rivers filled with bodies took her six days to locate her mom who is still miraculously alive. Mom lived for another twenty two years. We stuck ohka became a prominent voice amongst the hypocrisy shower, atomic bomb survivors, atomic sufferers. Telling Her story abroad many times in hopes of preventing atomic bombs from ever being used again. I heard this tale from her daughter. He got no. Mario. Who's part of a fascinating unique project underway in both your Sima Nagasaki to help preserve the stories, of Hypoxia, for generations to come to, how does this project work? So there are still some hundred and thirty thousand living. inbox. Amiss. Gone. But their average age is now over eighty three and the number who can tell their stories publicly is declining drastically. Just. You got the fact that could have done this. So the city government's in both fishermen sake have been recruiting scores of volunteers like music Otieno to become what they call dense Shosha or legacies successors. These are essentially memory keepers, people who learned the stories of the hypoxia down to the most gruesome details in order to be able to retell them with power and veracity for years into the future do. So the volunteers in, Hiroshima, have to go through a rather rigorous course, three years of study training discussion with hypoxia before they're allowed to retell the stories in public. Ms Higashi, no is somewhat unusual in that. She inherited own story, most of the Dan Shosha, take on a stranger's burden. And it simply because that's that generation of of survivors passing that the these city governments have started this program. Yeah, it is. It's really reflective of the anxiety that many people in here, C.`mon, Nagasaki and throughout Japan feel about fading wartime memories I'm what will happen. Once this generation firsthand witnesses passes away the city governments and the peace museums. Atomic bomb museums in both cities have been collecting and recording testimony for many years. But this then social program is away, they hope to preserve these memories in living form to retain the emotional impact. The comes from searing these stories from another human being. and. So where does this fit in with the the wider of up the bombing of of the war in Japan? For Japan, the Hiroshima Experience became central to wartime memory and park has some scholars have argued because it allows victim narrative to dominate shifting the focus away from the atrocities Japanese soldiers committed abroad in Asia and the Pacific certainly oaks in China and Korea have bristled at the lack of context that some of the retailing's of the aroma and Nagasaki experiences or trey. and. If you look at Japan today, it's of course, wrestling a new with the legacy of the Second World War and its aftermath in particular the constitution that America imposed on Japan after the war, which renounces war bars Japan from maintaining armed forces. In practice, Japan does maintain a powerful military which it calls the Self Defense Forces and its Prime Minister Obey Shinzo years has hoped to change the constitution to revise the constitution in order to make explicit that Japan's military is constitutional and and perhaps to expand the limits of what they're allowed to do. Curiously, the public still supports maintaining the postwar constitution. So in short pacifism is still deep seated in today's Japan. and. What about the the the effort of auction others to to learn the lessons of the second. World War d? How does nuclear non-proliferation look at this stage from where you are. Well. This is another source for concern. Of course, non-proliferation efforts in recent years have been faltering just this January. The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. It's doomsday clock. It's subjective measure of our proximity to self-annihilation closer to midnight than anytime since its establishment in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven, the hawks are are pleased and take solace in the signing of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in two, thousand, seventeen, it invokes there unacceptable suffering in its preamble and a nod to how the memory of interesting Nagasaki continues to shape non-proliferation efforts globally yet at the same time, no country with nuclear weapons has signed up to that treaty neither has Japan in fact, which shelters under America's nuclear umbrella. And, and how does that sit with Hypoxia at this stage at this anniversary being marked. I spoke with US Akihiko the governor of the prefecture, and he expressed the view that I heard from many others both your seem sake, which was a wish that Japan would use its moral authority as the only victim of atomic weapons to push harder for their abolition. The hypocrisy. Have Long gramps and spoken about abolishing the bomb before the last houses away. Just to make the do. You call. You can. That's unlikely. But the hypocrisy hope that their stories at the very least. Deter the world from ever using his weapons again. Thank you very much for your time. Thank you very much for having me.

Japan Hypoxia Hiroshima Nagasaki Bulletin Of Atomic Scientists Sima Nagasaki Untold River Mr K. Ohka Dan Shosha Toco America Takeo Holland Ms Higashi Snyder Tokyo Bureau Chief Mario United States
Demonstrators at Mauna Kea say they’re leaving. Tribes included in national massive stimulus bill. First Nation leader urges for people to stay home.

Native America Calling

03:56 min | 10 months ago

Demonstrators at Mauna Kea say they’re leaving. Tribes included in national massive stimulus bill. First Nation leader urges for people to stay home.

"This is National Native News Amazon. Tonia Gonzales and Hawaii demonstrators at the base amount K. of blocking an access road to prevent construction of the thirty meter telescope are leaving camp leaders announced this week in a video message. Leader said there's no imminent threat posed by T. M. T. but pointed to threats of covert nineteen in response to the corona virus. They made the decision to pack up and come off the Mouna but pledged to return if there are attempts at construction demonstrators have been there since July and opposition of the telescope to protect the site many native Hawaiians hold sacred a spokesperson for. Tnt told the Honolulu Star advertiser. There's no immediate plans for construction. Us lawmakers hope a massive stimulus bill will soften the economic blow due to Cova Nineteen Wyoming Public Radio Savannah Mar reports on. What'S IN STORE FOR TRIBES TOUGH ECONOMIC. Times are likely ahead for many tribes including those who rely on gaming and hospitality dollars oil and gas revenue. The stimulus bill passed by the US Senate on Wednesday sets aside eight billion dollars in a Stabilization Fund for Tribes Senator. Tom Udall is vice. Chair of the Senate Committee on Indian affairs he says he was pushing for twenty billion in direct funding tribes. The first time we were able to fight and get a tribal stabilization fund of Eight Billion Dollars. We were asking for a lot more. We think the need is a lot bigger. Did they'll also include over a billion dollars to the Indian Health Service and provision for. Bi Police departments tribal colleges in federal Indian housing programs. Those housing dollars will be especially crucial for communities dealing with housing shortages. You'd also living in an overcrowded home is especially dangerous during this pandemic and the money could be used for emergency housing big infusion into housing and so one of the things. I think that's going to allow to happen. Is Communities to be able to rally around new out the the. Us House of Representatives is expected to vote on the bill on Friday for National Native News. I'm Savannah Mar. Health officials are urging people to wash hands to prevent the spread of cove nineteen but many households on Navajo land. Lack Indoor plumbing from the Frontier Desk Laurel Morales reports. Shanna Yazdi who lives in Cameron drives fifty miles for her drinking water groceries and other necessities my mother was asking like. When are we taking the trash out? We have four bags of trash and we have to drive into the city to do that doing laundry. I'm scared to go through laundry right now. We have a small laundry. Met here at a community kind of risky for us right now. So our laundry. It's just kind of getting piled up with each one. N One in two thousand nine American Indians and Alaskan natives had mortality rates that were four times the rates of all other racial and ethnic groups combined. That's according to a study by the National Institutes of Health. Their couvert nineteen may have a significant impact for national needed news and Lorrimore. Ellis inflect staff. Assembly of first nations national chief. Perry Bell Guard is urging first nations people across Canada to stay home in response to covert nineteen an address Thursday. He urged people to self isolate. Avoid large gatherings and asks for everyone's help to protect elders. He says Af en is also pressing Canada to ensure first nations are included in Cova nineteen planning first nations leaders have raised concerns about remoteness overcrowded housing and lack of access to clean drinking water. Government has pledged more than three hundred million dollars for indigenous communities but some first nations leaders have expressed that funding will not do enough to help their communities respond to Cova nineteen. I'm Antonio Gonzalez.

United States Savannah Mar Cova Tom Udall Us Senate Tonia Gonzales Canada Honolulu Star Indian Health Service National Institutes Of Health Hawaii TNT Hawaiians Senate Committee Antonio Gonzalez Stabilization Fund T. M. T. House Of Representatives Laurel Morales
Ancient Artifacts on the Beaches of Northern Europe

Science Magazine Podcast

07:47 min | 11 months ago

Ancient Artifacts on the Beaches of Northern Europe

"Now speak with Andrew Curry a freelance journalist based in Berlin. His new article in science explores hidden treasures that have surfaced on the coast of the Netherlands. They include such things as neanderthal tools. A willy mammoth tooth and human remains from thousands of years ago. These remarkable fines lending significant insight into the ecological and anthropological history of the region. Hi Andrew All right. The story highlights a variety of people from a nurse to university professors who were studying the samples from vastly different perspectives. Generally speaking who were the scientists involved in the research so it's kind of an incredible array of different disciplines that are being brought to bear on the same questioner region there geneticists archaeologists geographers people who specialize in underwater mapping. And then. There's also one of the things that really interested me in a story. There's a big contribution being made by amateurs interested in the fines and spend time just looking for the stuff on each where it washes up right so these things are just washing up on shore. What are some of the most compelling fines that have been dredged up so some of the most compelling fines are stone and bone tools and human remains that date back seven thousand or more years ago some of which goes all the way back to fifty thousand years when the the area was populated by neanderthals? They're also finding animal remains. They found Bama's skulls all kinds of things that date back to a time when the shore off the Netherlands and the UK in the North Sea was actually above water. So how are these finds turning up on the beach in the first place? It used to be that these finds would turn up in fishing nets and sort of at random but in the last few years as the Netherlands has really focused on coastal reclamation and protecting their coast against sea level rise. They've been dredging sand and gravel offshore and bringing it and dumping it on the beach and in those massive hundreds of thousands of tons of sand and gravel that they've brought in from offshore there are bones stone tools human remains that slowly then get uncovered by the waves and they're amateurs who go out to the beach every day almost and just look for the stuff as it as it comes out of the sand. Pick it up. Send pictures of it to archaeologists then identify it and they work together to analysts. Awesome and like you said. These fines are eating found by all these different types of people. Could you outline some of the techniques being used to analyze the fines? There's actually geneticists who are scraping DNA straight off the sea floor and showing what kind of plants and animals live there when it was terrestrial land. The fines are one aspect of the whole effort. Devoted to trying to figure out what the landscape under the North Sea looked like before the last ice age ended and flooded the area so at one point there was an area three or four times bigger than Modern Day Holland. That was all above ground. There were forests there were rivers and it was probably heavily populated. Sounds pretty beautiful actually. Yeah what kind of DNA is being analyzed. So geneticists are using ancient DNA techniques to look at both the soil to get DNA from there and also analyzing human remains. The collectors have found on the beach. That are actually really well preserved because of the cold and wet at the bottom of the sea to get whole human genomes and you can then look at the ancient. Dna from these populations that lived in an area that is now underwater very cool. There's a specific item that surface that holds huge significance. And that's the landscape of the area being studied. What are some of the most important lessons learned about the landscape of this submerged region? I mean part of it is just that it's cool to go is one of the researchers. I talked to said. They're getting maps of a country that you can't visit so there's this massive landscape that was once above water and they're testing out all these different ways to look at it could also be applied to other coastal regions. That were once habitable. That were once passages to new lands like the landscape between Alaska and Asia for example Barron. Jia they call it yeah and look at how you know how these areas worked for human migration how humankind spread around the world. There are these key gaps in our knowledge because the sea levels today are thirty meters higher than they were twenty five thousand years ago right and you mentioned these maps that they're able to make out of information being collected and one of the sources of that information are these energy companies. Could you explain how these energy companies are contributing to the data collection? And what that data help discover sure. It's been a really interesting and sort of inspirational collaboration. Between scientists and industry in the North Sea is a is a tremendously important commercial area for shipping. And then there's a lot of wind farms oil. Well gas well drilling and so companies went out and did these seismic surveys to see what was deep under the ground. And for the archaeologists it was a very top level. That wasn't maybe commercially. Valuable but tremendously valuable. In terms of the knowledge it contains about the landscapes so they worked with the companies to get that data. And then we're able to start. These maps based on seismic survey data. There's also been some interesting collaboration. Between companies that dredged gravel for construction use and then led archaeologists have access to the stones and dirt that are dragged up from the bottom of the sea which was once land these maps and some of this information really revealing what humans were like thousands of years ago what civilization was like before this landscape changed. So what did this region? What does this research teach us about human history? The very end of this landscape was populated by modern humans. Just like you and me who were hunter gatherers. At first they were in a landscape that was probably a lot like the most fertile parts of England were Hollander Belgium today and then slowly over a couple of hundred years. Some of the research has revealed that as the water levels rose it transformed into more of estuary wetland area but people kept living there and they managed to adapt and change their lifestyle to the rising seas which I guess goes to show you. The climate change is an old story of course that that begs the question right. This begs the question of sea level. Rise impacted these civilizations and we can see it. Is that going to tell us? About our present. On the one hand they managed to deal with a certain level of sea level rise and then there came a point about seven thousand years ago when there were a series of nominees and the landscape completely disappeared. It was rendered uninhabitable su-nam as that's That's pretty familiar. Actually yeah I mean for a while. Archaeologists were reluctant to get into this one expert. Told me because they didn't want to be seen as digging after chasing after lost continents or Atlantis or something like that. But as the techniques have gotten more and more advanced it turns out that they can do some really scientific

