31 Burst results for "Thirty Kilometers"

Olympics Live: Questions about Taiwan skater's China suit

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 3 months ago

Olympics Live: Questions about Taiwan skater's China suit

"American Jessie Diggins takes almost surprising silver medal in the women's cross country skiing thirty kilometer freestyle deggans becomes the event's first medalist to come from outside Europe since its Olympic debut in nineteen ninety two really that's cool I didn't know that hi it's it's really special I think it's it was a really cool team effort and I yeah I just I guess I guess keep coming back to being really grateful for our team and the fifteen nation alpine sixteen parallel makayla Shiffrin in team USA made it to the bronze medal match but lost to Norway and finished fourth team USA leaves Beijing with eight golds and twenty five overall medals the fifth most of any nation I'm Danny cap

Jessie Diggins Skiing Makayla Shiffrin Olympic Europe USA Norway Beijing Danny Cap
Ocean Currents Predicted on Enceladus

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Ocean Currents Predicted on Enceladus

"New study claims. That ocean currents churning in the subsurface sees of this attorney an ice moon enceladus. The findings reported in the journal. Nature geoscience a based on the shape of enceladus twenty kilometer. Thick shell new hypothesis challenges. Current thinking that the moon's global ocean is a modulus apart from some vertical mixing driven by the warmth of the moons core and syllabus is a tiny frozen snowball just hundred kilometers wide. That's just a seventh of the earth's moon. It's the smoothest body. In the solar system is smooth as keeble and sold us attracted the attention of scientists in two thousand fourteen when a fly by the cassini spacecraft discovered evidence of subsurface after water was seen spewing out of guys alike eruptions through fissures in the circle tiger stripes in the ice neither moon south pole a spectral analysis of the water by cassini indicated that it was salty together with jupiter's iceman moon. Europa enceladus is one of the few locations in the solar system other than earth with liquid water. And that makes it an obvious. Target of interest for astrobiologists searching for signs of life but the oceans on enceladus are almost entirely unlike those earth earth oceans are relatively shallow with an average depth of just three point six kilometers. They cover about three quarters of the planet surface and a warmer at the top thanks to the sun's rays and cooler depth near the floor and they have carrots that are affected not just by the spirit of the earth but also by wind on the other hand and syllabus a piece to have a global spanning and completely subsurface ocean. It's at least thirty. Kilometers deep is cooler at the top. Of the i show and warmer at the bottom thanks to hate from the moon's core despite their differences the study's lead author analog from caltech says the oceans on enceladus do have currents based on the cassini measurements and observations on earth looking at the way ice and water interact drive ocean mixing. Dr

Keeble The Journal Caltech
"thirty kilometers" Discussed on EN TIJUANA HAY ROCK RADIO

EN TIJUANA HAY ROCK RADIO

07:30 min | 1 year ago

"thirty kilometers" Discussed on EN TIJUANA HAY ROCK RADIO

"Looking represented anatolij. Joe consider as combined mass experiment than throw. They locate with yasser theology. No l. extremo melodic. Okay the kennedy pm in the noise. Look look apology payroll instead in the law of limitations look last year the most capacity permitted rattle. You a lotta. Ceo knows some anita proposition economic. Not the movie but go no. No no no no crocus to sound that iraq fascinating Look set up thirty kilometers from delhi. Look and look and look i know. See the who must go Ethan okay said wounded are the poco electoral dega poor. So we still passer. Por carneiro nato. No no more nor the continental new. I told standing miracle does he lavar jacquemus he just become a move by the skills are now alaska last found in cardiac stomach. Okay you're going to school academy no nato Quantum theologist i would be yellow prematurely skills. Beef wayne in in beacon be the you can see on easter mammal project-related number eight looking granted concert on k. Jordan the antes alive on the sabbath rotondo. You have the west. Mexico cap equals yell. Your own like marijuana the Could miss clough allowance Affected islands commit don rickles. Is they career. What is way bat again. The the does project grahovo similarities. Luca mi familia koreans are not decision. nothing's continue ma- ma- ma- mesa click for cabela's to spray materially silos cami thousand. Grow edna thousand. Cbs liberals carneiro. Negro mobile leader. What does he know. Lower even throw the if according to kevin Is a i got your low. Damn your demo. The new mutual multicolored mental in a in the must forget the incredible start. Mcnerney nary and profound enough schemers zemo. Transgression of Brendan this was a guy will announce shuki authority como amigos carniglia Because we are. Ni- is the korean tolerance either. Put on dundas courses come about eighty perkins. Joe's don't brokaw. More general yasser. Nancy equipment started to council electoral enthrone. Forget to me new for your fun. Whip working normally study. I did a sante. Docomo that are already. Pre telecast gabby ac- in the data is dated. This reveal oprah laments protesters electra's in gwen a sticky mass went. Dark at kantar differentes out state samples was because you're seeing permanent. Mila returned on. Is the yankee stadium. Principal combat in the canadian mascagni fitted E e you could assemble news through vancouver Komo from body scores. Don't sell to the two or three. La zona stan polyethylene guest starred in movies a document on the was jonathan redtop memorial demotic perky jealous. Yes garra kamal. Dan orient to have manassas and deal. Parietal intra before and does as the joy. The calcutta's is the continued through. Getty therapy for enter Kiosque anthony seeing is capacity. Continentals welcome columbia therapy. Continental control of charles kernigan says see jaw defeated the carreno areas three york ghetto lawson movie. I while the authentic on the quartet may stay amino moustava celine don christina's economicas cardiac rentable maza best he eko economic development. This enthusing Who have so little campbell's geico joaquin cabezas was coming. E new immi pinson procedures interesting but if the initial project herkus to uc mandelson mass war. Lord knows pregnancy yes. The yoga dhabi mascot. I guide moody all season. All mellow papa. Sierra it does the second the qantas on began in and garnell blurbs on this into no no notre algan e either legal eka Plasmon cook is a look. How is speaker. Pto parameter for a week attack equally. You flick them. Therapy in this was a total kept us when our our say. Most is the bookie look guinness book on monday. I don't know if it'll mean each.

k. Jordan kevin Brendan thirty kilometers delhi charles kernigan last year Ethan monday Joe jonathan each Mcnerney three two sabbath rotondo iraq alaska Sierra Mexico
Photographer Richard Mosse on blurring the lines between art

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:23 min | 1 year ago

Photographer Richard Mosse on blurring the lines between art

"Now richard. Moss's photographic practice has resulted in some of the most arresting images of recent years as a conceptual documentary photographer. He draws on a range of esoteric photographic media to catch a so much more than meets the eye. Monaco's much. Larry spoke to richard to find out more about his unique and emotive work to those nine. I went to iraq. And i made a series of images essentially architectural project photographic project documenting the us forces who were based in the saddam hussein's palace architecture and saddam. Hussein had about eighty four palaces. All around iraq may which he never even visited when the us military arrived. They were so strategically well located for obvious. Reasons and very defensively built. They made pretty straight forward operating bases so they were occupied by the us military which i found fascinating just the layers of power and expression of that architecturally from the sort of provisional corporate office partitions and cubicles that the. Us army would hastily set up within the very pompous and often poorly built authoritarian architecture of saddam hussein which had a very specific style with some very strange eccentric ornamental features. Such as giant teapots and. Yeah it was very incongruous staff. And i brought eight by ten inch camera there and it'd be like that project and after that i realized frustrated with the medium documentaries over here. It's really so conservative as a language so reductive often. You're just an illustrator for writers texts if you're doing it at oriel which primarily. We're documenta over. Do i wanted to break it apart. Actually i wanted to somehow really smashes just for myself. It was a very personal desire to essentially as an expression of the frustration of with my own practice. I was at that time. Kodak was on its path to bankruptcy was announced had announced the discontinuation of this infrared film. Kodak erico two thousand ten. I think says nine around the time and so i thought well this is a wonderful way to unpack a documentary subject. I don't know what may be quite yet. But i gathered as much as i could off ebay and wherever it was being made extinct and i sort of worked backwards from the medium which i always tend to do actually to find to find effective subject or subjects that could be more adequately conveyed to be elevated through the medium through this particular medium and reading was a starting point for me over. The last ten years i've been working with spurred you call them infra-red film technology's very interested in the unseen registry invisible light forms as the way often metaphorically telling very complex documentary narratives more powerful way and to refresh very saturated subject matter for example the refugee crisis unfolding across europe the middle east north africa. Everybody photographer was out there taking pictures. And they all tend to look rather similar. And i really was. After a certain point the imagery just became inherently less compelling and less powerful as language. So i wanted to refresh my own way and i found this bizarre military grade thermographic camera that can image human body heat from thirty kilometres distance. Day or nice. It's classes weapon designed for battlefield situational awareness long-range insurgents detection tracking and targeting. So it was actually part of a weapon. System very sort of activated medium to think through the representation of the refugee crisis and also almost an aggravated one. Really confront the viewer. On some level with their own complicity. I believe and that was my intention to really make people feel that. And i think as an orange has that's one of the only things you can do is to make people feel something so i was working through metaphor aesthetics in this work but with that work with my project incoming its title and it was using this weapons technologies long range border enforcement technology. Thermographic heat-detection camera. I realized i was also operating in certain moments on another level beyond the metaphorical and beyond the aesthetic. And that was the the forensic after understand. The camera sees index heat register. You can calibrate for about forty degrees and anything. That's relatively cooler or relatively warmer within. That given frame is depicted in black or white depending on how you set the the recording set the image. And so something that's black. Could be everything that's warms. The human body would be depicted in black and everything cold surrounding him. Buddy will be waste for example or if you sell it. The other way white hart. It's the opposite. And i was filming this tragic event i've ever witnessed probably ever will. Hopefully it was one of the biggest human trafficking disasters on the gnc and human memory of three hundred people or more were on a on a fishing trawler was had paid to be on that boat from turkey to lead boss and human traffickers just packed that boat too many people who zone designed for perhaps twenty or thirty people so the top deck of the boat collapsed and doing panic entire hull ripped apart and we were able to capture all this from about seven kilometers away with camera designed exactly for this kind of thing and then when the bodies were brought to shore to the harbour of malvo's something store happy it was after dark at this point literally out on the cold stone pier they were lined up on thermal. Br red cross workers volunteers local doctors. Anyone who could could help out. Were were frantically trying to revive these hypothermic victim. Some whom passed out or semi drowned or some had had remain conscious. But we're literally freezing to death. And so they were literally what they were doing. Rubbing life-giving warmth from their hands into the flesh coddled flesh of the these hypothermic victims in front of us on the pier. Desperately trying to sort of transmit life-giving heat back back into them. Now a normal camera of course after dark wouldn't wouldn't be abc's very much let alone. Would it be able to see the trace of that of that transmission of warmth which the thermal camera was able to do incredibly effective articulation of exactly the crux of of the emergency unfolding around us. It was a of very powerful test. Testimonial footage of the the effort survive these people on the scale of a trauma around us. That was richard moss and do head over to our website to the full version of that interview.

Saddam Hussein Richard Kodak Iraq Middle East North Africa United States Oriel Monaco Moss Us Army Hussein Saddam Larry Ebay Malvo Europe
Could We Be Entering an Era of Commercialized Space Exploration?

BrainStuff

05:16 min | 2 years ago

Could We Be Entering an Era of Commercialized Space Exploration?

