35 Burst results for "Thirty Five Thousand Dollars"

New York Man Pleads Guilty to Hacking and Stealing Nude Pics

Cyber Security Headlines

02:05 min | 1 year ago

New York Man Pleads Guilty to Hacking and Stealing Nude Pics

"New unofficial windows patch fixes more petite po tam attack vectors a second unofficial patch for the petite po tam vulnerability which allows a threat actor to force a windows server domain controller to authenticate against an. Nt relay server has been released to fix issues not addressed by microsoft's official security update the petite bottom bug tracked as cv dish. Twenty twenty one dash three six nine. Four two was partially fixed by microsoft's august twenty twenty one patch tuesday update but unfortunately it is still possible to abuse petite bo tam using e f s rpc functions that were not addressed zero patch micro patching service has released an unofficial patch. That can be used to block. All known petite potassium alum relay attacks and windows server. Twenty nineteen twenty sixteen twenty twelve in two thousand eight. Our two for those who wish to wait. For an official patch from microsoft petite bottom attacks can be defended against using nets h rpc filters that block remote access to the f. s. Rpc service new york man sentenced to prison for stealing student's nude photos after hacking their accounts. The justice department announced on thursday. That nicholas farber of rochester. New york has been sentenced to three years in federal prison. For hacking. The accounts of dozen female suny plattsburgh students to excess private nude photos farber. Who is a suny plattsburgh. Grad worked with co-conspirator michael fish to access the students school email accounts between twenty seventeen and twenty nineteen fish gained access to at least one account by guessing the answers to victim security questions farber then used their credentials to ex's facebook snapchat in cloud accounts from which he stole private nude photographs movies which he then traded online with others farber was charged with computer fraud and aggravated identity theft and has been ordered to pay just over thirty five thousand dollars in restitution to the school fish also pled guilty to several related charges and his sentencing is set for november third the school implemented multisector authentication all email accounts after the incident

Microsoft Nicholas Farber Farber Plattsburgh Michael Fish Justice Department Rochester New York Facebook
Bernard Lee Chats With Poker Pro Johnnie Vibes Moreno

The Bernard Lee Poker Show

05:40 min | 1 year ago

Bernard Lee Chats With Poker Pro Johnnie Vibes Moreno

"You have been playing cash for many years well over a decade and kind of mistakes cash. We're not talking high nose bleed kind of what is it. Been like for that because we will talk about your youtube presence. You're logging in how that really is taken off. But well prior to that you were poker player. It's not that you are of vlogger that plays poker. It's really the other way around. Is that you played poker for so many years and kind of logging has kind of come into this space how was it and what were your trials and tribulations playing cash poker for a living because everyone loves seeing the big scores but people don't understand the grind sometimes of six sessions in a row where you don't win everyone's happy when we have a twenty five hundred five thousand dollar pot and can show it on on air but how many times do you struggle struggle struggle and flush dr doesn't get there or you flopped upset and they get run a runner and now you're going home with you know only job in the world where you can work x. number of hours and go home poor right. I mean it's very rare that that happens talk about your trials and tribulations in how it got to the point where you really felt like you could steadily make a living at this. Because it's really hard. I remember the first day that i left my job as a software developer with 401k health benefits and all these things i remember thinking like if i if i don't make good money playing poker i can always go back and get offered job again and you know the i i i was doing. I was doing well right out of the gate. But you gotta keep in mind that it wasn't that difficult to make money playing cash game poker if you had a solid strategy fifteen years ago because the money was everybody you could find a two five game anywhere that was great and you know there was probably one hundred to five games on any given night in las vegas during this time so i i was doing well but naturally as you progress in any career you want to make more money than the previous year and you want to get better and you want to further your career and you know. That's that's easy to do. Fifteen years ago and poker. You know you could start applying one three. You can make thirty five thousand dollars that first year. Feel like it was amazing but the next year. You know your your goals maybe fifty thousand in the next year your goals. Maybe seventy five thousand. But then you reach a point where you're making around one hundred hundred twenty five thousand dollars a year and you realize that in order to make more than that you need to get substantially better. You need to find better games and the games needs to be big and what's interesting about. That is poker. Games were shrinking. They were getting smaller over the course of the last five to ten years and they were getting tougher. So no i even if even if you got better in your own poker game it didn't ensure that you were gonna make more money than the next year right. I remember i kind of plateaued about six years ago. Where i was in the one hundred to one hundred twenty five thousand dollar a year range and i didn't really see gray prospects for making more than that and and just as a natural Ambitious human being. That started sparking me. Like what else can i do to ignite passion in the game. And what else can. I do to keep things interesting for me. And that's kind of how you know. Creating the poker channel came about My my five ten game had died. That i was playing in san diego on a consistent basis. That game was no more. So i was in a precarious spot. Where how am. I going to continue to make this good money with smaller games and i thought it would be a perfect time to start a new project and i remember those first couple of episodes that i started. I didn't think anybody's gonna watch him. I was just. I was just trying to get better at public speaking. And you know perhaps china Develop some other avenues of interest at a time. When i was unsure where the cash games could take me As far as the ceiling was and it it took off after the seventh episode. When i lost sixty five hundred dollars in a in five ten in in one session. I picked up the camera and put it in my face and i was like this sucks because like this game doesn't run twenty four hours anymore. I got like eight hours a day. That i can play this game. It might take me a while to win back. Sixty five hundred kind of share that on my youtube channel and algorithm picked it up. And they're like wow. This is a real poker player. That's making youtube videos. So i think that the looting to what you talked about before. I wasn't scared to talk talk about my thought process. I wasn't scared to say how i played hands. I was competent and my poker game. I think one thing that a lot of people have have happened as their newer poker players that are making you content so they're kind of more Afraid to just say what happened right and like you know because people are gonna show up in the comments and be like oh you played that like an idiot or what. Are you doing three batting without hand but for me. My confidence in my overall poker game. That part didn't bother me like if you were gonna talk crap about my game in the comments. I was fine with that. You know and i think that. That's what destroys a lot of people in the early stages shirt will have that confidence in know the when you sign yourself up for youtube comments the youtube comments they're gonna come come