North Sea The Netherlands Andrew Curry Andrew All Berlin Alaska Modern Day Holland Bama Hollander Belgium Asia UK Barron England
Sciences leading role in the restoration of Notre Dame, and the surprising biology behind how our body develops its tough skin

Science Magazine Podcast

08:33 min | 11 months ago

Sciences leading role in the restoration of Notre Dame, and the surprising biology behind how our body develops its tough skin

"Up. This week I talked with freelance science writer Christa. La- stay Lazar about the role of scientists at the Notre Dame cathedral both in the restoration of the structure and for the investigation of its past. Then we have the researcher. Felipe make arose. He's GonNa talk about how our skin forms a tough area against the outside world and how this barriers formation depends on phase separation a very hot area of cell biology first up today. We have freelance science writer. Crystallised J. LO Sarah. She wrote a featured this week on the scientists leading. Notre Dame's restoration after the April twenty nineteen fire and their use of the fire to probe the mysteries of this Cathedral. Hi Krista for Sarah Okay. The way you describe the scientific works it's going on at the Cathedral after the fire. It can almost be broken down into these categories by material stone glass led and would each has experts. It has its own challenges in its own mysteries all the teams that are working together on the restoration on these different categories of materials are working together in the same organization. Can you tell us a little bit more about this group? They're all working out at the same laboratory. Which is part of the Ministry of Culture? A description of it in the story was pretty amazing. Oh Yeah it's it's really phenomenal. It's the front. They have a wing of a seventeenth century castle. You had these Austira Iron Gates that lead up to it and you just have no idea of the treasures that are hidden in that area. Let's take this material by material first stone obviously Notre Dame is made of Stone Wood and some other pieces and I was really surprised by how dangerous getting the stone out of the building after the fire was the researchers actually had to use robots to get the stones out they did. You've got this vault. That said teeter on collapse because they have no idea how much forces have changed. They've absorbed water but they've also been affected by heat. So there are some stones that have suffered some heat-damaged crumble. At the same time there are also some stones that are just dangling from the ceiling and they now they might just drop at any moment. Everything is really delicately balanced. And you've got a thirty meter drop. That's a hundred foot drop coming down. So many stones are actually taken back to this French chateau from his French castle. A lot of them ended up store outside the Cathedral waiting to be put back in it but they do take some back to the French castle right. Most of them are stored in these tents that are all in front of the cathedral and sorting them. It's just hit and miss about of work of of sorting these. Because they're not going to lose anything anything that's about more than five centimeters long is going to be put back into the Cathedral. The wants to take back to study what they're looking for is to see different signs of heat damage so that can be seen through for example oxidation which contains the color of the stones. But that's only guy but it's still a pretty good guide. According to helmet heated got. You can go from red to black and then kind of surprisingly than to white and when it gets to white then you know that it's really bad because it's just powder they also are doing some testing on the water. Absorption it's these stones absorbed quite a bit of water. They can gain up to thirty percent of their weight. The water came from trying to put the fire out yes. The water came from the firefighters. Hosing down the federal. And it's taking up very very long time for them to dry sue. The fire was April the fifteenth and as of today. It's still drawing. They're still losing weight to water Evaporation yes they're still losing weight. Oh that's amazing. So what can they do with this information about how the stones change color? How was it helpful to know that this color change corresponds to how much heating went on with the stones? What they really need to know is the detail of which stones are likely to be damaged enough to need to be changed. Because there's some that may may not have fallen but they may have been so damaged that they're not going to be able to hold up the structure correctly anymore and at this delicate balance of forces going to be upset they also need to know how long it's GonNa take everything to dry because there's no point in testing for example the mortar between the stones until everything's finished drying because the border is continued to be affected by the changing forces. Right another dangerous aspect of this work is led. Notre Dame had a lot of lead tons of lead in the roof and spire and it was melted by the fire was also thrown out into Aerosol particles a yellow cloud escaped and it coated everything inside the building and possibly some of the nearby neighborhoods. What do we know about the contamination and the surrounding city? We actually don't know that much about the lead contamination. In the city. There was a lot of fear at the beginning. Parisians were very worried and rightfully so because lead toxicity can be bad for children and there are a lot of children living in Paris but the scientists here at this laboratory have found out that the vast majority of that roof did not go up in to smoke or cloud. It melted the melting point. Nos three hundred degrees Celsius. The evaporation point is one thousand seven hundred degrees Celsius. We didn't get anywhere near that. After about six hundred degrees Celsius than it created these little micro nozzles that went up into the air. An Aerosol so really a small portion of the roof did go up quite a bit of it actually fell down into the cathedral itself some did go outside and it floated away. You can see it in the videos of this Yellow cloud that would along the Seine but the scientists think that probably much of it did not drop down onto the ground her into the Sun River but just kept going following the son of further downstream so it may not have ended up in Paris at all. We don't know where it is yet but the researchers are consort right. They're going to be testing different areas of the city trying to see if there's a signature of the Notre Dame leads. They're able been able to test the lead from the roof to be able to get to the isotopes. This has allowed them to have an isotopic signature so when they find lead and there's lead Oliver Paris. You can't just a sample say. Oh that Kim furniture dom you don't know but because of the isotopic signature then you can. So they're trying to test that find out if the lead ended up in those areas. What about the lead levels inside the CDL? Are they a big concern for the researchers working there now? Because of the high amounts of lead in the cathedral there is a great concern with the work agencies so they are requiring very very strict procedures on lead safety first of all access is extremely limited just the bare minimum people that are allowed to get in the only access in is to go through a shower. Cabin may have to take off all their clothes. They have to wear these paper clothing paper. Underrun paper socks. You're allowed to stay for a maximum two and a half hours in the whole time there. You have wear these masks. That are really heavy and uncomfortable and they have breathing assistance. And it's not just the people it's also any equipment they bring in anything they bring in has to be either destroyed or washed thoroughly on the way out. 'cause as they leave the Cathedral Matra two and a half hours. They take all of their clothing off and they go through the shower and anything they brought with them also has to go through the shower and wash with all this protective gear all this rigorous cleanliness routine. They have to go through. It shouldn't be surprising that most of the work that they're doing right now is to get this led out of there. The lead is not being rude yet because the initial step is finding how to get the lead off without destroying this eight hundred fifty year old monument and all of its Precious art inside and this is an extremely expensive project to begin with and they're trying to be cost efficient as possible. So cost is really an issue. They can't just go in with The most expensive kind of equipment either and they need something that is can be explained to the people that are going to be doing it because the people who are cleaning are not going to be the scientists is going to be a company. That's going to be brought in and they're gonNA be technicians. That are going to come

Notre Dame Researcher Notre Dame Cathedral Paris Writer Cathedral Matra Foot Drop Cathedral French Castle La- Stay Lazar J. Lo Sarah Felipe Christa Krista Austira Iron Gates Sarah Okay Teeter Ministry Of Culture Stone Wood
"thirty meter" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:31 min | 11 months ago

"thirty meter" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Twelve of thirty metres died in northeast Philadelphia prison Justin traffic and weather headaches long show with your stop traffic for an opening on the twenty Tamara bridge to the Betsy Ross bridge good choice president bridges in okay shape Alex Eckley wrapped up some construction on the Ben Franklin bridge which was slowing down traffic coming into Philadelphia but that the lady's gonna Platt bridge still jammed almost the entire length heading westbound towards the airport once again it is bridge inspection they on the downside still blocking the right lane to the Girard point double decker bridge good option and ninety five itself in great shape north and south bound between Bucks county in the Delaware line seventy six east bound jamming up from four seventy six to the approach the Conshohocken curve something must be happening there because not the laughter that no problems to the approach Montgomery drive would slow to the vine that's volume westbound is busy between University Avenue in the vine more brake lights appear from the Boulevard to the approach of Gladwin inbound Lincoln drive still jammed approaching Wissahickon there is construction this afternoon blocking the right lane no issues on the Pennsylvania Turnpike the northeast extension of four twenty two in New Jersey minor volume delay on route fifty five north bound approaching the forty to merge forty two freeway to ninety five and the New Jersey Turnpike are moving at highway speed mass transit not reporting any major problems I'm just a job like any cable company twenty four hours thanks Dustin let's look at the forecast bonded by colonial marble and granite NBC ten first alert meteorologist de salsa this afternoon plenty of sunshine and pleasant delightful to be outside.

New Jersey Delaware Platt bridge president Betsy Ross bridge Justin NBC Dustin Tamara bridge New Jersey Turnpike Pennsylvania Turnpike Wissahickon Bucks county Philadelphia Ben Franklin bridge Alex Eckley
Satellite Constellations and the Future of Astronomy