"I S A great deal to Nasr's defunct Space Shuttle Program Green Lit by then president Richard M Nixon in nineteen seventy two. This initiative gave the world its first reusable spacecraft from nineteen eighty one to two thousand eleven NASA astronauts into orbit on American made shuttles. These were often used to transport portions of the ISS during its construction on July Twenty first twenty eleven. The space shuttle. Eric came to an end. As the Atlanta's orbiter returned from its final mission with the program just continued. I S bound astronauts grew dependent on Russian Soyuz rockets. Then the law of Supply and demand took over for nearly a decade. No other rockets were capable of sending people to the ISS. All astronauts bound for that station had to be launched out of Kazakhstan Baikonour cosmodrome which is spaceport least to the Russian government and by April of two thousand twenty. The Russians were charging eighty six million dollars to include foreign astronauts in their Soyuz missions. Another Soyuz rocket launch is scheduled for October. And Breitenstein says NASA is currently negotiations to book a seat. Nevertheless it's hoped that the SPACEX x crew dragon will end the spaceflight monopoly. Rydin Stein explained. We want the russian-american relationship in space exploration to remain strong. We see a day. When Russian cosmonauts can launch on American rockets American astronauts can launch on Russian rockets by now space x the International Space Station? Have a fair bit of history. Using unmanned crafts the company has delivered supplies to the orbiting laboratory since two thousand twelve. The crew dragon aced dress rehearsal and March of two thousand nineteen when it left. Merritt island on the nose of a spacex Falcon nine rocket and autonomously docked with the International Space Station. Five days after its departure the crew track and returned to Earth splashing down in the Atlantic Ocean. Some one hundred and forty three miles or two hundred thirty kilometers a Florida's eastern coastline. But that trip only passengers were in earth shaped plush toy and a dummy named Ripley AB- named after Sigourney Weaver's character Ellen Ripley from the alien movie franchise a flight later. This month will be the first time that live. Astronauts will be on board space x crew mission director. Benjamin Reed said at the May First Conference Dragon will be fully autonomous. Expectation is that can carry the crew safely to the station and bring them home without direct intervention even so hurley and Bankin are set to take control for a short period before the crew dragon. Docs they'll be able to guide the vessel using touch screens or physical switches. Both options are available for certain portions of the journey while aboard cruise expected to test out such components as the maneuvering thrusters and in my own. Mental Control System. And then there's the spacesuits one piece outfits designed by SPACEX to supply the astronauts with oxygen provide the appropriate temperature and maintain pressure spacesuits plug into the crew dragons chairs when their wares. Sit down read. Said suits also have an integrated communication system so that the crew can communicate through their helmets. Neither Bank nor Hurley are strangers to low earth orbit. Lincoln's logged more than seven hundred eight hours in space and Hurley a member of NASA's last shuttle era crew back in two thousand eleven but every mission presents its own unique challenges like the rest of the world NASA space x and these two astronauts had to make adjustments during the krona virus taking extra precautions. So what does that mean? Both SPACEX and NASA have implemented social distancing protocols like keeping work desk six feet or two meters apart at their respective control rooms. Meanwhile the cruise getting a wide. Berth contact with them by any other team. Members has been minimized and many training sessions have been done. Virtually and the safety of is S. crew the astronauts will observe a preflight quarantine for May sixteenth until the launch on May twenty seventh. Right now. There are three space fares two Americans and a Russian living and working aboard the International Space Station. The length of Benjamin's and Harley stay at the facility will be determined at a later date it could last anywhere from five to thirty days when the time to head home arrives the crew tracking should undock Disley and deliver. Its human charges to Florida by way of the Atlantic. There's a long proud tradition of civilians gathering near the Kennedy Space Center to witness rocket launches. Unfortunately NASA is discouraging people from following suit this time lest they spread or contract Cova nineteen. But you can tune in and watch launch online for just the fifth time in history NASA astronauts will be test flying a new type of spacecraft should bankin an early complete their mission objectives. We may yet see a golden age of space tourism and innovation with private industry taking on development roles long adopted by governments Breitenstein. Said this really is the next major step. In commercializing low earth orbit and having a really vital low earth orbit economy in which NASA is one of many customers.

Nasa Spacex International Space Station ISS Kennedy Space Center Hurley Florida Benjamin Reed Russian Government Richard M Nixon Kazakhstan Nasr Atlantic Ocean Eric Atlanta Rydin Stein President Trump Merritt Island
North Korea fires two projectiles into sea

BBC World Service

00:23 sec | 2 years ago

North Korea fires two projectiles into sea

"South Korea says the north is fired what appeared to be too short range ballistic missiles into the sea off its east coast a report by south Korea's Yonhap news agency citing the country's military joint chiefs of staff says the projectiles were launched from the coastal city of on sun they flew about two hundred and thirty kilometers towards the sea of Japan

South Korea Japan
Living with Your Limiters On

Badass Agile

05:09 min | 2 years ago

Living with Your Limiters On

"Have a contemplation for you do you live life with your limiter on eliminator to me is something that capture output you ever read the manual manual for a new car. When you read in the specs page it always tell us what the top speed is and then in brackets says electronically limited to. Do you like two hundred thirty kilometers an hour or something boring like that. Why would you do that. Why would you have a racehorse under the hood and then cap it to limit the fun. You can have well of course safety legality and all those other things. Come into play when you're dealing with a car but when you're talking about your life why would you WanNa do that now. Here's what's interesting is that this came up because of a conversation. I had with a very senior executive this person's totally visionary totally inspiring totally masterful admire very much but the one thing I noticed is that they still. I do want to ask permission before hitting the go button now. I loved the go button and what I struggled so much to understand. Is that knowing that your failure to leap is one inhibits and hampers innovation and momentum. Why on Earth would you not seek to interest back to identify. I find that behavior and to correct it. Because let's face it. If you have a great idea or something you WanNa do or something you WanNa try one. Just go build it because if you're into into asking for permission rather than asking for permission to start WanNA use spend an hour or ten hours building. Something prototyping something and then bring that to the permission conversation. It's the same conversation if you're accountable to accompany and you WanNa make sure you have the go ahead to spend resources on a certain collective. There's someone need clear that with your having a permission conversation the other way but why don't you think the ten personal hours to create some additional value to create some momentum but most importantly to create something that other people can react to because then if you've created something impactful if if you've created something undeniable. They can't ignore that. It's a lot harder to decline the idea and I say this often if you're working in the kind of place where they frown frown on you for taking some of your own time to build a prototype to endeavor. You are working in the wrong place. They're just not there yet. The mindsets aren't right either. Oh you got change him or you got to change meaning go bring your talents and skills to someone who is ready for them someone who wants them values them the more you you do this agile thing and the more you do this bad ass. Agile thing the more. I think you'll find yourself looking around and recognizing how many people run with their limiters on on cap themselves out two hundred and thirty kilometers an hour when they've got the engineering in their belly to do twice that we're five times out are ten times. That first step is. Make sure it's not you. It's pretty easy to spot. I've said this before. Look for times when you hear yourself saying great excited. Let's do it but I I have to wait until I I have to check with or I I gotTa make sure or want to think about a little longer here we are preaching agility and yet do we practice it. Do we minimize upfront. Planning by sketching things on Napkins by drawing ideas on the Whiteboard so that we can very quickly get to the point of certain enough that it's worth trying that it's a great idea but after you've done that minimum due diligence and I mean minimum shopping. The idea around after that is best done not with words but with product in your hands things you can see touch feel sense experience. This is the most important part if you treat your creative backlog as something when you have to get permission for I guarantee there are other areas of your life. Were you've got limiters on professional development. You're training your career escalation. Your future is an entrepreneur's business. Owner your sales prospects your personal and community achievements all all of those things are subject to a governor or limiter that you yourself imposed. That says I'll be ready when or I must wait until what would you be capable. I love if you took all those limiters off today. How fast could you go. And how much fun could you have. And Yeah sometimes. It's dangerous injuries. And Yeah sometimes it's rule bending but that's the very best kind of fun my friends. I don't know what I find that. Once you've discovered this in applied for yourself yourself you look around your friends your colleagues your peers. And you can't help but want to help them do it to the reality is most won't but if you're purposes to change to heal to help to inspire to ignite you're definitely going to want to try

Senior Executive
20 Minutes With Brian Keane

20 Minute Fitness

07:12 min | 2 years ago

20 Minutes With Brian Keane

"So high Brian. Welcome to the show. Thank you very much for taking the time to speak to me today. How you doing? I'm doing amazing. Thank you so much for having. I'm really looking forward to this conversation. No aures thank you again brought. If you could start off just giving us an introduction to yourself yeah so my name is Brian ranking ranking fitness online. And I'm a former primary. School teacher turned fitness entrepreneur effectively. So to cut a long story short. I was a primary school teacher in London for four years and for two of those years I worked as a personal trainer nighttime walking in a gym with people looking to lose weight get fit or get stronger etc and then it's thousand fourteen. I moved back home him to the west of Ireland where I currently live and set up a one to one personal training business and then over the space of eighteen months two years of living full time at home in order to kind of match the supply and demand because of the amount of people that were coming to me for personal training. I moved my business online and over the last name. Since two thousand fifteen I've been primarily online with the exception of a couple of books books that I rise in the appearances that ideal person in terms of speaking everything else in the fitness ramble. My business is on line. Two programs one a sport specific the other is pure fitness Pacific. Civic and now I just spend my days talking to people like you and working with my online client doing some talks around the world that to kind of communicate with some awesome people. Yeah I've got a pretty awesome lifestyle per minute so long. No definitely greats ahead obviously as well with your podcast. That's another great resource for anyone that wants to find out more about what Bryant Definitely Chatham. We'll talk more about that throughout the podcast. First thing on the touchdown Brian McKnight's obviously you saw your other fitness industry as you said is a PT and did some fitness modeling now use of transitions since doing ultra endurance events. As well what's changed in your own way. You approach your fitness to not to want to make a massive lead so one of the things that I generally always advise people with fitness whether your couch to five K.. An absolute beginner. You've never step foot in the gym or ever done a workout or somebody. That's a near professional athlete or professional professional athletes and their life. If is training you always need to have a goal that you're setting in working towards and I'm the exact same with fitness and in two thousand and end fourteen. I started competing in fitness modeling. Embody I believe so stepping onstage and the end of two thousand fourteen I won a pro card fitness. Molly was basically just means that you can compete for more money and in two thousand and fifteen. I was preparing for the World Championships in Las Vegas and a few months prior to that my daughter was born and I remember having this moment where I was getting ready for a show. I couldn't form sentences in my head. Hey I'm so pleased and just hired all the time I remember thinking I'm going to be terrible dad if I keep doing this man. I made that decision there and then that I would do that show in Las Vegas and I did quite well that I came to the world's in Las Vegas and I decided I was stepping away. I needed to set a new fitness goal. This wasn't going to be my life anymore. It was too all consuming for me and and to be honest Charlie for the next eighteen months. I didn't really do anything in the fitness realm. I kind of trained a few days on and off. I always did something in the gym. High intensity interval training bodyweight workout aesthetics. You don't just Kinda messing around with it. But I didn't really have any serious fitness goals. Now I wrote my first book my first book. The fitness mindset which did really well that was sixteen weeks of the bestseller list on Amazon is an eighth consecutive weeks and wrote that in released in two thousand seventeen and after that point when I came off the back of the success of that book I was starting to get that little bit of a hollow auto feeling again Ronn like mine. I haven't set a goal for myself in ages. I haven't had any fitness school. Because I've been so focused on my business so focused on my family so focused on the book at the time and then I was at this event in Tony Robbins business mastery in Amsterdam and I met a friend who I've met a guy who sits become a close and personal friend totten's name and he ran what he told me about was ultra marathons and I had been from a world of played sports all my life football rugby soccer and I'd never heard of an ultra marathon marathons I like really ignorant the ass of the what an ultra marathon committee and he was like an over her marathon distance and he told me about this race in the Sahara called Maratha Saab which is marathon in the sand. It's six back to back marathons self sufficient through the Sahara desert in the north of Morocco and itself supported to carry all your food on your back to give you water checkpoints but evidence self sufficient. We need to have a venom pump within arms reach at all times so that your in case you get bitten by a snake armor. I'm telling you about this event. He did and I was like that sounds insane and planted the seat and I was like a couple of months later signed up for his having never random marathon having never ran and running when it's unfamiliar with the way I look. I'm fair from built like an marathon runner like I'm short and stock Yemeni harsh really built for Durance and I signed up in August two thousand seventeen and then decided that look. I need to start training for the marathon to solve in April of Twenty eight eighteen so I signed up to my first ever marathon there Dubai marathon in January two thousand eighteen Iran with a backpack in thirty five degrees and Dubai. By and from there on I just kept training in April around those six back to back marathons through the Sahara Avenue kind of got hooked and ultra endurance in February of this year around June thirty kilometers through the Arctic circle which was gold old. And now a minute. I'm currently trading for one hundred mile to marathon in Nevada in February. And so that's kind of a long story you've got a medium not long story. Short story brought to a kind of a medium to where I am. Now in the transition from bodybuilding fitness model into running ultra endurance events. Going to challenge my body in a different way then to be honest charity it. It all comes down just needed a goal to work towards because I train hired otherwise 'em and I recommend that to everybody. Listen it's relative like you don't have to run to the The Arctic for some people. It's just going to the gym twice going for a walk around the block after work. When you know you'll be tired or decided body weight program Monday Wednesday and Friday for the next three months? You know it's completely relative. What for me working towards a goal and not wanting Halloween into combat because? I'm not working any specific fitness goal. modest the distance is your Rhode Island oversee pre yourself in his positions blanket. Imagine it was just incredible when you actually accomplish them. Oh it's different. Especially to be honest. There was a huge difference between the first two between Maryland Assab because when Iran six back to back marathons in the Sahara. I'd never done anything like that before I ever marathon which was on the road in a few months earlier and I wasn't sure sure Charlie until I got to the finish line of the six back to back marathons if I was going to be able to finish like there's so many things that could have gone wrong. I was like I just didn't know the article slightly different. I knew I was going to finish that race. And it's probably a different story for different day but I tore my kidneys. Eighty six kilometers from the end of that race and the High A.. Different completely different relationship with pain. In 'cause I powered through for the eighty kilometers off three months after put I powered through honors. And what you get out of these events for me anyway like you just get this massive of net benefit your confidence grows. You feel like you can attack any obstacle comes your way you get really good at separating like real problems from perceived problems so like even in my everyday life in my business with my daughter with my family like I get very good between separating right. This isn't a rea- problem. This is an inconvenience. This can be fixed verses this is this is a real problem I e. There's something wrong with my daughter. There's something wrong with my mom. There's something wrong with the family. Member and ultra endurance gives me that. Because you're just doing that. On a micro basis. Yeah as I said you don't have to to do ultramarathons crazy events to get that people get it from different areas. But it's definitely something I've got. I've got a massive net benefit as a result of