Youtube Las Vegas San Diego China
What an Increasingly Booming Economy Means for Bitcoin

The Breakdown with NLW

02:07 min | 1 year ago

What an Increasingly Booming Economy Means for Bitcoin

"What's going on guys. It is thursday april twenty ninth and tenth day we are asking the question of what an increasingly booming economy means for bitcoin. So the setup for this. Is that obviously for. Bitcoin and bitcoin has always been a macro asset in the sense that it is fundamentally about reorganizing the global economy in some way when it comes to the rest of the world however it's really only been in the last year that that idea of bitcoin as a meaningful player on the macro stage has come to the fore. The connection was made first and most profoundly by. Paul tudor jones with his great monetary inflation thesis. And since then. Bitcoin has been tied up in its digital gold narrative as an inflation hedge. Right there's no way to deny looking at micro strategy getting in and michael sailor talking about the melting ice cube of cash as a treasury reserve asset and stanley druckenmiller seeing five to ten percent inflation over the next few years. There's no way to deny that bitcoins. Narrative has been tied up in the fear of looming inflation. The question then becomes. What if that starts to withdraw. What if the macro narrative shifts. Where does that leave bitcoin so today. That's what we're going explore. And i think the start. Let's start with this idea of it. Being a booming economy one of the wall street journal's lead headlines today is. Us economy appears to be lifting off. Economists are projecting a quote robust consumer led recovery. Gdp grew at six point. Four percent seasonally adjusted in q one which is almost exactly what economists had predicted. What's more consumer confidence is approaching pre pandemic levels. In fact it's the highest. It's been in fourteen months and it's done nothing but increase for months in a row in particular a low income band people and families earning between twenty five and thirty five thousand dollars. A year has increased dramatically in march. Nine hundred thousand new jobs created an unemployment went down six percent.

Bitcoin Paul Tudor Jones Michael Sailor Stanley Druckenmiller Wall Street Journal United States
Tiffany Aliche's Financial Components to Become 'Financially Whole'

BiggerPockets Money Podcast

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Tiffany Aliche's Financial Components to Become 'Financially Whole'

"Alita welcome back to the bigger pockets of any podcast. Always so excited to talk to you. I love that you guys have me back. Thank you so much mindy. Thank you scott. I love being. I feel like i'm a regular now shooters. I think you're our normal three-time guest. Oh which is nice Okay so tiffany. You are a master of all things money and finance but where your budget needs to story. Starts you worry financial disaster. You had a lot of shame over your situation. And that caused you to withdraw from friends and basically from life. What would you say to thirty year. Old tiffany going through all of this financial horrible mess and two others listening who are feeling ashamed of the financial situation there. In how do you get you to stop feeling bad about a mistake that you've made so i'll say get you linda and explain what that means. Emitted in alsace. Shame is a liar. So the way i was able to go from like this secretive. Shame when it came to my money. Was that my best friend linda. Who'd been trying to reach me for months. After i lost my job after i lost all my money after i scanned into thirty five thousand dollars in credit card debt after i couldn't afford my mortgage and had to move back home at thirty so i was at the bottom of the bottom. I remember literally looking at the ceiling from my middle school bed saying you had more money at sixteen. They do thirty like in total. I'm talking about retirement. Savings pennies in my purse like is this was like shame on top of same so linda called me after trying to get me on the phone for some months and was gonna pretend like everything was okay. That was busy But you know your best friend knows you best.

Old Tiffany Alita Mindy Linda Tiffany Scott
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on Real Talk with Mary Contrary and Starfish

Real Talk with Mary Contrary and Starfish

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on Real Talk with Mary Contrary and Starfish

"Out my buddy. John inviting me. So so john and i met waylon. You know over here in the background. I met them in and we were on the same track for amazon. He was teaching me live about shopping by he invited me. This event called sellers sellers playbook and essentially we came down. We had a very bad lie about guys. And i think they're trying scammers guys. They're turning up sales for thirty five thousand dollars. What do you call it to up sell to to buy. The horse.

