35 Burst results for "Thirty Forty Years"

Pause and Prioritize with Purpose with Andrea Goeglein

The KTS Success Factor (a Podcast for Women)

05:07 min | 4 d ago

Pause and Prioritize with Purpose with Andrea Goeglein

"Guest today is dr andrea gig. Line she altered the truth of her age and got a job at a wall street brokerage firm at age fourteen and by twenty four. She opened her first operating business. A haagen dazs ice cream store in reno nevada many businesses and a phd in organizational psychology. Later she felt she had experienced enough stress and anxiety to be an expert. Today she is a success. Catalyst and is known as dr success. Andrea is founder. chur raider an author of the don't die self-development collection of books. Her latest book is don't die waiting to be brave as an expert in applied positive psychology. She is your success. Sharp up guiding you as you climb the mountain of success welcome andrea. I'm delighted to have you sir. Thank you so much as a pleasure to be here so as you know this. Podcast is geared primarily towards senior executive females. So what is the biggest challenge you help them. Face in business today and what might be some symptoms of that problem. You know. it's very interesting because the word today is what stuck out in that sentence for me because this moment in time has given us the most unique perspective of what is really important. So had we had this conversation eight or nine months ago i would very easily said prioritizing female executives have been challenged threw out the last ten twenty thirty forty years. We've continued to move up. The corporate ranks more opportunities have opened up with. How do i prioritize the various communities of concern in my life. My family my personal health. My employees. How do i do that today. I will say that that is on steroids. That prioritizing is still the number one what the view to which they look at it changed very distinctly and the most sustainable way that i can give it to you is that they are looking through the lens of life and business priorities through the three. C's compassion collaboration and cooperation Very interesting and how do you see that. Manifesting well as people who raise and want to be successful Honestly in my work it goes across male female. It really doesn't matter what we have traditionally done and what our traditional system had taught us to do was in fact being the best problem solver on the face of the earth and we internalize that as meaning. I have to know the answers. I have to formulate the solutions by myself so that i look like the leader and through the eighties and nineties. Free began to put cracks in that myth. I want you to know right. Now we've been given just dynamite. It has blown up that we realize that the problems were so great. How do you handle a medical emergency global pandemic. when in fact you've got your own family to worry about and the business that you're running or the the organizations that you're involved in at all different levels. It is really a different moment in time where we are moving away from. We have been forced to stop thinking. We can do everything on loan. In fact we are now facing the reality that it is never best to do it alone but in fact compassionate collaboration and really cooperating with others will get to the best solutions. So does that feed into my next question by what the biggest mistakes for clients. Make before working with you. Well i'll give it to you in a short way. They wait too long. We have this tendency of waiting till the pain is so great and there is a spiritual adviser who uses a term that i love that pain pushes until the vision holes. Well now we aren't waiting as long and that doesn't mean that we're reaching out for the type of help that i do with my clients necessarily because we have so many immediate concerns but we are definitely looking to others for advice and seeing what's working in their environments in their communities of concern

Dr Andrea Gig Haagen Dazs Ice Cream Store Reno Andrea Nevada
'Shameful': US virus deaths top 400K as Trump leaves office

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 5 d ago

'Shameful': US virus deaths top 400K as Trump leaves office

"Johns Hopkins University says the U. S. death toll from the corona virus has eclipsed four hundred thousand it absolutely didn't have to be that way Dr mark Roberts of the university of Pittsburgh graduate school of public health we are population and absolutely the worst developed nation in handling the crisis but Robert is optimistic with the new administration coming in especially when it comes to getting vaccines into the arms of Americans Biden's plan to hire a hundred thousand public health workers is you know thirty forty years too late but it's the right direction the right thing to do the nation reach the four hundred thousand milestone in just under a year the first known deaths from the virus in the U. S. were in early February of last year I'm surely employer

Dr Mark Roberts University Of Pittsburgh Gradu Johns Hopkins University Biden Robert U.
Interview With Dr. Jason Fung

The Ultimate Health Podcast

05:06 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Dr. Jason Fung

"Jason. Welcome back to the podcast. It's great to have you on paul. Thanks for having great to be here. We're gonna have a great discussion today. I really loved the new book. The cancer code. And i gotta admit when i dug into the book. It was really what i expected. I was thinking would be more along the lines of fasting. How that could help prevent maybe treat cancer given your background fasting but it was so much more than that. I mean that would have been a great book but this goes really deep into cancer and the evolution of our thinking of cancer over so many years so congrats. I really enjoyed this. Oh thank you very much. And i think that's sort of when i started looking at the issue of cancer. That was sort of how i got into it. Which is why you know most people. I would think think it's going to be about all about sort of fasting and nutrition and cancer but as done sort of deeper into the topic of cancer. There's just so much else going on because clearly cancer is a much more. Broad problem than just attrition because we know things like smoking for example has nothing to do with nutrition. What you eat if you smoke your risk of cancer just goes way way up saying with the best for example. You've exposed as fast as it doesn't really matter what you eat. You're you're great risk of developing a museum which is the type of lung cancer. So that's sort of while it was sort of how got into it as it developed as looking through it more became More and more the question which is never really answered. I think that is really important. Is the sort of how we think about what this problem really is. That is what is cancer. And that's i think one of the greatest remaining medical mysteries because most of these other diseases that we face we sort of know what's causing that. So even when we get a new virus like poof nineteen for example within a few months. We've got this virus like look you know it's still kicking our bod but we've sequenced. We figured it out. It's this is the virus. This is the sequence you know. The dna sequence. This is how it gets in. We've said okay it's the ace two receptors. You know you get at the site of storms. We know so much about it. Even within six months of this sort of brand new disease coming up which has greatest fascinating. Yeah something like hiv. For example it took us years to figure out the actual virus going from age hiv to sort of treatment whereas now you know thirty forty years down the line. We figured out what this virus looks like. We figured out know where detaches we figure so much. Stop so quickly but the problem is that with cancer. What is this disease. Such a strange disease because it's a common disease. It's the second biggest killer of americans yet. If you were to ask the question of what is this disease. People have no idea. Most experts have no idea like you ask the american cancer society and it says well. It's a disease of genetic mutations and that's not really correct because if it was simply a matter of genetics that is You know just bad luck genetically then. Why does environment play such a huge role in this genetic disease. That is if you have a disease. Such as cystic fibrosis sickle cell anemia. All these genetic diseases they passed on sort of mother to child or they have a significantly higher risk in we can identify the genes that are associated with it on the other hand. It doesn't matter if you're japanese if you're african if occasion If you smoke you're much more likely to get lung cancer. So it's not a genetic disease in that sense yet. People have been saying it's genetic disease donate disease and the problem with that. Is that if you don't understand what causes it. Your research sort of goes in the wrong direction that is looking for these genetic mutations and they progress in cancer has really slowed to a halt. Like if you think about how many genetic sort of tours for cancer we have. It's very very few the number of medications that makes a difference to cancer. You can count on one hand in most of those were developed in the early part of the sort of late nineties early two thousands rates with that was twenty years ago and whereas all these great genetic cures for cancer. We just don't see them in because it's not nearly a genetic disease and we have to sort of understand further and this is this is really an exploration of how the way we think about cancer has changed over the last little bit because there's been a huge paradigm shift from being a genetic disease tomorrow logical evolutionary disease which has huge implications for treatment.

Cancer Lung Cancer Jason Cystic Fibrosis Sickle Cell An Paul American Cancer Society
Hiring A Players

voiceFirst careers

05:32 min | 6 months ago

Hiring A Players

"Why do I say voice I space? What does that mean? K. Have. You heard this in called Alexa or Siri or Bixby? These are what some would say. Artificial intelligence devices to help you do a better job of whatever it is you WANNA do. And so if you create voice skills, let's say for Alexa which has over one hundred million devices out there. then. We say you're working in the voice first base. And so, if you're a hiring manager and you're trying to hire talent inada arena arenas. Yes in some regards, it's twenty thirty forty years old, but really. From a acceptance perspective. From demand if you will. It's only three or four years old. So. Had Laugh I saw job posts the other day. They were looking for. Can't remember exactly. WHAT THE TECHNOLOGY WAS IN A. And they wanted twelve years experience, but the technology was only six years old. So. That's what happens when you let hr. Get involved, right? They're going to bump the stats up the specs. If a an associate degree is good than a bachelor's degrees going to be much better right and while we go for a master's. Excellent. K May was Hud. Even masters. Degrees offered. So, as a hiring. The deck is stacked against. You and you already know that I mean if you've been at it more than a few months, you realize. It's. Is? They said when I enlisted. In the marine, corps the theme song was, we never promised you a rose garden and believe me. They deliver on that promise. So as a hiring manager, you're learning or have learned that. It is not as easy as the brochure makes it sound. In hiring one of those most difficult things. I worked on a project a number of years ago, staffing four insurance agencies. and. The thing was. Their business model, this particular company was take successful people with some money in the bank and say well. You ought to have a franchise for our business. And so they see yeah, that makes sense you know. The money looks good, and and as okay now you need to hire these three typical. Positions for your company. The only problem was the people that have been successful in life in different areas. They had no comprehension of what hiring men. Or. How do it effectively and so? I could go on and on your problem is. Your challenge is you've got stuff to get done? And you don't have the right people noth- people to get it done. That's where we come in. Particularly if you're looking for software development. Software developers. That's our. That's our sweet spot, so if you're in that space acid to reach out to me and the best way to do that, pick up your phone and dial pound two, five zero and the prompt say contact ski man. That connect us. Now. Let me know that you need some help. We'll have an old fashioned phone conversation. We can even do a video version one, but we're going to get on the phone. We're GONNA. Talk about what it is. What deadlines you're on what challenges you're facing from personnel perspective. and. I'll tell you how we can help. And if we come together. We're going to want some money to solve this problem. It's only fair, right. You want heat in your building. You have to pay the. The Heat Bill Right. You want the right staff you, WanNa, motivated staff. You want the best of the best. You want a players because if you don't know this if you're new hiring. You may not understand this the minute you hire a be player. You've set your copy on course to the bottom. And you may not recover from it. You need the a player. It's like you can't put something. You know rock and roll was exception right evert especially close enough for rock and roll. You've heard it. Pizzas Pizza. There is no really bad pizza. Might take exception that but. Pizza's good right. Well people are not all good, and not all people are cut out to do the role that you're asking of them, so take advantage of my thirty plus years in recruiting hiring of hard hundreds of employees for myself and for my clients. Only ever had to fire three. You know sometimes people sneak in there, but if you want somebody who's consistently able to deliver for. The A player. Then you want to reach out to me. Is that simple? And, if you've got questions again, call me. We don't really like to email. And by the way we've got a no ghosting policy. You can't ghost me. I won't go S-, you. In the talent that we work with will not ghost. You and you're not allowed to go stem. That's the number one complaint I get from talent. If you didn't know that K- hiring manager now you know. GHOSTING is a thing. In it tries people crazy as it should. It's disrespectful

Alexa HUD Siri Bixby Evert
Cheriss May & Idris T Solomon

The Candid Frame

09:52 min | 8 months ago

Cheriss May & Idris T Solomon

"Thanks for doing this guys for the last couple of weeks I have been thinking about what role I. wanted the show to play in terms of the dialogue that's happening. With this and I thought it was better than me. Sort of giving voice to it myself that it be a much better to have a dialogue with people is one of the things. I was realizing over the last two weeks outside of my own house. Old I really haven't discussed this stuff in. You know my wife and I have talked about how `bout it, but I really hadn't. Beyond that really. Considered? What kind of conversations I? I would want to have with people outside of my own home. My own faith and I think it is important dialogue to have especially. Amongst photographers photography are actually documenting. What's happening right now, but it will also lived the experience of being. Covering this. Just, just briefly I I experienced the LA riots back in I think it was ninety to ninety one. And one of the things and I grew up in that neighborhood I grow near arts in Normandy probably about two miles. My family's home is is there. And one of the things that I remember very vividly. Besides all the cast that was happening is the presence of a lot of photographers in those communities. Not just the photo journalist, but a lot of people who were just photographing independently. One of the things that really bothered me about that. Is that a lot of those people had never come to the community photographic before. That, many of them would not come back afterwards. And then later on when I would look at portfolios. like six months to a year later I would see images. That were made during the riot. But they were without any sort of context or any sort of greater egg relation of what had happened what led to those events happening? Changing and that's spurred me to work on a project. That I've been working on now for thirty years on downtown Los Angeles largely because I felt like at the time. This is years before it became what it is now in terms of gentrification, but it was a part of Los Angeles I had grown up in and I felt that had been dismissed to a great degree and I just wanted to. Use My camera to sort of illustrate. What I felt was beautiful, interesting about a part of Los Angeles that was fiving and important to a minority community here in Los Angeles now it's become gentrified in now. It's completely at very very different thing, but as I see the events of the last couple of weeks, I have thought very much the same thing. You're saying all these people going out and making photographs. And I just felt like you know us as photographers regardless of race. We have to think about. Not just the kinds of pictures that we make, but those pictures are intended for. And the impact it can have especially if those of us who are out there. Making photographs are not working journalists and I just wanted to have a dialogue with both of you. Because you guys are both working photographers on the east, coast. Photographing these events and Photographing. Events. Not only American society with Black Cultural Society before going to continue doing this. And I just to hear I your own personal. How you are both Alliott. Both are personally experiencing these events. And then we can get into much greater conversation in terms of the role of photography now and going forward, cherise, I think you can take since you've actually been out in a failed. Covering summit is now well I have to say first and foremost as a black woman have a personal stake in experience with what's going on. I have my personal stories of you know experiencing racism. I can remember as far back as I was in third grade. The was third grade when I I was called a nigger. From there I became more aware of that in. It has carried through to the woman. I am today. I've had experiences of being stopped. While driving my car in questioned, whose car is this where you going? Where do you live, you know? At broke. No Laws I've had experiences of male male family members and friends who have had violent interactions so having that personal story it gives me a perspective when I go in and I'm actually covering the current the current things that are going on now with the protest in the demonstrations that are happening all over. ME. What I will say is this time it feels different of cupboard, protests and things before, but this time it feels like the youth are really what what I've seen. What I've noticed is the youth are more engaged in their on fire in their serious You can see that there are so many young people out there. In their organized they have an agenda. They have action items. And they're calling for certain things to be done or they will continue. With the protests with the work that feels very different, because it's a stronger a stronger voice now the other thing I'm seeing that's different out there are. There are more white people out there this time. Whereas before it was mostly black, people who were calling you know saying. Stop doing this to me. And calling for change now you have white youth who were out there as well as I saw other people, too, but like I said it's been mostly like a younger movement in terms of who are really out there in the numbers with them. Having what experience yesterday was. They have printed out their agenda and these action items in. They've given it to their legislative representatives. They're calling them. They're following up, so that's been probably like the biggest thing I've seen. Is that the youth are more engaged which. May Have Time In. They're not giving up in there, not scared That's the other thing you know. They're not scared to voice the problems that they see. They're not. To demand for these changes. This time around of being closer to home and I've been watching. Some of my friends out. There believe covering this protest top to bottom in light was such a high level of qualities amazing. Is One of those things where. Fast, forward, twenty thirty forty years and twenty twenty is in the history books. Would be proud to say that I know a lot of top officials. Who when documenting this time in history? So I've been close to home, you know I have a five year old son, and for me. The question of should I be out there? Covering this or should I be here covering my son? and. That's been a big question mark throughout the last week and a half when. The protests began and last night was the first night that. You know told my wife I'm going to go out there. It will fuel events happening in picked when I was close to home in. Backed up mcgeer? Wait now and by the time I got is the crowd had already dispersed. I was online trying to figure out if there was something else happening now close enough that I can get to. And the social media feeds had updated at that time so I, just said all right. Let me just go home. When I got home I started. Seeing all feeds, update and I just. decided to stay home, but you know my wife was. Worried rightfully so I would have been choosing to go out after the curfew. Dowse set in New York, which means that. Just, walk into my car I. could have just been arrested. Just welcome to the car or driving Cardin I'm seeing footage of police officers. Yanking people out of the car the after curfew, so those are the things that you ought. To Take into consideration and you know I. didn't grow was father's radio home so the last thing I wanna do is put myself in this situation where I'm not at home for my son so. I do know that they are the ways that we can be protesting that we can't be revolutionizing. You know it's not just a one-size-fits-all type of situation you know on. We can revolutionize by reading informing ourselves equipment ourselves with enough knowledge and information today. The was not pulled over is anymore. Re can right you know contribute with words you know. I'm seeing a lot of photographers being jerked around with the licensing so so so bringing awareness to how can properly get business stuff to together Sodano? Getting jerked and we get the proper value for all photos does a lot of different ways that we can contribute to this protest without being in front