Sahara Desert Las Vegas Brian Mcknight Charlie Dubai Primary School Teacher School Teacher Ireland Rhode Island Molly Bryant Morocco Iran Durance London Chatham Amazon Maryland Nevada
"thirty kilometers" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"thirty kilometers" Discussed on KCRW

"With the report Adam driver plays a Senate staffer investigating the CIA's post nine eleven tactics revealing evidence of a government cover up net vending and John Hammond now on prime video Charles Schwab Schwab believes in asking questions and being engaged Charles Schwab own your tomorrow learn more at Schwab dot com you're listening to morning edition on KCRW it's six thirty four this is morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep why would someone kill aid workers who were trying to contain Ebola someone did in the Democratic Republic of Congo they killed four people have been working in the eastern part of that African country the violence has led the World Health Organization to withdraw more than one hundred of its workers from the region Dr Margaret Harris is among them she is a spokesperson for the organization and is now in the DRC is city of Goma welcome to the program thank you very much for having me how were the four people killed unfortunately some groups is a guerrilla groups in the area of a place could be a cut to mean decided to attack the WH a basis weight which is used as a base of operations but also camp with the stuff leave so that they can be close as possible to the areas where people need the help and this group came in there and group they overwhelmed police who were guarding the base and killed to drive as and the vaccination and Egypt a lot of other people a separately but around the same time people from the same group we think I we we don't have confirmation exactly who they were attacked listen to full coordinating the operations in an area code nine deny about thirty kilometers away and killed one of the police guarding that particular area do you feel you know why this armed group would attack the WHL there has been a constant narrative that a boulder isn't real and that it's being used as a means of earning money buying elites groups within the society we have worked very very hard and had tremendously UT a and brave communicate is working within communities and we had actually sold that this belief had to bean overcome but with massive unrest in Benny it seems that the groups that attacked basis took the opportunity to attack them at that time do you feel you understand why there would be such a theory about the World Health Organization that you were there some out to profit rather than to help this very complex society in complex area people here have had suffered conflict and suffered enormously from outside this for generations so for thirty kids the people of growing up here on you believing that people who come from outside come to do no good so it does take a lot of if it to a lot of work a lot of listening to persuade people that truly people who come from outside who don't look particularly positive to the local people we do come in jeeps we quite often come with to protection because they have been many killings in many attacks on health workers we've seen three hundred attacks of old complaints we are used to having a jeep starring for instance spot this is the first time we've had an attack on a basis Sir they are not trusting amount sinus and the key to really working here is to build trust it's it's painful to hear you say that you want to build trust but because there's been attacks you bring protection and then your groups seem large and intimidating so I have to ask now that you've had to withdraw World Health Organization people from that region what are the implications for the fight against Ebola we will continue we working out how we can continue to stop Ebola we cannot just walk away and we have not just walked away we have removed people who can continue to work safely to save locations but we have actually gone stuff still in those areas still in nineteen I am so overwhelmed and impressed by the people who've state including the field coordinator there a young woman who's just dedicated her life to health and has stayed there to make sure that all her stuff for protected Dr Margaret Harris of the World Health Organization thanks so much it's been a pleasure talking to you thank you.

CIA Adam Senate thirty kilometers
"thirty kilometers" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"thirty kilometers" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"To withdraw thirty kilometers back now those Kurdish fighters have not done that yet they say that one of the big problems is the Turks are besieging the main town where the conflict has been it's called rests online meantime speaking on CNN's state of the union democratic candidate people to judge questioning the president's arrangement with Turkey he says the U. S. abandonment of the Kurds will affect the US legacy and take some time to correct any place in the world where we need someone to trust us to go out on a limb to fight alongside our troops it's going to be harder and that could last for decades and will make America less safe democratic candidates senator any closure are also criticized the move on state of the union he gets a call from erred in line and what does he do it puts the Kurds out to slaughter he gets a call from Vladimir Putin and what does he do he says that he doesn't believe that Russia invaded our election he gets a call from like someone does from the pharmaceutical companies and he doesn't do anything to take on farm house speaker Nancy Pelosi is leading a congressional delegation to the region this weekend a training accident of the U. S. army's fort Stewart in Georgia turns fatal three members of the army's first armored brigade combat team were killed and three more went to the hospital after a training accident early Sunday morning at fort Stewart outside Savannah Georgia few details have been released other than the incident involved a Bradley fighting vehicles CBS is Jim crow sewer in Chicago studio city officials and striking teachers still trying to reach an agreement for a cuddle mayor Laurie Lightfoot says it appears that Chicago parents will have to keep juggling their work schedules for now my expectation is that we will not be back in class on Monday classes for more than three hundred thousand kids were canceled Thursday and Friday union officials Stacey Davis gates insists teachers are anxious to return our whole point.

"thirty kilometers" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"thirty kilometers" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Hour US forces have begun pulling out of Syria that according to news reports the White House says Turkey will soon invade northern Syria casting uncertainty on the fate of the Kurdish fighters allied with the U. S. here's Ben wedeman Turks have made it clear they want the so called safe zone along the almost four hundred and fifty kilometer border between Syria and Turkey to be thirty kilometers with inside Syria which is basically would encompass a variety of large towns and cities that are currently under the control of the Syrian democratic forces those in the forces I did the United States was closely aligned with in the war against ISIS and the Syrian democratic forces are clearly very unhappy with this move they put out a statement did this morning just a little while ago saying that the United States is not abiding by its commitment with the STF keeping in mind that in the beginning of September the Americans and Turkish forces began to patrol a smaller part of that border and not well within it so certainly this it does represent something of a big trailed by the United States of one of its most important allies in the war against ISIS and it brings into question what art Turkey's intentions we have heard from the Turks that they want to settle as many as two million Syrian refugees currently in Turkey within this part of Syria but we need to keep in mind this is not where those Syrians come from these are Sunni Muslims from western Syria bean resettled potentially no part of Syria that is largely Kurdish so this has serious implications they could certainly destabilize a part of Syria there has been relatively stable now for several years Ben wedeman reporting it's nine passed the lawyer for the first whistle blower who came forward with accusations concerning president trump and his Ukraine interactions is representing a second whistleblower Bob Constantini has that story no one from the trump White House was on the news programs in one Sunday tweet president trump re tweeted a letter sent by the chair of the Senate foreign relations committee to leaders of Australia Italy and Britain urging them to cooperate with Attorney General William Barr as investigation into foreign influence in the twenty sixteen election and on fox news Sunday futures Lindsey Graham announcing he will insist that the whistleblower one or two whatever they come forward under oath testify so the public can judge your credibility if that doesn't happen in the house I will make sure it happens in the Senate was lower one or two is a reference to the attorney for the first intelligence community employee who was alarmed by president trump call the Ukraine's leader announcing officially a second person is joining the complaint and the attorney says a second whistleblower has first hand knowledge of the call president trump doesn't think so twenty word is they're going to the bench in another whistle blower is coming in from the deep state also with secondhand info the object of the president's concerns about corruption former vice president Joe Biden wrote an op ed piece in The Washington Post calling Mr trump wholly unfit to be president facing how subpoenas secretary of state Mike Pompeii who was on the phone call president trump had with Ukraine's boredom is a Lynskey we'll obviously do all the things are required to do by law now the administration is denying all requests and subpoenas until the full house voted for impeachment inquiry Bob Constantini Washington it's eleven after the hour the Supreme Court is back today with a new term the nine justices will face a blockbuster docket if the twenty twenty election campaign hovering in the background John Laurence reports the highest court in the nation as a number of high profile cases on hand this will all happen as an impeachment investigation into president trump takes place across the street and the capitol building tensions are already flair.

Syria US thirty kilometers fifty kilometer
"thirty kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:45 min | 2 years ago