Astronomy Cast

11:11 min | 1 year ago

Satellite Constellations and the Future of Astronomy

"We are back at the American Astronomical Society Meeting in Honolulu Hawaii and and we last episode. We talked about the big controversy of the construction of the thirty meter telescope. Here on the on the Hawaiian islands the Bit other big controversy. That's going on is of course. The starling constellation and literally just a couple of days ago. SPACEX launched launched the third batch of starling satellites another sixty satellites into space. And I it is safe to say. Hey that astronomers are outraged. I think that's an under Sabin. Yeah and there. There were three different arguments. Demint put forward and I have to admit at the top of this episode. I am somewhat biased. I desperately want to see the digital divide to be overcome and low cost Internet Internet to be available globally and Starlink promises. That and so a lot of what we're GONNA talk about. Today the issue comes down to whether or not you trust. Trust Elon. Musk to actually implement the low cost in the low cost Internet so the three arguments that we heard today against Starlink And one was a cultural problem of old but the children if you see satellite zipping around in the sky will people still fall in love with the stars. Will your experience visiting a dark sky site. Turn you off to astronomy if you see satellites and the cry of outrage. We heard was that people won't be inspired by the sky if they see manmade objects now I have to admit I distinctly remember exactly exactly where I was the first time I saw satellite. I I was up in the mountains of the caucuses camping beside a glacier and and I was sitting on a rock all by myself because being a teenager is hard and I was fifteen and sometimes you need to sit on a rock by yourself from your fifteen and and the satellite. I just saw something moving in the sky and I realized what it was and that realization of I'm alone on orrock beside a glacier but there's a satellite moving through my stars that at the age of fifteen was amazing moment and this idea that satellites make it impossible for people to fall in love with the stars. I I don't think that's the case. But it was one of the arguments arguments put forward and getting together to the second but but sort of like from a practical technical standpoint win. The starlings are first launched launched. They are actually very bright there about magnitude two or three which makes them easily visible to the unaided eye from many spots on the earth and they look like this train of moving across the sky. Call this this string of pearls and end and then as the starlings raise their altitude up to their final position of about five hundred fifty kilometers altitude the dimmed back to about a five magnitude which is at the very limits of the human. I can see in Nice dark dark skies and and but of course in the eyes of a of an astronomer that is incredibly bright. Eight of fifth magnitude star is very bright star in in the eyes of telescope and then the other problem is that when when when they pass across the sky they will really only be visible to astronomy when they are low on the on the horizon during the summer months. So when it's when the night is the longest the night is the shortest. You're going to get really. You're only going to be able to see these satellite right. Aided the right after twilight and right before sunrise. And and that's it you have to be and then for the for the rest of the night there won't be any satellites delights but as the nights get longer the satellites get brighter over C- over the entire night sky and so they're anticipating baiting that over some of the the big observatories in Chile and in the Northern Hemisphere. When you're in the middle of the longest nights you're gonNA see these? These satellites run across the entire sky. So so there's no question that these are going to be very bright objects that are going to move through your field of view and I leave streaks and one of the things that people keep bringing up is there's already thousands of pieces of stuff. There's eighteen thousand thousand tracked pieces that you can pull from the database right now. Eighteen thousand seven. I think you can pull from the database and you can track the position using celestis and other other things like that. Yeah so there you know we know and to adding another twelve hundred. which is the goal for link? So so let's narrow this down even further so there's eighteen thousand things up there. Prior to the launch of Starlink only two hundred objects were naked eye visible. So Oh you can only look up two hundred different things in heavens above and go outside and see them with the unaided eye with Starlink. They're adding well over for a thousand by the end of this year to the list of things that will be visible to the unaided eye and its brightness that is really the problem. I was an observational astronomer. For a number of years before realizing I am the rain God in those years years that are as an observational astronomer. I had myriad satellites go through my images but because they were low brightness objects there'd there'd be the straight line of pixels that well I couldn't see stars in but that line was the size on the sky. I that the satellite was on the sky. We starlink what's happening is these well captured. photons that are reflected off of the satellite delight. There are so many of them that they saturate the pill pixels spill over to adjacent pixels wiping out a larger swath of your detector than the satellite alone would wipe out. And when you saturate a pixel that saturation can cause the next. Several images to have ghosts hosts of that satellites passage still visible so not only. Are you wiping out. A larger percentage of pixels with that satellite but you're wiping them out across multiple images. Yeah and and so you know a lot of these these these satellites as they pass the field of view view can overwhelm the sensor and essentially make an entire observing frame worthless and the speed that they're moving is of great concern into these dreamers as they as they move through it's about. How quickly is this thing moving through your field of view? And how long do you have to not be able to take data data while this while the satellite is is moving through so so they're they're quite concerned just about overall in the time domain as well and of course the the big observatory that's going to be the most effective is the newly renamed. That's a different controversial. I know that's like a third the Third Controversy Jersey. We won't get into that but the newly but we. I think we can all agree. That the Vera Rubin Observatory is a wonderful Navarine Observatory and that is going to be the. That's that's going to be the facility that's going to be deeply affected because it just is staring wide eyed at the sky for all all night capturing as much as they can as deeply as a canon so every frame is GonNa have starlings and one ebbs and all this past them and this is this this is a problem of because it has a giant field of you. The probability that there's going to be a Starlink in any one image goes up if you have a small field of view. There's the potential that you can time your images to avoid having star Lincoln them but because this is a huge field of view. You your ability to do. That is greatly reduced. And they're going to end up picking up. STARLA starlings left and right and here's a question starts to become one of mitigation so folks are working with spacex to see okay. What do we need to do to reduce the brightness of these objects so that they aren't blowing out the detectors? Yeah there's more than that so so Someone from spacex actually gave a presentation this morning and that was actually a bit of a surprise and they didn't do a very good job of letting us know that this is is going to happen. There weren't a lot of people we have the whole ballroom and there wasn't a lot of people they're listening to her her talk. They mentioned essentially a couple of mediation strategy. So the first first thing is with this first launch they have. They've applied some darkening materials to one of the sixty satellites to see if the some of their ideas to make them to have a lower Albedo lower flexibility. And before you laugh at the fact that it's only one the thing you have to take into mind mind is these suckers were already largely built in preparation and turning around and re fabricating that takes time and so my suspicion. My hope is that that they were only able to fabricate one with the new materials fast enough to be able to test and I think it's you know. No this is how you perform an experiment right. Is You you isolate. The variable does putting all this material on one of the satellites make darker than the rest and and we'll find out what happened happens so so that's the first thing they did is experimenting and and this is a good sign. I mean this is like literally. This is the first time I think that any satellite constellation Elation has ever had a conversation with Strana mors and said what can we do to minimize our impact on your science. I don't there's you know the two hundred others others that we mentioned plus all the eighteen thousand. No one's ever tried to make them not bright in the eyes of strimmers so till the first strategy is to try at a paint them so there will be the second thing is to provide an open source real time. Location of all of the satellites in the Constellation and to communicate with the other networks. And anyone out there. Who is who is going to be relying on knowing the position? These starlink so in theory as the as the Constellation gets built your of your telescope operator. You're going to know when a Starlink is going to be passing through your detector and you'll be able to shut detector down. Wait for the starling. Pass opened the doctor again. And continue to get your to get your

Starlink Spacex American Astronomical Society Honolulu Hawaii Constellation Elation Chile Demint Third Controversy Jersey Musk Northern Hemisphere Strana Mors Vera Rubin Observatory Starla Lincoln Navarine Observatory
Big Telescope Controversy in Hawaii

Astronomy Cast

08:23 min | 1 year ago

Big Telescope Controversy in Hawaii

"We're going to talk about the controversy and really what's going on in Hawaii. The local voices that we've had a chance to talk to the concerns of the astronomers the science they WanNa do and maybe even some of the alternative places that that that might be chosen if it looks like. It's not GonNa work here in Hawaii and even what the future holds when the lease runs out right for the the existing observatories that are on Monica. So so where do you WanNa start so so to just review some of the history here back in nineteen sixties there. There was a lease arranged with the Hawaiian Department of land resources that would allow the University of Hawaii too. Well have have access to Monica a sacred mountain to the Hawaiian people at a cost of just one dollar per year and there were caveats to this. There could only be a certain small number of telescopes put up there. The indigenous peoples would need to be able to continue to have access to their sights on the mountain. This is a place as for people go to hunt to worship to well be part of this land that is so much a part of the Hawaiian culture culture and religious system now over the years different things have come to a head as astronomy has found ways to if you follow the letter of the law without following the spirit of the law so for instance Keck one into is counted as well one of those observatories even though it's two giant it multimedia telescopes act is one together right for ometer. Yeah sometimes sometimes if they need to do separate telescopes looking at separate objects yeah and and at the same time that this problem with the astronomers following the letter of the law but not the spirit of the law has been taking place. There's also been a change. In the local culture culture back in the eighteen hundreds the Hawaiian monarchy was overrun in the spirit of capitalism to allow essentially the white people who've been buying land to better well enrich themselves. Yeah teen control over the island. Yeah when he said Yeah and and and so I mean I think there are more than one hundred years of grievances just in general that that are have bubbled up in all kinds of places across Hawaii and and what's happening with the astronomers is just one example of this general region frustration about how first nations peoples have been treated needed. I mean really. I mean not just here in Hawaii but we have the same situation in Canada. There's a there's there's unresolved land disputes. That are happening in Canada Dan. I know what's happening in Australia. And and wherever you've got a first nations people who've been displaced you've got this pent up rage and frustration. That is looking for any of hot button issue to try and bring it up back again and and this is a great example again of of what what is perceived as a very large telescope being put in a very Sacred spot on the mountain. But it's just another example of people who aren't islanders making decisions coming here deciding what they wanna do and try and just steamrolling ahead until they get what they want and this. This is a case. Where at this moment when we're looking to build the thirty meter telescope telescope? It's that same moment in history when there is a resurgence of bringing back the Hawaiian language going back and recognizing that until the eighteen nineties that sovereign nation that was here they had a rich culture a rich international trading system. There are newspapers recordings. Is that allow that culture to be seen and brought back and these people that want to bring back their culture they also want to bring back their mountain as being there mountain and so you have a conflict of these strong reserves. But it's our mountain now astronomy. I don't care about your religion and these are the problems that we faced is over the past decade or so a large number of scientists have unfortunately put forward arguments along the lines of but my science. This is more important than your culture. And there's been a lack of listening and people have been litigating instead of building relationships and from a scientific standpoint. There's no question. Monica is without a doubt the finest place to put a telescope in the Northern Hemisphere. It is the tallest clearest most accessible mountain with some of the clearest views from the top of the of the summit. There's no question that it is that is really premior place to put a telescope. That's add it has other other purposes as well so we'll looks talk a bit about sort of what we understand the with the controversy of course with the new thirty meter telescope. That's coming in so let's talk a bit about sort of what the plans are to to. What mitigations they've already put in place for the thirty meter telescope nope to try to sort of understand? 'CAUSE 'cause I mean. My perspective has definitely been that that although they are still moving forward they are still getting sort of taking the court's judgement on on this they did try to work more closely in concert with local locals in the placement in the environmental concerns. And things like that. And so what we've been hearing at this conference. Is that in the day right after Christmas. It's a new accord was found where they were able to to get one of the tents that had been put up by protesters moved so that there is easier access us to the mountain. They have started to actually build. Well these starts a new relationship and this has been a recurring theme throughout the week. Where speaker after after speaker both from the indigenous peoples and from the strong community have been saying we made a mistake? We did not start from a place of building a relationship ship. Some of the arguments have been kind of week one of the things that was brought up. But Hey we're doing all of this education in the local schools but then when pressed. They admitted that those are the schools that astronomers kids are going to not the schools. The local kids are going to majority wise. There are some Adverts with the indigenous people school systems. And it's this disproportionate. Hey but look what we're doing from the community that when you dig deeper you realize oh that that doesn't mean what you think it means. That has a lot of people saying look you guys you really need to just step back and figure out. How do you build a relationship? That's built on respect and not on the yes but argument because the astronomers have really been trying to win this with yes but occasionally with yes and and not instead with let me sit down and listen and the message. I keep hearing the as we need to change this to let me just sit down and listen And there was a great presentation in one of the conferences from Greg. I Chun he was he was from the University of Hawaii in Hilo. And he's he said that they the and he's native Hawaiian and and and he said that they had taken they'd taken this step back and really had this opportunity to listen and to and to just understand from people people not. What's the solution but just to understand? What does the mountain mean to you? How does the mountain play into your personal spiritual practices? What are what is your definition of a shared use of this of this mountain? And what is that. Look

Hawaii University Of Hawaii Hawaiian Department Of Land Canada Hilo Australia Keck Monica Northern Hemisphere Greg
How Could Artificial Glaciers Hydrate the Himalayas?

BrainStuff

06:06 min | 1 year ago

How Could Artificial Glaciers Hydrate the Himalayas?