Los Angeles Normandy Black Cultural Society Cardin Sodano Dowse Twenty Twenty New York
We're All In This Together.

Buddhist Boot Camp Podcast

05:42 min | 10 months ago

We're All In This Together.

"The reason I wanted to talk with you today is because I keep being asked to offer some words of inspiration during this whirlwind the thing that is really important for us to remember right now as people are freaking out in panicking is that people don't know what we don't know how long this is. GonNa last and we don't know if this is just going to be a week or this is going to be a year and a half and we become aware that nothing is ever certain nothing ever was certain so the only thing that we've lost during this time of transition is this illusion of security in this false sense of stability. It's not that we used to know and now we don't. We are now aware that we've never known we never know what tomorrow is going to bring. We never know how long things are GONNA last. And so we're getting more in touch with reality now than we've ever been and that can be scary for people because especially control-freak Because they like feeling like they are under control. I think I have it all figured out. They know what's going to happen tomorrow. They have plans for next month. They have reservations for next year. They know where life is going to take them. And all of a sudden the rug swept out from under you and it doesn't necessarily have to be a virus. It could be a divorce. It could be getting laid off work. It could be a number of things that death in the family. Your own death the death of someone else it could really you know. Pull the rug out from under you and we've often posted when something like this happens in life just yell out plot twist and keep going and so this is a major plot twists and if we treat it as such then there's a sort of release an acceptance in. Dare I say surrender in the most beautiful sense to come what may to allow to trust to witness often. Invite you guys to treat everything in life like as an experiment. The what can I learn about myself from this? These are interesting times and actually I. I WanNa talk about that. I WanNa talk about how the words with which we describe our experienced dictate our experience. So if you're using adjectives to describe what's happening right now as horrible and tragic just use the word interesting and say this is interesting. It takes the negative weight off of it still honors. What is happening that people who are getting sick the People? Who are dying. I'm not in any way nullifying the the heaviness of that. It's very interesting that we are called upon by something practically invisible to stop being selfish. This fires doesn't care about your race. It doesn't care about your income bracket it treats all equally and maybe we can learn something from this by. Maybe we can understand that. This is a time for us to come together and be kind not greedy. Not hord people are running out of toilet paper but it's for one reason and run reason only it's because so many other people got way more than main he did and I'd like to think of us as a human race as as the roots of big tree you know when it rains which is nourishment for the tree. It's important for all the roots. The ones that are close to the surface in the ones that are deep down the ones that on the left the ones that are on the right to take as much water as they need not more and then let the rest seep through to the other route so that everyone can get nourishment because if once out of the tree or one route says no. I'm going to gather all the water right here myself. Then it's going to kill the tree. Does that make like we have to take the whole tree into consideration because trying to save one route will not save the tree? It's important for the nutrients in support for all the gifts that we received to seep through and nourish all of us for the sake of all of us. I think the sheer awareness that your experience is not unique Hugh in the sense that we're all going through this. That to me helps tremendously because one of the challenges we have is that we think we're alone that no one else understands what I'm going through. Well that's not the case in this situation. Everyone understands what you're going through. Everyone is going through that whole whirlwind of what level? Panic is too much panic. In what level of carelessness too careless. Where do I find middle ground of honoring the situation in myself in my decisions and also not going overboard in either direction? The invitation is for all of us especially now is to question some of our reactions. Why am I reacting the way I am who modeled this behavior for me? And why choosing to emulate them the power of this pause we are all given is to take inventory contemplate. Who In my life has inspired me and I wanNA take a step beyond inspiration because inspirational alone is almost some form of entertainment if he would whereas motivation has more to it. Because you're not just inspired you're motivated to modify your behavior to be more in line with your values with the behavior that you've witnessed in someone else and said that is how I WANNA be. Even though I've been one way for thirty forty years I want to change the way of and I want to be a better version of myself with knowing what I know

Hugh
The Open Source CIO

a16z

08:17 min | 11 months ago

The Open Source CIO

"Red Hat did such a great job. In pioneering what I call open source one DOTTO. The free and support model that their scale and capacity really made them a one off as a startup to be able to go and create the same backend. Infrastructure is quite expensive to do so. Let me go one step further here. I don't believe there will be another red hat with the red hat business model however I believe that there will be many many many successful open source companies into the future that have different business models from red hat that are further unlocking the potential of open source specifically open source as a service if we look at the history of open source as soon as the economics come into balance with the technology we see entrepreneurs flourish in the community flourishes because their sustainability and. I think this whole sas you know open source as a service has unlocked a whole new. Economic Model Peter's article ended with. Maybe even red hat should think about becoming the next Amazon and I think alluding to this kind of SAS era that we're in. How has that changed? How you're approaching open source and open source communities. Well I think our model started off as a on Prem subscription which was pretty unique at the time and as the cloud the public cloud has taken home you one of the benefits that we see is all those technologies are built on the core asset that we have which is Lennox and the different providers have different nations of that technology different distributions of it. The approach was to make sure our technology runs on all of them because to us. It doesn't really make a difference so we have partnerships with all of the major cloud providers and we obviously have our capabilities as well and so the idea of this hybrid world is the one we placed a lot of bets on the one that actually fortunately has evolved to sort of be the dominant design. You talk a little bit about the dominant design. How do you view this emerging enterprise architecture? Where are we in in that open or hybrid future? There was this view about five years ago. I would say that the cloud takes over there would be no more on. Prem there would only be one cloud provider and now what we're seeing is that there are multiple cloud providers and the pendulum has swung back to where there's a right place for certain on prem software and infrastructure and applications and there's the right use of the cloud and there are many tools now that makes the integration of public and private. I hybrid seamless across different domains. And once we have that cheers really know Ed your core. There's just compute it when we first started studying cloud and all different stations of what it was going to be the hype that surrounded it it was a binary thing right. It was either. You're all public or you're all on premise. It's like come on. That doesn't make any sense. So what has come to fruition? Now I think is starting to recognize all the choice that's available all the just incredible amount of innovation. That's taken place that for someone in a job like mine. It's our responsibility and our job to take advantage of it so the means by which I can manage it is almost as important as the means in which I can. Just use it. If you're in my job your partners and other functions in the company shouldn't care where what what's underneath the solution. All they care about is that the solution is correct and it's optimized both for agility and cost purposes for whatever problem. You're trying to solve Peter. You've said software as a service has really cracked open open source in terms of its valuations in its potential but at the same time. The end customer doesn't really know if it's open source or not from a development standpoint we get all the innovation the community the bug fixing that open source has been great at for the past. What THIRTY FORTY YEARS? But really we can monetize open source at the full value of that software because people don't care all they want is the service. Just give me whatever that software provides and I don't really care whether it's open source or not and by the way I'm willing to pay full value for that stack in the one data. Oh you're the economic problem and I ran an open source company in the one data ear. I know the economic problem is a buyer would compare would say okay. You're giving away your software for free and charging for support and I'm GonNa go compare you to your proprietary counterpart and the proprietary counterpart charges eighty cents for the software and twenty cents for support. Therefore we're going to only pay you twenty cents because all you're doing is providing support now if it's run as a service and support and the service of the software is all built in together. It's a hundred cents and let me also add that going from open source. Bits the source code to creating a reliable manageable service. There's a lot of work in that so it's not like you have open source and all of a sudden you cobble this stuff together and you get open sources service you know. There's a huge difference between a project and a product and that is really really important. Especially if you're in in my role in a company and you inevitably going to have members of your team saying well we'll just we'll just get the free version right and it's like okay. Well who's GONNA PATCH IT? Who who we relying on to provide feature function updates integration etc etc etc. So the notion that people don't care because it's a service. I is true to a certain extent but the person is ultimately responsible ought to care on. Who's behind the scenes? The good thing is all this innovation. That's happening especially in the software like in the infrastructure and clouds fees. It's all user driven innovation. It's all people that are practitioners. That have a problem and they tried to go solve the problem. The creative opens and there is a rap group that rallies around it and you know the dominant design forms and then it take the upstream project and create products. So you mentioned this idea of the difference between a project and a product. How do you evaluate or think about that difference? What tells you something is no longer just a project. It's a fully baked product you as an. It buyer might want to invest in. Well I think when a company stands up and put some service around it anybody can go get the community version of a piece of software and use it. As they see fit the minute it becomes a product is when a company says. We offer a business model around that particular project. It's interesting what happened with the role of it and a lot of companies for the longest time. What IS OUR CORE? Competency was the discussion and we said well. We're really not great at it so we should try to run that at an optimal cost. And you know look for partners that can run it better than we end because we're not in the IT business and back in that time open source was mostly a commodity play. That's how red hat got put on the map was. We were commodity. -tising and product nowadays where every company is all of a sudden a technology company and companies are looking to. It is. We're going to use technology to disrupt our competitors. People are in a job like mine. After sort of retool ourselves having the capability for an one individual team to run a distribution of open source software community version is more tricky than having a trusted adviser partner with you and do side by side and as a buyer. I encourage everybody to inspect pretty heavily. What's behind the scenes there? And how do I know who's handshake when everything goes really

Red Hat Peter Amazon Lennox Partner
Are Cell Phones the Cigarettes of the 21st Century?

The Ultimate Health Podcast

10:38 min | 1 year ago

Are Cell Phones the Cigarettes of the 21st Century?