"thirty kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Talk with his intraday in in discussing the book and and we had some thoughts on it and I wanted to run by you so if you think in this collection there just poems about Dick decolonization about colonialism and they exist alongside poems that are about and I don't just exist alongside bursar interwoven with poems about love poems about sex. do you see these two things love three things love sex and indie colonization is having some kind of connection yes of course the very much entangled in a it's knives. so when I first started realizing that one how one approached love and dating an intimate life could have remnants of the way that colonization unfold so we can reproduce political structures in our end and enter personal lives so in later into my into my early twenties it was very much a deliberate project of mine to figure out how not to bring certain kinds of of of understandings into my relationships are not thinking it as the property relation or or or and bringing my sort of political as stances into the into the into the relationship and meeting people whether I'd stuff of that sort just being as ethical and feminists as possible and and and these things were things you were thinking about when you're reading this collection yes I ever wrote part of the book I near the tail during and in in the aftermath of a of a field a tumultuous relationship so of course that would sort of monopolize some of my thoughts and because I think also with love so much of the world is wagered we lose in when so much and so I I wanted to show how that can all stand in as a kind of synecdoche for decolonization accommodation as larger projects just turning and I'm speaking with Billy ray Bellcore is live in the show last year he won the Griffin poetry prize Canada's most prestigious poetry prize he's an egg you got a new collection of poetry called Indian coping mechanisms I'm gonna get you to read something a little bit later on but but first there's a upon the really stuck out to me I guess visually but also structurally at treaty eight can I know I know we're on the radio you can you can you describe tribute for folks who haven't seen it yet of course the treaty is one of the numbered treaties which go from three one two three eleven SO three eight was signed I believe in eighteen ninety eight and my ancestors in northern Alberta signed it's only about twenty thirty kilometers from where my my family lives now and it is one of these central texts for how we understand Canada and its citizens and its relationship to an indigenous people and I wanted to see what would have been if this text which of course was written in English and there was as many scholars have have taught us that there were spaces of mistranslation in misinterpretation between white indigenous people said two interpreters and translators in what ended up in the official document so I was trying to reveal through a racer what some call the spirit and intent of tree which was a bad living together while sharing the land having a more sort of communal worlds as the basis of what then became Canada and so I wanted also to figure out a way. it may mean for this document to live inside a book of poetry so the entire the the entire sort of central parties for date is in the book most of it is a resurgence blackened uhhuh but I thought what would it mean to put this text into people's hands and I think that would treaties they should they should be in people's hands they should they should circulate in public life with a lot more used in the do you they're open access on the government Canada's website so I wanted to sort of add another level of access to that by putting it in a book of poetry and and blocking out in black and all those words the leading to your poem I thought that was yeah maybe the most powerful work in hand the entire thing it was is there something else I I I I do want to ask not about the work right now but about you after you win that Griffin. prize. is it hard to create under those kind of circumstances Hey you think that. so the short answer is no and the longer answer is that because this one is a world is a written at such an early stage of my artistic development that a fellow with a lot of urgency that I had more to say and I had to wait to say differently and it would as we as we just spoke about it stayed eight that what I say also comes about in different forms with in relation to different Texan poetic traditions so I I very much felt that. I felt I felt empowered to to produce more reading okay now aftermath of the way in yeah you never know right you never know what you're gonna write this thing here and here is kinda like my reading your second record you know they're like you know got the thing first thing that really well and what the hell I'm going to do with the second one but I'm glad you can feel that block yeah I think you're I do think there will be a bit more scrutiny. the I feel like that a book that fathers something like a Griffin when I will always be put under the microscope more much more intensely than the first book but I know you're heading to Vancouver you were saying yeah I'll be starting a position in a in creative writing at UBC there in January I feel about being a profs it's. it's pretty surreal I will likely have students think my age or older than me but I I do think that creative writing programs need indigenous faculty and indigenous students will be newer generations of them will be applying to creative writing programs with much more frequency than ever before big part precisely because there are so many more visible indigenous writers working in Canada today so happy to be a part of that so do shift towards the colonizing creative writing programs yeah it's it's it's in it was a lovely collection I I and powerful collection and something that a lot because of his reading most of it there the it the other night and I'm ever as I realize we're on sort of the eve or I guess where currently maybe depending on when you're listening to this in the middle of a federal election if it felt like a good book to be reading around them great you're gonna be room or home yes another excerpt this one is from and the and brothers so some of you may not know that I have a twin brother and we live pretty different lives he's up in northern Alberta I mean I mean can seem to be on the west coast listening right now this will say Hey he's probably not. loosely. so this is called Indian brothers. loneliness find me drunk in an old Billy rebel cord from. it's important is that wherever I am my brothers perched on my right cheek bone we are twenty four an already too old for our own good. last night felt like our last night they always do this is what makes night nightly in an investigation against a literature of treason. that was the publicly rebel court with an excerpt of the poem Indian brothers Billy ray when the Griffin poetry prize in twenty eighteen he's back with a new collection called Indian coping mechanisms that's a talkie again yeah it was a pleasure and I guarantee you this will not be the last time that you come on the show maybe you should face. maybe..

twenty thirty kilometers
"thirty kilometers" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:44 min | 2 years ago

"thirty kilometers" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is Bloomberg opinion on Bloomberg radio bringing you news comments and insights from Bloomberg opinions of worldwide team of editors and columnists I'm David Shipley enough on the show we explore the limits of fed independence in the age of Donald Trump but first earlier this week Russia released new data that appears to show a nuclear reactor was involved in a mysterious explosion that occurred when a weapons test went wrong on August eighth Russia has been cagey with the details of the accident which killed at least five people and triggered a brief radiation spike in the nearby city a detail Russia has flip flopped on the knowledge in limited Brzezinski a columnist for Bloomberg opinion is here to tell us more about rushes game of nuclear strip poker limit thank you for joining me maybe we should start with the time line what what what happened on August eighth one August eighth at a testing ground in Milan oaks even be a hunk of screeching room northern Russia the Russian defense ministry was testing some sort of new device with the help of experts from Los option which is the state corporation in charge of the nuclear program in Russia and something went wrong and soon after that the city authorities Severodvinsk wishes the movie some thirty kilometers from the test site published a news item on their website saying that the radiation level in the city have jumped may soon removed the item but by then it was impossible to hide something was going on you know something's wrong what's happening so the defense ministry issued a press release saying they've been testing something and that liquid fuel missile engine blew up ten days later on on August eighteenth in another bit of information dribbled out yes there was I guess the next book last one in the in the study group all for one summation Saddam the the the nuclear a corporation planes the this liquid fuel missile engine had some sort of a nuclear components generationally canoe clear battery just use from the national the kale some radioactive elements and president trump we to deal with the weapon the US store Russia has been testing and that's the one of the super weapons that president Putin presented in his two thousand eighteen states in the nation address the NATO countries cold sky full it's nuclear powered missile that can stay in the air presumably for days or even weeks has unlimited reach because its nuclear power and is this thinking still serve unanimous that it is sky fall or there are other possibilities there were races old for certain radioactive elements released into the atmosphere that point towards the there being a reactor all just a a nuclear battery form the missile so that points toward either sky full the missile at the trump national street or another wonder weapon announced a platoon two thousand eighteen which is on under water grown cold side on that no one is also supposed to be nuclear power supposed to be equipped with the reactor so we can keep moving for pretty much unlimited length of time comfort inn you know you like in the unfolding of the story to a game of strip poker can you explain that world where all the sleep lady in the strip poker is to remove garments one by one when you lose and that's exactly what the Russian government has been doing they've leaked old information about what exactly happened under a testing ground for a bit first they mentioned that by missile engine blew up when they had missed the some radiation was on hold then it has leaked so that this radiation elements consistent with the presence of a reactor which was in the midst of the four so it's leaking out the way sexually officially on it giving out those bits of information one after another I'm not altogether and that's you know that's what makes it a little bit like a game of strip poker do you think does the metaphor apply more broadly he yes I do the same pattern was seen after the crying man looks facial first illustrated the miles but Russell was involved with them some hands over some old months and then finally a streets of mission from pulled himself it's it's sort of a standard procedural most for the Kremlin these days limit thank you for taking the time to talk that's.

Bloomberg thirty kilometers ten days
"thirty kilometers" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

06:00 min | 2 years ago

"thirty kilometers" Discussed on KGO 810

"So it would take an awful lot of these are a great thing that would be ninety four expect to release the energy from that a large earthquake proof that this really is not the case okay now I want to go back to some of the basics about earthquakes so where we we know that there are plates we know that the plates move that they shipped are they are do they move in different ways I mean do they ever move apart from one another are they moving side by side do they sometimes move where one plate moves a top another plate yes there are different types of earthquakes opening in violence we call them and that can depend on where you're located so far here in the bay area the folks that we see are the one despite the guidelines that we speak Andreas fault where one side slits path the other in other places like off the Pacific Northwest coast we can have what we call center action down and that's when one of the plate in diving down underneath the other one and that kind of area can actually create larger earthquakes for example the Chile earthquake does I think they're really really big earthquake because there's just more of one side in the other side when they split it releases more energy and so the third type of smoking environment is when the plates are spreading apart from each other and that's the three different types of their garments that we see on I made that up that's spreading apart from one in there I did that actually have okay so it does so in here in the bay area I grew up in Hayward that what we always have been told were always good and there was a big movie made about the San Andreas fault that San Andreas is the big one that we have a big one that is likely going to be on the San Andreas fault lately I've been hearing that there's a real concern about the Hayward fault are there faults that we have to be more concerned with than other fall to win the big one happens are we fairly certain which of these false is going to give way unfortunately we really don't know when the next big earthquake is gonna happen aware the next big earthquake is going to happen each earthquakes even happen in places where we didn't even know there was a fault line the only time we can see the evidence of these faults and when there are earthquakes happening along them right sometimes it happens that we have a ball what would you just rector's like for example in and in New Zealand a few years ago there with mark we can you know they don't even know that there was a call where this earthquake happened and so we can always you know be prepared to know that there are three that could happen at any time and any place in the bay area but no we don't you don't know which one and I got next unfortunately can you quantify how much a plate has to move in order to create a really big earthquake like I'm under quite that would do a tremendous amount of damage I would assume in the bay area we're talking about something in excess of US seven would that be what we need to have in order to be certain that there would be a lot of damage and can you quantify how much the plates have to move in order to achieve that level so you could see damage starting I mean even and I can take the pending on where the earthquake is located I mean it for example the rich better make that happen in a fairly remote area there weren't as many people affected the people who did it back obviously it only affected them but there weren't as many people in that area if that many to seven point one earthquake happened directly and early that would have created a lot more damage so partly you know the damages related to where the earthquake happened Kelly to answer your question because the damage from ninety six in a starting their how much movement in the plate to create that I mean is that what determines how big how how what the magnitude of an earthquake is is it determined by how much the the plates are moving yeah it's the area it's beat the rupture area we call it the amount of area that being on the other side right and so for example an average majors that make week might be AT thirty kilometers long on average at bay and with a flick or perhaps one meter and so you know that there's a trade off there between links and let them but that's kind of an average number doesn't seem like very much to create that much havoc does it now I know but you know when the moon when the earth that quickly with one side going past the other side you can create a lot of damage and it says in ways that need to come out from where those that it happened the community a lot of damage so how do you know I mean what's happening weighed down there how how how do you know that the play to slipping and how much they're moving here we are on our network of seismometers that throughout the west coast in the last and we've studied these earthquake happening we can stack them up to a very small earthquakes and so we we just there's a lot of time and then to determine where the third picture happening how big earthquake is happening so at like we're talking about the different types of stalking environment yes right click where they fight each other transaction when it's going down underneath that we can actually tell what type of earthquake it ends by looking at this I think records and enter using these these networks were able to really understand better how the earthquake that happening I I need to take a commercial break but hang with me for a few more minutes one of the things that I want to get to with you is earth quakes you know they've been studied for awhile and I just want to know what's happening what the studies are are revealing you know how much new information there is information that would mean something to me not information that excites scientists necessarily because you guys get excited over things are way over our heads hang out with me and and we will come back and we'll continue our discussion and also let me open up our phone lines to our listeners the telephone numbers eighty eighty eight ten we have doctor Angela Chung joining us he's a project scientist for the Sheikh alert.

thirty kilometers one meter
"thirty kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"thirty kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Right now to the situation in Syria and the north western province of it live yeah this is the last province that's held by Syrian opposition forces it's been under attack by the Syrian military and there's a big humanitarian problem there which is that more than a million refugees from all over Syria live in it lypso hundreds of civilians have been killed in fighting over the past few months right now the government appears close to taking an important town and important opposition town in it in a clip and enters Ruth Sherlock is following this from Beirut hi Ruth okay so people are talking about this town this oppositional town is very important what what is the town and and why it's so crucial here well the town is called Hon she **** and it's close to a highway that links the major city of Aleppo with the capital Damascus and say this is the highway that the Syrian regime wants to take back this also symbolically very important you know this was an area that suffered a chemical attack in two thousand and seventeen that prompted president trump to launch S. strikes on Syria and it's being controlled by the rebels for years so it would be a big boost to the morale of the regime troops to take it back as of now they seem to have made inroads into the town but the fighting is still on going when a and I as I understand you managed to speak to a doctor in one of the hospitals here what what did he tell you and and what did you learn about the the the situation yes Sir in the conversation I'm going to identify him is Dr admit because doctors have been targeted in this war I and you know he you really sense that because he says he's in one of the main remaining hospitals in the province all that sound medical centers on it does because in this house of I'm in no somehow my now destroyed yeah we lost a lot of people because there is no because their face and see some places are you saying that as well as civilians who died because of lack of access to medical care at in the last few months alone since the fighting ready intensified in April he also knows of at least twenty medical staff that have been killed was working in these clinics a lot of them were hit by Asterix uses many of these people were his friends and you know his hospital has now been inundated with casualties in the recent fighting he says more keep coming about ten minutes that a gene get bombed bit one of the town well to thirty kilometers from here and there is some casualties is count ancillary they were coming thanks you can hear the siren that and she has to and the cool well because the an ambulance was was just pulling up at the moment I I would imagine yeah Ruth that the isn't this an area where you said so many people have have actually come to flee fighting elsewhere yeah exactly there's been over million people have been displaced from other parts of Syria that and now in this area and they keep going north against being pushed up against the Turkish border but that borders closed in the promise that there isn't really anybody anywhere else for them to go aid groups to trying to help with the not really able to cope people of staying.