John waylon john amazon thirty five thousand dollars playbook
FAA steps up enforcement against unruly airline passengers

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

FAA steps up enforcement against unruly airline passengers

"Federal safety officials are announcing stricter enforcement against unruly airline passengers citing confrontations with Washington DC rioters the Federal Aviation Administration says there's been a quote disturbing increase in incidents where airline passengers have disrupted flights with threatening or violent behavior this includes confrontations over facemask rules and from recent violence at the U. S. capitol so the agency says it will no longer give initial warnings to unruly passengers it will immediately launch enforcement action penalties can include fines up to thirty five thousand dollars and jail terms for threats or assaults the flight attendants union says it's applauding this new policy of first strike your out Jackie Quinn Washington

U. S. Capitol Federal Aviation Administratio Washington Dc Flight Attendants Union Jackie Quinn Washington
Netflix's audio-only mode could threaten podcasting

podnews

03:34 min | 1 year ago

Netflix's audio-only mode could threaten podcasting

"Letterman walks out. Onstage blows a kiss to the crowd grabs a might cover much. Thank you takes the mic office. Stand to see you move over. Podcasting net flicks is rolling out an audio only mode to the android app. The app also has variable speed playback and a feature called audio description. Which as you've just heard tells you what's happening on screen. The company will hope you. Don't listen to a podcast when you can listen to a movie or tv show instead. Try and digital has released the latest podcast report. The data covers most of november. The top five remains unchanged with npr at number one total downloads from the top ten publishers drops by more than five percent in a month that included the us presidential election and thanksgiving an incomplete rancor it measures participating publishers only and notably not iheart radio. Edison research published their ten for twenty compilation of their biggest findings from twenty twenty expects audio consumption spoken word and us election voting willing to that from our show notes now newsletter today story board and enterprise podcast and hosting platform has raised four point. Five million dollars in funding bryant barletta. The first sounds profitable deep dive yesterday. Looking at pod scribe. It's free to watch on the profitable website. Espn podcasting had a record year with ninety six point five million downloads in october alone. They say vox media studios to double the amount of shows it makes and plans to bring in one hundred million dollars in revenue in two thousand and twenty one. Steve hand wonders if independent podcasting has peaked. He was formerly at google's audio mused division at a us public radio. Nick held him to. Is broadly pessimistic about the podcast industry available content massively exceeds available interest. He claims and the changes in the industry in two twenty are a long way from won't made podcasts. Special he says and captivate has launched show notes snippets a simple way to at creatine snippets to your show notes. I'm an adviser. What does it take good and effective secretary. The president's cabinet well first of all congratulations. I'm thrilled by news that you're going to be nominated. That's a clip. From the deciding decade with pete buttigieg who learned had been nominated as transport secretary while he was doing a podcast with hillary clinton podcast. One australia has lost a show. And russia's podcast 'em salvation will become an independent production in two thousand and twenty one. She describes her relationship with sea. Who owned podcast one in australia as an abusive relationship. I keep going back to sa hired. Her for short lived stint on the ailing today. A famine sydney one in a list of underinvested breakfast shows on the formerly market leading station. Crooked media's wind of changes to be adapted for television says deadline and a sports podcast has crowd funded over one hundred thirty five thousand dollars in two weeks that tennis podcast has received funding from nearly one thousand two hundred listeners in the uk. It's been going since two thousand twelve

Edison Research Bryant Barletta Vox Media Studios Letterman NPR United States Pete Buttigieg Espn Nick Steve Google Australia Cabinet Hillary Clinton Russia Sydney
Passenger in Offset's car arrested for concealed weapon

Mojo In The Morning

01:58 min | 2 years ago

Passenger in Offset's car arrested for concealed weapon

"Dirty story over the weekend to offset detained by police while driving through a trump rally in beverly hills. This was Saturday afternoon. He actually took out his phone in recorded himself being pulled over share the video instagram alive he refused to step out of a car while being questioned by cops one of whom had a weapon drawn and I'm GonNa play his video in just a second the officer started off by telling offset. There had been a report that he was weaving guns at people as he drove through the area looking at me like that Bro. Medina turned. Telling you. Do it, but you got so Gaza. I I'm not I stayed with. Her driver I'm giving you more take your right hand turn off the I'm not doing no orders. You got guys outpointing. Turn Journal. On. Asking you to do I'm not gonNA WANNA because you've got guys. That's my choice nothing to move my half of my world this. Guys were wait somebody was told that I'm celebrity I offset from the Migos they bears that's why they following me. WHY WE'RE HERE Waving. The flag. What are you talking about? told me to my hair's up I'm not doing that you put my hands on twenty five thousand people. Public. Movement. Reiterate offset. said that trump supporters had his car with the flag pretty be was when this all went down and for the record, it was actually Cardi's cousin Marcello. Who is waving guns at people he ultimately was arrested. The cousin has now been charged with carrying a concealed weapon and carrying a loaded firearm and public. So he is being held on like thirty five thousand dollars moments before this happened on Cardi's instagram live. Videotaping some of the people that were in that. Trump rally to the time, but she was not in the same car with him.

Cardi Donald Trump Beverly Hills Turn Journal Marcello Gaza Officer Medina
The Surprising Truth About Environmentalists and Voting