"We go with Dr Joseph McCulloch Doctor mccalla. Welcome back to the podcast so great to chat with the again. Well it's great to be here Jesse. Yeah we got a lot to get into. I loved your New Book On. Ems and I love the title. Em assist perfect. My sister's responsible for that one love it. I'm sure people are gonNA love it as well as we jump in here. I think it's important to talk about how you first became aware of ems. I know for you. This has been something on your radar for about twenty years. Some curious how did you initially come in contact with them? And what was your initial reaction. Well because I've got a website that seeks to educate the public about health issues. I became aware of this a long time ago about two decades ago as you mentioned and it was pretty clear if you if you're serving the literature that this is an issue so I knew about it. I accepted that they were an issue but reluctantly chose to accept it. Fully embrace it and act upon it in a way that would protect me specifically largely because I fell prey to the deceptive campaigns by the wireless industry essentially replicated the patterns of the tobacco industry. They absolutely do work. They seek to create doubt and confusion. Which is a primary strategy and they certainly did my mind than they effectively by spinning off of many other ostensibly credible research studies. That suggested. There wasn't an issue. So pretty this doubt this lack of scientific certainty and unlike tobacco which has very clear and strong suggestions that. There's something going on here. I mean just common sense. Why would you inhale something? That's Y- smoke into your lungs. I mean it just doesn't make sense is not going to be an issue but wireless radiation. It doesn't have that at all in fact to other counters at our amazing Lee beneficial to us and that is incredibly inconvenient prize with all these tools easy access to the greatest innovation history of mankind. Which is the Internet. And it's invisible. You can't hear see it smell it so you're just never aware that you're being enveloped with these exposures with that. In the convenience aspect primarily I just shows to be remained ignorant and at ignorant but chose to embrace it in full and take measures to counteract it and I didn't really get motivated to get more serious about it until one of my mentors. Dr Klinghoffer confronted me with this. He's a clinician. For many years in sees a large number of people still in the trenches being patient some of the sickest patients in the world sees in Europe and in the US and one of his basic tenants as he refuses to see someone. Unless they're gonNA mitigate the M. F. Exposures because he knows that there's not going to get better so that to me was a giant clue and I got serious about in once I started studying it and it took me three years to compile information. This book became real obvious that this was indeed. A real threat in that the source of the confusion was the wireless industry and they're far more sophisticated than tobacco industry. Everyone knows how effective they were. I mean Jay's we had every federal regulatory agency telling us in warning of the dangers of cigarette smoking yet they still persisted for thirty years before we finally got the black box warnings and telling people very clearly authoritatively that these are dangerous and I think everyone listening most likely can remember when the four five. Ceo's of all the major tobacco industries testifying before Congress saying one that cigarettes were not addictive and to to the best of their knowledge did not cause cancer. They were lying through their teeth. It took that long and they still lied. But finally attorney generals were able to correct that in impose tens of billions of dollars in sanctions against them. And we're going to head towards a similar result with the wireless intrigued but it's going to probably take another twenty thirty forty years. I mean because the evidence is so clear and compelling once you objectively review it and before we get deep into the nitty gritty here. I think it's important. Were on the same page and to get there. Can you explain exactly what? Ems are sure mfs is an acronym is your electromagnetic fields and describes the entire range spectrum. Which can be anywhere from a fraction of a cycle per second which is called hurts too many billions of or even hundreds of thousands of billions of cycles. Per Second. Not all you must are dangerous. We've been exposed to EMS since air entire human biological history and example of those would be sunlight. Sunlight isn't enough broadly. They're broken down into two different categories. I O nizing radiation in which there is some from sunlight. Ultraviolet radiation was gives us our son Tannin. Vitamin D is actually ionizing radiation. That's when you get too much you'll get a thermal burn as dangerous. You don't WanNa get excessive something like that but obviously some as important to stay healthy. I don't think any rational human being other than a dermatologist. Which hard to classifies rational most of the time would disagree with that and we've had relatively low exposures. I mean they're earth actually emits certain very low level. Emf's Shuman Resin Sake. Seventy eight hurts or so but this is very low level but the exposures that we're most concerned about our manmade ones which didn't really exist before the late eighteen eighties or so electrical fields radiofrequency feels these were not around the planet but they started becoming more prominent even though they were around for four years at the end of World War. One they were still pretty low and if you compare the levels of a typical major exposure we're concerned with which radio frequencies which is about two to five Gigahertz Gigahertz as a billion cycles per second those are the frequency that your microwave oven runs on and your cellphone. They're almost identical frequencies. The industry uses heat thermal damage as a measure of the safety. Because it's the same for microwave. So their thought is that if it's not heating your tissue like a microwave than can't possibly cause biological damage will go back to that later. There's this broad spectrum of ems the end of world will want certain level even though ems. Were around be as we're ROTHROCK FORTY YEARS? It was still relatively low out century later. Nineteen or twenty twenty. We are literally at a billion billion times higher exposure than we were a hundred years ago. That's ten to the fifteenth. So it's hard to imagine that an increase in that type of magnitude of exposure wouldn't have some biological impact so today for example getting into the different man media mass. There's four different types. One being radio frequencies than we got magnetic fields electric fields and dirty electricity. Well Yeah. Those are the primary mimic exposures note. Nature does create radio frequencies to I mean they exist in stars amid him. I think you'll see there are out there but the really really low exposures if you were to measure them they be. I mean it almost immeasurable by most commercial equipment so the issue is not only the frequency but the amount of intensity of exposure them out of power. That's being broadcast into your tissue right. We're going to be looking at the Manmade Weinstein how we can lessen or totally eliminate the impact on the human body. You talked about the SARS and you talked about the effect of this radiation causing heat on the tissue so first of all I just want to get into the FCC here. 'cause they're the ones that are creating these guidelines and the guidelines they're creating have to do with heating tissue so let's go a bit deeper into this and talk about SARS and in the measurement that we're using here and how that works will SARS is another acronym again stands for a specific absorption. I forget the IRS Stanford but essentially it's a term used to describe how much heat is generated when you're exposed to electronic device and it's not unreasonable because it is. I says microwave transmitter. So it will vibrate your tissues as certain frequency and create. He'd and he'd can clearly 'cause biologic damage and it can be an indirect indicator of the amount of danger. That's there but by no means a direct because we know now very clearly and there's literally hundreds if not thousands of studies have proved conclusively that is not the heating damage is what we call the non thermal effects and for the longest time it. We really confused me. No one really knew or understood. What the biologic mechanism was for these. Non Thermal Effects. We just knew. That's what causes damage. We knew it was heating was very very clear was not heating the tissue and if you go abide by these standards FCC I think just adopted him from another professional agency is like International Electrical Standards Agency that they took that from and they've got these models based on but even using this flawed model they use this model that is called Sam which was patterned after a six foot. Two or four military guy was weighed about two hundred thirty pounds sale very large head and it totally different characteristics than a child. They're measuring SAR based on that model. So it's flawed and they're not measure for children also it's slugged begin with but even using that model. It's still an indirect indication because it will give you an indication of the amount of power that's being generated by that devise. But you cannot you simply cannot use. Sars is indication of the safety of your phone because it isn't other than you maybe can compare models and will lower star rating. Might be a little safer but you still need the shield yourself because exposure this will clearly increase your risk of biological damage in the most common would be cancer but you know what I call cell phones to cigarettes of the twentieth century for good reason because there's so many similarities. Not only did they wireless industry pattern their tactics after tobacco but they also in many ways are almost identical with the mechanism of the Holocaust. Har- They do not hurt you. After one exposure or exposure for a week a month or maybe even a decade it takes these is a long term chronic exposure. Where ultimately you'll succumb to the biologic damage. So this is a new experiment. Most people listening to this if not been exposed to their cell phone for more than two decades. I mean there are some but there's like no one more than three decades and debt still maybe under the window a word required exposures going to occur to encounter these side effects and you know people can smoke for four or five decades and still not have cancer now. They make succumb to other reasons. Like my mom who's longtime smoker and was confusing to see by the tobacco industry and she ultimately wound up dying from complications from COPD or emphysema. So you don't necessarily have to die directly from cancer but there's a lot of people coming down with brain cancer as and even prominent celebrities. We have two senators Ted Kennedy and John McCain who both died from brain cancer secondary to cell phone

Sars Cancer Brain Cancer Dr Joseph Mcculloch Jesse Europe United States Dr Klinghoffer Doctor Mccalla LEE Copd Congress Ted Kennedy International Electrical Stand FCC Attorney Shuman JAY
Amanda Litman, Executive Director of "Run For Something" discusses the importance of down ballot races

The Electorette Podcast

08:58 min | 1 year ago

Amanda Litman, Executive Director of "Run For Something" discusses the importance of down ballot races

"The Mandolin. Welcome to the PODCAST. I am so glad to be here. Thanks for having me so I read something really interesting last night I was reading through twitter. Of course only at night. That's what I do and there's a thread pincher twitter feed that caught my interest. You said something to the effect that you were talking talking to people and people have said to you about this year's upcoming election. They're just kind of focused. Their resources are energy and their time on trump and getting trump out of office. A what's what's wrong with that view view. Well I think it's It's it's wrong. I think it misses the bigger picture of what's at stake this year. Beating trump is important at. It's it's obviously a high priority it. We can't dismiss the importance of winning the White House both on a policy level and on a save American democracy level and it's not enough It can't be our priority as Democrats to the at the expense of everything else and what I've been hearing especially from donors this year not as much from volunteers which is great but especially from donors this year is that their money their efforts their energy is going towards things that stop trump. Yeah and that means that there are huge swaths of this ecosystem of this work being done that are under funded and under resourced and aren't going to be done in the way that they need to at a time when we have a chance to make huge progress especially on state and local government awry in. You know you're not the first person who runs an ORG that I've heard that from right that going into the general election. I think this happens a lot. You know every four years people start focusing especially early donors their their resources into the general election and that just kind of misses the point really important point so I just want to point something out about the power of down ballot races this so was it day before yesterday the Equal Rights Amendment was ratified in Virginia. And I think one of your alums run for something along. Jennifer carrol. foy Is a delegate in Virginia that she was a part of that process. Not just a part of it John was leading the charge on this and she is. I think she's incredible. We've been working with Jensen's she. I ran twenty seventeen I think people forget about her first election. You know it was twenty seventeen Virginia House of delegates. It was the first first big race after twenty. Sixteen she was running in a primary against a candidate who had run before and people wrote her off. They didn't think she could win. She was a black woman running in northern Virginia They didn't feel like it was possible for someone like her to take office. Not only did she win. She won her primary by fourteen votes like week or two after having given birth premature twins. Wow she is hard core. And you'll we were with her during that primary and then into the general when she flipped flip to see in the Virginia House of delegates. Red To blue She helped pass Medicaid expansion in Virginia in two thousand eighteen to ensure that more kids had healthcare just like her baby's I did and then when we met with her a little bit later after twenty eighteen. I guess she was like I want to take on the way and we said great. Let's do it so so. She did a bus tour across the state. She's been working really hard to ensure that there are the votes for it. She campaigned really hard to make sure that the Democrats are able to flip the Virginia House in Twenty nineteen gene and then she was the lead sponsor of the bill just earlier this week. Making Virginia the final state to actually finally ratified the equal rights amendment. It's so amazing. See not what is possible when you elect a Democrats that's amazing. I actually didn't know the depth of her story. That is amazing because I just did an episode on the IRA that was was a century in the making and the fact that run for something was behind a candidate who did all of that. I think that's amazing. In that in itself is a commercial for why we need to focus on these races. It's really remarkable. What happens when you elect the Democrats to offices where they can actually make a difference? You know one of the things. I find so fascinating as people. Tell me you know. My biggest goal is insert issue here. That's why I'm putting all my efforts towards winning the White House towards a House district like do you not see where the power comes from if basically every issue you care about the true levers of power happen in state and local government so whether its reproductive health or criminal L. Justice reform or voting rights or climate change or lgbt equality. Really any issue pretty much makes progress or gets defended at the state and local level. So another one of your alumni isn't a Tamie Sawyer in Memphis. I'm actually from Memphis. I grew up there so I interviewed her a few times. She's another powerhouse. I loved loved him. You saw her. She's in the city council. Right now ran for mayor another person who is going to make a big big changes in local politics in Memphis. Yes yeah. She's amazing we were so proud to be a part of her campaign and I know even though she lost that race. She's not done so I'm excited to see what she does next. Yeah so the thing is. Is that one party already. Does understand this. And that's the Republican Party. They understood this for over a decade that the power lies in these local races. They do focus on the Journal election. Obviously the White House in in governorships and stuff like that but they don't think that any rates is too small like from the school board to election. Birlik you've mentioned. Do you think that Democrats are finally catching up into between to that to that strategy. I getting closer. I think the deals you see is doing amazing work. I think the National Democratic Redistricting Committee is an incredible partner And I think it's not enough and I think it's not local enough even with all the work being done on state legislative races the best example. I've got here. Do you remember that New York Times article. I think it was maybe earlier or this week or last week. Time is a flat circle. That was talking about the textbooks in Texas. I California right right and was explaining. How like in California? It's sort of a broad ed more nuanced look at history versus Texas textbooks which are very dismissive of African American history in the United States and have Berries Pacific viewpoint around the second amendment. Things like that. The one thing. That article didn't get into that I think is worth pointing out is that that is an outcome. That is an intentional goal of the Republican Party. The the Republican Party invested millions winning the Texas State Board of Education which helped dictates that curriculum. In fact in some points in the process the Texas the State Board of EDUCATION GETS LAKE LINE ITEM veto power over these textbooks That's why Republicans controlled it. That's why Republicans spent money and invested did efforts to win it and what that does is teach Texas teenagers. If specific viewpoint of history breeding them to be more conservative voters It is both with a short term and long term impact of this work there. Republicans have understood. They have figured it to fuck out and important is because they see the longer picture and I hate to complement the Republican Looking Party. It's a bad party. Lease the elected officials in it are bad for the most part but their donors figured it out. They figured out early. They've been doing this for decades twenty thirty forty years So we have a lot to do to make up for that loss. Time am and there aren't too many groups who do the work locally the way that we do. I wish there were more so yeah no. You're absolutely right. You're as I was thinking the exact same thing that you just said that they are thinking about generations ahead. Children are reading these text books. They know exactly only whether it is intentional. Strategic it is long-term thinking it is understanding that the crazy person you elect to a city council today could be the crazy person a letter into a member of Congress tomorrow but that they've been crazy member of city council sort of gives them credentials. It's a breeding ground. So it's not just now policy policy. It's not just politics. It's the entire cultural impact in echo chamber that they have created to give themselves sustainable power and ultimately that's what run for something is all about is building being sustainable power for Democrats progressives because if we don't win these grass roots offices these local school boards water boards and community college boards. The rest of it falls house apart because it's not on a solid foundation. So let's talk about money where the money goes because this is another thing. They figured out that we have it. And I'm Kinda pissed about this one. So the coke brothers right. They've poured millions and millions into these down Belarus's right no racist too small for them. You know they'll put lots of money into a school board. If it means something but Democrats on the other hand you can and tell me. Maybe I'm wrong about this. Maybe this criticisms wrong. But you know we've got billionaires running in the primary running what appear to be vanity campaigns spending hundreds of millions of dollars Ads when if they were reinvest that in down ballot races. Maybe we get somewhere yeah. I've no disagreement here You know I hey. I have a very strong belief that if you are a billionaire or a KNOB billionaire it is your money to do with what you wish. If you think that's the best way to achieve your goals as running for president let go forth respectfully disagree. I don't think it's a good way to achieve your goal but I do think it's a symbol of how the Democratic Party has has sort of idolized allies. The presidency is the solution to our problems. You know that we have to billionaires running for president and not enough of them funding local offices like could you ask for a better metaphor it just. It drives me

Virginia White House Republican Party Virginia House Donald Trump Texas Memphis California Twitter Republican Looking Party President Trump Democratic Party Texas State Board Of Education New York Times Jennifer Carrol. Foy Jensen John Tamie Sawyer National Democratic Redistrict Belarus
Senators Running In 2020 Look To Make An Impact In Iowa

This Morning with Gordon Deal

04:18 min | 1 year ago

Senators Running In 2020 Look To Make An Impact In Iowa

"Has yanked the three senators seriously competing in the Iowa caucuses back to Washington for a trial with only Sundays off for good behavior this will be their last Sunday to compete in Iowa last weekend during what was probably their last unencumbered stretch of campaigning before Monday's caucuses all three reacted in characteristic fashion about being in Washington for the impeachment trial more from Walter Shapiro staff writer at the new Republic Walter who's saying what what weight class what they're saying it's where they're saying it the fact is that of the top five candidates in Iowa three of them are supposed to have taken a vow of silence as impeachment here are the three senators Elizabeth Warren Bernie Sanders and Amy Klobuchar so it's that is one thing that we have never seen before in trying to handicap Iowa for example Amy clubber Kerr was doing a tele town hall with a maybe ten thousand I went on the fall but this is such a whole three substituted campaigning person but we have other variables the more the Republicans scream about hunter Biden even though there is no evidence whatsoever that hunter Biden did anything illegal the more it raises questions I would think in the minds of a number of Iowa Democrat Joe Biden really the most electable Democrat or do we have to argue about when your bite into fifty thousand dollar a month retainer rain energy company until November that cease to face I would imagine I I think Elizabeth Warren might have captured it best talking about the lack of face to face and how that that's so critical in Iowa it is very much and I mean the fact is that the best candidates and by far Elizabeth Warren has the best stump speech in Iowa and her her that she's not giving it in any consistent way I mean they're gonna be back on Saturday when the impeachment trial presumably takes a break but should be a breakneck thirty six hours and you can't find too many I wind of boaters at four in the morning yes speaking with Walter Shapiro staff writer at the new Republic so what have say the likes of senator Sanders warning club char said cleverly to kind of avoid the subject of being in the impeachment trial Bernie Sanders has been consistently grumpy about the whole fuss is totally playing to tight now that have been watching that I wish it were otherwise that would that's a paraphrase a little bit of wind has just talked about how much she misses I answer question press about how much she I just misses the face to face interactions with voters in town halls and Amy Klobuchar he's put the highest note possible on it saying that it's an honor to be in Europe only one of only one hundred Americans get the chance to make this judgment an impeachment trial and this is her higher duty I thought you brought up an interesting point to about endorsements right here senator club which are with the shared endorsement oddly enough from The New York Times and then another one recently in Iowa from the quad city times all of a sudden she's gonna sidelined in not even able really to show these off I guess well bear pictured inner TV ads in similar fashion Aliza up since I wrote my article for the new Republic Elizabeth Warren was endorsed by the morning register the largest paper in the state and so do endorsements carry the same weight that they used to and if so how do they come into play when you have senator sidelined an impeachment trial well first of all endorsements and this is sad Purnell bring guy like me endorsements don't carry the weight they did twenty thirty forty years ago but in a caucus where voters are so desperate for clues and cues endorsements may matter in Iowa more than a matter any other time during the twenty twenty presidential