"Discussions about climate change tend to focus on low lying areas like coastal cities yet people who live at higher elevations also feel it's negative effects including fresh water shortages to help these folks get by the duckie inventor named Sonum one Schuch has created a line of artificial glaciers called called. I stoop as their restoring frozen water so it can be used hydrate crops in the driest stretch of the year. Glacial meltwater is a necessity for most villages judges in Lubbock a region of northern India. The DOC sits on the debt and plateau between the Karakoram and the Himalayan mountain ranges this elevated terrain is is world famous for its is supply Abedin Plateau and surrounding mountains contain more ice than any other non polar area on earth. Much of this is stored up in glaciers. His will help feed vital Asian waterways the young Zee the Mekong and Indus rivers. Unfortunately those glaciers are receding because of climate change between two thousand and three in two thousand fourteen the ones located near the Brahmaputra River source lost six point nine billion cubic miles of ice. That's twenty eight point. Eight billion in cubic kilometers with glaciers some seasonal melting is expected but normally winter snowfall allows glaciers to replace the melted ice. They lose during the springtime however across the plateau. Glaciers are no longer getting enough annual snowfall to offset their lost water and so many of them have been dwindling in size as a cold desert. The dock area sees very little rainfall receiving an average of two to three inches per year. That's about fifty to seventy millimeters meters. The summer months of June through August. Do get a modest amount of precipitation however that's also when a large quantity of melted water from neighbouring mountain. Glaciers enters the streams teams. That depends on a steady water flow fills the streams during the winter as well yet because of the frozen ground and low air temperatures. The farmers can't hint grow crops during the coldest months of the year. According to an Chook winter water gets under utilized as a result demand for meltwater grows exponentially in April April in May when the life-sustaining crops of wheat buckwheat and barley need to be sown and hydrated. But in the springtime before the glacial water arrives enforce the streams often run dry. Climate Change has worsened. The problem a twenty seventeen study found that over the past six decades about twenty percent of the permanent ice ice preserves and the Docs home state have disappeared that translates to less meltwater for the locals hoping to solve these water woes. A civil engineer by the the name of Chihuahua North L. devised an innovative reservoir system in the nineteen eighties and I hope I'm saying his name correctly I couldn't find a pronunciation using dams and channels nor fell L. diverted large volumes of glacial water into Manmade Lakes on the shady sides of mountains where it froze into blocks come springtime. The ice would melt and be sent downhill the farms and villages eligible by way of canal. But this ice melted to quickly so the water tended to run out before the summer rains arrived in two thousand thirteen Wangchuk deduced I ice in Norfolk dams melted so fast because too much of it was exposed to direct sunlight. When chook figured that if he could somehow freeze the ice into a conical tower with the narrow oh end aimed skyward much less surface area would be exposed to make his frozen stalagmites when Chook devised an irrigation system? That's brilliant in its simplicity. implicity the major component is a long pipeline most of this is buried deep underground with one end tapping into a glacial stream or naturally occurring reservoir high high in the mountains through the tube the water rushes in the direction of populated areas at lower altitudes. No moving parts are electrical gizmos are needed to keep the liquid water flowing. Gravity does the trick it also pushes the water into the final stage of its journey downhill. The pipeline connects at a sharp angle to another narrower pipe. That rises soil standing vertically like a telephone pole as the saying goes water seeks its own level gravity pretty and pressure gained by flow through the narrowing pipe together naturally propel the liquid straight up that pipe until it flies out of a sprinkler on the pipes raised tip high in the air. The spray encounters atmospheric temperatures in the ballpark of negative four degrees Fahrenheit. That's about negative twenty Celsius or lower before landing it freezes. He's a solid forming a large cone of ice around the vertical pipe. The cones distinctive shape resembles that Stupa which are traditional Buddhist prayer monuments that have graced creased look for thousands of years. Hence when Chook and his associates have taken to calling the new glacier like structures I status the ducks ice Tubas meltdown meltdown in late spring. Right when the need for liquid water is greatest. The prototypical stupa erected in the winter of two thousand thirteen contained about forty thousand gallons. That's about one hundred hundred and fifty thousand liters of frozen water and lasted until may eighteenth of two thousand fourteen. Since then numerous others have been constructed. Single Stupa has is watered as many as five thousand newly planted trees standing at sixty feet eighteen meters tall. It held a breathtaking five hundred and thirty thousand gallons. That's two million liters a frozen water. Others may someday exceed one hundred feet about thirty meters in height and hold two point six million gallons or ten million liters of water outside India. The stupas have spread to countries like Switzerland in two thousand sixteen. When tooks icy brainchild earned him a coveted Rolex award for enterprise But I- stupid are not without their critics. went to in companies legal right to divert. Glacial meltwater has been challenged by a group of the duckie villagers furthermore anymore although the stupas are meant to help sustain human life they won't reverse the Tibetan Plateau's worrisome climate trends but if Homo sapiens is to survive on a changing Jin planet will need to reevaluate the ways. We use an store water. Projects like this can kick start those

Chook India Abedin Plateau Lubbock Karakoram Schuch Tibetan Plateau Single Stupa Brahmaputra River Switzerland Engineer Wangchuk Manmade Lakes Norfolk Four Degrees Fahrenheit Thirty Thousand Gallons Forty Thousand Gallons Fifty Thousand Liters
How Did We Miss This Week's Shockingly Close Asteroid Flyby?

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:35 min | 1 year ago

How Did We Miss This Week's Shockingly Close Asteroid Flyby?

"An asteroid as large as a football field is just flying past the earth with astronomers not detecting acting it until literally just a day before its closest approach. The giants space rock thought to be up to one hundred and thirty meters wide came within sixty five thousand kilometers of earth on july the twenty fifth in nominal terms. That's about as close as it gets. The asteroids being catalogued as twenty nine. Okay the european paint space agency says this near earth objects close approach illustrates the need for more eyes on the sky was able to observe the asteroid just before its fly by requesting requesting to separate telescopes in the international scientific optical network is on to take images of space rock the observations allow strana missed the determine the asteroids exact back position and trajectory yesterday it was i the technical the day before its closest approach by the southern observatory veneer of asteroids research observations of twenty nine thousand nine okay with an independently confirmed by other observatories including the chiba radio telescope in puerto rico and third telescope in the ice on network following following its discovery with knowledge of the astros would have been in the past based on its current course and by manually searching for it by existing images were found in the past is is an atlas skysurfer archives it turns out birth said they had in fact captured the asteroid in the weeks before it's ultra close encounter with earth but the space space rock was moving so slowly it appears to move just a tiny amount between the images and was therefore not recognized as a near earth object neo and hence the seriousness of the threat <unk>. It wasn't appreciated of course astronomers now of an attracting thousands of asteroids across the solar system so why was this one discovered so late will unfortunately originally currently there's no single obvious reason apart from its slow apparent motion across the sky before it's close approach twenty nineteen okay travels in highly elliptical orbit taking it from within the open of venus out too well beyond that of mas this means the time it spends near earth and therefore time it's detectable both current telescope capabilities is relatively short modules towards the size of twenty nine. Okay i relatively common throughout the solar system but they impact on average only about once every one hundred thousand years or so still an asteroid like that hitting a major city or urban area would cause major devastation destruction based from its current orbital path through the solar system the asteroid one come close to the game for at least the next two hundred years. I'm stewart gary. You're listening space

Giants Astros Stewart Gary Southern Observatory Strana Chiba Puerto Rico Sixty Five Thousand Kilometers One Hundred Thousand Years Two Hundred Years Thirty Meters Twenty Fifth
 Giant telescope consortium to seek Spain building permit

The Michael Medved Show

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Giant telescope consortium to seek Spain building permit

"The executive director of a telescope project that's being blocked from construction on Hawaii's Big Island says the decision to seek a building permit for an alternative site in the Canary Islands is part of an ongoing process to secure a backup site thirty meter telescope executive director ed stone says the international consortium hoping to build the telescope still prefers Hawaii's Mauna Kea but that the group is moving forward with its planned be site in

Executive Director Hawaii Big Island Canary Islands Mauna Kea Ed Stone Thirty Meter
"thirty meter" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"thirty meter" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"Us make this goal help us stay on the air that's the bottom line one eight hundred four three nine five seven three two KPFA dot org the man tasked with trying to find a way out of an impasse over the construction of a giant telescope in Hawaii says he met with native Hawaiian L. leaders but the only issue they reached a consensus on which to meet again Hawaii county mayor Harry Kim says he met native Hawaiian community leaders including many from along who is as a group did not include protesters currently blocking the road to mount a K. as summit or international consortium has a state permit to build a thirty meter telescope Kim says he met with protest leaders earlier when he visited the spot where they're blocking the road reporter Antonio Gonzalez has more on the protest now in its fifteenth today the mayor of Hawaii county says he's hopeful for peaceful resolution and conflicts over construction of the thirty meter telescopes on Mauna Kea mayor Harry can hold a press conference Monday to discuss efforts between the state and demonstrators blocking access to the summit of Mauna care which is now in the sixteenth day during the press conference stream by Big Island video news Kim talked about a meeting he hosted Friday with the native Hawaiian community and I decided I need to call to get the leaders of the white community see guidance seek wisdom and he said which affected some of the issues.

Hawaii Harry Kim Antonio Gonzalez Hawaii county Mauna care KPFA reporter Mauna Kea Big Island thirty meter
Fans call for The Rock to run for president as he fights to protect Mauna Kea: 'Champion of the people'

Rick Hamada

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Fans call for The Rock to run for president as he fights to protect Mauna Kea: 'Champion of the people'

"The rock came to the mountain yesterday Dwayne the rock Johnson is throwing his support behind those protesting construction of the thirty meter telescope at the summit of Mauna Kea the Hollywood star met with some of the protest leaders and Polona he told the crowd that the world is watching and said everyone needs to come together to find a solution Johnson spent part of his childhood in Hawaii and attended William McKinley

Dwayne Johnson Mauna Kea Hollywood Star Polona Hawaii William Mckinley Thirty Meter
"thirty meter" Discussed on Ariel Helwani's MMA Show

Ariel Helwani's MMA Show

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"thirty meter" Discussed on Ariel Helwani's MMA Show

"There to be future shows in Hawaii which you know if if you don't have Hawaii headliner and you don't have a way champion than I don't know if if that makes sense to the U._F._C. to be holding events in Hawaii every year <hes> but but the other alternative is to put it back on a boat or whatever it is and get it Outta here and <hes> and spend all that money that it's GonNa take to to be able to do those things so I just think that the the stars aren't aligned for for this to happen <hes> but with that being said you know the fact that it got as close as it did it at least a sign that it's something that both sides see value in it just a matter of one day accomplishing some kind of middle ground to to make it work speaking of Lima Lay <hes> I've noticed that she's been very active on social media this week talking about an issue a very tense issue. That's happening in Hawaii but I will admit I am not an expert. I don't quite understand what is going on. I noticed that yesterday Max Hallway wrote a very long post about this. Could you explain to us what's going on <hes> in Hawaii right now and <hes> it sounded like Max was getting pressure from people to speak up about it because he's in the limelight and if from your understanding that as accurate as well if people were trying to look to him because he's so famous and he's fighting right now <hes> and there's a spotlight on them that they were looking to him to do something about this yeah the best way. Wait for me to explain it. I it's a lot like the Dakota access pipeline protest from a couple of years ago. <hes> essentially what it is is there is a mountain on Hawaii island which is the big island <hes> called molineaux okay and it's <hes> it's largest mountain very high pink and it's <hes> viewed as <hes> a sacred land to the People Hawaii and sacred in regards to it was <hes> Landau royalty land of the King King and Queen <hes> and the thirty meter telescope is being built up there and what the thirty meter telescope is is <hes> eighteen in story telescope that takes by five Acre footprint <hes> on this mountain and so you have <hes> a lot of wind people that are up there protesting saying that this thing should not be built on there's mountain <hes> and at the same time the the constructors of the telescope or saying hey we went through everything that we had to go through <hes> we went through all the environmental studies we went through legally everything we needed to to make this thing build and we were supposed to start building this past Monday and that didn't happen because protesters blocked the road and and so that's where we're at right now is and it's a very touchy subject here. It's a very sensitive subject because you know. The Battle of <hes> you know astronomy and learning and you know this is a telescope that according to the scientists must be built on that mountain because there's nowhere else in the world that will allow the telescope to work in the way that it does atop Mona Care <hes> because of the height because of <hes> the the wind up there because of the visibility everything this is the only place for that the Hawaiian people were saying we understand Dan that but this is not the place to be had built this a secret land and I think then you start getting into you know some some messy subjects where you know I it ceded land where it's protected by a lot of conversation laws <hes> yet thirteen telescopes smaller telescopes have been built up there so a lot of the activists are saying hey when is enough enough and so that's where we're at right now. This thing has been going on for over a week. <hes> you have a on average a thousand people <hes> essentially camping of they're blocking this road of for the last seven days and so elite Malays made her way up there B._J.. Penn a lot of people are very strong on this and I will say if you have time to go and read Max Holloway Post <hes> because really the.