Warm Regards

07:53 min | 2 years ago

The Surprising Truth About Environmentalists and Voting

"Nathaniel I'm really excited to have you on the show today. I have never seen so much discussion about get out the vote efforts around a midterm election. So were really here. We're really happy to have you here in excited to have you on the show. Well thank you jacqueline and thank you Ramesh I'm I'm really excited to be here with you guys. So, do you do you feel like we're seeing something different in this election we keep hearing all these projections about how college students are really GonNa vote this time and You know the projected voter turnout is really high in various places and I think I just read an article that my home state of Vermont has something like a ninety two percent. Voter registration rate for the state, which is crazy. Awesome. So do you do you feel something's different? Are we going to see a shift from the from the recent past? Yes. I absolutely feel like something is different. A field director just told me about an hour ago that a million people have already voted in Florida so far as also voting. and they're in person early voting hasn't started yet. So all of these people are people who requested that ballots be mailed to them. And have already made them back in and just to put that number in context just to give you a denominator I think barely six million people voted in the twenty fourteen midterms and Florida. So the hot a million people have already voted mean something's going on now who are those people that I can't tell you? I can't tell you with whether these are young people storm in the polls or liberals or conservatives I don't know. But you're right that there's a new energy going on this time around. Suspending of demographics mean you focus mostly on on kind of an untapped group, the the environmental movements, and we often think of environmentalists is really active in terms of making lifestyle choices. giving up meat or dairy, or or abandoning abandoning your car for a bicycle that takes a lot of effort and a lot more than going to the polls. So my question for you is, how are we doing? Are we actually voting as a group? Jacqueline you you ask the the sixty four, thousand dollar question no, we're not we're not laugh. Yeah environmentalists awful voters. I'm not going to sugarcoat it. We. We've done a lot of research on this and it's pretty easy to measure because weather you vote or not, and a lot of Americans don't know this. Whether you voter not as public, record. Now. I'll never be able to look up who Ramesh voted for or who jacqueline voted for but I can absolutely look up which elections you vote in in which elections you don't. And so people are able to run large polls and build predictive models and identify all the environmentalists in various states. And it turns out. That environmentalists. Habitually under vote they vote far less often than the average voter in almost every other state and just to give you some context here, I'll use say the two thousand, sixteen presidential election as an example. In two, thousand, sixteen, Sixteen, nine percent of registered voters voted. But only fifty percent of environmentalists did. Wow Yeah and if you go back to twenty fourteen, it's even worse. Forty four percent of registered voters voted but only twenty one percent of environmentalists did. Okay. So the obvious follow up question there is why? Yeah. Why? Is that one hundred, thirty, five, thousand dollars. That's Before thousand. In one dollars. So we know some of the reasons but only some of the reasons. So part of what's going on here is just demographic correlations so I don't know what the Environmental Movement was like ten twenty thirty years ago but. It certainly isn't now. What People Imagine as the stereotypical environmentalist. The typical environmentalists now is not well, it's not me it's not some white Yuppie who hops into their electric vehicle to get to their job downtown. people who deeply care about climate and the environment are now much more likely to make less than fifty thousand dollars a year. Be African American or Latino, and live within five miles of an urban core end they are predominantly younger but that's not. Not so much the case anymore. And all of those demographic groups that I just mentioned right now. Vote less often than the average American. So part of what's going on here is just that environmentalists are likely to be part of demographic groups that just habitually under vote. But the really interesting thing. Is that's not all that's going on here because even if you look at just young. Environmentalists vote less often than the other young people. Were even if you've looked just at Latinos, the Environmental Latinos vote less often than the other Latinos. So something else is going on here and the honest answer guys is we don't know what it is because it's really easy for behavioral scientists to measure why someone takes an action. So it's really easy to set up an experiment to to figure out how to get someone to vote. What's really hard? is to figure out the opposite. What's really hard is to set up an experiment to figure out why people don't take an action like exercising or voting or or vaccinating their children or something like that. the best you can do is ask them. And when we ask environmentalists why they're not voting. They lied their pants off. They lie France off and so and I'm. That other people or So, so no not more than other people and that's a good question but no, I mean no matter how you ask the question if you try to determine why people don't vote. The responses they'll give. Our responses that they think you want to hear. What we've realized is that even non voters still buy into the societal norm that voting is a good thing. So everybody wants to be known as a voter. Just, like everybody wants you to think that they brush your teeth, brush their teeth or or wash their hands every time or something like that. This voting is a societal norm that we all buy into and so I ask people why they don't vote. They will often before they even give you an excuse guys. They will lie their pants off and say, Oh, no, I vote all the time Jacqueline. And we that's a lie because whether you voted not as public record, right? These people looking at their voting histories and we know that they've never voted their entire lives and they swear up and down all the time that they vote whenever there's an election and so. The honest answer to your question and it's a good one is. We. Don't know why environmentalists aren't voting, but we've got some good ideas as to how to get them

Jacqueline Ramesh Environmental Movement Florida Vermont Nathaniel Environmental Latinos Director France
How to Not Have a Lost Decade