Iowa Washington
The Value of Engaged Employees (Part 2) with Les Smolin

Podcast | Don Rheem

07:18 min | 1 year ago

The Value of Engaged Employees (Part 2) with Les Smolin

"Welcome. I'm your host on Rebe. CEO of e three solutions today the next conversation in our new series with industry leaders about the challenges of employee engagement. I'm delighted to welcome. Oh come less than a group chairman of vintage international the world's leading organization for CEOS. He is also the founder and CEO of the Executive Leadership Leadership Forum which specializes in leadership development and consulting mostly for middle market companies. He is a prominent broadcaster. The host of executive eight of leaders radio a business program heard on multiple stations across the country the show features key interviews with prominent industry leaders. Welcome less and thanks for being here today. Thanks don show So I We've had you on before and and it was a really enjoyed the conversation but some of the folks listening today may not be familiar with vestige and your role as a chair in the community. Can you just give us the elevator speech on vestige a stooge in your role. This is what I consider to be. The most trusted Global Executive Leadership Development Company for Small and mid-size businesses it's got a global learning platform orm and strategic partnerships kind of position to prepare our members to successfully compete in what you and I would call an increasingly more complex business environment now now my role. I run several groups in the DC Washington DC metro area and then also engage nationally and internationally with my college so less. How long have you been working with CEOS and his capacity in our role with vestige? I've been doing this for over twenty five years now. I wanted folks to hear that. That's that's one of the key reasons why I wanted to have you on your your level of experience working with CEOS is extraordinary. And you've seen just about everything and I have had the pleasure pleasure speaking to your groups about employee engagement. Tell US why his employee engagement important to your CEO's. That's a great question and I don't I think it's obvious as as people would think it is if you're running a business everybody knows that it's fraught with all kinds of landmines. It's not as easy at once. Was Even Twenty thirty forty years ago out. The world's a lot more complex than the cost I think of of making a bad decision is expensive so if you try and go to loud it's not the answer nor can you be expected to know the answers yourself so for me when I think about employee engagement it's an imperative. Need to engage them and it's not just what they're capable of but also also potentially they can do to help you. Successfully compete whatever companies they operate markets. They operate in. So this is for me in my experience the the thing. That's a competitive advantage. It's unleashing what really is the potential of people that I don't think a lot of small to mid sized businesses. I don't I don't care how big or small company as they don't really engage their employees in a way which they maximize what is possible in order the effective in their markets less in these markets. Did you talk about the growing complexity of being being a leader no question with combination of metrics and the application of science and competitive analytics. But also one of the big pressures right now and I don't want to date the broadcast cast But we are recording at the end of twenty nineteen and we just received the numbers from the US Department of Labor. Yesterday we added another two hundred sixty eighty six thousand employees to the workforce last month. We're now the lowest unemployment rate since the Vietnam War unemployment rate is down at three point five percent which is considered third full employment. How much pressure does this put on leaders when there's no more talent pool? There's not even a talent puddle in America today. We're drilling for talent. How is employee join gauge moment fit in and why is it relevant to that pressure? You know it's a great question. I've thought a lot about it Especially since I've been listening to you a lot I'm at every other channel or media that you can listen to these days. Where a reference to the talent pool is not getting any bigger and it to me? It doesn't matter matter whether the talent pool is shrinking or is growing as the fact that we've got talent or ready and we're really not getting out of them what reads e to And it may be simple or it may be a whole lot more complex so larger small growing or shrinking. I think the idea is not in engaging employs the way we need to in order to get the most out that we're paying him for it but we're not getting what we really can't from. What is the role of? CEO's here so you've you've seen dozens ends in dozens of CEOS over the over the years and your role as a leader in vestige what what seems to be some of the key differences from the employees that get this an act and those that I just think the world is going to operate like it always. Has I think among the leaders you know you said a little earlier. I think folks think this is really hard. They're not really sure or how to grab a hold of it so they'll listen to someone like you talk about it. They'll look at the data that you share with them and yet they're not sure what to do with it So on one hand when you have those people who I think they're hard surrounded but they're not sure exactly how to get started on the other hand. I think there are those that are in it. But they're not sure exactly if it's the right stuff they're working on and so it's easy to get distracted from whatever the shiny object is kind of appears in front of you so they kind of put it to the side because they think give it is something soft but in fact it's not it's the hard stuff but it's also there's data rounded as you well know that is the evidence that is only they. They could see that what the possibilities were than they would probably grab. It is hard as they grab anything else and make at the top initiative in anything they do. There's something something about the fact that when I look at organizations and how they use science they use it just about everything they do. They're they're using it in supply chain. They're using it in finances they're doing they're doing sigma. They're doing everything they can. But when it comes to the science of what drives human behavior most organization seem about two decades decades behind that science. What is it from your perspective that makes the science of human behavior or focusing on the conditions where people thrive that is so hard for? CEO's is it because it's new. It's mysterious what's going on now. I wish I had the The Magic Ball that answer the question. in my experience I I think maybe there's a couple of things here as you mentioned the science grown simply new managers that have been around for twenty thirty forty years that at sites that Emma's new and emerging even though it's twenty years in the making so far where we're beginning to truly understand how scientists driving designed behind behavior so I think that's one thing I think the second thing is this. We all get caught up in old habits so when we get introduced to things. We're exposed to things if we're in an environment where we're constantly being exposed to the new science if you will. I think we're more inclined to want to gravitate towards it but we still need something to take the next. I step the thing that puts traction around that thing that gives us the ability to act on it so I think those two things have particular might actually make it more difficult for people who who otherwise would want to work with us and to take the science and put it to

CEO Founder And Ceo Global Executive Leadership De Executive Leadership Leadershi Executive Us Department Of Labor Rebe Group Chairman United States Washington DON America Emma
Transform Your Life with Bishop T.D. Jakes

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

05:37 min | 1 year ago

Transform Your Life with Bishop T.D. Jakes

"Jake says we all have the power to transform into the highest and best representation of ourselves that is awaiting us is that the question is. Where do we start? And you know what I love. Is that anyway. Favorite Bible verses is transformed by the renewing a new man. How transformed by the renewal of your mind? And that's what you're really talking about. That is exactly what I'm talking about because the reality of the matter is any other place that you try to transform from is not going to work you have to change the way you think about the circumstance situation Asia. We spent so much money changing the way we look the way we address where we live. We changed all outside but until you change the inside you really not GonNa Change Your Life and so I'm excited about having the opportunity not just changing your life released to your behavior and your character and all of that. That's very important to and for me that God something but even changing your career what you focus on what you what you put your energy in who you hang around what you're GonNa do with this section of your life. That's that's that's all I got because all of us are in the process of evolving. All of us want to live our life Torah fullest and highest potential. We do not want to get to the end of our lives and wonder what if we want to as the thing goes die empty to have poured out the very richards of yourself and I want to show them how to do that. You have the floor but one of the one one of the stories that I heard you telling you sorry. I was so moved by the story about the dog and the legs can can. Can you just share that before we get started. The dog with a female dog dog who had been hidden an accident and her back legs were broken and she was pregnant and she birth puppies and oddly enough. The puppies were fine. They were they were completely -pletely normal except for the fact they drug their hand leaks just like their mother and the amazing thing about the puppies who drug their legs as alleged. We're completely lately fine. But if what you see model in front of what you see in any way deformed or deranged your your concept of normalcy is defined by what you see. It is hard to be what you have not seen. It's about rounding yourself with good things surrounding yourself with aspirational things. So that you can see the highest part of yourself because else we have to have it modeled. It's not enough to have it preach to us or top tourist or anything we have to have it. Modeled demonstrated what does this look like. What does it feel like? You can get information from people but the real inspiration that transforms her life needs to be modeled in front of you so many times we get a degree green something and then when we get into it. We don't like it. We get a job when we did the job. We don't like it because we have not had it modeled in front of us and the problem with the puppy. Happy is that he had a bad model and many of us are suffering from the models. We take it away. I'm GonNa let did you have a seat over here. Bishops Freedom the I think one of the things that we do not realize how much has been laid on us about other people. The whole body auty of our experiences are summarized things we've read and the things we've seen and the things we've been taught and I want you to think this way that that failure. Oh you're is a learned behavior. You are not create it to fail nowhere. You created misallocated. There is a strategy in mind. Where when you find the place where you fit the best you are the most functional where you fit the best most of us have been crammed into what people needed us to be? And and we have been responders reacting to what the needs were what the kids wanted. What mother had in mind what your sister had in my what your boyfriend wanted? What's your husband husband wanted? This is what your girlfriend wanted. And after a while you get sometimes twenty thirty forty years old you start saying wait a minute. I've been everybody but me. So so I've got a little illustration it looks like. I'm getting ready to make a cobbler or something but I'm really not. I've got these apples here because I want you to understand understand about this apple. That's this apple right. Year is really an orchard. It is an orchard. Come on with it. The problem is in order to get the potential its highest and best potential. You have to get beyond the peelings and all the things that have been placed on top of it now. Imagine imagine the apple is you and you're trying to get your orchard out but there's all of this surrounding you that are are causing you not to be who you were created to be the transformational potential of this apple is never in its peeling. It's never in the meat of the Apple. Oh it is it is only when you are able to get it down to the core the core essence will you touch the core and you get down to the seed. You have been gotten to the place where you can find his fullest and best potential. You either have to cut to it or rock to

Apple Jake
Sharon Stone Got Kicked Off of Bumble

Celeb News Ride Home

03:11 min | 1 year ago

Sharon Stone Got Kicked Off of Bumble

"Sharon stone has been kicked off of the dating APP Bumble Bowl and honestly this whole thing is like it's making me quietly devastated. Sharon stone the very famous and very gorgeous sixty fifty one year. Old Actress tweeted about getting kicked off of the dating operating quote. I went on the at bumbled dating site and they closed my account eyeball emoji eyeball emoji. Some users reported that it couldn't possibly be me. Hey At bumble is being me exclusionary. Shrugging Emoji you. Don't shut me out of the HIVE. End Quote this upsets me. I am upset for many reasons but first of all. I'm upset that Sharon stone is trying to beyond bumble at all for me in my personal belief system. Celebrities should be on riot. The exclusive dating APP for celebrities Duh. So this bums me out because I'm assuming riot hasn't approved her yet or something in which case Raya Your cancelled you're fully cancelled bit. Sharon deserves serves love okay. Sharon stone deserves love and if she wants to find love on bumble. It's her God given right. Hey maybe she hasn't heard Araya or or maybe she wants to date a regular person like you know one of the people which is very admirable. bumble was so shook that Sharon chose to sign up for a normal normal person dating APP. That they I guess. Shut down her page thinking it was faked but if bumble is working out Sharon's got plenty of replies to her tweet from potential suitors including one that got almost fifteen hundred legs at the time of me recording this written by my friend at Shaken Baiki who said quote damn. That's so crazy. They knew there was a reason. We hadn't matched yet. Ha Ha but we're here now. So dot dot dot and quote anyway. The bumble has restored her account and I assume the marketing reading department is like spraying champagne everywhere because they got all this free publicity from Sharon stone and Hey I'm happy for Sharon stone. She's got her bumble account back and you know she wants to date normal people like I said. That's that's brave speaking of Sharon stone being single and potentially lonely. I'm reminded for October. Twenty nine teen interview that she did with allure where she said quote. I wish that someone had fallen in love with me. I guess I think life would have been less harsh with a partner and quote. God that makes me so sad. Someone should love Sharon stone. She deserves love okay. What a devastating quote There's another apart in the article Talks about being lonely in general and it makes me very very sad. She said quote. I Miss People inviting me over for dinner inviting me to do things. Most famous famous people spend a lot of time alone. I still have my friends from thirty forty years ago when I have to go to something run upstairs. Throw on some lipstick and sunglasses. And they're they're like Oh you just turned into Sharon stone. It's like she's someone we deal with and quote heartbreaking Sharon. If you're free tonight so you could come to my place for dinner. I'll treat you right and also maybe I'll invite shake and bake do little wing woman in

Sharon Stone Bumble Bumbled Hive Partner Araya
Inside Digital China With Jeffrey Towson