Syria thirty kilometers ten minutes
"thirty kilometers" Discussed on THEMOVE

THEMOVE

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"thirty kilometers" Discussed on THEMOVE

"But, you know, I think the presentation of those two teams, you know, that say they're Stu, Don and a movie star or audio away round then it's going to depend wetter something happens on the climb on the on the second carry climate. So it's, it's about thirty kilometers from the top to finish. Now let's say just. You know, it's a it's a it's a high hype hypothetical assumption. But let's say there's a break away in their stupid movie stars in their enough. Donna and. The, the guys from roughly steam are struggling little bit on the climb, and all of a sudden, which is isolate. It's Llandough tax. Let's say and he gets a gap now logic would say, okay, you know, we're not gonna we're not going to panic and it's still thirty K the go let him go. And then, you know were bring my team back together. And then we'll chase him down, which is normally what any en- leader with Dewi a leader relies on his theme as long as he can, and until he's is elated than than it's up to himself. Now, what we might see is an attack from the peleton of one of those leaders, whatever Lopez or Orlando or cut up us or even gates try to try to get some advantage and then have the one of the writers in the front. Wait for him. And then basically get that help from that teammates. So, so, basically the, the, the intention of having an Astana and a an a movie star rider in the breakaway good. Be not just to try to win the stage but with the idea ready that one of the guys is going to attack. And so it was soon as he gets a gap over the top the guy waits and basically helps him in the valley in on the flat. Now that's interesting, and that some would never have occurred to me. And that's why why think here I think that's we, we may. We may see something that tomorrow. I mean, especially no. Especially knowing these two teams that's that's their that's their favorite strategy. And so if you see multiple astonishes or mutliple movie stars in the in the breakaway, we, we already know what we can expect on the last climb, and the Pelata..

Lopez Don Dewi Astana Donna Orlando Pelata thirty kilometers thirty K
Are there deep global oceans beyond earth?

WSJ The Future of Everything

05:58 min | 3 years ago

Are there deep global oceans beyond earth?

"Have good reason to predict that deep global liquid water oceans exists beyond earth thinking about that think about the role of of our ocean here on earth in our biosphere. Now, imagine an ocean that's ten times as deep as ours and global covered in ice potentially with harder thermal vents, and all sorts of interesting chemistry occurring in it. Could it be inhabited? Could there be life microbial or even larger swimming around in that ocean today? Where there's water there's usually like to find out if life might exist that the edges of our solar system. We've I have to get there, and then somehow access the deep hidden waters of these foreign world, that's where robots and other technologies come in when we design these robotic vehicles to go down to the surface sample the surface and ultimately drill or melt through the shell itself. We need to understand what that kind of upper region of Europe is ice looks like feels like and how it behaves Europa one of Jupiter's moons. Planetary scientists think it could have a massive ocean beneath. It's frozen crust. What's really cool about it? Is that on the outside of that moon has about fifteen to thirty kilometer ice shelves overlaying one hundred kilometer ocean? When we look at Europa, we can see evidence of cracks along the surface. We can see salt deposits in these things we think reflected the chemistry of the ocean below to prepare for such a harsh environment. Scientists are training in a place. Not so far. From home, but every bit as alien and Artika. From the Wall Street Journal. This is the future of everything. I'm Anthony green. And article is the coldest and least habitable place on earth. The Wall Street Journal Daniel Hernandez traveled there to meet a robotics team led by Brittany Schmidt. From the Georgia institute of technology. You have to be on your toes about almost everything. And so it's actually kind of a constant battle to keep on top of what's happening. The environment itself can change very quickly. The internet is slow or non-existent phones. Don't really work down here. You know, there's not the normal creature comforts even the ability to really kind of escape from that. So it changes the way the operate is a person. And so you're monitoring all of those things in addition to you know, highly detailed robotics, Bernice group is prototyping technologies that could one day. Help us pro distant planets and moons for signs of life. We drove out on snowmobiles to a section of sea ice blink bike glacier on one side. And a massive iceberg on the other. Think we're having us welcome. It's pretty beautiful out here accolades. Sure is yes. It's so beautiful this whole thing. Right. It's this side and the other side, so we're going to kind of go around and try to figure out if any of its floating or if the whole thing is grounded, which means it's laying on the seafloor. And then maybe do some fun. Check out of the iceberg because we haven't done that yet. But I wanted to work out here since twenty twelve and it's just the right time to be able to take a vehicle out there. It's performing really, well, we've got a few days left of of not too many cracks in the ice too. Many cracks in the ice make dangerous for them to work in the field. Our main science questions here this. How does the ocean affect the ice and vice versa? It's not very well known even here on the earth. And then when we moved to places like Jupiter Zeman Europa, we don't really know how that whole thing will operate and so by asking these questions here, we get really good at measuring them and thinking about the processes. To do that her team is testing underwater robot high spend, the twelve foot machine is bright yellow and looks like a torpedo is Finn is a hybrid autonomous and remotely operated underwater vehicle or an HR V. And what it's basically doing is measuring the properties of the water column the ice and the sea floor and searching for biological communities as well. This one is also a platform for testing sensors, and technology and science questions for future. Exploration of other planets predominantly were interested in icy moons of two bitter and Saturn in this case. Europa our primary target the grand scheme of the project is to develop this vehicle as something that we would want to send to of Europa and look for life there. So we basically have as small of a vehicle as possible with as much scientific instrumentation on it as we possibly can. I'm Chad Ramey. Grads. Student at the Georgia institute of technology, and I write software for Iceland. While we hear an Antarctica. This is the closest analogue we have to Europa, but we're interested in science. So how is is forming and melting and what does the chemistry of the water looked like and how many dissolved organic matter are in the water, what are the oxygen levels. So we'll be putting the robot in the water for three deployments today. We're really interested in the grounding line. So where the glacier actually departs from the ground and starts floating on the water. And then also we have this massive iceberg that we're going to drive the robot up to and have a look at because I spur are awesome. The grounding line is important because it can impact how stable a glacier is it's one of the places melting occurs. So when are you guys gonna launch? So now, we're getting ready for our first full systems test. We'll go through each of our sensors make sure they're all operating who make sure all of our thrusters are good. And then we'll be ready to go. And we all like to have some pizza before him though. As they're getting ready to put ice fin. In the water was small full in the ice. It's hoisted vertical in a stand and attached to other. Coordinates?

Georgia Institute Of Technolog Jupiter Zeman Europa Wall Street Journal Europe Overlaying Bernice Group Anthony Green Chad Ramey Antarctica Brittany Schmidt Daniel Hernandez Finn Iceland One Hundred Kilometer Thirty Kilometer Twelve Foot One Day
"thirty kilometers" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

The Cycling Podcast

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"thirty kilometers" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

"There's an assumption that it's going to be less selective. I think the opposite. It's going to be true. Because I think the rice is being a little bit some sterile, and it's been neutralized until the last twenty or thirty kilometers in in the past few years in the expectation of those final particularly final two breaking everything up. And I think whenever we say new, and I think this was actually a factor, and I'm still as well. The first couple of dishes the race more aggressive racing because does that uncertainty. People don't know where the is the marks the spot where the rice always decant CIN and comes to life, and that will be the case in the age. I just think that. People will be will be more aggressive. They the rice to more riders. And and you know, who who would previously have been intimidated by that finish. Yeah. That's what there's around fifteen kilometers from the top of the final climb the Cote de LA Rocha fossil to the finish. In liaised. I around about twenty minutes of racing. But it keeps going up a fab it doesn't after the top about national gonna be and but then once you get into the suburbs of Asian. What have you doesn't narrow down? I mean, you could say you could see a small group, which would have some some Ophiuchus better sprinters and others. I mean, when you reading out your list, I don't know what number automates came in or Mike woods specifically..

Cote de LA Rocha Mike woods liaised Asian fifteen kilometers thirty kilometers twenty minutes
"thirty kilometers" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