Money For the Rest of Us

04:13 min | 2 years ago

How to Not Have a Lost Decade

"Welcome money for the rest of this is a personal finance show on money how it works how to invest it and live without worrying about it. We host David Stein today's episode three, fourteen it's titled Don't have a lost decade. Recently, got an email from a new plus member. He says he's treating the material on the website like an online college course but he had a question he wrote that he's approaching a crossroad in his life and he would like to prepare himself for that crossroad. He works at one of the Best Public Gardens in us as a horticulturalist he's been there three years makes forty three thousand dollars per year has four weeks of vacation full healthcare and Hsa they have a four zero three. B. Defined contribution plan where he gets a six percent match his boss enjoy working with him and he enjoys his job. This member also has his own business, a lifestyle business providing premium horticulture services for high end properties. He started in two thousand nineteen gross four thousand dollars and anticipate grossing twelve thousand dollars this year he has no debt. The only thing he owns he says, that is worth. Any money is an old pickup truck that's worth about three thousand. Is roughly eighteen thousand, five hundred dollars in his defined contribution plan and using the online tools on money for the rest of US plus. That, he's on track to retire in his early sixties. y'All says about two thousand dollars in a savings account pays two percent and about fifteen hundred dollars in a wealth front Robo Advisor. Account. He's living on about eighteen to twenty thousand dollars a year. After contributing to is defined contribution plan and health savings account, he brings home about twenty, eight, thousand dollars but that doesn't include is overtime bonuses or the work in his business. After taxes and contribution he estimates that he's bringing home about thirty, five, thousand dollars with everything, which means potentially he could save fifteen to seventeen thousand dollars per year and certainly ten thousand dollars per year. He writes for the first time in my life I'm not living paycheck to paycheck am planning for the future. The business I own. Now as a hobby passion, I turned profitable. It has been a great space for me to learn and have done a lot of just that but it ultimately is a glorified landscaping business. What they really want to own is a retail nursery that one day will become an event, an education centre as well. I turned thirty two months. I thought at this point I would go beyond an entry level position. I thought I would own my own house and maybe own a business full-time. Those goals seem so far away. The question I want to pose to you is, how do I get from where I am today to owning a five to ten acre property that can use to develop into my next lifestyle business as soon as possible Had An additional investment question that address in a few minutes. I he's not in an entry level position. He is a master, her cultures he's studied it. He learned a lot of those skills working at an organic farm and Tasmania. Got, his university degree. He was admitted to a professional horticulture program at the Public Garden where he works, he is very, very skilled in all aspects of landscape design and gardening. and. There are a lot of people that would be very envious that he has his amazing job working in horticulture and one where he can listen to a lot of podcast which he does. In order to answer question I want to compare to couples I know I've known for about a decade. This particular members approaching thirty. He's looking out over the next decade. What has to happen so that he doesn't have a lost decade and can reach goals I'm positive he can reach his goals.

David Stein United States HSA Public Garden Advisor GOT Tasmania
What if lifesaving prescriptions were affordable for all

TED Talks Daily

05:01 min | 2 years ago

What if lifesaving prescriptions were affordable for all

"Hi Hugh Ted Talks Daily today a super cool idea to ensure people have access to the medicines they need to survive and thrive Kia Williams the founder of the nonprofit serum saw both a problem and a solution that exists in the pharmaceutical space and her idea link. The two together should explain in her talk from Ted Twenty twenty. Every day in this country families are forced to make impossible choices when it comes to their healthcare. Like Kimberly who said? There is time I to choose between my food and my pills. It wasn't luxury stuff because I didn't make that much. It was like, can I get shampoo or conditioner? Things you take for granted and Debbie. Who Said you put your medicine in one hand your living costs in the other. Okay. Well, what am I going to do? Am I GONNA get my medicine or am I gonNA pay my bills? Will. I can't live without my medicine but I can't live if I don't pay my bills ten thousand people die every month in this country because they don't take the medicine that they need. More people die from not taking medications than. Overdoses and car accidents combined. But you can't take medicine if you can't afford it. Today the average household spends three thousand dollars a year on medications about a third of folks who are uninsured said that they stopped taking medicine as prescribed because of cost even folks with insurance. If they make under thirty, five, thousand dollars a year half of them report skipping the medications if their insurance doesn't cover it. So there are. Million adults like Kimberly in like Debbie who are forced to make impossible choices every day. We all know that prescription drug prices are too high. In our healthcare system that makes some folks uninsured and other folks underinsured doesn't prioritize people who need access now and need medications. Now, ten million, it's a big number, but it's also a solvable number because there's also ten billion dollars of perfectly good unused medication that goes to waste. So this is an injustice onto sides people not getting the medicine that they need to survive and to thrive. In, that very same medication being sent to a medical waste incinerator to be destroyed this waste is unconscionable, but it also offers an opportunity I started serum a not for profit technology company with my co founders Adam and George. To turn discarded medications into a lifeline, we may not be able to fix all the ways in which our healthcare system is failing us, but we can fix this one. Medications come from manufacturers wholesalers who have safety stock, and when it's short dated, they destroy it. It also comes from healthcare facilities like fiddles pharmacies in nursing homes who end up with surplus when a patient stops taking medication or when they pass away. We can use this untapped source of medications to supply all ten million people who need medications, and we can do this today. Serum get surplus medications by putting recycling bins into the hundreds of facilities that have surplus they fill the been and when the boxes full serum initiates a courier pickup to pick up that medication in we handle the shipping the tracking the manifests in the tax receipt medicine donors want to donate because it's actually cheaper and easier than the highly regulated medicine destruction process. And they're strong tax incentives to actually donate. We then deliver those donated medications to people who needed a new prescription comes in in our platform matches that patient need with the inventory that's available. Our platform then generates a warehouse pick lists. The medications are picked in the prescription spills. We are building the twenty-first-century pharmacy experience that low income families deserve patients can register in under five minutes and have access to over five hundred different medications A. Stable list of medications for everything from heart disease to mental health conditions

Ted Twenty Twenty Kimberly Debbie Hugh Ted Kia Williams Overdoses Founder Adam George
Novelist Donald Ray Pollock On Factory Work And Finding Fiction Later In Life