Digital Business Models

14:28 min | 1 year ago

Inside Digital China With Jeffrey Towson

"High at one for police station. We We'd ask Jeff we had a speaker on China and Asia that grants visas professor at Beijing University and older older of a great book which is really a quick greeting driven understanding about China which is called the one hour channel Hannibal so thank you Jimmy disquisition Jeffrey now pleasure to be here. Thank you so let's start from urology actually actually get you know to study the Chinese Market Economy Ellison your story I just a sort of international international business guy doing a lot of deal stuff's out of the Middle East and slowly started doing more with Asia this is good fifteen eighteen years ago and I was sort of half in the developing world in half in the US and it was pretty clear that Asia was the place to be early early on and China and Asia was just going to be a huge story so I was kind of on the ground is pretty obvious what's going to happen so I started focusing more and more on China Asia and I've been doing that ever since I still keep about half my time in China half my time in the US which is just an endless opportunity 'cause there's always new stuff to do and it's also pretty enjoyable lights so that's kind of where I settled days one foot in China one foot in the US which is gets more and more more interesting every single year absolutely of course suitable also to see all the things and the differences and similarities between Howelsen Woodson the the landscaper right now that the most interesting backup tech companies probably messy before for for a few years and I guess your good spectator and also protagonist of these which is interesting so and then in the book you actually mentioned seeks Mega trends that shape than actually are s shaping China in the Chinese economy. I am looked at those make sense. Can you give us just a short as an option about Those ones will be this is a CO author author. Jonathan Mackenzie we know China's confusing and there's a lot going on. It's a big place very complicated and what we did is we sorta pointed. Look at least major economic trends happening that our long-term these. Are you know thirty forty year trends if you if you I can understand those a lot of the chaos becomes a lot more understandable and so the trends. We started to look at where things that were driving. The revenue are the cost structures of companies and out of that we we identified sort of six number one. We is urban as ation just the fact that in China reopened to the world nineteen eighty about eighty percent of the population west farms and twenty percent in this city which is usually pretty much the inverse of most developed countries I so there's just been a steady movement of people into cities which is still happening today. That creates a lot of economic drives. We also like to things like manufacturing manufacturing scale just a lot of money capital rising Chinese consumers which is something that's really become important in the last five to ten years. I digital China and then what we call brainpower behemoths which is just there's there's more and more people with advanced degrees. China's not liking us to be in nineteen ninety minutes engineers and PhD's and artists and a lot of advanced skills now so we kind of looked at those six EXC trends and that that's held up pretty well over time. This little model used a lot of most of the major companies. You see are writing one or two of those trends so so far it's held up. Its minimum four to five years so we'll see but I think it's pretty solid most of those. Things are going on for at least another decade gate if not longer and then we'll say interesting. What time do you think it will be really going on a steeler in the in in the next I mean of course the Sikhs Mega as you said that we would be going on or thirty four thirty forty years but some of them really started the banking the against inspecting the eighties so those spence that you see losing momentum and which ones are the ones that I really any moment I can get. You know it'd be nice to from your side perspective random in the ones that were easier to predict where urbanization manufacturing shrink capital just a lot of money because it's just been steadily narrowing. I mean it's literally a linear line. Just dry nineteen eighty two today and it's just a stray raid law. The ones were little more unpredictable. Were rising Chinese consumers which you know they were not really an economic factor ten years years ago. People didn't talk about Chinese consumers ten years ago. They weren't buying much even know they had income and savings well. That's changed dramatically in the last five to ten years now. It's the world's largest market for audio for gaming offline gaming cinema movies and one industry after the next day become the largest argest marketplace or in the top two so that one's sort of a late bloomer and then digital China which is one of our six is the most unpredictable acas crazy stuff happens all the time most of the China. The digital consumer stories really about consumers. I'm sure most of the digital China's story is mostly about consumers honors. that's where things are really happening. Fast Alibaba ten send social media all that that's a lot of China who turn out are almost almost entirely digital creatures. You know you can't talk about Chinese consumers without talking digital anymore. Everything happens on a smartphone. That's probably the most awesome predictable one but it's moving quick now each missing and you said at the beginning knitting these bedding posted to stress out because a steeler for many people. China is blocked by the very complex set county which is a male of many classes as you. I liking the in the book but did the digital megatrend like Internet Essa changed in China lagged in terms of society consumers would seeing now consumers is his main. Everyone knows a lot of them. That's not a big surprise. Everybody knows that they're rising in their wells. I think the part that gets under appreciated is how complicated they are. China's is arguably the world's most complicated consumer market now it is just you can look at thirty million. Chinese consumers live in caves. You can find Chinese consumers in the far west. Were you got several hundred million of them. That looked like a different country. You go to downtown Beijing. You get more billionaires in Beijing in New York City so there's a huge fragmentation and complexity to them. and it's just getting more so because you know there's a lot of them so we get a lot of anything you're. GonNa they get a lot of complexity and to you still get this big spread between very very developed market behavior like Beijing and Shanghai and you know okay that's out in the field and in the mountains and so you know it's just this hugely complicated subject in the only way you can really understand and Chinese consumers at this point. Is You have to go small. You have to study micro populations Chinese moms sports enthusiasts inland consumers DADS. You have to break it up that way and you find out people are very different YEP. He in Buca Luke Action Yields Twilight one point which I found very interesting in Sao actually people consume the consumption of the Internet sites okay to be more intense or for for Chinese especially young people compared to two west Westerners and is it something that it's still valid today. I mean they still like more time spent on the Internet on digital devices compared to the West Yeah basically I mean everyone knew that was going to be a lot of people with smartphones mark bones in China. That was pretty predictable. Seeing the same thing in India Indonesia places like that. I think what surprised people was how enthusiastic they are they just doc things faster than other countries APP mobile apps off like crazy and they they spend more time online than other consumers in other countries. They contribute more they post more. They add content more so just turns out they. Are you know some of the world's most enthusiastic netizens are Chinese. You know that wasn't necessarily predictable but it's true the other thing to keep even mind. Is You know there's a difference between regular consumers who go down to the supermarket by apples and online consumers because the online consumers effectively operate like network you know it's not just one person that person's sharing with another person sharing their interconnected and if you have three hundred million Americans or three hundred fifty million Americans. There's a certain number of connections. You'll get between them. When you have a billion Chinese consumers. It's actually exponentially financially larger so digital. China effectively operates like a network and it's very rapid very vibrant so so that part is sort of showing itself when you see a new aspect off in China. It goes for nothing to a hundred million users in two months three months now. We don't see that anywhere else that I've seen right and I thought it was interesting to see. Nowadays is a bit of a bads in the marketing world because they said these schools that the talk which they claim to be combated in like in social media space by finding because they sort of in some cases compare the metrics the users acquisition of blood from Lake that we the we we waste about a dozen the make in some ways. It's much sense because as you said I mean it's very eat steady easy to the up went up Atlanta actually they they might get Eddie began than median us so I think it very important to the seldom understanding of China and when he just something he's also that in China that he said that the phenomenon of a super APPs which is something that we didn't yet I guess seeing though in the in the West which makes me think that of course intend as technology China's evolved by looking at you know how Western companies any state companies work actual of the since it was more a I think a couple of years ago looking more in depth at the by do business business model but what I found interest with that right now recently they company like by do is not just a coping a something like a company that Google but actually innovating each way so it's waiting its own innovations as many things actually will will doesn't ever as well as always interesting to see these scandal. I mean what we'll do. They will you see on that standpoint. How does that look like right now. In China China obviously from the West and use any of combining the yeah I mean it's most people in I'd say the United States they got on the Internet by PC. You sit at home. You have your laptop your desktop. They discovered g mail than a couple years. Slater discovered youtube and they slowly adapted various tools over time that didn't happen in China. People basically joined around two thousand nine in two thousand ten only on their smartphones mostly. There were some users before that was very small and they got all these tools at once you know they went from nothing thing to. I've got a smartphone. I can do messaging. I do online video like drawing gaming so they kind of jumped in the deep end of the pool and they've only know the Internet on smartphones and the difference between a smartphone in a P. C. Is One you you work at home your office and then you leave the other one you carry with you all day long so they carry these around all day they message they take photos they watch videos all of that and one of the things that it was different early on people don't use email you send an email to someone in China. You better wait a week. 'cause permanent going to check their email. It was all about messaging so it started out with messaging with Q in that led to we chat and then from there they added payment which Allie pay in and we chat wallet and once you had messaging in and we chat take mobile payments set up that enabled you know e commerce to happen on your your phone anywhere you happen to be during your day that was the basis of the Super App and it turns out people just live on their smartphones. It becomes sort of the operating operating system for your life but we didn't see any of those three steps in the US you know people weren't living on WHATSAPP as much. Although they kind of are now they were using email they didn't adopt mobile payments because they were using credit cards which worked fine not awesome but they were functional

China China Asia Beijing United States Asia Beijing University Middle East Jonathan Mackenzie Jeff Professor Alibaba Howelsen Woodson Spence Hannibal Allie
College Students (And Their Parents) Face A Campus Mental Health 'Epidemic'

Fresh Air

11:43 min | 1 year ago

College Students (And Their Parents) Face A Campus Mental Health 'Epidemic'

"Colleges and universities across the country are reporting an explosion of mental health problems verging on an epidemic. According to my guest, Dr be Janet Hibs and Dr Anthony Ross Dane, their new book, the stressed years of their lives is about why college students are more stressed. And how parents can help their kids cope with stress and anxiety and prepare them to become independent after Hibbs is a family and couple psychotherapist. Her son took a medical leave of absence during his first collared spring break to deal with anxiety and depression when he returned home. He was treated by Dr Ross Dane, who chaired, the university of Pennsylvania's task force, and students psychological health and wellbeing. Dr Ross Dan, is a professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at the is Perelman school of medicine and practices at the children's hospital of Philadelphia. Dr Ross Dan, Dr heads welcome to fresh air. Dr dinner. I want to start with you. You say that you've seen a dramatic rise in campus mental illness rates describe what you're seeing on campus. Well, we've always had students come in with anxiety, and depression, or adjustment disorders and having to see a counselor or therapist or psychiatrist to help them through a crisis. What we're seeing now with growing numbers of students coming into campus who already are already being treated for mental illness, who've are on various medications, and who really have learned to manage their illnesses at home but suddenly they're on their own and sometimes they're not following through their own recommended. Treatments were also seeing students coming on with an inordinate amount of anxiety about surviving college and doing well. And we think the anxiety levels are rising, and creating in students, a great amount of both distress when anything goes wrong more of a brittle response to challenges a greater avoidance of risk. So people are really not wanting to move out of their comfort zone and in real. Over reliance on things like alcohol and other substances to help manage things like social anxiety. The good news though, is that they're more aware of that. So we think more of them are coming forward to talk about it. Us server seeing were stress and anxiety in students today. What do you think are some of the causes behind those new levels of stress? Well, we think that the culture has changed in the last thirty forty years and that these students are growing up in the post nine eleven era that they've been exposed to a lot of trauma, both in the media and also in their lives. Many of them school shootings the rise in uncertainty from globalization. And of course, the economic recession of two thousand eight you know, our students today we were young then and the anxiety. We think really had an impact on their families as well as on what they could glean from the news. And of course, being in this twenty four seven news cycle, as well as the internet itself has really created a sort of a different childhood, you're at the university of Pennsylvania, which is a pretty expensive. Yep. School does that. Add to the stress. Oh, house -olutely center. Of this huge investment that you or your family are making in this college students come to school nowadays, very conscious of that of the economic expansion of the sacrifice that, that parents are making and that adds to their burden of, of worry about doing well and about, especially about anything going wrong. I mean we can also talk I think about the preparation for school that many of them have been overprepared in terms of taking tons of AP classes and really packing their CV's with all kinds of activities, and we worry that there's not enough downtime and things that they can do. They're not going to necessarily always result in a great or in someone noticing them. You know, you have to do a lot of family therapy, so you see a lot of families before the child is going to call it. What are some of the stressors that you're seeing in preparation for call in preparing kids to be on their own? The overwhelming majority of high school students today. It somewhere around ninety percent report college as their top stressor and to build on what Tony saying it's not only kids, but their parents who are anxious. So we're living in a culture of fear and many times parents come to me and go what's wrong with kits today? I didn't have these kinds of stressors and this isn't what my college experience was like. And it's important for parents to know we're in what I would call a moment of historic swerve where basically this has been building for about forty years. And then the threat is just spinning out rolling out really fast now with all of the very rapid changes. And so parents have gone into a control mode they used to promote autonomy. That's how I grew up like the free range kid. But now, they're basically. They're exerting more and more control, which makes their kids more anxious and also less prepared for the unpredictable. We knew say, more control what forms of control? Parents are scared that there's only one path linear path to the good life, and silver some parents who are affluent enough. That means the brand name college or top, you know, prep that you can get for other parents. It's just a lot of pressure on the kids. You have to do well, you can't make a mistake. Your chances will be ruined. So we see, especially very smart kids, which some researchers call brainiacs. They have what we call destructive perfectionism, which they cannot tolerate. Not excelling at everything and no one. I mean, typically excels at everything we all have, you know, times when we, we both make mistakes, or fail, and kids don't have as much practice at that today. Because there. Protected from having those experiences and also it freaks their parents out, which makes the kids feel more responsible. I wanna go to something that you mentioned, which is a lot of parents feel like I don't know, when I went to college, I was so happy to get away from my parents and to be independent. So why is my child so reluctant to leave home? Why are they having such a hard time adjusting to being away from home, and I'd like you to reflect on that a little bit because I think it is baffling to a lot of parents. I think most kids are still really happy to leave home. They want to be in the life of the pseudo adult, but what they're unprepared for our what I would call both the expectable challenges that college poses in terms of the requirement for more independence, more ownership of your hours, whether it's sleep saying no to partying managing yourself, basically. And it also is a fact that parents remembrance is that it was less pressure. That's absolutely true. It's a much harsher environment now to same number of slots at these top competitive schools, a lot more applicants and part of what's also going on. Is that as the college for all movement rolled out forty five years ago? It dismantled vocational funding at the federal and community college levels, and even at the public university levels. The underlying message is there's only one path to a good life. And so the pressure on kids who've really, you know drunk the Kool aid. That's the message. They believe is that they'll have as one of the kids, I've treated says a second tier life unless they just keep going to the top top top top schools of everything. And even then they feel they cannot make mistakes. It's all about expectations. Now, there's a certain amount of inev-. Evitable anxiety about transition. I mean we, we call this age the transitional age period of transitional age youth so that we think is natural, the, the feeling that, oh, I don't know quite what I'm doing here, but it's the response that they're having to that uncertainty that we've noticed students have a lot less resilience or preparation. So that's part of what we're trying to do in this book is really talk about readiness social emotional readiness. There's no question. People are actively prepared. I mean they're learning incredible amount nowadays in school. They're learning amazing kinds of things, and the internet has opened up knowledge that was never as available, you know, but it's also created distractions and a lot of pressure. Socially, and more importantly, I think when people get to college, maybe not enough time has been spent in highschool both in the curricular side. And with the family in what we call social emotional readiness or mature. Parity? How do you teach that? I mean what are you what do you mean by preparation? How do you hear somebody else, so fan maturity begin to going back to the comparisons? You know in the past we'd go off to college. Sometimes never our parents would drop us off. But that's it say goodbye, and you're, you're there, once a week phone call. Yeah. Once a week phone call, if you were lucky right now it's constant, you know, texting and Skyping and talking to one another. So there's a lot of closeness and we're not against closeness what, what happens then, though, is that the student doesn't feel like, hey, I really know how to manage this on my own and haven't had a chance to practice. And the way you teach it is really by going through, you know, set of conversations with your kid and saying, hey, you know, let's talk a little bit about, you know, the way you manage your life. But can you get up in the morning and manage your day? I mean, I, I run an ADHD program at Penn, and I got a phone call from a parent a few years back saying, hey, you're the director of the. HD program. My son is coming depend. I said, great wonderful. Congratulations. She says, do you have a wake-up service? I wake up service. Yes, my son can't get up without me getting them up every morning. And so what I I said, listen, we don't have a wakeup service. But I think it's really important that he learned how to wake himself up before he gets college. So that's really what we're saying is learning to manage your life learning to do things. More on your own without constantly checking back and asking for someone's help and also being able to handle things like the risks that college brings and being able to handle social relationships all those conversations, parents and kids really need to have in an open way. So there's a level of helping your child, that's maybe too much help. Exactly, and it comes at a cost right because. Yes, we're giving our kids, everything we have and we care about them, right? But at the same time, what's the message? It's oh you need to succeed or else. We're we're going to really get upset. I think if the message from apparent to kid is like you may not know but we expect that you'll be able to figure it out. Let's see. What happens is different than saying you better do this. You better know that you'd better not mess up, and that the anxiety itself is part of what we want parents to deal with their own anxiety, and then being able to let go in a way. That's more feels more natural. It's okay to not know