Hawaii Max Hallway People Hawaii Hawaii island Max Max Holloway Dakota Landau Penn Dan thirty meter seven days five Acre one day
"thirty meter" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"thirty meter" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Tomorrow in Hawaii a crowd of protesters at the base of a mountain on the Big Island is growing nearly fifteen hundred people are gathered this weekend Jackie young of Hawaii public radio reports native Hawaiian protesters have been camped out for more than a week trying to block construction of a telescope atop the mountain they consider sacred demonstrators say they will continue their protest against construction of the thirty meter telescope atop Mona can indefinitely their campus blocking the access road to the mountain summit last week the governor issued a state of emergency and called in the National Guard so far more than thirty people have been arrested several of them elderly on Saturday county lawmakers on the big island's mayor visited the camp first hand police have threatened to clamp down on parking in the area which is overflowing nearby roads sympathetic protests have sprung up on other islands as well as in other states such as Alaska Nevada and California for NPR news I'm Jacki young in Honolulu radio communication between the British navy frigate Anna Ronnie and forces has been released the conversation took place shortly before Ron seized a U. K. flag oil tanker Friday in it a British naval officer in since the tanker be allowed to continue through the strait of Hormuz and Iranian forces demand the vessel change course this is NPR from KQED news I'm Tiffany cam high in Berkeley the words man hole and man made will soon be changed to maintenance hole and human made because the Berkeley city council this week voted to remove gendered pronouns from its municipal code here to explain why is KQ Edie's Maranda light senior and ran that these kinds of words seem pretty harmless why did this city council vote to do this you know the city council saying that there are laws are for everybody and that the municipal code should reflect that that it should be accurate and inclusive representation of women and non binary people so the city council member writes all Robinson whose idea this was he said you know he acknowledge it is a small move but it matters and there's power in language and a move like this is not that out of the ordinary for Berkeley because they're known to be on the leading edge of social movements but in this case the ordinance was actually recommended by the league of California cities yes actually so last year they put together guidance that they shared with many municipalities across the state saying that there should be gender neutral terms I spoke to while one of the members of the LGBT caucus for the group and she said you know terms like firemen policemen these imply that these are our jobs for men there's is unconscious bias that we have in these terms apart from the pronouns are using so they said it is something that is important for a government to be leaders on and and that was what you know Berkeley picked up on as while the city clerk did say that they have looked at this guidance in putting together their ordinance that with KQ Edie's Maranda like senior well tweet a link to her story were at KQED news I'm Tiffany camp.

Hawaii thirty meter
"thirty meter" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"thirty meter" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"Another exchange the governor jokes about shooting sand one mayor comment you lean crews and calls former New York City Council speaker Melissa mark the very though a one four mark the the radio is an ally of you lean crews she also called for the Porter Rican governor to resign I don't know if he's available a difficult moment for Porter Rico we have an administration a leader who showing his true face is immoral character and it's now what's coming out in chat which is obviously very worrisome but also regarding the investigations from the likes of the F. B. I. importer Rico so there's accusations of corruption we also have the moral character of the governor whose appeal for the trust not only from his own party but also for the Porter Rican people so he can be an effective leader so for the benefit of Porter Rico as people are calling for he ought to resign marking the re total democracy now she sees a lot of similarities between what's happening with the road say only ministration and under the trump administration she said what's very different is the response she said the one hundred thousand people who protested in Porter Rico yesterday it would be the equivalent of three hundred thousand people marching in New York City Lucy responded to last night's massive protest with a tweeted statement he said he recognizes what he termed the challenge she faces because of the recent controversies but the governor said he firmly believes it's possible to restore confidence and achieve reconciliation president trump responded to the protests with a tweet saying a lot of bad things are happening in Porto Rico trump said the governor is under siege he called the mayor of San Juan and despicable and competent person who I wouldn't trust under any circumstance and trump added that the aid given to Porter Rico after hurricane Maria was squandered away are wasted in that much of their leadership is corrupt and robbing the US government blind San Juan's mayor you Lynn crews responded to trump quote you never got it and you never will this is not about you this is about the dignity of the border we can people she said more than one hundred thousand took to the streets to exercise their right to live in a sensible just and peaceful society the mayor added quote I also understand you cannot condemn corrupt misogynistic homophobic and abusive behavior after all if you did that killing crews told trump you would be passing judgment on yourself thousands of protesters have joined a swelling effort to stop construction of a telescope they have long tried to keep off a mountain considered sacred to some native Hawaiians but state officials of double down on their commitment to ensure the project will be completed after a day of growing crowd said the arrests of thirty three elderly demonstrators Hawaii's governor signed an emergency proclamation giving law enforcement more options to end the blockade about two thousand people packed the base of monic K. at after the arrest more than three times the number of protesters who would showed up in previous days more from Antonio Gonzalez of national native news one of the leaders of demonstrators blocking access to mount a care for construction of the thirty meter telescope responded to Wednesday's arrests of thirty three people and the governor of Hawaii's emergency proclamation co who cut he canoe ha in a press conference streamed on social media by the group says the standoff and arrests were peaceful he calls governor David you gaze moved a responsible how do you.

thirty meter
"thirty meter" Discussed on GamesMyMomFound

GamesMyMomFound

06:08 min | 1 year ago

"thirty meter" Discussed on GamesMyMomFound

"There's a jellyfish that can grow thirty meters which is actually longer than the blue whale. Oh, yeah. Yeah. It's, it's super discussing looking at busy Lewis like a living rope that somehow I looks like a rope that was once alive that is now dead. I'll take wail facts for five hundred. Yeah, I don't have any facts general Ceefax came my head. Dammit. The next fact is about my favorite animal the octopus. The octopus has eight lakes. That's fact. Really steering? This is actually incredibly intelligent animals. And if you if you were to you shouldn't do this. But if you were to take an octopus and put it inside of a glass jar close little at the activists could actually figure out how to open the jar and get out. That's also. Yeah, I call database awesome creatures. I can only contribute like water, Pokemon facts. This is most of my c- gonna be about octopus. I've really. Give me some Waylon facts. Is about is actually a two part facts. So my last fact is about a lobster. The lobster is technically immortal creature. It is biologically immortal, so lobsters don't like they don't weaken with age. They just moltes, so more or less when all lobster, like dies of old age code. It's just because of some complication when moulting but theoretically lobster could live forever. It just continues to grow. Go into a pot and they said. Is that the French romantic poet, Sherard new new fall at a pet lobster, internal that used to take on walks around the, the Paris gardens, and you have like a silk urban is a leash. Yeah. Yeah. What was what was the name 'til? It's ten. I wonder if he named it after Juliet's cousin and Romeo, and Juliet, I wanna say till actually outlived him as well. Wow. That some say till still living to stay. Say if you go to go to post line, even notice, not coastline. Is selling health insurance? I got one last factor where we crease Paris, you'll see you'll see here, lots of clip-clopping the middle of the night before we can quote, our way on our on. And now I got one last fact, I want to add mega blast twice at the most powerful non legendary waterfall. I didn't know that. Thanks. Only so fully of came on that can't learn solar wjm I was also gonna go with female toward are incredibly rare. But I thought I wasn't sure. But, you know, so. See, I know at least one person will get my reference there. All right. I think we should do what game. Thanks, gives me all right. I'm gonna introduce it since it with my pick for next week. We are going to dive into parasite eve next week and not wait for that. I'm playing all week already and and and sergeant riches coming back for us for that next week. This is true. All you guys that get to introduce amazing game. We're playing next week. All right. I think that's about anything about everything. We should have had him. Introducing since he's turning guest. The only time I guess, could introduce the game of the next episode. We have Christian returning to this. Sure. I'll make him do it. Okay. Right. And just before and we started here plugs for I wanna save. You guys get a chance. They'll be Lincoln the show. Take a listen to undocking story, it's another podcast wanna rotation also because I forget this every so often, I want to give big shot up to our intro out music, the cool kids squad from Bobi aka Mike. Stony he's a please. Watching listen to listen to music, watch videos on YouTube. I kinda however you want extensive down. And. From he by Kemal? So listen to that. And also, I'm gonna give I'm gonna give plug for Stewart and Stephan, even though they're never we are in finance to what we are in the process of getting church designed it might be another month or two. I think before we get everything up and running with the shop, but it's coming, there will eventually be sure to this show. Verified that we got Sal, shed. It's coming. It will be leaks in the in the show, notes of actually, we'll talk about it when it finally around anybody who rear four shirt plans right now. In the works. Yeah. If dinner. So if you guys wanna shirked away for the show coming. We have we have five shirt plants because I've got to that I am going on about. And I forget, yeah. I talked to guys every day, almost okay? Guess you'd wanna plug the end of the show. Oh, god. Not really. I mean we're not. The episode doesn't end until you. We're just here forever. Definitely let it run guys. Graham fans are often it's ninety five degrees. Please. This is hell. I got an Instagram Magus advocate read with two DS. I also Vanessa Graham. It's gone chair pictures on it. That's a different story. Am too, but that is full of pictures of the game. Hope that hope. And I'm drunk. Yeah. I've got strawberry banana smoothie that I made. All right. They everyone for listening to this episode we all talked about doom not really we talk about the nineties, but I wanna thank everyone taking their time. Hi, everybody. Thanks. Bye. And then..

Ceefax Paris Vanessa Graham Juliet Lewis YouTube Sherard Bobi Kemal Sal Lincoln Waylon Stewart Romeo Stephan ninety five degrees thirty meters
Space Economics