Fresh Air

20:21 min | 2 years ago

Novelist Donald Ray Pollock On Factory Work And Finding Fiction Later In Life

"Today's first guest is author Donald Ray Pollock, whose novel the devil all the time has just been made into a new netflix movie premiering next Wednesday. It Stars Tom Holland and Robert Pattinson, and here's a taste in this clip. A young boy has just watched his father pulverized two guys after they made lewd comments about the father's wife, the son's mother. Afterward the father gives his son some advice. You remember what I told you. On. The buzzer gave you. That's what I mean. got. To. Sir. Good sons of bitches out there. One hundred. These that many. Cannonball. In, both the movie and the novel the characters in the devil all the time are driven to extremes whether their fathers and sons, serial killers or preachers. The story begins in the small town of knock him stiff a real place in southern Ohio where Donald Ray pollock grew up. He didn't become a writer until he put in over thirty years at the local paper mill and got sober. But. Once he did start writing. He was noticed quickly receiving both awards and critical. Acclaim. Terry, gross spoke to Donald Ray pollock in twenty eleven when the devil, all the time was first published. Donald, Ray pollock welcome to fresh air. I'd like to start with reading from your new book, the Devil, all the time It's about the second paragraph from the prologue. So would you just set it up for us? What we have here is A young boy's name is Arvin Eugene Russell and he's following behind his father Willard and there and place called knock him stiff and they're going to Willard's prayer logging as a log in the woods where he Wants to communicate with God and So this is where they are. You know early in the morning and their. have finally reached this log. Willard eased himself down on the high side of the law and motion for his son to kneel beside him in the dead soggy leaves unless he had whiskey running through his veins Willard came to the clearing every morning and evening talk to God. Arvin didn't know which was worse the drinking or the praying. As far back, as he could remember, it seemed that his father had faulted devil all the time. Arvin little with the damp pulled his Co. tighter. He wished he were still in bed even school with always miseries was better than this but it was a Saturday and there was no way to get around it. Through the mostly bare trees beyond the cross Arvin could see whisper smoke rising from a few chimneys, half a mile away four hundred or so people lived in, knock him stiff in nineteen, fifty seven nearly all of them connected by blood through one godforsaken clam or another be it lust were necessity or just plain ignorance along with the tar paper shacks and Cinder Block houses the Holler included two general stores and a Church of Christ in Christian Union and joint known throughout the township as the bullpen. Three days before he'd come home with another black I I, don't condone no fighting just for the hell of it but sometimes, you're just too easy going Willard told him that evening then boys might be bigger than you. But the next time one of them starts his stuff, I want you to finish it. Willard was standing on the porch changing out of his work clothes. He handed Arvin Brown pants stiff with dried blood and Greece. He worked in a slaughterhouse in Greenfield and that day sixteen hundred homes had been butchered a new record for RJ Carol meat-packing. Those boy didn't know yet what he wanted to do when he grew up he was pretty sure he didn't WanNa kill pigs for eleven. Let's Donald Ray pollock reading from his new novel, the Devil, all the time. You know in the reading that you did the father tells the sun that the next time. So many beats him up the sun has to fight back and that seems to be. A recurring theme like in the opening story of your collection of short stories, the collections called knock him stiff. The opening sentence reads my father showed me how to hurt a man one August night at the torch in when I was seven years old it was the only thing he was ever any good at. You certainly seem interested in the idea of a father. Kind of indoctrinating a sun on the need to fight back and then egging on to do it even when it's inappropriate. so was is this a story that played out in your life? Well, not so much in my life I. Mean as far as I don't my dad really didn't push me to fight or anything like that. But you know when I was growing up my father and I had a very Uneasy relationship. You've got to understand my dad was born in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty he's still alive. You know he's eighty years old and he's still kicking but He was born in. Nineteen thirty grew up in the depression I went to the eighth grade. He was working on the railroad by the time he was sixteen, and then he was in the navy. And, my dad is a very tough. Hard. man Stra very strong man. As and in contrast to that, my mother is very shy kind. Small Bone woman. and. Either fortunately or unfortunately for me, I took after my mother and I believe. When I was a kid, my dad was. Maybe disappointed for not taking after him more. So. You know that's where I guess part of that comes from it and part of it also comes from. Lived in stiff. That's where I grew up and I saw a lot of other fathers who were you know drinkers and hell raisers and they didn't treat their families very well You know maybe they went and worked for a while and. I got enough money to go on another band or whatever, and pretty much left the family to take care of themselves. So, yeah father's have a pretty rough time and my work I just. It's just. You know I'm a father. You know I have a daughter WHO's I'm thirty years old now and I have always felt that I. Wasn't. As good as I could have been. Her mother and I were divorced when she was very young she was like a year old and and I wasn't around that much and. That's probably the best explanation. I can give for why treat father's like I do my work. Were you bullied in school. You said you, you took after your mother who wouldn't hurt a fly. So and if you were bullied, would you fight back? Did you know how to actually I wasn't bullied in school I? Never really had any problems with that and yeah, I. Mean a would fight back if I had to but. That situation you know didn't come about very much probably you know just. No more than any other normal kid you know might face that sort of thing. But. Yeah. I mean I wasn't really interested in Working on cars or farm or anything like that was more of A. I won't call myself a bookworm because we really didn't have that many books but you know I like to read and watch old movies and drawl and stuff like that and My Dad. Just you know he's a very practical man I mean, even today you know his idea of success is. Owning your own farm, starting your own business or something like that and I know that he probably looks on what I'm doing now is. A pretty useless way to spend your life trying to write books. Would you describe what the town of knock him stiff was like when you were growing up well, when I was growing up there it was. You know relocated for us. Ok we'll knock him stiff. is about thirteen miles west of chillicothe Theo, which is you know southern Ohio. It was its own little place. You know there wasn't much else around there but it was a community There were three small general stores and a bar and a church, and probably four hundred, fifty, five, hundred people now I probably was related to. At least half those people. So did you find this nurturing being in a town where half the people in it were related to you or incredibly claustrophobic? I think when I was a kid when I was a kid I was claustrophobic for me. You know I was one of those kids I was always unsatisfied I always wanted to be. Else and somewhere else. And so from a very early age. You know I was thinking about escaping from the hauler. I just Thought that I'd rather be somewhere else are somewhere else. But where you are as in Chile coffee which is. PHILADELPHIA, which is about thirteen miles away like you got out but you didn't go very far. I, really didn't get out I mean that's the weird contradiction of that whole thing you know i. Wanted to escape and them what I finally got my chance or whatever I. I chose to