University Of Pennsylvania Dr Ross Dan Depression Professor Of Psychiatry And Pe DR Dr Ross Dane Perelman School Of Medicine Dr Dinner Dr Anthony Ross Dane Hibbs Hospital Of Philadelphia -Olutely Center Tony Janet Hibs Adhd Skyping Penn Director
Capturing carbon, once a fringe idea, may be key to fighting climate change

Bob Salter

12:20 min | 1 year ago

Capturing carbon, once a fringe idea, may be key to fighting climate change

"With Courtney white on it for Courtney, the author of grass soil hope and talking with us on our program we talking about climate change, we touched on that topic just before we paused for update and his interesting hearing you use the word hope. Well, I two responses one as I as I sort of chronicle in the book, there are new hopeful ideas out there, these these ideas being put into practice at small scales right now by farmers and ranchers and scientists and other folks our new they have a different way of looking at the world their affective, and we can see the effect. And so there is hope on that level. Meaning that we. We don't have to make anything up. You don't have to wait for some big technology. Come running down the road. We don't have to wait for some huge shift and governmental policies the toolbox for re carbonized these landscapes is is in place, and that's exciting. And that's hopeful. And it's a work. It's the result of a lot of hard work over a lot of years. These these folks so many folks working on this or thirty forty years. And so you look at what some of the answer to our problems. There are these new ideas are these new ways of managing landscapes. So that's hopeful the town, of course, there is trying to scale up make these tools in its toolbox work at larger scales. And there there are a lot of obstacles in the way. I'm not going to sugar coat that, but you gotta start somewhere. I mean kinda start small and be be hopeful about that. The other answer is things seem to be shifting. I will take for example, the head of the ranching community, which if you go back about ten years the words climate change were politically. No as as it is many folks out west kind of a political position largely not true. Not true not true that that's that's changed in. Because folks that seeing it in evacuated as conditions change. And I see the conversation has shifted in last ten years. We see in our conference, for example, where we kind of embrace these ideas up early up first and got into a little hot water or some folks. How are you can't be saying those things now we don't hear those conversations quite so much folks understand and what's neat about? The radical center is brings folks of kind of different political persuasions together to talk about land and water and food the politics, they they dissolve folks want to work together to do things, and that's hopeful to and we've seen that over the years. The challenge, of course, where the hope issue comes more difficult is trying to figure out how to take all the stuff that's at the grass roots and at the margins to some degree forgot how kind of elbow its way into our political system. And our Tommy in a way that you know, we can we can make some larger effects that's more difficult than I don't know what the answer to that is except to look at these on the ground things that are happening say, well, here are examples progress hopeful progress, how do we how do we convince other folks, particularly our political leadership to try them or give them a chance. We're right at that point right now. And I don't know the answer to that yet. Maybe two years from now we can talk again, maybe they'll be good news to report. So that's that's kind of a challenge. And so I'm hopeful up to a point I'm hopeful about the practices and ideas, and the people be, and then we have to figure out how do you get over that threshold? So hopefully, hopefully, I answered your question. It does answer. It's the idea of a long term situation of sustainability for the environment. Do you have to make the argument to some people that it makes economic sense? Yeah. I we have to figure out how to do this economically. It just this just so much you can do with different kinds of other kinds of incentive programs like government programs. Let's say or you know, just paying folks directly out of a foundation grant or something like that to to make it work. We can fund demonstration projects which is what we've been doing for a while. But how do you make it work economically in a long run? That's that's sort of the sixty four thousand dollar question at many levels and lots of obstacles in the way. They're I mean, ranchers, for example are. Economics of everything to them. Beyond living on the land and enjoying it raising livestock. They have to pay their pills. And so they have to figure out how this works economically. A lot of adopted kind of a multi prong strategy. They do different kinds of economic activities, including grass fed beef. A lot of them had value to meet, and so they looking at the second nominally we could figure out how to incentivize carbon building soil carbon economically. I think a lot of the stuff will take right off as I said before the two boxes there. We know what to do. We have small scale samples of how economic could work, but if carbon for example, were economically valuable, I guess to the country as in the soil instead of being burned put up in the atmosphere. Those practices are there would take off. And I sometimes think what if we somehow figured out. To pay farmers and ranchers pay them to say, double double the carbon in the soils. Well, they would set out to do it. They would know any stood back and said pick a practice. They're all good, whatever works for you. They argue is at the end of the book, they they would figure that out in an economic and capitalist sense. I'd say a market sense. I say, okay, I'm I'm gonna pick a strategy that works here, and I get paid for increasing soil carbon. And it's good for me because it increases the productivity land water kind of stuff how we get that incentive incentive. Carbon thing to happen is the question right now. I know what nobody's always clear on that just yet. Well, does that take the leadership if I can phrase it that way of our elected officials and policymakers? Yeah, it does. And and you know, as well as I what a challenge that. And so and also I also wanna throw in here. The the other part of this. I need to say that you know, the the climate question climate issue isn't gonna resolve with carbon more carbon in the soil. This is this is a good part of what we call the mitigation of the problem, but we have to turn down the emissions of greenhouse gases. I just I just wanted to serve on that. And that also takes leadership as we all know. So yeah, how. What kind of policies would come out of congress or any administration to to kind of put this to work? Well, gosh. You know, I'm not an economist. I'm you know, I'm a land guy. I like I like animals grass and soil hand. So I I'm not sure how to make. I know some communists has my Via's that they tend to involve putting some kind of tax on carbon at the source know, kind of making the pollution caused more. Maybe maybe in that question is some kind of payments to landowners for sequestering that carbon in the soil, and I don't know, that's that's beyond beyond my expertise gun. My pay grade. When you talk about this book and the importance in doing this book. What are you hoping that those who read the book, you're actually going to take away from well, you know, first and foremost, we spent a lot of time demonizing carbon carbons the bad, dude. Here, you know, we have a war on carbon. We have to we have to have a post carbon economy. We have you know, it's just a terrible thing in the media largely because it's pollutant it's going up here. What do we do? What are you do part of my goal with the book was to say, no, no, no carbon is actually part of the answer here. It's the fundamental element of life. We are made of carbon everything around us has made of carbon life wouldn't exist without it. Let's look at it in a positive way. Instead of simply always in a negative way. We look at it, positively all these opportunities kind of pop up. Food water land-management all kinds of things when we look at carbon through a positive lens. And that's that. Main objective of the books to say the some of the answers to these problems. All right into our noses. And it's really just a matter of attitude more than anything else, if he have this sort of war on carbon attitude. We we overlook carbon as part of Hanser, and that's an in the book tries to explain that chapter by chapter, which let's look at carbon this way carbon that way, and when you do really cool interesting things up and start to happen. And when we talk about the leadership in that area of some of those cool and interesting things the real innovation that is happening. Is taking place in this country. No today. There's there's there's a lot going on. If you go back about five or six years wasn't quite so much. I think they're actually speeding right long. Australia has been a key place for innovation. I was really amazed to go down there and see all the different things going on about. Joe you I ain't partly they're probably their attitudes. They they'd have kind of anti thority kind of get her get her done kind of thing. How long farmers and ranchers male heads of scientists all kinds of stuff going on there that there's definitely on here as well and Europe and other places, but it's it changes still coming from the the margin. Which is where innovation comes largely outside the system, whether it's technology or farming or something the new ideas need to start with the innovators county, edges and then work its way in and that's very much. What's happening right now. And it's it's picking up speed. It's coming more into the center. I'm amazed by how much soil carbon talk. There is as as this to other books. I've come out, and there's a bunch of other stuff happening different places. As folks realize the potential of this to help with the problem with need about this. And it's it's it's a cliche win win. You know, so you're pulling carbon dioxide down and storing and soils while you're producing food and water because we improve the soil all kinds of Nicole things. So that's in a world that's worried about how to feed itself whereas water coming from that kind of stuff. These are these become important issues and more and more folks are getting an a stand that we still have some institutional barriers, you know, kind of big agribusiness things like that. So no, no, no. You can't do that. Gotta use chemicals. You gotta do this. Well, we'll see how that works out kind of in the

Courtney White Europe Tommy Congress Hanser Australia Nicole JOE Ten Years Sixty Four Thousand Dollar Thirty Forty Years Six Years Two Years
"thirty forty years" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"thirty forty years" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"If it were good. If it were if it were or I mean, this is this is actually another reason why conservatives often fail at the culture and fail of movies is we're a little too on the nose for a little direct sometimes and the left is very good at hiding itself until recently until the last two years, they were even pretending that, they're not socialists. And so if the if the movie is a work of art that isn't just some deck knock over the head political message. That would be good start. Yeah. I I think the thing that could stay conservatives makers that conservative arts not look like conservative life. I mean, the sopranos is a great work of conservative. Art. It doesn't look anything like conservative life. It has all kinds of violence and bad, language nudity. All those things and yet it is deeply deeply, moral and godly even story. I was I was reading a book of Genesis originally sent people always say this to me, they say, I don't need that stuff. I can read the bible you read the bible. But there is a question here that I think is an interesting one, which is very often what you'll hear is also things like why don't they nominate movies that people actually like though. So that's not what the Oscars are for for nominating stuff that that that the artists, you know, that more artistic there's some other standard out there. I think that separation between what the people this goes back to a discussion. We're having earlier the separation between what the people like what is quote artistic is an art official separation that has begun in the last thirty forty years. The godfather was a massive box office. I mean, Star Wars was a massive box office. Mash AT was a massive box office. Mash raiders lost was nominated for best picture the never gets nominated for best picture now. It's not it's not even though the truth is that writers of the law star has some actual morality to read minutes, actually, saying like in the essence saying there is something beyond what you think there is. It's actually a pretty good argument against science was the last Spielberg who's the last director could make films that everybody loved the world's great movies. Right. He really is the last guy. The other thing is you, and I have had this discussion where we. Agreed about the movie get out and one of the things I think that art does that offense conservatives is that it talks about the inexperience of being human being in the world. And why I loved get out. And I really did think it was a good movie a very good movie. No. Yeah. We disagreed. I thought actually talked about the fear in this. When you simulate will, you lose your soul. Assimilate will I lose my soul? It was a horror movie, so in the horror movie, you do your soul, but that's a human experience a human fear. And that's I thought it was legitimate..

Spielberg official director thirty forty years two years
"thirty forty years" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

The Andrew Klavan Show

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"thirty forty years" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

"Would it be if it if it will or it? I mean, this is this is actually another reason why conservatives often fail at the culture and fail of movies is we're a little too on the nose, a little direct sometimes and the left is very good at hiding itself until recently until the last two years, they were even pretending that, they're not socialists. And so if the if the movie is a work of art that isn't just some dig- acting knock over the head political message. That would be a good start. Yeah. And I think the thing that could stay conservatives makers that conservative arts not look like conservative life. I mean, the sopranos is a great work of conservative. Art. It doesn't look anything like conservative life. It has all kinds of violence and bad language, due to the all those things and yet it is deeply deeply, moral and godly even story. I was I was reading a book called Genesis rich people always say this to me, they say, I don't need that stuff. I can read the bible, and you read the bible. But there is a question here that I think is an interesting one, which is very often what you'll hear is all say things like why don't they nominate movies that people actually like? And so that's not what the Oscars are for for nominating stuff that that the artists, you know, that is more artistic there's some other standard out there. I think that separation between what the people this goes back to discussion. We're having earlier the separation between what the people like what is quote unquote, artistic is an artificial separation that has begun in the last thirty forty years. The godfather was a massive box office. Yeah. I mean, Star Wars was massive box office mesh AT was a massive box office smash raiders lost was nominated for best picture the never gets nominated for best picture now. Because it's not it's not even though the truth. Is that raiders of the wall star has some actual morality to mean is actually saying didn't like in the NFL saying there is something beyond what you think there is. It's actually a pretty good argument against science. Was the last Spielberg the last director who could make films at everybody loved there. We're also great movies. He really is the last guy. The other thing is you, and I have had this discussion where we disagreed about the movie get out and one of the things I think that art does that offense conservatives is that it talks about the inexperience of being human being in the world. Why I loved get out. And I really did think it was a good movie a very good movie. No. Yeah. We we disagreed. I thought actually talked about the fear in this. When you simulate will, you lose your soul. Assimilate will I lose my soul? It was a horror movie, so in the horror movie, you do your soul, but that's a human experience, that's human fear. And that's I thought it was legitimate..

NFL director thirty forty years two years
"thirty forty years" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"thirty forty years" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"If it were good it be. If it were if it were or I mean, this is this is actually another reason why conservatives often fail at the culture and fail of movies is we're a little too on the nose. We're a little direct sometimes and the left is very good at hiding itself until recently until the last two years, they were even pretending that, they're not socialists. And so if the if the movie is a work of art that isn't just some dig- acting knock over the head political message. That would be a good start. Yeah. And I think the thing that could stay conservatives makers conservative arts, not look like conservative life. I mean, the sopranos is a great work of conservative. Art. It doesn't look anything like that -servative life. It has all kinds of violence and bad, language nudity. All those things, and yet is deeply deeply, moral and godly even story. I was I was reading a book called Genesis originally people always say this to me, they say, I don't need that stuff. I can read the bible, and you read the bible. But there is a question here that I think is an interesting, which is very often what you'll hear is also things like why don't they nominate movies that people actually like, so that's not what the Oscars are for for nominating stuff that that the artists, you know, that as Martissant there's some other standard out there. I think that that separation between what the people this goes back to a discussion. We're having earlier the separation between what the people like what is quote unquote, artistic is an artificial separation that has begun in the last thirty forty years. The godfather was a massive box office. Star Wars was a massive box office mesh AT was a massive box office mash raiders loss was nominated for best picture raiders. The law never gets nominated for best picture now. It's not it's not even though the truth is that readers of the wall star has some actual morality to read minutes actually, saying didn't like in the essence at saying. There is something beyond what you think there is. It's actually a pretty good argument against has. Has he was the last Spielberg who's the last director who could make films that everybody loved there? We're also great movies, right? He really is the last guy. The other thing is you, and I have had this discussion where we disagreed about the movie get out and one of the things I think that art does that offense conservatives is that it talks about the inner experience of being human being in the world. And why I loved get out. And I really did think it was a good movie at very good movie. No we disagreed. I thought actually talked about the fear in this. When you simulate will, you lose your soul. Assimilate will I lose my soul? It was a horror movie, so in the horror movie, you do your soul, but that's a human experience a human fear. And that's I thought that was completely legitimate..