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:58 min | 2 years ago

Space Economics

"Thirty seven meters. Thirty meters twenty meters seventeen meter standing by for touchdown. These were the sounds inside of Nasr's Jet Propulsion Laboratory near Pasadena, California on Monday afternoon, as the people working there eagerly-hoped Nasr's unmanned spacecraft. The insight would nail the really tricky landing on the surface of Mars touchdown confirmed. Ever gets. It doesn't rats NASA. No, it's thrilling thrilling the landing did the insight which was carrying instruments that will help scientists to study the surface of Mars, and it's an habitants and learn whatever it can about the planet occupied or not this is able to prove it's not occupies. This is all very inspiring stuff. But our interest in space missions here. The indicator is not actually about the science as always it's about the economics. I'm Garcia, and I'm Stacey Vanik Smith and technically Cardiff economics is a science science issue. It's a social science. I think they. This is the indicator from planet money today and tomorrow on the show, we're going to take a look at the economic history of the US space program with a space economist. Yes, there is such a thing as a space economists. There's kind of thing. We'll tell you why the incites mission to Mars is actually a throwback to the way NASA used to do things. And we'll also explain what the economics of space looks like now. This message comes from the indicators sponsor capital. One capital. One's indicator is zero because they offer accounts with zero fees or minimums, and they offer accounts that can be opened from anywhere in five minutes. Capital one. What's in your wallet capital? One NA. Support also comes from SAP. Concur employees can submit expenses from anywhere. It's how the best run businesses make their expenses run better SAP. Concur. Learn more at concur dot com slash NPR. Matt Weinzierl is our space economist, well sort of he teaches at the Harvard Business School. He's an economist, and he has a really passionate interest in space. Matt knows that most people have a fascination with space because of like the grand themes exploration. The search for aliens going to the moon so planets AB someday living on Mars with its other inhabitants. Exactly, not Matt. He got excited about space for a different reason is the over the last decade, really almost two decades. Now, we've seen a real flourishing of a commercial space sector. See back in the Cold War decades, the sixties seventies and eighties. When the US was researching the Soviet Union to the moon and developing the space shuttle, Matt says the US space program was meant to provide Americans with so-called public goods. And this is a really important concept in economics public goods are defined by two things first when someone uses a public good it does not. Prevent another person from being able to use it and second when a person uses a public good. It also doesn't take away from how much someone else can use it. So a computer is not a public good. No, not at all. Because I'm using it. And you. One example of public good is clean air. My breathing. It does not stop Stacey. From also, breathing it or military protection. Just because I'm protected by the US military doesn't mean that Stacey is not protected. Matt gives three examples of the public goods that NASA originally was meant to provide the first one national security being able to defend ourselves from space or do something else space was critical importance to national security the second scientific discoveries. So too early. It's hard for the private sector, which is motivated by profit to do basic research in things that won't obviously be sellable. The third public good something you just really can't put a price tag on national pride. Don't usually talk about as much. But I think if you think back to the Cold War that was clearly a big part of it that we wanted to show that our model. Our our society was was the better choice for other societies to take and as the name suggests public goods tend to be publicly provided or. Vied by the government using taxpayer money because there isn't always an obvious motivation for the private sector to provide these public goods, there just isn't an immediate way to profit from them. And yet these goods are valuable to society. So the government uses its unique ability to direct massive amounts of money into providing those goods, it's a centralized economic model. The government agency in this case NASA decides what to do, and it has no competition for how best to do it and using this model. Matt says NASA has really accomplished amazing things over the years, think of the moon missions. And yes, the Mars landings like the one this week and also helping to build the international space station, which is a research laboratory the size of a football field that orbits the earth. And finally, of course, there was the space shuttle program, which was designed to transport people and stuff into space. But Matt says by the early years of this century NASA was struggling to define what its next mission should be NASA hasn't put a man on the moon. Since nineteen seventy two and the space shuttle program, experienced two tragedies, I when the challenger space shuttle exploded in one thousand nine hundred six and second when the Columbia space shuttle disintegrated in two thousand and three and that says it was a lot more expensive per space shuttle flight than people hoped and it got into space a lot less often in two thousand four the administration of President George W Bush announced that it was canceling the space shuttle program and this left NASA with a problem. How is it going to send cargo and cruise into space to do things? Like, for instance, supply, the international space station without space shuttle program NASA came up with two strategies one was a conventional big government centralized program, which would last many years and cost many billions of dollars and then on the margins. There was this idea to spend a little bit of money to encourage a more decentralised, private sector driven space economy. But basically it turned. Out that that conventional program went over budget and behind schedule and eventually got cancelled. But that little experimental program that involved NASA, partnering with the private sector that worked out. This programme was known as cots c o t s and that is an acronym. For commercial orbital transportation services. Nasa issued a report last year saying that the cots program had been this huge success and a model for the public sector to partner with the private sector. And since then NASA has launched no pun intended, is maybe slightly intended other partnership programs that are just like it. Yeah. And the basic way these programs work is that when NASA needs something NASA tells private companies how much it might be willing to pay for it. And then those private companies get to work on figuring out how to provide it for example, last decade when NASA wanted a better way to send supplies to the international space station, and in fact to private companies orbital sciences and SpaceX convinced NASA that they could use their shuttles to resupply. The. Space station. So NASA paid them combined three point five billion dollars for a total of twenty resupply. Flights to the space station. And there are plenty more examples. Like right now NASA is asking private companies to propose technologies they can build and which NASA will pay for that will be useful for future moon missions. We're going back. Yeah. Matt says that NASA is more of a partner with such private companies than a supervisor NASA sets the goal, but private companies compete with each other to come up with the best way to meet that goal and the private companies, then get to keep most of the innovations that they come up with and which they can use to develop new products that they can sell in the private sector or which they can sell to organizations other than NASA. From an economic standpoint this newer, decentralized model has a lot of benefits there's competition between companies which tends to make products better. There's also a profit motive for those companies and incentive for them to discover new technologies and NASA gets access to these new technol-. Gies for a lot less money than it would have cost to develop them. Plus this model is laying the groundwork. Or Stacey laying the space work. Very nice. Very nice, not very nice for the future. When a lot of activity in space will be driven mostly by the private sector. In other words, these partnerships between NASA and the private sector are creating new marketplace for space technologies. We're one did not previously exist and private companies right now are coming up with technologies that will have actual value that could be bought and sold for actual money in this possible future. So what are these new exciting activities going to be and what weird new economic challenges might these activities themselves create Matt tells us about them on tomorrow's episode to tune in. I'm excited to hear more about the martians. Hey, it's catch out with the code. Switch team few years ago. I adopted this queue, but also shy eagle next from a dog rescue. But I noticed really fast he mostly barked at my friends of color made me wonder is my dog racist. So I went to find out check it out on the next code. Switch podcast.

Nasa Matt Weinzierl United States Stacey Vanik Smith Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Nasr Pasadena Government Garcia SAP Partner Cardiff Harvard Business School Soviet Union Football President George W Bush
NASA's InSight probe successfully lands on Mars and deploys solar panels

60-Second Science

02:52 min | 2 years ago

NASA's InSight probe successfully lands on Mars and deploys solar panels

"As the spacecraft landed on the planet after a voyage of six months and three hundred million miles. It'll be sending a probe some five meters below the Martian surface to measure heat flow and listen for tremors. Most of the talking is by Christine's ally of Nasr's Jet Propulsion Laboratory travelling at one thousand meters per second. Insight about four hundred meters per second. It will deploy it's twelve meter diameter. Supersonic parachute. Parachute. Parachutes deploy nominally at about mach. One point seven thirty. One seconds pass round. Patients are serving signals consistent with parachute. Deploy. Trees shows parachute deployment radar powered on. Did you separation commanded twenty two seconds pass? We have radar activation. Where the radar is beginning to search for the ground once the radar locked on the ground and inside is about one kilometer of the surface. The Lander will separate from the back show and begin terminal descent using twelve descent engines, twenty seven seconds pass altitude convergence the radar has locked on the ground. Yes. Danny by the Lander separation. Lander separation commanded altitude six hundred meters. Gravity turn out four hundred meters. Three hundred meters. Two hundred meters. Eighty meters. Sixty meters. Fifty meters constant Rossi thirty seven meters thirty meters twenty meters. Seventeen meters standing by for touchdown. We'll be until about eight PM eastern time today that NASA knows if inside solar panels are out and working correctly. They needed to literally wait for the dust to settle from the landing before deploying the panels catch down confirm. Scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

Jet Propulsion Laboratory Steve Mirsky Nasa Nasr Christine Rossi Danny Four Hundred Meters Per Second One Thousand Meters Per Second Three Hundred Meters Twenty Seven Seconds Four Hundred Meters Thirty Seven Meters Two Hundred Meters Six Hundred Meters Twenty Two Seconds Seventeen Meters Eighty Meters One Kilometer
Mars Mission Makes Clean Landing

60-Second Science

03:09 min | 2 years ago

Mars Mission Makes Clean Landing

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky passed through peak. Deceleration telemetry shows the spacecraft saw about eight G L, and Markle Bravo and Iraq radio science reports carrier detected. Inside is now traveling at velocity of two thousand meters per second control room of the NASA insight Mars mission earlier today as the spacecraft landed on the planet after a voyage of six months and three hundred million miles. It'll be sending a probe some five meters below the Martian surface to measure heat flow and listen for tremors. Most of the talking is by Christine's ally of Nasr's Jet Propulsion Laboratory travelling at one thousand meters per second. Insight about four hundred meters per second. It will deploy it's twelve meter diameter. Supersonic parachute. Parachute. Parachutes deploy nominally at about mach. One point seven thirty. One seconds pass round. Patients are serving signals consistent with parachute. Deploy. Trees shows parachute deployment radar powered on. Did you separation commanded twenty two seconds pass? We have radar activation. Where the radar is beginning to search for the ground once the radar locked on the ground and inside is about one kilometer of the surface. The Lander will separate from the back show and begin terminal descent using twelve descent engines, twenty seven seconds pass altitude convergence the radar has locked on the ground. Yes. Danny by the Lander separation. Lander separation commanded altitude six hundred meters. Gravity turn out four hundred meters. Three hundred meters. Two hundred meters. Eighty meters. Sixty meters. Fifty meters constant Rossi thirty seven meters thirty meters twenty meters. Seventeen meters standing by for touchdown. We'll be until about eight PM eastern time today that NASA knows if inside solar panels are out and working correctly. They needed to literally wait for the dust to settle from the landing before deploying the panels catch down confirm. Scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

Steve Mirsky Nasa Markle Bravo Jet Propulsion Laboratory Iraq Christine Danny Rossi Nasr Sixty Seconds Four Hundred Meters Per Second One Thousand Meters Per Second Two Thousand Meters Per Second Three Hundred Meters Twenty Seven Seconds Four Hundred Meters Thirty Seven Meters Two Hundred Meters Six Hundred Meters
"thirty meter" Discussed on Inside Europe

Inside Europe

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"thirty meter" Discussed on Inside Europe

"A boiling plume thirty meters. High about every seven minutes. It's one of many natural wonders that draw crowds to this volcanic terrain along the so-called, golden circle in southern Iceland. Further east is the Yukos are long glacial to goon where giant icebergs stand like sculpted sentinels in luminous other-worldly shades of blue the blue collar this with a thickness of the ice into reflection. As by the why is our guide on this amphibious vehicle that shaped like an arc but mounted on giant tires that float when they hit the water to drive home the importance of keeping a safe distance from the icebergs, he jokes about avoiding a repeat of the Titanic. The icebergs are certainly dangerous if you get too close, but due to climate change. They're also endangered and the glacier in our midst. The biggest in Europe is retreating faster than any other was if you see beautiful Louis bed or just rope out of his bed. That means that these one too. So it depends every day just up to the right place the right momentus unites over and then as if on cue after just a few minutes it happens. What a nice is just flipping over on its side. And it's gonna make some way. Our group certainly got more than we bargained for the presence of a well informed. Natural history guide makes a big difference. Like, Ben wa whose French many come from abroad since there aren't enough Icelanders to accommodate two and a half million visitors a year, but yuck. Oh bionson who started guiding seven years ago is a local you have common guides like me talk about history, geology culture, then you have the more specialized guides you have hiking guides. Reindeer hunting guides Wayne watching guides all these call for different needs of education, but to operate as a guide here. One needs some sort of a license or certification, correct? No turns out there isn't much regulation involved in Iceland tour guide business, no training required. That is the main probably we are dealing with because we have all kinds of fortune seekers who started to companies. Among them. There is a common view. Oh as long as your entertaining. It's okay. I soon found out what you on cement five. Tonight. We all end the now, I am a Torquato here in Iceland. Then I have my company here Iceland is nice, Lunt. And I'm working for other companies to go around then showing people and entertain them. This local guide played his harmonica to accompany an Icelandic song. He'd queued up on his music system. But he was driving almost one hundred twenty kilometers an hour at the same time along Iceland's, rainy, windy, south west peninsula, and it was getting dark not the kind of bus ride. Most of the passengers were after Yaacob Johansen thinks these fortune seeking types of guides should do more homework. Instead, the country's striking assault. Cliffs ten thousand waterfalls and thermal vents are like mirrors that reveal how much of the earth was formed long ago, if ice slumped didn't exist, just imagine. But then we decide you, and I to create a destination for people from all over the world. We would create a destination that would look exacly like Iceland looks the same age the same jail nature everything now who should come here. And why are we selling? We need to answer all these questions without thinking. Oh, it just happened to be here. That's not good enough. But the topography was more than good enough for these visitors are loved it. I wish I had longer. I didn't know icebergs flipped that was awesome breathtaking. It's so unique with all the rock formations mountains right next to the water. Totally new for me. Do you think you'll come back? Oh, definitely. I just hope that tourism doesn't get so crazy here. The it would be tough to see some of these beautiful views without a lot of people around. He has a point tourist numbers. Multiply Iceland's modest population by a factor of seven, but that's not what keeps Yacob Johansen up at night. He worries that if guides don't focus enough on the environment the tourist experience here will be reduced to physical, candy even. So he recognizes that not everyone comes to Iceland for the same reasons. Just go through some travel agency and say I have this week of where she let go, oh, go to Iceland. Oh, what's that? Okay. It's fine. You don't have to know anything about your destination..