16:02 min | 3 years ago

"thirty kilometers" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"And welcome back to coast to coast. We're back with Dr Peter pry, we will take calls with Dr prime next hour as we talk about protecting the power grid. Peter. Let's talk about the science behind the EMP's and the sun solar flares. The EMP, of course, electromagnetic pulse when a nation detonates a nuke in the atmosphere. What happens technically, okay? Well, the nuclear weapon, it's actually not detonated in the atmosphere. It's detonated above the atmosphere. Space has to be above an altitude of at least thirty kilometers and. It's not an people think of it as a nuclear attack, but the Russians and Chinese North Koreans neurons. They don't think of it as a nuclear attack. They think of it as a cyber attack or an electromagnetic attack because none of the normal the effects that we're usually associated with nuclear warfare heaven. If you're on the ground standing directly beneath the explosion happening, perhaps one hundred kilometers over your head up in space. You know, you wouldn't hear anything that there'd be no. That'd be no noise from the blast. No shock wave would reach the ground be radioactive fallout. The only thing that would be experienced on the surface of the earth, and by airplanes fly into the atmosphere would be electro magnetic pulse, which is like a super energetic radiowave traveling at the speed of light. And it's got so much energy in it that it will damage electron x across the area at at four hundred kilometer altitude all of North America, most of Canada and a big chunk of Mexico would have an EMP field from one weapon put down on them that would destroy electronics. Takedown power rich destroy communication systems. Cars start lanes would fall out of the sky would fall out of the sky nuclear reactors Fukushima, you'd have a natural gas pipeline explosions because the the skater systems in them the electric controls would spark caused natural gas pipelines explode all kinds of things that we depend upon for existence in our in our electronic civilization would fail and the and the biggest and most serious things would be no food and water. You know, it takes millions of volts to provide water to our cities, and and the grocery stores that were used to buy food from having a food in them for about two to three days at normal consumption rates there resupplied almost every day by these big regional food warehouses. There's only enough food to feed the whole population of the United States three hundred twenty six million people for thirty days, and that would start spoiling immediately because emergency generators might be destroyed. They're gonna run out. Emergency generating capacity and seventy two hours anyway, and that you know, when the temperature controls, no refrigeration, working food begins spoiling, Wyndham chaos. Pales. Yeah. In for example, after Hurricane Katrina when the power grid is down for a protracted period. All the food is is gone and to feed people you've got to bring it in from other states, and we're able to do that. When when when it's a limited a blackout like from hurricane. But when the whole continent is blacked out. That's not going to be a solution. Everybody is in the same boat when that happens, and that's why millions of people could die from starvation disease societal collapse and really our civilization could end. This is one of those existential threat is an overused word these days, but an existential threat threat dangerous if every existence of your civilization, there's very few things that are really existential an asteroid strike in North America an all out nuclear war, some kind of biological war. And and and we can't do much about a lot of those others. But the P there's no really reason for us to be people normal department of defense. For decades for decades has taken steps to protect critical equipment from electromagnetic pulses in that same technology can be applied to civilian infrastructures as the Russians and Chinese did during the Cold War and continue to do. So and in this particular case to the missile could be launched from a small ship. Couldn't it could be lofted from a meteorological balloons that can get up to thirty kilometers off the deck of his ship or a short range missile. You know, the North Koreans actually apparently experimented with during a crisis. The nuclear crisis following their thirty illegal nuclear test back twenty thirteen and they they had a freighter transit the Gulf of Mexico, and you know, it was right in our backyard. And we didn't know until it tried going back to North Korea through the Panama Canal that had to s a to nuclear capable missiles in the hidden under bags of sugar in the whole of the freighter. Now, it didn't have. Nuclear weapons on it. But, but this particular system is designed to take ten kilotonnes warhead, and yes, you could launch a missile system just like that off of a freighter and causing EMP. And we'd never know who did it, you know, because those missiles are very common, and and there's thousands of freighters in our territorial waters. You know, we don't have even good radar coverage facing south over the over the Caribbean. So you can you know up the bad guys could ex- execute a lethal attack against our civilization. We might never know who did it. You can't retaliate. Exactly. The North Koreans have got two satellites orbiting over us the campus three and cameras for that the commission has warned could be nuclear armed pricey MP attack. Now those satellites, you know are travelling at the four hundred kilometer altitude I described earlier the optimum altitude to put any field over all of North America. And the first things that among the first things to get. Streudel ballistic missile early warning radars. And other national technical means of intelligence, the we rely upon to who attacked us, you know, there's hundreds of satellites and low-earth orbit. And if they if they did that did a surprising on P attack by satellite. We might. We might not be able to figure out that it was the North Koreans. It could be we wouldn't necessarily know what was the satellite. It could have been a ballistic missile off off a freighter or something like that. And we would know wouldn't necessarily know what's the North Korean satellite. You know up racist possibility of false flag operations. Everybody knows the North Koreans have got those satellites up there. What if the Iranians decide, you know, to to launch a satellite that does the EMP attack hoping that we will blame the North Koreans. That's right. I mean such scenarios are entirely possible. Absolutely. And then of course, then there's the sun and the X flare solar flare which happened in the eighteen hundreds. It's called the Carrington event. We were fortunate the. Only really electronics. We had during that time period was the telegraph system, and that got fried didn't it. Yes, that's right. And the telegraph systems were basically all over the world at that time in eighteen fifty nine even the there was a transatlantic cable that had just been laid North America and Europe. But there were kept telegraph systems north and South America, India, China where with cloning powers were present. There was a telegraph system and all over the world. That was so powerful basically affected the entire world. And but because civilisation was not electron explanation yet except for the telegraph people didn't depend for their lives on the telegraph system. The thing that's so disturbing about that is telegraphed when you look at them. I've got one here in my office. And I'm looking at now in eighteen fifty nine telegraph key. And this thing is literally about a billion times harder. A billion times with the be harder against PF affects that are modern microelectronics which are much more sensitive much lower levels. And and telegraph keys like this that are billion times. Harder melted. All over telegraph stations. Caught on fires of the telegraph wires. Did some railroad lines cook to the the metal on the the the rails that happened in nineteen twenty one? There was another negative storm. Call. The railroad storm now up again, we we still weren't really electric civilization in one thousand nine hundred eighty one large scale electrification of the country. You know, there were some electric grits around. But but large scale electrification to the point where we were really dependent on. It didn't start happening until the Roosevelt administration in the nineteen thirties. And but the nineteen I believe it was nineteen twenty one railroad storm. Yeah. The the pulse coupled into the railroad tracks and destroyed all the electronic systems associated switching systems signal systems that were so shaded with railroad system in in in North America and took down the electric grits that were there at the time. Now that was that phenomenon was only percent as powerful as the only ineffective North America didn't affect the whole world. Ten percent is powerful as as the eighteen fifteen and Carrington event. But even if that happened not Carrington event, but even if that much. Solar storm happened today. Could end civilization in North America. If we had another such affect us, and we're one of the things the commission was most great about is this naturally MP because it's inevitable. You no one can debate about the North Koreans attackers. So the Chinese and Russians, and I do think that that's an extremely serious possibility exercise it all the time. They could get away with it. You really can't deter it at and we might not be able to tell you it against it. But the natural MP for the sun. I mean, that's a certainty. It will definitely happen. There's no avoiding it. It's just a natural phenomena. It can't be deterred NASA now estimate some. In fact, we were nearly hit by another Carrington class storm that would have affected whole world back in twenty twelve twenty fifth twenty twelve at the chrome Asha checks in the causes. This actually MP crossed the pass of the earth and missed us just by three days. And after that NASA estimated that the likelihood of recurrence of the Charrington class. Shoemaking medic superstorm is twelve percent per decade. And so that very guarantees that within our lifetimes, or at the latest that ever, grandchildren. You know, we're gonna see this phenomenon habit. To get ready for he'd been lucky so far. Yes, we have been lucky for we're all really overdue. You know, we estimated that these things happened once a century in eighteen fifty nine was much more than a century ago by now. So we've been living on borrowed time up to this point, Peter when we talk about protecting the grid technically, what are we talking about? Well, putting in search arresters and blocking devices and Verde cages, which are just basically like metal shorts. So it's all doable. Absolutely. I as an example. You know, the another form of the MP thinks it this way. You know, like a form of natural p to we call it e to the MP, and whatever we're talking about protection whenever you've talked about lightning anymore. That's because society already solved that problem almost everything's protected against like name, even your personal computer. If you if you look at the plug on your personal computer, you'll notice it's kind of fat. That's because there's a surgery restaurant there. That's right. If there's lightening strike on power line, it'll protect your personal computer. It basically breaks the circuit. For a brief moment to stop the lightning from damaging your personal, computer. I used to have a little horse farm years ago in Illinois and on the roof of the house and the barns. We had lightning rods connected with a wire into the ground. So in case lightning ever hit in you know, so wouldn't hit the house, but it would hit the it would hit the rod in power would go right down the wire and then ground right to the ground that was at that's right now. And that that lightning that that's what we call each William P the kind of lightning the kind of pulse that we're afraid of from nuclear weapon. It's called e one EMP, and the the pulse that we're afraid of the sun is called E three EMP and so two middle mid range frequency right between the two of them. And and for the sun to really do it. It has to be an ex flair of a pretty big magnitude. Right. Well to the to threaten any civilization. Yes. Because we do have Choo magnetic storms. Happen. All the time. Sure. You know every year, you know, there was one in nineteen eighty nine called hydro Quebec storm that blacked out half of Canada for ninety seconds, excuse me in ninety seconds. But it only lasted a day. Okay. It wasn't a civilization ender and countries high northern latitudes. And the state of Alaska. Finland Sweden Russia. You know, they get hit with these to make Nick schmaltz you make an extra compared to Carrington event. You know, they're absolutely station. Unders there troublesome, you know. And and they and those countries have usually already protected their grits against the naturally p to the extent of the of the of the kind of phenomenon that they're used to experiencing the most of them except for Russia are prepared for a big big one. You know, the the big, but to answer your original question is what do we do about this? That that solution. That's in the plug of your personal computer that deals with lightning. You know in effect. You're just scaling up that same technology. The surge. Arrester Espy more powerful, right. We've got the equipment. We've got the personnel to do this. Yeah. Yeah. That's that's right. And and how did we get our society protected against lightning? Well, you know, when it comes to designing equipment now, it's just written into the engineering and and books and regulations that, hey, when you build any kind of electronic system, you know, that that that's really important to could feel from lightning. It has to meet certain standards and certain criteria and industry doesn't even think about it. They just build the stuff to that standard. Well, that's what we've gotta do. We've just got to change the standard. So that e one e two and three are all covered and that'll solve the whole problem. And the estimate I heard from Bill forced to couple of years ago was about two billion dollars to fix this. And. Insulate the grid. Is that number still pretty constant? Yes. I that was you know, the commission estimate back in nineteen no excuse me yet. Two thousand eight back in two thousand eight you know, some years later, so, you know, cousin inflation, and like it might have gone up to three or four billion. But yeah. Two to four billion dollars would be enough to protect the electric grid and can the president do this as an executive order. Yes. I think the president can you know, he can direct all the departments and agencies to to protect themselves and those parts of the critical infrastructures that they oversee. So at the department of energy department of homeland security, for example, you know, could, you know, could Andy most importantly, the Federal Energy Regulatory commission, which saying we're going to have these new standards, we're going, and you guys are gonna have to protect the electric grid communication systems because we're so electric these days. Peter, I mean, everything is done this way. Go to a store. You can't go to an ATM. You can't do anything without electron IX anymore. That's right. And if the electron IX are manufactured, we know from from decades of experience in the department of defense that when you design the EMP hardness into a system, it's part of the design before you even.

North America EMP Dr Peter pry MP Mexico NASA Canada North Korea Caribbean United States Hurricane Katrina Panama Canal Dr prime
"thirty kilometers" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