Spielberg director thirty forty years two years
"thirty forty years" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"thirty forty years" Discussed on KNSS

"All right as we continue with Gregg Jarrett, and David Sean, I wanna talk about this whole put the screws to somebody. If you're sixty six years old, and you're facing twenty thirty forty years in prison, David and the prosecution goes, you know, we can get you get out of jail free card. We can we can get you out. You just gotta tell us about this guy. And they'll even sorta tell you what they're looking for that to me would be bribery that to me would be offering something of tremendous value to incentivize people to lie and suborn perjury. Yeah. You're one hundred percent right logically. In fact, there's a case out of the tenth circuit that was going that way years ago, but spring court said, otherwise when the government pays it. It's not bribery. Somehow. This is very tempting. But as you've said before so many of these people have face bankruptcy family problems. I just hope that Mr. stone is going to be able to fight this thing all of these stories on the internet. Well, he's waffling now. And all that I hope you're gonna tell him to stay strong when you speak to him in the next hour Santana. I know for a fact because he'd been saying in all these interviews he doesn't have the money to fight. I mean, I don't know why people -ssume that some people have a lot of money to fight this. This is millions of dollars. This is not right. You see you see these other jokers with these defense sheriff Israel now you've got a legal defense fund, Michael for naughty for stormy Daniels. Maybe people to pony up Roger stone because he's fighting for the American people is fighting for our constitution. He has to have his day in court, and we have to show the American people what went on in this prosecution. What do you think about this quid pro quo tell us what do we want to hear? You gotta get out of jail free card, Greg. Yeah. You know, we sanction in America. And it's wrong. Prosecutors using extortion and bribery and threats to get people to lie under oath to implicate others. It needs to be changed. But you know, the odd thing about all of this is that when you actually read the indictment it demonstrates. There is no no no evidence of Trump Russia collusion. If such evidence existed Muller would have charged stone or others without offense. Not a single person has been charged with the alleged crime Muller was appointed to investigate. All right. Got to. Thank you. Both. Roger stone will join us at the top of the hour. We're going to check in with freedom caucus members. Mark green of Tennessee. Andy Biggs of Arizona. We'll talk about immigration also about this witch hunt and much more as we continue the Sean Hannity show Hannity tonight nine eastern, we got a great show tell you about that in a minute..

Roger stone bribery David Sean Muller Sean Hannity Gregg Jarrett Andy Biggs perjury Santana Mark green Arizona America Greg extortion Israel Russia Daniels Tennessee Michael twenty thirty forty years
"thirty forty years" Discussed on Living Legacy Leadership

Living Legacy Leadership

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"thirty forty years" Discussed on Living Legacy Leadership

"I imagine giving to newlyweds we're going to a lot of weddings that same summer. And of course, listening to all these newlyweds talk about how it was going to be so fun and so easy. And they were so meant for each other. And it was going to be great and to twelve years in. I'm sitting there like, yeah. You know, it's going to be awesome. Every second that kind of a kind of a conversation with these newlyweds about, you know, no, they're going to be moments where you actually want the other person, you know, to suffer and it's going to be okay. Because by the end of the day, you'll be back in love with them. And that was the case in Minneapolis. Wow. That's amazing. So what do you think was what was it about that article that gave it such a high appeal relate ability or was it his response or how it all turned out? It's just going to sell. Yeah. Well, you know, what I think is so funny as you know, I wrote that essay Senate into my editor at the times. And I said, you know, don't know if you can use this. It's just kind of like a little thing about how you fight in marriage. And then you get get along. Again. It seemed very obvious to me and very simple, and he ran it. And quite soon after I sent it. And then the response was just a slut, and it was it was mostly from people who've been married a very long time. People have married like twenty thirty forty years who said people never talk about how hard it his in a way that acknowledges that that the hardness is also part of the joy that they're all bound up together. You know, we talk a lot when people get divorced about how hard it was like, oh, they didn't make it was really tough. But people don't talk about how. In a happy marriage in a good marriage. You still find yourself very mad sometimes and very, you know, lonely sometimes, and there are moments even in a really good marriage that really test you, and that's part of part of marriage. It's designed to be part of marriage. It's not like it's not doing it wrong. And all these people married a long time. You know, they talked. They're in a very funny way in these emails. They sent me about moments when they almost left, you know, when they really they really hit this wall. And then now they're still together. And they're very glad. Wow. That's amazing. You know, I heard this. And it could actually be from the the channel at self harm. Hallmark channel lames to be the number one movie viewing station TV is that right here. You know? And that's kind of like the fairytale sort of perfect love story. You know rendition where you talk about examples where people get comfortable with a real relationship and.

Senate Minneapolis editor twenty thirty forty years twelve years
IBM, Leicester City and Thailand discussed on All Of It

All Of It

00:14 sec | 2 years ago

IBM, Leicester City and Thailand discussed on All Of It

"To all with Crystal Palace. Iran. Thrashed Real Madrid five one in L classic with the future of manager Yulia. And is now in serious doubt rail now ten in Lalita and in baseball Boston Red Sox the wraps on a dominating season with a five one win over the Los Angeles Dodgers in game five of the World Series. The Red Sox are killed their full title in fifteen years James more from James in twenty five minutes. In the meantime, let's talk about the computer giant IBM spending thirty four billion dollars to buy a software company that gives away its products for free business presented this morning. In Hong Kong is Andrew would Andrew what's this all about? Well, he doesn't give away all of the products for free. It gives away the key products. You remember the old thing they used to say is if you give them an official feed him for a day, if you give them if you teach a man to fish and you'll feed him for life. The capitalist version is you can also sell him fishing equipment. You can sell him magazines fishing. You can send him about theme holidays and conferences, and it's a bit like that with red hat, which is the company that IBM is board at the key to its business is the Lennox operating system which has been around for a couple of decades now, and it's no fun source software, and it's free. It's basically being put together by volunteers. So the problem is with the with the software is that because it's being put together volunteers. There isn't really anything like a company you can ring up or help desk. If you've got problems with Lennon's so company like red hat comes in and says, well, we'll solve your problems with lenox. We'll we'll adapts it. If you need it be we can debunk it. We come come connect you to other computer systems, and so on so red hat makes a lot of money out of that. It's also into cloud computing as well now IBM is the deal is worth thirty four billion IBM's worth. About one hundred ten billion on the stock market. So this is quite a big deal in terms of expanding the size of IBM rather. It's quite a big big takeover that might take a bit of time to digest IBM gets access to an awful lot more technology services. And traditionally IBM was very very good at coming up with big computers and lots of software and selling them a rather renting them to people. And so in a way, this is actually going backwards to what the IBM was like thirty forty years ago. Very good at coming up with software, which you can sell services rented out in effect, pay subscriptions and get cash again. And again and again. Yes. So IBM kind of coming full circle. Thank you. Andrea. That's our business presented this morning. Andrew would and as you may have had in the news throughout the last couple of days funds of LeicesteR Leicester City football club in Britain has confirmed. The chairman of the club died when his helicopter crushed outside the stadium on Saturday evening. All four people on board were also killed. Funds have been laying clubs shots and messages of support. Also the team stadium. Mr. VJ as was famously helped to put together a team which ton Waldron at one of the Premier League in two thousand sixteen at odds of five thousand to one at tell us more bottom and how he made his fortune that ended up in LeicesteR city's George McCloud who's a political risk consultant based in Bangkok. And you started his business is all right, George. Yes. That's correct. Now, would you would you say that he was immensely wealthy? He was he was a extremely wealthy businessman. His net worth was estimated at over three three billion US three point three billion. And speaking to my colleague Jonathan head not too long ago. He says that he wasn't that. Well known. In Thailand until he bought Leicester City. No, he was you know, he I I would say he was a figure of some controversy as well. He he he obtained a very lucrative duty free concession for Thailand's airports, which obviously did attract attention, but. His his acquiring of of the Leicester City football club sort of propelled him to to a new level, you know, locally as well, obviously internationally and what we've seen with other. Thai wealthy people. Not least should know what ended up in politics, but he stayed out into. Well, you know, formerly speaking he did. But behind the scenes, he's he's he's been incredibly active, politically, I'd say that that he stands apart in that sense. A lot of businessmen in Thailand try to deliberately steer clear of politics. He's been very active financing various sides of the political spectrum depending on I guess who's in power at the time. He's switched sides a number of times, then proved very dexterous at at navigating the difficult political system here, why Lester city of all the teams why did he pick it? Well, I mean for for one thing it was you know, it was an underdog team. And I think he set his sights on on, you know, wiping it into shape, which which he did very well. I mean, the shows a high level of sort of business acumen on his part and. It was very much a down de project. He he's as I say very wealthy, but he doesn't come from one of the legacy wealthy families here. And he was always struggling to gain acceptance in those circles, and I think acquiring that football club was partly intended for for that level of acceptance. So how will ties be reacting to his death? Well, there's obviously shock over this grief over this because he is possibly, you know, the the only figure in this country that's managed to internationalize himself to that degree. But you know, of course, I don't think people are in the under any illusions that they that he has been a figure of controversy as well. Good to talk to you. Thank you very much for sharing your thoughts with us. We've been speaking to George McLeod who is a political risk consultant based in Bangkok. So.

IBM Leicester City Thailand Red Sox Andrew Bangkok Football Crystal Palace Hong Kong Los Angeles Dodgers Yulia Consultant Iran Lalita Boston James George Mccloud
"thirty forty years" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"thirty forty years" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Special agent in ABC news contributor, Steve Gomez. Steve sounds like here as opposed to what we've heard about in the last couple of years in terms of a school shooting. We had the church shooting in Texas, this appears to be the more traditional workplace shooting that we've been dealing with for the last thirty forty years, I suppose Steve. You know, we we don't know a whole lot. But when you're talking about a business community enterprise community there. That's the first thing that you're taking about from a law enforcement standpoint. Everything's on the table. I mean, I'm sure that's what they're considering. But they're definitely thinking along those lines, and then they're going to pursue accordingly. Trying to get the business owners the managers who was this person. And what relationship did they have at that business community what sort of special challenges could be out there. In terms of this warehouse area this distribution center. The guy. The guy lots of corners, lots of people and lots of surrounding neighborhoods. Exactly, you know, some of these warehouses and manufacturing plants that could be there. We'll have a lot of nooks and crannies as far as where a person could be hiding or maybe they stored some weapons and explosives. They're gonna be thinking along those lines, and they have to make sure that they clear the area or any potential areas that the suspect may have went to or came from. So that's probably why we're seeing some delays there. In addition to just the initial part of the investigation to try to figure out ways and the relationship that person had with the victims, and and the the location where the the suspect went into the seems to be looking at pictures here. No real sense of urgency on the part of those law enforcers there, they are directing traffic around the area. There is a school elementary school that you in that neighborhood. It's on lockdown. Now, as you could imagine that people are just generally being kept back away from that. What what do you surmise from the the the attitude with way that officers are carrying themselves understand like this every day like anyone else tenses up? I guess when things are hot. And when things are are over, I suppose, they relax of it. Exactly when you don't have that kind of urgency that usually means that either the suspect is in custody or the suspect has been neutralized, and they feel comfortable that there are no additional suspect. But we have been hearing some unconfirmed reports that maybe somebody at large. So. Just be a matter of the gut theory contained with the perimeter. They feel comfortable about the control within the perimeter. And and now it's a matter of clearing everything getting all the civilian out. The the the witnesses get them over into an area. It sounds like they were moving some of the people in a bus from what they were describing people in a bus that that's typical when they finally start to get the the witnesses and the victims out of there. They put him on a bus extract them to a different location. Then we're watching those more pictures of Harford county officials there the sheriff's office bringing in a canine unit, also an armored.

Steve Gomez ABC Harford county Texas thirty forty years
Climate change projected to boost insect activity and crop loss, researchers say

24 Hour News

01:13 min | 2 years ago

Climate change projected to boost insect activity and crop loss, researchers say

"Potential effects, of climate change like melting ice caps and rising sea levels but there's another aspect, not talked, about much AP science writer said Bornstein reports a new study in the journal science suggests global warming could. Lead to more and hungrier crop eating bugs studying computer simulations of bugs and of climate change and, they found that for every degree Fahrenheit it warms the crop losses From, Hungary insects, go up by five to fifteen percent and he says those researchers have laid. Out an ominous, timeline for significant crop losses on a warming world they're. Saying in the next thirty forty years as the world warms another two point seven degrees. We will see about fifty million tonnes extra in crop losses from Hungary bucks Lawrence team says the study, does have, its, critics within. The scientific community this study does not include use of insecticides to fight, it and it's a broad-based study so. They're other outside scientists say it's a little too broad for that among. The crops, most at risk American corn wheat and rice

Hungary Bornstein Hawaii University Of California Writer Holstein Davis Fifty Million Tonnes Thirty Forty Years Fifteen Percent Thirty Percent Seven Degrees Seven Percent Two Percent Six Month
"thirty forty years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"thirty forty years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"To change I've got guys that look for a reason to buy another vehicle and they come up all the time and, they're talking to other people and I don't know if they, get influenced bomb or what but all of a. Sudden they, won't something different and I've I've got people. Have sold for years now. Right now, I'm selling grandchildren of course I've been in the business that fabulous brand children that I'd, sold their grandfather and grandmother And I've got people up so cars to for twenty thirty forty years but you know I, want to tell the truth I want to be the best, person I can be and how much is too. Much how, much profits too much yes we need to. Make a profit but we. Don't want, you buried an unhappy customer to figure out that they bought a unit way too much You know and that's. What happens, every day people go in? There and they, buy, one from a dealership and then, they, see another one in paper and the. Paper our own internet our friend of, their spouse one you know, a solo truck gentleman here while back and he takes it. Home and his neighbor had just bought a similar. Truck for ten thousand more with more miles and the neighbors told him, he said why would you do that and he said well I thought it was a bargain say people. Don't, know is the big secret the car business is a big secret and people really don't. Know and you, need to know you need to. Do your homework you need to research to many people. Spend months and sometimes I get? Out of date looking at? In, brand new TV Bill study them, hard in research them hard and.