Iceland Yaacob Johansen Lunt Europe Yacob Johansen Ben wa assault Wayne one hundred twenty kilometers seven minutes thirty meters seven years
Astronomers find black hole ‘which could be spinning space itself’

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:15 min | 2 years ago

Astronomers find black hole ‘which could be spinning space itself’

"In the journalists Toronto and astrophysics show clumps of gas swirling around that about thirty percent spate of light on a circular orbit just outside the black holes event horizon. It's the first time has been observed opening so close to the event horizon the point of no return beyond which material foles forever into the black hole. Singularity the authors use the gravity instrument on the European southern observatory's. Vail, Tae, ovarian large telescope in Chile gravity observed flares of infrared radiation coming from the accretion disk around Sagittarius, a style the flares originate from material opening close to the black holes event horizon making this the most detailed observations ever taken of material opening so close to a black hole. All some matter in the creation disc, the built of gas opening secretaries. A star relatively spades. Can over the black hole safely anything. They gets too close. He's doomed to be pulled beyond the event horizon and ten disappear from our universe relativistic spades. Those were to say great that the effects of Einstein's theory of relativity becomes significant in the case of the accretion disk around secretaries a star the guests. He's moving at roughly thirty percent. The speed of light the gravity instrument combines the live from all four telescopes the veil Tate into a sort of giant optical interferometer to create a virtual super telescope one hundred and thirty meters in amateur earlier this year, gravity and symphonic another instrument on the veil Tate allowed the same team to accurately measure the close fly by of the Starace to as it passed through the extreme gravitational field niche itary say style, there's up survey vacations provided the first direct evidence of the effects predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity in such an extreme environment during his close fly by strong in for. Red emissions were also observed it was during those ups of Asians, the authors were lucky enough to notice the three bright flares around the black hole. This flare emission is caused by extremely highly energetic electrons originating magnetic interactions in the very hot gas opening close to the black hole. It exactly matches the theoretical predictions for hotspots opening so close to a black hole a full point three million saw mashes. You're listening to

Einstein European Southern Observatory Toronto Tate Chile Vail Thirty Percent Thirty Meters
"thirty meter" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"thirty meter" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Five zero five forty six twenty six two things that I really would like to get off my chest if. You will let me and you can. Feel free to comment agree or disagree one I was so rudely interrupted last hour I ran out of time but. There's A story out tonight that the. National that the, all star game had the lowest ratings of all in fact was it. America's got talent actually drew more viewers. Than the major league all, star game Now ratings being what they are. I don't know much about TV ratings and every time someone anyone who says they do I think they're lying because I don't think. Anybody can really truly understand the rating system but major league baseball the game started at seven while. The pre-game, started seven first pitches at what seven thirty ish in the last pitch was at midnight Well the seven thirty or so central time let's say eight thirty metres starting a baseball game at eight thirty at night Game ended at. About midnight okay well how many people do you think are up at midnight I mean you. Don't put the the most exciting game that was a home run to in the ninth. Inning and then a couple of home runs in the. Tenth to win the game exciting game but the the exciting part happened outside of prime time I don't understand. Why. Major, league baseball puts the most exciting part of the game Outside. Of prime time doesn't make any sense so America's got talent is in prime time Right and the major league baseball, game, is outside of primetime don't please please please please do. Not call up and say oh it's TV No that's exactly? The? Point, it's TV so why would you. Put it on at eleven. Thirty at night, on the east coast who's up. At eleven thirty now yes there are some people, up there some people who can't sleep I get, it but prime time is prime time and, basically? Baseball does this. Time and time again whether it's the seventh game of the, World Series whether it's the first game of the year. Right I get it you don't wanna play the game at, noon because everyone's working but there's a happy medium. And I understand time zones and so if it's at eight. Thirty on the east coast what is that six thirty, on the west coast maybe you do it at five thirty on the. West coast maybe that's maybe you missed the window and the right but ending. The game at midnight is no way to grow the game, so? They're shocked that in two thousand eighteen the lowest rated. All star. Game it's. Because the game is being played outside, of, prime time And then there was another there's I'll tell you what There was somebody floated a story I saw that there is momentum gaining for the National League to accept, the designated hitter for those. Who, are not baseball fans Designated hitter being they have a, hitter that hits the pitcher. And he doesn't play the field he. Is a designated hitter for the pitcher. And the American League has a d. h. designated here the National League does not and it's been a, bone of contention it's been two different styles of play it's amazing how different this. Two styles of play his just with that one small little change in rules but. They are talking about doing away with the pitcher hitting in the National League and I know I can only imagine the purists Necessarily call myself a purist but in this sense I am it's a completely different game I if you're asking me. I am very much against having the. Designated hitter come to the National League. Let's go to the phones here one eight six six five o. JIMBO one eight six six five o., JIMBO McGraw Hill haven filling in for Jim Bohannon let's go to John in bay. City Michigan John welcome to the Jim Bohannon show Thank you sir appreciate. Gem show and listen regularly and? Once, in a. While call in. And got home today and, my son was sharing a little disappointed regular media news outlets. Apparently over the weekend one of the secret service personnel was over with the president in Europe and, he had a stroke and then apparently died the next. Day over there while he was had been on duty and yet I've not heard a word about this. Regular news media have, you heard..

"thirty meter" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"thirty meter" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Five zero five. Forty six twenty six there's two things. That I really would like to get off my chest if you will let me and you can feel free to. Comment Agree or disagree one I was so rudely interrupted last hour I ran out of time but there's a story out tonight that their nationals that the all-star. Game had the lowest ratings of all in fact was it America's got. Talent actually drew. More viewers than the major league all star game Now ratings being what they are I don't know much about, TV ratings and every, time someone anyone who says they. Do I think they're lying. Because I don't think anybody can really truly understand, the rating system. But major league baseball the game started at. Seven while the pre-game started, seven first pitches at what seven thirty ish in the last pitch was you know midnight well seven thirty. Or so, central time let's say eight thirty metres starting a baseball game at eight thirty at night Game ended at. About midnight okay well how. Many people do you think are up at midnight I mean you don't put. The the most exciting game that was a home run to tie it in the ninth. Inning and then a couple of home runs in the. Tenth to win the game exciting game but the the exciting part happened outside of prime time I don't understand. Why. Major, league baseball puts the most exciting part of the game Outside. Of prime time doesn't make any sense so America's got talent is in prime time Right and the major league baseball, game, is outside. Of, primetime don't please please. Please please. Do not call up and say oh it's TV no that's exactly the point it's TV? So why would you put? It? On, at eleven thirty at night. On the east coast who's up. At eleven thirty, now yes there are some people up there's some people who can't sleep I, get it but primetime is prime time and basically, baseball does this time and time again whether, it's? The seventh game. Of the World Series whether it's the first game of the, year right I get it you don't wanna play the. Game at noon because everyone's working but there's a happy medium, and I understand time zones and so if it's. At eight thirty on the east coast what is that six. Thirty on the west coast maybe you do it at, five thirty on the west coast maybe that's maybe you missed the window. And the right but ending the, game at midnight is no way to grow. The game so they're shocked that in too Thousand and eighteen it's the lowest rated all star game it's, because the game is being played outside of primetime? And then there was another there's I'll tell you what there. Was of somebody floated a story I saw that there, is momentum gaining for the National League to accept the designated hitter for. Those who are not baseball fans Designated hitter being they have. A hitter that hits for the pitcher and he, doesn't play the field he is a designated hitter for the pitcher and the American. League has a d. h. designated here the National League does not and it's. Been a bone of contention it's. Been two different styles of. Play it's amazing how different this two styles of play has just with that one small little change in. Rules but they are talking about doing away with the, pitcher hitting in the National League, and I know I can only imagine the. Purists necessarily call myself a purist but in this sense, I am it's a. Completely different game I if you're asking. Me I am very much against having the designated hitter come to the National League. Let's, go to the phones here one eight six six five zero. JIMBO one eight six six five o. JIMBO McGraw Hill haven Philly in four jimbohannon let's go to John in bay city Michigan John welcome to the Jim Bohannon, show Thank you sir, and appreciate Jim show and, listen regularly and once in a. While call in and got home today and my son was sharing a little disappointed in regular. Media news outlets currently over the weekend one of the secret service personnel was over with the, president in Europe and had a stroke and then apparently died the next day over there while he was had been on duty and it is not heard, a word about this regular news? Media, have you..

"thirty meter" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"thirty meter" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"They have it helps with digestion heart health and respiratory problems and it also could prevent stillbirth oh go as far as that if you are pregnant i don't know if there was any other way i could sleep when i was pregnant i had to have a pillow between my knees to keep my back straight and then you just i never sleep on my stomach my daughter does and i'm always like how do you do that my neck won't go in massage table my son floats around but he mostly fall asleep like straight up on his back and i looked at macau just laying there like a blink that's a no no because that's what makes you snore really as being on your back and all of this well i don't want to gargling all you know all of this extra stuff in your neck here can cause your your waddell or whatever is some people even if they don't have that it's it just affects all kinds of people so laying on your side stops all of that wearing or it is but you know if you're used to it you'll just end up they say if you if you want to avoid turning back over onto your back at night they recommend sewing tennis balls into a sleeping cap or wearing a backpack at night for people also you won't turn to the can't turn in my bed anyway because i've like accumulated enough pillows that i could pretend that i'm with somebody surrounded by pillows makes a little nest a pillow right like i'll just pretend i'm spooning with my pillow there's a pillow no or snore be mad that i eat crackers in bed going back to the tie boy yes yes you want to see because a lot of people were like why can't they drill down where they are a very good visual that the bbc put out i put both of those on my twitter they'll also be in our show links but it shows you how long it takes a little cartoon images lamad her down that they would have to drill through mountain so not possible each leg like how long it is like the part of it is a thirty meter dive how they have to take off their gear at some points because there's just not an it takes eight hours eight hours to get those four boys out yet traveling a distance longer than a mile yeah it's it's it's more because when you think about it and you visualize your mind you're like how far back could they go but really they just had to keep going back further and further away from the water oh my goodness it's in there you know what's so amazing is that when they've done little videos in there the kids are smiling mike it just amazes me that they didn't know how long they had been in there it's completely and they're all just like thumbs up oh my god she just breaks my heart yes the sweetest kids so we're all thinking about them right absolutely they're almost looks like the eighth child has been taken out so hopefully the progress and they will all be out yes we'll check out that diagram at donna dark right miss shannon you are miss miss.

eight hours thirty meter
Hawaii on high alert after day of earthquakes, more lava fissures

02:18 min | 2 years ago

Hawaii on high alert after day of earthquakes, more lava fissures

"This is the fourth year he's come on a truck to their national convention and this was a straightforward speech in support of their views and their values and really saying if you want to hold onto that then you better not vote democrat in november and you better make sure you get out there and vote republican gary donohue at the nra conference in dallas volcano on hawaii's biggest island has erupted again sending lava thirty meters into the air and forcing the evacuation of hundreds of people if i erupted a day early and since then the area's been hit by a number of strong earthquakes janet's snyder a spokeswoman for the mayor of the county of hawaii says the situation remains very dangerous we do have elevated levels of sulfur dioxide so two which prevents people from even contemplating going back to their evacuated areas it is quite toxic and in fact even our first responders find it too hazardous at this time to go back into the subdivisions without heavy protective equipment from john tyson he normally gives people tours of hawaii's volcanoes as part of ethic lava tours this is something that hasn't been seen for a long time over here in a way we generally get more gentle lava flows in the last three decades that are surface flows that people could almost walk right up to all of the love of disappeared recently underground and they'll pressure in this was kind of the result so it's a new thing there's definitely a a sense of panic in the community when you go down the road right now the gas stations have lines around the corner the grocery stores have lines out the stores and everybody's just getting all the supplies and everything they can when we got rocked with that bigger quaker earlier it lasted somewhere between forty five seconds and somewhere in the neighborhood of a minute and what ended up happening is the ground just shook and shokhin shook it was kind of rolling and so a lot of people got scared as that happened the lava lake up at the top summit of killer way of volcano known as holly who had a big collapse and huge ashes explosion the pool ovent also had a collapsed probably part more of the north so we'd had a big ash cloud that went into this guy and they were new figures that started you know those.