stay I'm out at knock stiff at least once a week even today Ladder parents go to visit. My parents are still alive. You know I have a brother and two sisters and they all live fairly close to there and So I. Think though as far as escape goes what happened with me was I quit high school when I was seventeen. And I went to work in a meat packing plant much like Weller work, Dan? And then when I was eighteen I moved to Florida you know that was going to be I was going to get away that you know by moving to Florida and I was down are working a job in a nursery and I wasn't making much money or anything only been there a few months my dad called and said. Hey, I can get you a job at the paper mail if you come back up here so. I chose to come back. You know the paper Mills Calling it was union job and great benefits and. And I knew you know for a high school dropout that was probably going to be the best job I. Ever got. You had that job for. How many years did you work at the paper mill? I? was there thirty two years and you didn't start writing till you were around fifty or is that is fifth well I'm fifty six now and I started writing when I was forty five. Okay. So how come it took so long did you know? When you weren't writing did you know that you had that in you? Well. You know I'd always been a big reader as I said and I love books. And I think maybe in the back of my mind, you know always thought writing would be a great way to get by in the world and you know, of course, I was very naive about it. The principal reasons for me you know as far as being a writer were one, you were your own boss. To you could do it anywhere. And three, you made lots of money. Wasn't until actually began writing it. I found out. That was a real true. But I. Think you know Sorta like maybe a fantasy that? It was in the back of my mind for a long time. I had a problem with drinking and for a number of years and you know it was one of those fantasies that when you got half loaded and You started daydreaming or whatever it was. One of those things that you thought about right thought about. But it wasn't really. You know I went to school when I was in my thirties I went to college I went to Ohio University and I ended up with a degree in English and You. Know even while I was there though I wasn't thinking about being a writer I never took any writing workshops or anything like that. But then finally when I was forty five my dad retired from the paper mill. And there was just something about watching him retire and go home. and. You know that was you know pretty much the end of his career and it really. Bothered me and I. Just. decided. I had to try something else you know. To some other way to. Spend the rest of my life. So. When you decided, you wanted to learn how to write what did that mean? Any. Writers or anything in for a while I just sort of scribbled and struggled. And then I'd read an interview with a writer and I can't recall her name now or no it was a lady. But she talked about typing out other people's stories as a means of maybe getting closer to them or just learn how to put a story together. and. So I started doing that. Who did you type out? I typed out a lot of different stories I. I was typing out a story at least once a week and that went on for about a year and a half. So John. cheever hemingway. Flannery. O'Connor Richard. Yates Dennis Johnson the you know the list just goes on and on if it was a story that I really liked and it wasn't. Long I, type it out, and then I carry it around with me for a week and you look at over and you know jot notes on stuff like that, and then I'd throw it away and do another one. Typing a story out, just was a much better way for me to see how you know person puts dial together or you know. Moose from one scene to the next that sort of thing. Was it hard for you to find your subject matter as a writer? Well when I first started. Trying to learn how to write. As. I said like maybe I would copy out John cheever story. So then I would try to write my own story about some East Coast suburbanite having unfair. Something like that or maybe I'd write about a re Rita Andrei debut story, and then I'd write about a Catholic priest. and. So I did that for maybe two years or so and it just wasn't working at all for me. and. Then filing maybe at about two and a half years, I wrote a story that's included in the book. Knock him stiff called back teen. And it's a very short story. and. It's about these two losers sitting in a donut shop. And that was the first thing that I had. Written that I thought wasn't too bad. And so then I increasingly started focusing on you know the people that I knew about instead of nurses, lawyers, that sort of thing that I had absolutely no idea. How to write about There's a passage in your new novel that's about a bus driver and the bus drivers father had gotten a certificate from the railroad for not missing a single day of work in twenty years and bus drivers. Mother always held this up as like what you could do. If you really you know were strive and tried to accomplish something when the bus drivers father died the bus driver hope that that certificate would be buried with his father's. We didn't have to look at it anymore, but instead his mother just like. Put It on the wall, display it in the living room. And then the bus driver thinks it wore on you after a while other people's accomplishments. I love that sentence did you ever feel that way I mean he kochman here seems. So relatively small like a good attendance record and not to knock that. But for that to be like, you know the zenith of somebody's life is. You. but did you feel that way that a war on you? Other People's accomplishments? I don't think that I paid so much attention to other people's. Successes or whatever. But I, know that I was aware you know by the time. I was thirty two or so and I've been working at the mail for about fourteen years. And I knew that all the guys that I had come in with you got hired about the same time as mayor guys even much later than that. You know they own their own home. Maybe. They owned a boat and they had two or three vehicles and they were married and had kids and on and on and on. You know in contrast to them. I've been divorced twice. I'd filed bankruptcy when I got sober I was living in this little very small apartment above this garage. Of. Motel Room and I've been living there for about. Four or five years. I owned a black and white TV that my sister had given me and I had this seventy six chevy that had the whole side of smashed in and that was it. You know for fourteen years of working there. That's what I had. And so you know there was that sense I guess of me just being a failure. Wasn't really that I wasn't jealous of those people or anything like that. I, mean I had enough sense to know that you know where I ended up was my own fault. But there was always that that idea in back of my head that. I could have done more you know I could maybe went to college or something you know. I'm sure you know if I'd wanted to go to school when I was eighteen, my dad would try to help me. and. That's not the route that I chose though how has your life changed? Now as a published writer, you have a collection of short stories. You have a new novel you got a thirty five thousand dollars cash prize, the pen, Robert Bingham Award. So, what's different about your life? well, I have a lot more time to just set on the porch and. Smoke and daydream. Think it's a legitimate. Yeah well, at least that's what I tell my wife. But my life hasn't really changed that much I. Mean I get a lot more emails. Now you know that sort of thing, but you know I still live in the same house I still pretty much. You know my daily routine is. I really can't say that it's changed that much. It's a good life and I'm thrilled that you know I've got a publisher and. You know had at least a little bit of success. You know I know a lot of writers out there a lot of writers out there who are much better than I am. And would. Probably give their left arm. To be setting, you know where I'm setting today. Well Donald Ray, pollock thing you so much for talking with us. Terry I appreciate. It. Made my day. Donald Ray pollock speaking to Terry Gross in twenty eleven. The devil all the time a new movie based on his novel of the same name.