twenty thirty forty years
"thirty forty years" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"thirty forty years" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"Defined what a communist tactic looks like when it's being played out the more you attack donald trump who attacks donald trump more than the cia controlled media nobody why by design to drive support to the candidate that the people have grown to like because the american people haven't paid attention to the fact that donald trump has been groomed for thirty forty years in this country in a favorable light to the people now i think donald probably a cool guy but i also know that he's a traitor i know what donald trump says and what donald trump does are two different stories and see the problem that we have this country is we have too many people that are willing to sell out their principles because they like their favorite politician and i wanna tell you something right there you fail my friend to learn from history do you think that for some reason eighty million people under adolf hitler do you think that they hated eight off nope it came across as a favorable dude do you think stalin was i hate to do as a matter of fact they still call him the father of their nation what's interesting about that back in the thirties friends president roosevelt had the american people calling this mass murderer joseph stalin they had americans calling that mass murderer uncle joe how simply you are deceived make yourself sheep america and you will be devoured by the wolf and you're being devoured well what are you talking about bradley what are you talking about well just like i've been talking about over the last hour now hour and a half do you remember the one point three trillion dollar omnibus bill sold as national security to the american people this was on march twenty ninth i wrote this isn't it interesting that the one point three trillion dollar omnibus bill sold as national security to the american people was teed up by barack hussein obama and paul ryan the traitor himself back in two thousand fifteen of december and it literally funded everything concerning our enemies without and our enemies within i'm gonna highlight that in just a couple moments and i'm going to show you folks davidson now announcing plans to have some operation out of the us because of the tariff newstalk thirteen.

donald trump adolf hitler roosevelt joseph stalin bradley newstalk cia president barack hussein obama paul ryan davidson three trillion dollar thirty forty years
"thirty forty years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"thirty forty years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The folks in china big man who are making the sort of the default ships for bitcoin minorities and hope to do the same fray i folks in israel at mobilize intel subsidiary that say they can put driverless cars on the road faster than uber google that's one of my favorite stories i think i i had no idea i guess how much how many different companies that they're working for and how they're kind of maybe taking a different tack quite a motley crew smart critic for sure on on both counts yeah mean we kept seeing over and over again particularly in the profiles you say is that a lot of these these folks have been working kind of toiling in the background on this on this sort of stuff for as long as thirty forty years sort of baseline theory behind what are known as neural networks designed to mimic human thought with a big eskimos of computers it's an idea that's been around since the fifties but only really practical in the last five or six years or so and so a lot of these guys who've done a lot of the baseline research whether it's on the neural net level or trying to build in the case of richard jenkins in his drones sailboats that can really monitor the oceans in ways we haven't been able to before.

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"thirty forty years" Discussed on KTCK Sportsradio 1310 The Ticket

KTCK Sportsradio 1310 The Ticket

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"thirty forty years" Discussed on KTCK Sportsradio 1310 The Ticket

"And i buy it that's awesome news i'm glad to hear that i suffered for forty years every since i moved here with teams that socket and never mind the city never mind it used to be something thirty forty years ago but the city's full of rich toss ours support a team they're a bunch of toss ours what i used to be and you're the only one that tells the truth you're our dawn sherri you know that i love you this guy's not get him a beer everything is say you're spot on no who knows there's no way you grew up there where'd you grow up i grew up in belfast i thought so that's where my family's from and they're all nuts and drunk and they'll what do you think i am i'm not nuts but i'm drama listen when i started dating thirty four zero mother said if you do anything to my daughter i'll blow off your legs i thought that was a fantastic way to start a relationship and but she took i took i send my kids to belfast they went over there and hung out for two weeks in belfast they got to go to chill the most in ireland and really live it up in belfast and see all that great you know jerry kelly stuff going on over there let's stop the conversation and its tracks did you notice that i mean just say jerry kelly i was a little suspect if you drive them out in i mean i found the whole thing to be a little accent you weren't down with the accident where i thought it was a little suspect to be quite honest with you thought we braveheart on the list and i think the fact that i thought he could have been from a couple of different places way he was switching it up i just like the fact that he kept calling people toss here's that was great i what is tall sir well we can talk about that in the break but i'm going to start using it on my show i think i'm going to have to run with that one from now on it's hoster your budget sir.

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"thirty forty years" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

The Meb Faber Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"thirty forty years" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

"Tips where where that fit in it doesn't fit in because they've only been around so not not as much recently and even tips if you look at on a real basis lost in the past thirty forty years they lost twenty or thirty percent so that's the challenge and so i had tweeted i said look you know find me a portfolio it's almost impossible to find an asset allocation portfolio so if you think from the starting point of stocks having lost eighty percent bonds having loss fifty then find me portfolio that hasn't lost at least twenty five percent on a real basis and it's nearly impossible there's some that are close so the permanent style portfolios in the us which is a quarter each stocks bonds gold and cash yeah tbills dow one's pretty close but the problem with that is it's not really robust because if you take it globally it's closer to forty fifty percent what do you do with this though i mean the candles gloom and doom you're gonna suffer twenty five percent regardless i mean as i think of this it seems like there's an issue between the portfolio you need to accumulate assets in the portfolio you need to preserve your assets but if you're saying that even the best preservation portfolios stills vulnerable to twenty five percent draw down what happens to people who are sixty sixty five and can't afford that like you can't food even cat food and retirement you touch on two different things one is the get rich portfolio you know there's a couple of ways to do it there's the build a business there is or you invest in potential businesses that have the ability to exponential unusually that requires concentration or you invested a reasonable rate of return let's call ten percent even better if it gets up to fifteen and let that compound for a couple of decades and you'll get rich on the paul merriman podcasts he talked about how he's gifting his children it what it was doused and dollars and by the time.

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"thirty forty years" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"thirty forty years" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"I'm and they did twenty thirty forty years ago when you're out on the south forty plowing near with behind him you'll or whatever uh and so the competition to get a piece of that time is higher today but i think more broadly speaking and this is where i think i think is very applicable for for a lot of investors and kind of hearkens back to that 60cent dollar point i made earlier when the scarce resources human capital and not financial and not financial capital or physical capital it becomes the output of human capital is poorly reflected on financial statements he was the best way to put if you build a rail or if you put a building up that's not a balance sheet i can look at that build a steel mill less right there okay but what's the valuables engineers but also i mean the the are are these expensed or his era stanage lira decrease series oh they are ripe it's not capitalised and i mean i mean if you had asked me like what is this scarce resource right now it's human capital the scarcest resource in the mean distal as as a as a brief pivot is one of the things that scares me most about the current integration debate because for many decades if you'd asked the best and brightest person in any given country or two hundred could live anywhere in the world where would it be five at a ten six had a ten pick a number would probably say the us and if that goes down then we live we at the march and loops because that's the scarce resources human cap how do you evaluate that so this is a nice of the spurs nicely with this idea that what markets miss pride is the kind of qualitative stuffers as the quantitative stuff how do you evaluate that in a business the value of human capital say relative to piers were relative to pricing a really kind of for us comes back to the competitive advantage analysis because competitive advantages created via human capital is created via the construction and maintenance of a brand it's created be via the increase engagement of a network affected ten created by making a product difficult to switch wave.

twenty thirty forty years mill
"thirty forty years" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"thirty forty years" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"I'm and they did twenty thirty forty years ago when you're out on the south forty plowing near with behind him you'll or whatever uh and so the competition to get a piece of that time is higher today but i think more broadly speaking and this is where i think i think is very applicable for for a lot of investors and kind of hearkens back to that 60cent dollar point i made earlier when the scarce resources human capital and not financial and not financial capital or physical capital it becomes the output of human capital is poorly reflected on financial statements he was the best way to put if you build a rail or if you put a building up that's not a balance sheet i can look at that build a steel mill less right there okay but what's the valuables engineers but also i mean the the are are these expensed or his era stanage lira decrease series oh they are ripe it's not capitalised and i mean i mean if you had asked me like what is this scarce resource right now it's human capital the scarcest resource in the mean distal as as a as a brief pivot is one of the things that scares me most about the current integration debate because for many decades if you'd asked the best and brightest person in any given country or two hundred could live anywhere in the world where would it be five at a ten six had a ten pick a number would probably say the us and if that goes down then we live we at the march and loops because that's the scarce resources human cap how do you evaluate that so this is a nice of the spurs nicely with this idea that what markets miss pride is the kind of qualitative stuffers as the quantitative stuff how do you evaluate that in a business the value of human capital say relative to piers were relative to pricing a really kind of for us comes back to the competitive advantage analysis because competitive advantages created via human capital is created via the construction and maintenance of a brand it's created be via the increase engagement of a network affected ten created by making a product difficult to switch wave.

twenty thirty forty years mill
"thirty forty years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"thirty forty years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On our and say you know thirty forty years ago the was great objection to people who are pressing for gay rights it's now absolutely accepted and most of western society it's not even an issue anymore either this it's always like that and other people at the beginning have to push and they may be people in leadership positions but that's what they do well i would say it off at like that other of it's always like that i would say you're completely right think of my country and segregating there was turmoil and they're a social strife and we had to get to a place but how you get there how you bring people long how you include them how to broaden educations import we don't do everything we want all at once because we have figured it out thurgood otto eminence agreeing with jeff in a way that we're miles more liberal society knew we were thirty forty years ago forty is because sixty sixty phillips and population thought homosexuality was wrong now more than seventy percent people spoke gay marriage but i think it's the amount to focusing attention on these so am nothing you'll you'll you'll average middling opinion person you know perfectly happy with the kind of principle of transgender people near an being allowed to exist and have rights and so on they just they feel uneasy i think about the extent of fit that these things to prioritize give you very much uh but they like the the the obama transgender teen let's case i mean that that is what kind of that's what gets i think you'll you'll deplorables a many of them i think a overall michael decent populists that that gone along with the great liberalization but they think you we there are more important things to be discussing let's let's let's take a break we'll come back to these issues we have got to the halfway point if you want to comment is news out or extra bbc dot code u k you can tweet bbc an h extra and if you want to listen to the program every week in our of discussion on a single topic than that subscribed to the podcast that the bbc newshour extra podcast distribution of the bbc world service in the us made possible by american public media.

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"thirty forty years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"thirty forty years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Dunno for the next twenty thirty forty years some of triggered this day now if he gets an roster subtly those those five interceptions the omega of the comes the story now that's because they that's why you're taught you know it so you kind of loses you loses the near of farmed kind of sainthood martyrdom when you get on the five interception if he could be fifty fat enough aand you know as opposed to just staying on it becoming this figures do it better for him to not combat are we set a gloomy wages paid was his cynical thing about the backup quarterback is always the most popular personality till you kind of giving a good side but i think as a show of good faith pretty grapple the owners asking to a sequel now what can we do said okay first thing i think psychiatric one of you as one of u s o b side cap verde garrity will also k now the issues that he raised we'll still be with us but you as owners have made a statement said you know what maybe we were we did black this guy it wasn't right and we're going to bring a bag give him a shot so should we do away with playing we are in from altogether i like yeah i think so uh i thought so for wa it by the way anybody who's bent with a football basketball baseball game go to the can go to the corridors wad during the national anthem people are by popcorn and beer their standard then i stand in for the national happen running on everyone everything you know what are you doing at home when you're watching a game people as the you know so again this is the sort of hypocrisy that we built a whole we've built a whole five a new cycle odd bus the flag national anthem give me a break with this stuff you know if it is again it's it's it's it's probably not going to happen but yeah i think that they she just stop at just come in and play grant focus off to his he'll play so what your favorite make a i do not think people go on to replace the national anthem of funk adel it.

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"thirty forty years" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"thirty forty years" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Planned for inflation and keep it from destroying our savings and and how may be does a little bit of risk help us do that it's very important that we take the time to sit down and come up with a plan as to how you as an investor are going to tackle inflation over the next twenty thirty forty years in their lifetime but as we've talked about out you know the fear of having too much risk with our investments as we've covered let me flip the script here for a second bannon give you this example as well we can't just take all of our money generally in throat in savings accounts for the long term because if inflation does exist there is a phrase i like to use and essentially when we keep all of our money at the bank making almost nothing and inflations going at two or three percent a year were actually going broke safely as the analogy i like to use biquinine here we're not losing money but we're losing buying power lation so that's not a good strategy either so yes having a bland or a mixture of of guaranteed income sources and perhaps portions of your nest egg that are not exposed to losses combined with the nonguaranteed sources are those that take on a little bit of risk to try and offset inflation and healthcare costs it's key it's kiso here are some examples of in of inflationbased products that can help things like while as i mentioned before annuities there are cheering full of annuities in the marketplace that will offer the potential for increasing income throughout your retirement on a guaranteed for life base now that would be one way to help offset inflation now social security you know they have these things that you may have heard of called kolelas or call austin of living adjustments right and in theory social security every year takes a look at what the rate of inflation is in our country and they grow your benefits by that amount now there's a lot of opinions.

social security austin healthcare costs twenty thirty forty years three percent
"thirty forty years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"thirty forty years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For environmental prediction and he's been studying the effects of climate change on allergies in our area so dr be all right told me generally speaking the entire population has seen an increase in allergies over the past twenty five thirty forty years but it also has to deal with climate change okay so as average global temperatures go up allergies are also on the rise yet partly because plant reproduction does get a kick out of warm weather and increasing co two levels but weirdly enough richard that doesn't actually explain what happened this year instead we just had a really weird end of winter with that warm week at the end of february followed by that huge snowstorm in march here's how dr byelorussia explains it we treat we started to feel do you have paid for pollination but then with the cold though move over oh eighty all at what okay so normally and i i pay attention to this actually i watched the leaves on the tree very carefully tree pollination is sort of staggered it is usually goes on elm maple in cedar in then birds than oak this year it was just like blam trains in weather and suddenly emily on everything happened it what everything's exploding sinuses are exploding but this year's weird spring is really a shortterm weather flick and i ask dr byelorussia about longterm climate change does this mean our allergies are get infinitely worse me told me at some point it has to plateau because eventually temperatures get too high plains just won't wanna pollinate and he's doing some research right now that plateau point but the best advice on a shortterm basis check the actual pollen count upon index the actual piling count and just just your time outside accordingly you can see that at ny nj pollen dot com using i should put that in the weather forecast i think it's a good idea maybe we'll do that might help people especially the theory that could get some bake rich eight support for npr comes.

climate change global temperatures npr richard dr byelorussia emily twenty five thirty forty years