11:57 min | 3 years ago

"thirty kilometers" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"And welcome back to coast to coast. We're back with Dr Peter pry, we will take calls with Dr prime next hours. We talk about protecting the power grid. Peter. Let's talk about the science behind the EMP's and the sun solar flares. The EMP, of course, electromagnetic pulse when a nation detonates a nuke in the atmosphere. What happens technically? Okay. Well, the nuclear weapon is actually not detonated in the atmosphere. It's detonated above the atmosphere. Space has to be above an altitude of at least thirty kilometers and. It's not an people think of it as a nuclear attack, but the Russians and Chinese North Koreans Iranians, they don't think of it as a nuclear attack. They think of it as a cyber attack or an electromagnetic attack because none of the north the effects that we're usually associated with nuclear warfare happen. If you're on the ground standing directly beneath the explosion happening, perhaps a hundred kilometers over your head up in space. You know, you wouldn't hear anything there'd be no. That'd be no noise from the blast. No shock wave would reach the ground. There'd be no radioactive fallout. The only thing that would be experienced on the surface of the earth, and by airplanes fly into the atmosphere would be this electromagnetic pulse, which is like a super energetic radiowave traveling at the speed of light. And it's got so much energy in it that it will look damage electronics across the Utah area at at four hundred kilometer altitude all of North America, most of Canada and a big chunk of Mexico would have an EMP field from one weapon put down on them that would destroy electronics. Take down power grids destroy communication systems. Cars wouldn't start planes would fall out of the sky would fall out of the sky nuclear reactors Fukushima, you'd have a natural gas pipeline explosions because the the skater systems in them the electric controls would spark and caused natural gas pipelines explode all. Kinds of things that we depend upon for existence in our in our electronic civilization would fail and the and the biggest and most serious things would be no food and water. You know, it takes millions of volts to provide water to our cities, and and the grocery stores that we're used to buy food from omen having food in them for about two to three days at normal consumption rates there you supplied almost every day by these big regional food warehouses. There's only enough food to feed the whole population of the United States three hundred and twenty six million people for thirty days, and that would start spoiling immediately because emergency generators might be destroyed. They're going to run out of emergency generating capacity and seventy two hours anyway, and that you know, when window temperature controls over Fitch ration- working food began spoiling Wenda. Adam chaos Cao's? Yeah. In for example, after Hurricane Katrina when the power grid is down for a protracted period. All the food is is gone and to feed people you've got to bring it in from other states. And we're able to do that. It's when when when it's a limited a blackout like from hurricanes, but when the whole continent is blacked out. That's not going to be a solution. Everybody is in the same boat when that happens, and that's why millions of people could die from starvation disease societal collapse, and really our civilization could end this is one of those exit stencil threats is an overused word these days. But an existential threat is a threat dangerous very existence of your civilization. You know, there's very few things that are really existential threat asteroid strike in North America an all out nuclear war, some kind of a biological war. And and EMP, and we can't do much about a lot of those others. But the. MP? There's no really reason for us to be to people. You know department of defense is known for decades for decades has taken steps to protect critical equipment from electromagnetic pulses in that same technology can be applied to civilian infrastructures as the Russians and Chinese did during the Cold War and continue to do. So and in this particular case to the missile could be launched from a small ship. Couldn't it it could be lofted from a meteorological balloon that can get up to thirty kilometers off the deck of his ship or a short range missile. You know, the North Koreans actually apparently experimented with during a crisis. The nuclear crisis following their thirty legal nuclear test back in twenty thirteen and they they had a freighter transit the Gulf of Mexico, and you know, it was right in our backyard. And we didn't know wait till it tried going back to North Korea through the Panama Canal that. Had to s a to nuclear capable missiles in the hidden under bags of sugar in the hall of the freighter now it didn't have nuclear weapons on it. But, but this particular system is designed to take a ten kilotonnes warhead, and yes, you could launch a a missile system just like that off of a freighter and causing EMP. And we'd never know who did it, you know, because those missiles are very common, and and there's thousands of freighters in our territorial waters. You know, we don't have even good radar coverage facing south over the over the Caribbean. So you can you know, the bad guys could ex- execute a lethal attack against our civilization. We might never know who did it. You can't retaliate. Exactly. The North Koreans have got two satellites orbiting over us the cameras three and cameras for that the commission has warned could be nuclear-armed pricey MP attack. Now, those satellites, you know are travelling at the four hundred kilometers altitude I described earlier the optimum altitude to put any EMT field overall North America, and the first things that among the first things to get destroyed or ballistic missile early warning radars and other national technical means of intelligence, the we rely upon to figure out well who attacked us, you know, there's hundreds of satellites and low-earth orbit. And if they if they did that and did a surprising attack by satellite. We might. We might not be able to figure out that it was. North koreans. It could be. We wouldn't necessarily know what was a satellite. It could have been a ballistic missile off off a freighter or something like that. And we would know wouldn't necessarily know what's the North Korean satellite. You know end up racist possibility of false flag operations. Everybody knows the North Koreans have got those satellites up there. What if the Iranians decide, you know to launch a satellite that does the EMP attack hoping that we will blame the North Koreans. That's right. I mean such scenarios are entirely possible. Absolutely. And then of course, then there's the sun and the X flare solar flare which happened in the eighteen hundreds. It's called the Carrington event. We were fortunate. The only really electronics. We had during that time period was the telegraph system in that got fried didn't it. Yes, that's right. And the telegraph systems were basically all over the world at that time in eighteen fifty nine even the there was a transatlantic cable that had just been laid, you know, North America and Europe. But there were cut telegraph systems in north and South America, India. China with cloning powers were present. There was a telegraph system and all over the world, you know, that was so powerful basically affected the entire world. And because civilisation was not an electron explanation yet except for the telegraph. But people didn't depend for their lives on the telegraph system. The thing that's so disturbing about that is telegraph when you look at them, I've got one here in my office. And I'm looking at now in eighteen fifty nine telegraph key. And this thing is literally about a billion times harder. A billion times with a be harder against 'em affects our modern microelectronics, which are much more sensitive much lower levels. And and telegraph keys like this that are billion times harder melted. All over the world. Telegraph stations caught on fires of the telegraph wires. Then some railroad lines cook to the the metal on the the the. Rails that happened in nineteen twenty one. There was another negative storm called the railroad storm now up again, we we were really an electric civilization in nineteen ninety one large scale electrification of the country. You know, there were some electric grits around. But but large scale electrification to the point where we were really dependent on. It didn't start happening until the Roosevelt administration in the nineteen thirties. But the one thousand nine hundred twenty one railroad storm. Yeah. The the pulse coupled into the railroad tracks and destroyed all electronic systems associated switching systems, the signal systems that were so shaded with railroad system in in in North America and took down the electric grid that were there at the time. Now that was that phenomenon was only percent as powerful as the only ineffective North America didn't affect the whole world. Ten percent is powerful as as the eighteen fifteen on Carrington event. But even if that happened not a Carrington event, but even if that much smaller storm happened today it could end civilization in North America. If we had another such affect us. And that's what we're one of the things the commission was most worried about is this naturally MP because it's inevitable. You no one can debate about what the North Koreans attacker. So the Chinese and Russians, and I do think that that's an extremely serious possibility. Because they exercise it all the time. They could get away with it, you really can't deterrent at. And we might not be able to tell you it against it. But the natural MP for the sun. I mean, that's a certainty. It will definitely happen. There's no waiting it. It's just an actual phenomenon. It can't be deterred national estimates. In fact, we were nearly hit by another Carrington class storm that would have affected the whole world back in twenty twelve twenty fifth twenty twelve at the Kroll, national the causes. This actually crossed the path of the earth and missed us just by three days. And after that NASA estimated that the likelihood of recurrence of the current in class. Shumate Nick superstorm is twelve percent per decade. And so that very guarantees that within our lifetimes worth the latest data for grandchildren. You know, we're gonna see this phenomenon habit. So we need to get ready for he'd been lucky so far. Yes, we have been lucky for we're really overdue. You know, we estimated that these things happen once a century in eighteen fifty nine was much more than a century ago by now so we've been living on borrowed time up to this point. I'm Peter when we talk about protecting the grid, technically. What are we talking about? Well, putting in search arresters and blocking devices and thirty cages which are just basically like metal. So it's all doable. Absolutely. I as an example. You know, the another form of the MP thinks that this way. You know is a form of natural get p to we call E to MP, and whatever we're talking about P protection, we talked about lightning anymore. That's because we use a society already solved that problem almost everything's protected against lightning, even your personal computer. If you if you look at the plug on your personal computer, you'll notice it's kind of fat. Let's because there's a surge arrester at there. That's right. If there's lightening strike on the power line, it'll protect.

North America EMP MP North Korea Dr Peter pry Mexico Caribbean United States Dr prime South America Hurricane Katrina Panama Canal Adam chaos Cao Roosevelt administration
"thirty kilometers" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"thirty kilometers" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Any orders contoss. Now, just about thirty kilometers from the data and just a woman in Kerry, Dan. That's one of the doctors has to say. Seventy eighty hundred twenty cases before. Hey is a day now is like five thirty and what did he injuries now? Gunshot in the lower stomach chess the area of the bodies. When do you see the day went there won't be boring? You're coming to your clinic. I'd say the free. I would say that day maybe as long as the holidays is still they're gonna keep sending people here seized while the these are in control of data. Talk about of course of the data was stay like, this will never end getting the new peace deal will work and we'll bring peace. This is like ambassabor. This is the seventh of possible way. There's no way do you have a country, and it is involved with their militia grow their mortgage, just like to make like disturbing and the bees or security in the country. So there has to be a military solution must be controlled all by military's extraordinary. Here we are at a few hospital and even receiving something like seventy patients a day from this war. But yet the all say the only way ten this war is by more war. That report from our chief.

Kerry thirty kilometers
"thirty kilometers" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"thirty kilometers" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Be your climatologists director of a seasonal forecasting for a e are joining us. Just a I thought we go right to the BBC because even though they're not smarter than the us. The Brits with the English accent? They do sound smarter, sir. Doc, thanks for joining us. This by the way, it's not Mr. Cohen. I can't remember his name. But he's from the BBC. So it's gotta be. It's gotta be good, sir. What exactly is a polar vortex? The polar vortex. Sounds dramatic sounds very cold. It does sound cold. What is it though? Let's address first of all what the polar vortex is. It's normally recognized as a huge chunk of atmosphere frigid atmosphere rotating around thirty kilometers above head in the stratosphere it spins because all planet spins and it's called the polar vortex because it sits over the polar region. It's as simple as that cat him follow all of that. But let's move through this. So it seems to be happening quite often. Nowadays, why quite often what happens with this polar vortex. The way of spins is reflected a little bit lower down in the the atmosphere. Now, the polar vortex ten could you find some English music? I don't care what you stones. The Beatles or something English is to run under him to hold my interest back to you, sir to work in harmony with a well-known friend the jet stream and the Jetstream often meanders underneath the polar vortex occasionally this meandering Jetstream digs so far south of fire. At will Tyler actually breaks off entraps a blob of spinning cold polar air, you can think of it was like. Like an egg yolk wobbling there on its own and the smaller vortices of polar air can bring some really.

Mr. Cohen BBC director Beatles Tyler thirty kilometers
"thirty kilometers" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

The Cycling Podcast

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"thirty kilometers" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

"She gives such considered opinions on things I find a really interesting talking about the debate over at around the woman's par core, and whether it's tough enough, whether it needs to be tougher whether needs to mirror, the man's reacing more. And it was interesting to hear her saying that she thinks it's about right railway because I always think whenever race courses are nine. And we've had this debate ourselves a lot on the second podcast Femina. There is a gut instinct and a an instinctive reaction among some quarters to compla- and immediately if the climbing in particular doesn't exactly mirror the man's Raya saying, and you know, we often hear from inside the Paladin that actually the women themselves think they need that. They don't need it to make it will. They don't need it to make it a good risk. But also that it could be detrimental to the same. And we had this question at the world. In this year if the woman's race had murdered the man's race. I just don't think as it was it was it was killed thirty kilometers to go. Anyway, would it have changed things if they hunt to wait on the final climb possibly, but we just don't have the strength and depth in women's Raya saying necessarily for the same kinds of routes that we've got an demands. And that doesn't mean that it's no good enough. Just means you've got to create a sport that caters four and showcases the best of on offer at the minute. I mean, I think with the puck who argument I think that the issue be the same type of rider that wins the women's race as wins the men's race. I think a lot of the time in in the women's races. The not quite so I always think about the tool Flanders we've had a few years. We've had so many people coming to the line at the same time. Diminished pack coming to the line etcetera. You never see that in the men's race. Because it is it's difficult enough that it's always kind of one person come to the line or two up sprint. So in that way. I think that we do need to keep that balance that it has to be the same thing should be more women's order. I mean, I mean that was it changes gates year to year changes on leasing depend on how people decide to tackle the rice. And what tactics they use? And which is there. But I think with like the when Curren Rivera not saying anything against away from Korean, of course, when she won. I mean, there was a huge amount of riders coming into that long finishing stray. And then it was just a a sprint like you might get give him say. And then for me that kind of lost the character of what it is to win Flanders..

Flanders Raya Curren Rivera thirty kilometers
"thirty kilometers" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"thirty kilometers" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Or the sufficiency of the moisture that's there, and the dynamics that you're sort of implying from the structure of those bands. And so often some the largest no falls as you just described are associated with these nearly stationary bands of moderate to heavy. Tation that can dump a significant amount of snow, and I think the issue is where to those bands set up, right? And you don't really know that at least in my experience it's often until the just before the sedation about to start or once it started. How things eventually a land. It could be a difference of twenty five or fifty miles. That's the difference between dry ground and shovel snow. Yes. That's exactly right. Why don't we know? Those bands are set up say a couple of days in advance. What's what's the issue there? Well, part of it's the these bans are in some cases associated with dynamical processes like front. Genesis the formation of these intense thermal gradients and models have inherently have errors both in their initial conditions as well as in the models themselves. There's and as you project data Ford and time and a forecast model getting precisely where that band is going to set up. It's a challenge these models or resolving things maybe now down to the sub ten kilometer scale. But these vans are probably about thirty kilometers. And so you could be just a couple. Grid points off the all the difference. Yeah. And as Michael alluded to earlier, I think it's a to get a really heavy snow or lack thereof is a result of a confluence of a number of different circumstances. That are some I independent of each other. They're not entirely independent of each other semi independent of each other. And so the analogy I always have in my mind is if you want to really nail down the exact timing and well in advance and position of snow band and a heavy snow storm. It's like making a combination shot on the pool table balls. The cue ball hitting five different balls before the object ball and the chances of making that shot except for somebody like, Greg very low. Yeah. So so you're saying the tiny little differences that are within the scope of error at the initial time are going to lead to widely different outcomes. And so we just don't know which one's going to be the right one. That's I think that's right in America weather, predictions, inherently a non linear dynamical system problem. Not to get too geeky abounded geeky. Let's got the sense that you know, these in those. Context that the forecasts are very are very sensitive to the initial condition. So there's like difference initial conditions. Their state dependent right? There's not the they're not white noise. So to speak. So let's talk about some forecast. Mrs like, for example, I'm thinking of the couple of come to mind like New York last month where I remember.