Gary Donohue Dallas Volcano Hawaii Janet Snyder John Tyson Lava Lake Holly NRA Forty Five Seconds Thirty Meters Three Decades
"thirty meter" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"thirty meter" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"To wait for the idea of to clear it there is a new attack tunnel just discovered what is an attack tunnel and what is the significance of the discovery discovery of the largest tunnel found so far thirty meters deep it's huge infrastructure of of reinforced concrete and israel is you know we've talked about defensive building hundred meters down fifteen years up with some sort of fluid or something in it that when it touches a tunnel or something it fills it in automatically there are sensors that set it off so it shows that the that the gazans are still hostile dedicated to crossing the border this has no purpose other than to kill israelis is no other symbolic significance other than to be a way to bring soldiers into kidnappers is to kill to go into the communities near the border the fact that israel's able to locate them now and to stop them before they're being able to be used is very significant but it it puts you on notice that they're shooting rockets over the border digging tunnels under the border because of what general cooper wasser described earlier as their one attempt which intent which is to take over to state officials can you describe malcolm the geography of where this trouble is happening now is it happening in the north of gaza on the eastern border on in the south in the south end the tunnels will go anyplace where personal where there's no fence yet built and they will look where they can penetrate across the border and hoped not to be detected they assume that some of them but they hope that people enough one or two we'll get through and that's all they need to do a lot of damage do a lot of killing so israel is on super alert right now and sometimes these areas get closed off because they see they detect activity in the region but they want people to see because when you see that the what a big undertaking it is and then they cry to the donor states that they don't have money you don't have money and yet at tunnel like this cost millions of dollars to build this is not something that people imagine you put up a few stakes of more than you quote through like we used to seeing the minds in western movies this is.

israel cooper wasser gaza malcolm hundred meters fifteen years thirty meters
"thirty meter" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"thirty meter" Discussed on WTMA

"That is not an old war you tell us and we've been eager to discover but we have to wait for the idea after to clear it there is a new attack tunnel just discovered what is an attack tunnel and what is the significance of the discovery while it's an discovery of the largest tunnel found so far thirty meters deep it's huge infrastructure of electricity of reinforced concrete and israel is you know we've talked about defensive building hundred meters down years up with some sort of a fluid or something in it that when it touches a tunnel or something it fills it immediately automatically there are sensors that set it off so it shows that the that the gazans are still hamas still dedicated crossing the border this has no purpose other than to kill israelis is no other symbolic significance other than to be a way to bring soldiers into kidnappers rabies kill to go into the communities near the the border the fact that israel is able to locate them now and to stop them before they're being able to be used is very significant but it puts you notice that they're shooting rockets over the border digging tunnels under the border because of what general cooper wasser described earlier as their one attempt which intent which is to take over the state officials can you describe malcolm the geography of where this trouble is happening now is happening in the north of gaza on the eastern border or in the south in the south end the tunnels will go anyplace where personal where there's no fence yet built and they will look where they can penetrate across the border and hoped not to be detected they assume that some of them but they hope that if you build enough one or two we'll get through and that's all they need to do a lot of damage to do a lot of killing so israel is on super alert right now and sometimes these areas get closed off because they see they detect activity in the region but they want people to see because when you see the what a big undertaking it is and then they cry to the.

hamas israel cooper wasser gaza malcolm hundred meters thirty meters
"thirty meter" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"thirty meter" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Waves came in a thirty meters high it was his high in some places as a twelve story building the colo was block it was a block waves the town was covered always water uh it was totally um like looking like a c people who have survived tsunamis described them as impossibly high black waves the devoured the horizon in seconds when the sheet of dark water briefly subsides before the next wave hits flighting bodies cause trees they will emerge ready to be smashed once again into communities it's an apocalyptic scene many of those who live through these disasters use the same words to describe their survival miracle i sold ellison a die so i just summed look delay immediately dana run to the final evacuation spot it was cold a miracle what was so surprising was that the children decided to run up the hill on their own initiative and not because any teacher told them to do so but many think it was simply the result of good planning among them robert mueller would author of the cure for catastrophe subtitle how we can stop manufacturing natural disasters and he devoted the entire opening chapter to what happens at this particular school wrong this has been called the miracle of commer he should amend vote will or children who survived with word because in order in other neighboring towns little children do front drawn in fact it wasn't a miracle it was the result of one man's work one woman who is a professor at a nearby university cold professor qatada and he had been out to the site of the gracie nami that happened in two thousand and four along the coast of thailand along the coast to sri lanka and in particular killer along the coast of northern sumatra but want term professor qatada discovered walls that a lot of people had simply waited around the felt the strong shaking believe the nothing because noone told them what to do some elect three hundred thousand dollars committed to have died in nazi nami a lot of them could be saved if they had taken their own initiative eight nam attending with a about his name seminar duckie janine it's that come on my in this is professor at qatar that describing a concepts known in japan as centimeter and then co the concept of everyone for themselves saving yourself above others emerged did you keep running through.

ellison professor qatada qatar japan robert mueller sri lanka three hundred thousand dollars thirty meters
"thirty meter" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"thirty meter" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"More often news talk six seventy kboi y i'm john batchelor this is the john batchelor show bob seventy keeps the website behind the black he's the author of capitalism in space also the author of the science fiction novel anticipating exploiting the solar system pioneer now bobbie is going to be like elvis presley blue hawaii because we're headed though hawaii and order to find the latest version of that longstanding melodrama will they are won't they build the thirty meter telescope odd topped the volcano mamic kia bob there have been a series of hearings there was an arbitrator who ruled in favor of building the thirty major telescope the thing that everybody loves it that there's the time line here there's a few burning after which the decision must be made to move thirty meter telescope to another local entirely i think it's springtime how's it going bomb well um i've been saying now for more than a almost a year i think that it will let never get built a wii because it's pretty clear to me that the opponents of this telescope emily with a democratic government which pretty much a oneparty state and hawaii all democrats like new york city where i grew up um they're pretty much working hand in glove even though the democratic party that doesn't want to admit to that in the try to hide it but the the guy oh he was delayed the lake alive so yes john did they had a land board arbitrate a hold hearings that went on forever forever he basically it was a filibuster you didn't allow he didn't um put any time limit on amy witness and he had like thirty plus witnesses they went on for weeks and then he ruled he recommended that the.

john batchelor bob seventy hawaii wii democratic party solar system bobbie kia new york thirty meter
"thirty meter" Discussed on Ham Radio 360

Ham Radio 360

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"thirty meter" Discussed on Ham Radio 360

"Yes and i'm not that good a tune in piano as it turns out most people aren't that's why it's a very expensive so you talked about the this fox filament so our most of your designs do you print pla abs or some exotic i do everything pla i have one role of abs and i've never really been success with a bs i did get a roller pet g because i needed the high temperature because i was building the fan it was a 360 circular found that went around the the the nozzle and they said don't do this appeal a you'll melted so i've done one role of pia herb pet g but mostly everything i do is is pla the one thing i did successfully print with a b s was i got a uh a slope her antennas slope or dipoto singled so it's a singlesided pull the comes off the tower um and it has the forty eighty on top and then it has a thirty meter underneath well it only came up like four spaces and so the spaces than the two antennas were touching each other so i three d printed about 10 spaces uh in attached him to him and i did that any bs just because i knew it was going to be out in the sun and i was just worried about degradation on the tower knack actually that's a good point because pla even left in a hot car on a you know on a sunny day can uh can melt on you.

dipoto thirty meter
"thirty meter" Discussed on Astronomy Cast

Astronomy Cast

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"thirty meter" Discussed on Astronomy Cast

"Is that it will essentially survey the entire night sky that it can see every couple of night at a very high degree of resolution so it's going to be like the sloan digital sky survey which is this sort of full view of the entire nights geyer the telescopes can see but at the same time it's going to do this every couple of days and what it's gonna do is going to show was how universes changing night after night after night and so it's going to turn up asteroids and comets and supernova and micro lenzing events and just all kinds of things that the and and a back to what you said right these things that we didn't even know were happening it's by watching everything all a him time is when you discover these events that you weren't expecting and and so vis telescope really scratches that it's for me which is just everything everywhere all the time and then what for anything to change i have to admit there's so many other telescopes go not so ellis t actually had their groundbreaking couple years ago so now i'm trying to figure out what telescope actually had the most recent groundbreaking 'cause the thirty meter i think or so was actually the extremely large telescope that had we just hours just cover this on euro today and i don't remember the like a literally just i i will find it you keep working and i keep talking and i will either find it and this is the thing is sciences advancing so fast and nations are starting to in some places withdraw the funding and this is where it so sad to watch like the gemena telescopes because they've been struggling with their funding situation with k parkers.

thirty meter
"thirty meter" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"thirty meter" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"A news items in the front of the by a magazine and on the website and in this description of the controversy in china they have a parentheses that is helpful to identify that we are not the only people watching the disappointment in hawaii they write construction wise man a kia has been delayed by legal claims raised by native hawaiians he i should add john net uh china is a partner in the consortium trying to build a third thirty meters telescope and so this is this is one of the reasons maybe this is happening in china and they don't know it that consortium that telescope look you built a now they're looking for some other options for so it's very disappointing to have to read that in science bob it's one thing for us to debate it and complained but here it looks like resignation on science is part all right more china news this has to do with a story that his wonderful they're planning a moon base and so they want to eat potatoes how they're going to do this well they haven't serious they have a an unmanned luna science products to a program you know they've done the various chang e e landers rovers and all but here's um they have it later this year they can have changji five is going to land and ember and bring a sample back well changji four is actually gonna launch next year and that day rover and a land it's kind of may of kind of repeat over the youtube the land rover mission they did a few years ago but what they did a porta on the that's kind of interesting is a small experiment which is going to attempt to grow within that experiment potatoes from feeds on the surface of the move basically actually somewhat revolution extent we've done some experiments like this in weightlessness but in low gravity it's never been done you know we've never had a centrifuge in altered by anyone where they could test gravity affects on unplanned growth well the moon's a perfect opportunity to do that and they got to try to do it and i think that's a very significant move forward without any question at all grow potatoes on the mood it's it's a first rate idea i w i i celebrate now casini is the last the last days.

china hawaii partner youtube land rover thirty meters