Ford New York Greg Michael America thirty kilometers ten kilometer
"thirty kilometers" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"thirty kilometers" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"In order to protect pedestrians and to give an acoustic feedback to the drivers governments around the world have introduced several regulations, which Peres -cribe the presence of a sound for electric vehicles in particular, very choir. Minimum sound levels at specific frequency bands up to the speed of thirty kilometers per hour. Besides the speed. The natural noise of the car is considered a sufficient. This regulation have generated different reaction among those favor. Sounds and those feared the presence of too much noise in the city. However, I don't see it as the noise of the car. I rather see it as the voice of the car. And this is one of my biggest challenge and privilege at the same time. I designed the voice of electric cards. We all know how it combustion engine sounds like. And we do actually also know our an electric engine sounds like think of the electric tramway as soon as it moves it creates this ascending high frequency pitch sound, which we called whistling sound. I'll have a if we would just simplify this sound we would still not be able to fulfil the legal requirements. That's also why we need to compose new sound. So how do we go after it? In many city. The traffic is already very chaotic, and we don't need more cows. But the streets of the twenty first century are great case study teaming with transients cross proposes and disarray, and this landscape offers a great opportunity for developing new solution on how to reduce this cows..

Peres thirty kilometers per hour
NAFTA, Principal Investigator And NASA discussed on BBC World Service

BBC World Service

01:01 min | 3 years ago

NAFTA, Principal Investigator And NASA discussed on BBC World Service

"It will be fifty years in two thousand nineteen since NAFTA. I London a human on the moon, and it will be a big year for space travel, China and India sending their own probes to the main while the US space agency is boldly going where no mission has been before on New Year's Eve and New Year's day. Twenty one thousand nine hundred NASA's new horizons space probe will explore the farthest world's ever explored in history. Allenstein is the principal investigator for the new horizons mission launched more than a decade ago. It will bring in the new year by sweeping past thirty kilometer white object that's been named ultimate so this fly by takes place six billion kilometers from the sun. It's very empty out there. We had to fly a billion miles beyond Pluto to target ultimate it's pure exploration. Pure science and pure exploration. We're trying to understand the origin of the planets and the object that we're gonna fly by is a frozen pine capsule from the era of the birth. Of our planets, although the risk of global spread is.

Nafta Principal Investigator Nasa United States London Allenstein China India Six Billion Kilometers Thirty Kilometer Fifty Years
Solit- Crater, Mr. Mcgregor And Sudbury Basin discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

01:20 min | 3 years ago

Solit- Crater, Mr. Mcgregor And Sudbury Basin discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"The earth is covered in scars evidence of violent collisions with space-borne debris like the chicks solit- crater in Mexico formed when a fifteen kilometer wide asteroid hit so hard it wiped out the dinosaurs. Or the Sudbury basin a one hundred and thirty kilometer wide crater caused by impact one point eight million years ago or the famous meteor crater in Arizona, which is small just a kilometer in diameter, but is a major tourist attraction. Well this week researchers announced they found a new scar. And it's a biggie. A thirty one kilometer wide crater bigger than the city of Paris. That's among the largest impact craters on earth. It was likely caused when a kilometer wide iron meteorites smashed into our planet, and it was found in an unexpected place underneath an ice sheet in Greenland and their investigations also revealed that this crater was. Relatively speaking pretty fresh. It was discovered by an international team that included NASA glaciologist Jo McGregor an expert in studying ice sheets and what lies beneath them. We caught him in Shwe Argentina as he's about to fly a research mission over Antarctica, Mr. McGregor. Welcome to quirks and quarks. Thank you very much. Glad.

Solit- Crater Mr. Mcgregor Sudbury Basin Shwe Argentina Paris Nasa Mexico Greenland Arizona Antarctica Thirty One Kilometer Eight Million Years Fifteen Kilometer Thirty Kilometer
Super Typhoon Mangkhut: Alerts issued as huge storm nears Philippines

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

00:20 sec | 4 years ago

Super Typhoon Mangkhut: Alerts issued as huge storm nears Philippines

"A super typhoon is bringing in the western Pacific, threatening the Philippines and Taiwan before heading to Hong Kong and southern China man coot is forecast to bring winds gusting up to two hundred and thirty kilometers per hour with heavy rain and storm surges it will be the strongest storm to hit the Philippines. So far this year. It's threatening rice and corn harvests and pushing up

United States Bloomberg Kennedy Hurricane Florence North Carolina Dr Brent Russia Managing Editor Philippines WTI Gulf Twitter Mexico Taiwan Mongolia Pork Farms Hong Kong
Samsung Galaxy S10 Plus could get blazing-fast 5G, says report

Geek News Central

02:26 min | 4 years ago

Samsung Galaxy S10 Plus could get blazing-fast 5G, says report

Twitter Kim Commando Samsung Facebook Europe Goodwin Lased Amazon Five G Thirty Seven Thirty Eight Doll Ninety Nine Percent Thirty Kilometers Fifty Percent Twenty-Second
WHO warns of new Yemen cholera surge, asks for ceasefire to vaccinate

BBC Newshour

04:08 min | 4 years ago

WHO warns of new Yemen cholera surge, asks for ceasefire to vaccinate

"Huge plus Schalken rage for the South Korean women secretly filmed in changing rooms couple for one. When I first saw the chat room, I was a social. My mind went blank, and I started crying and the March of the fall. Armyworm continues its reached India and could cause havoc. I, the news. BBC news McDonald Hulo there's been confusion in. Zimbabwe is the main opposition party the, MDC tried to hold. A news conference to, give an account of forty calls the rigging of the. Election results riot police at first tried to break. Up, the event Police said said to have climbed down and let the meeting go ahead the MDC, leader Nelson Chamisa says he has evidence of electoral malpractice the largest independent election. Observer mission in Zimbabwe. Says the official presidential poll results broadly tally with its. Own findings it's greed with the electoral board that the incumbent Emmerson Mnangagwa won the most votes although it couldn't definitely. Confirm whether or not there should have been a runoff As many as twenty people are feared dead in a suicide attack on a mosque in eastern Afghanistan it's unclear who carried out the attack over the Islamic state group has targeted the Shia minority in, the past sure Sharifi reports from Kabul up to five hundred people had gathered to attend the Friday prayer. Congregation that Hajra has sun shade mouse in the. Provincial capital Gardez Abdullah Ashrat packed your provincial spokesperson told the BBC as the people were leaving two attackers wearing burqas managed. To enter the mosque, and immediately started shooting at worshippers and I witnessed all the BBC one attacker. Was shot dead by mosque security but the other managed to get. Inside the mosque itself where worshippers had taken, the future from the shooting detonating explosives killing and wounding many including. Some children the UN is condemned an era attack on a hospital in the Yemeni, port of data which killed numerous civilians on Thursday the Saudi led coalition which Is fighting who he rebels in, Yemen has denied any involvement in the incident adding that none of its aircraft in the vicinity at the time of the attack imaging folks reports l. thorough hospital is Yemen's largest and one of the country's few functioning cholera treatment centres on Thursday it and the streets around it were hit the UN says, aid workers on the ground have confirmed multiple deaths and injuries as the fight for control of Hudeda intensifies. Cholera cases are rising again and the World Health. Organization is warning that Yemen could be on the brink of a new cholera epidemic it has called for a ceasefire to, allow vaccinations to take, place The World Health. Organization says the, current outbreak of A Bola, in eastern Congo began with the death of a sixty five year old woman. In manga hospital about thirty, kilometers from the city of Benny the WHO says seven members of our immediate family also died the UN. Healthy agency says there are also several cases in neighboring Tunari crossings World news from the BBC. This is WNYC in New York I'm Richard Hake governor Cuomo is pledging to introduce legislation that would remove the death penalty from, state law the democrat, made the announcement after pope Francis decreed the death penalty unacceptable under all circumstances New York's highest court ruled capital punishment unconstitutional in two thousand four but the law is still on the books WNYC. Is conducted an, unofficial survey of what Williamsburg residents. Think about a. Series of council bills to regulate, hit ride hailing services like Uber and lift and the results are not positive with locals facing, next year's, l. train shut down most riposte to the year long cap on the number of vehicles in. The city Williamsburg resident at Uber user Tom wild says the city should be expanding options not limiting them the city needs to be encouraging.

BBC Zimbabwe Yemen MDC UN Cholera Williamsburg Nelson Chamisa Emmerson Mnangagwa Wnyc Gardez Abdullah Ashrat World Health Armyworm Afghanistan Kabul Congo Mcdonald Hulo Tom Wild Tunari Crossings
Eritrea's leader visits Ethiopia as dramatic thaw continues

BBC World Service

04:14 min | 4 years ago

Eritrea's leader visits Ethiopia as dramatic thaw continues

"Now the world news this is abc news kelly the head of the colombian former rebel group the faulk has asked for forgiveness for the kidnappings carried out by the group and the pain and suffering inflicted on many families rodriguez london also known as timoshchenko was attending the first hearing of a special tribunal that will try crimes allegedly committed during the country's fivedecade civil war nncholas russia reports three former rebel leaders have attended the first hearing friday while a fourth took part via video conference from prison they're required to provide details on the alleged kidnappings enforced disappearances between one thousand nine hundred and twenty twelve the fall top commander donyo also known estimate shaneco ask for forgiveness for the pain and suffering inflicted on many families relatives of the victims say they hope the tribunal will bring to light where the remains of some of those who were kidnapped and murdered can be found that has been more violence in nicaragua after a twenty four our national strike on friday to demand the resignation of president daniel ortega a group of about one hundred and fifty students was trapped inside the church of the main university in managua along with priests and journalists after coming under attack from paramilitary groups sympathetic to the government and the opposition stronghold of messiah thirty kilometers to the south there reports of two deaths jairo gonzalez is a civil servant everything that is happening now with the strike is a way to put pressure on the government for response to the problems in through the economic crisis in the country i think this is a form of expression for the people so as to get out of this crisis the local government in pakistan southwestern province of baluchistan is observing a day of mourning for more than one hundred and twenty people killed in a suicide bomb attack at an election rally on friday the bbc's kunda karmani says the attacks race security questions ahead of elections across pakistan later this month in two thousand thirteen in the election that was taking place then a number of political parties simply weren't able to campaign at all because of the threat of militant violence many people had thought that the security situation had improved since then and in many ways it has but these attacks are really a a reminder of the of the threat that militants can still pose and buckets on this latest attack was claimed by these slummy state group which has a small but it seems growing presence in the country the president of eric traer s yes work is due to visit ethiopia late today the latest diplomat move towards reconciliation between the two countries after years of conflict which left tens of thousands dead last week ethiopia's prime minister visited eritrea where the two leaders declared a formal end to a state of war world news from the bbc the twelfth poise rescued from a flooded cave complex in northern thailand are expected to be released from hospital next thursday thailand's health minister told reporters that the boys and their families needed to be prepared for the media attention they'll receive when they come out the boys and their coach or recovering physically and mentally from their harrowing underground ordeal and the dramatic rescue in west belfast northern ireland an explosive devices being thrown at the home of gerry adams the former leader of the xinfei republican party no almost hurt here's chris page xinfeng has said gerry adams's grandchildren were in the driveway of his house minutes before the attack mr adams has tweeted all well here new one hurt he's thank the neighborhood watch and party colleagues who he said kim very quickly and other explosive device was thrown at the home of a close ally of mr adams bobby story is a former ira prisoner and a senior shin and activists the party has suggested the attacks were carried out by dissident republicans you're opposed to the peace process and said there the desperate acts of increasingly desperate and the relevant groups meanwhile hundreds of people have rallied in.

ABC Thirty Kilometers Fivedecade