Writer Donald Ray Pollock Willard Terry Gross Ohio Arvin Arvin Brown Netflix Ray Pollock Donald Trump Donald Ray Arvin Eugene Russell Robert Pattinson Tom Holland Robert Bingham Chile John Cheever Ohio University Dennis Johnson Greenfield
Mastering Money With the Budgetnista

Motley Fool Answers

05:55 min | 2 years ago

Mastering Money With the Budgetnista

"So. Tiffany. Let's start with your personal story. So we're currently in third recession of the century. But I'm guessing that you're doing just fine partially at least because of the lessons you learned during the last recession to tell us a little bit about your history, what the last recession was like for you and what has happened since then. Now. Certainly The last question caught me off guard i. Was Not prepared. I because quite honestly I was a schoolteacher and you know I was pretty confident. I'm like, I don't know that schoolteachers lose their jobs because you know we are essential workers, and now yet here we are back again. But Yeah I was a schoolteacher and I didn't move my job actually in two, thousand, eight when so many of my friends did but I let I lost it at the tail end of two, thousand nine. So it really took me by surprise but. Up until like I would say, twenty, five, twenty, six, I was what I called financially. Perfect. I grew up in a household. Money was talked about wasn't scared of talking about finances. Might author was a CFO OF A small nonprofit? He also had his NBA in economics, his his a in finance. My mom was a nurse and we literally used to have money meeting so. I. Didn't grow up with the angst that most people did. So by the time, I was twenty five even though. I was teaching preschool wasn't making much. I think I was making like forty thousand dollars a year By the time I was twenty, five ahead. Forty thousand saved bought a Condo I. I had an ADL to I. Think Credit Score at didn't have any credit card debt. I paid off like my parents helped with my undergrad degree plus. I commuted. So what I did haven't stood alone. I was able to pay that off a few years after school. So financially perfect like okay. So I honestly couldn't relate although I was helping my friends with their budgets savings and things like that. I couldn't relate to the mistakes because I had not yet need them but I was going to then. When I was twenty six, I went on to get my masters in education and I was like, okay. So you now you went from no debt to a mortgage, not so bad. I had a a you know student loans because my master's not so bad. But by twenty six, I said, okay. Now, I'm ready to learn to invest and instead of asking my father who has literally two degrees in years of experience I'm GonNa ask a friend of mine. and. So I asked a friend of mine who appeared to be independently wealthy because he had like a really nice car. and. Like a like a fancy apartment he's well I think Spurs. You have to learn to invest with other people's money at. My money. So what he postulated as is that. Do, you have credit card said, yes. But I paid off in full every month because as instructed by my father, he was like well, did you know you could pull money off a credit card? I, did not know that. So he said not only can you pull off one? You could pull it off to I was like double the mistake. Let's do it. So I pulled off twenty thousand dollars off of my credit cards and I went to invest with him what's to say? That didn't happen I. ENDED UP Thirty, five thousand dollars in credit card debt when I didn't have credit card debt prior and I just remember thinking a first year. I said didn't want to take responsibility for the mistake that I made I did not tell my dad or my mom. But I pay just a minimum because I said, you know what? He's going to come back or he's GonNa. Take care of this because it's not my fault of Ansel from age twenty seven I didn't do anything. Well, twenty, seven night out the money twenty eight, just pay the maximum finally twenty nine, I said all right I'm GONNA pay off this debt just going to buckle down I live pretty frequently anyway, and then twenty nine is when I lost my job. So. Now, I've got a mortgage student loan credit card debt and I was like, okay, I don't know what to do. I've never been in the situation. So. Fallon to this light dark hole of like spiral like because I'm twenty nine going on thirty I've lost everything as far as I can tales financially. So I ended up moving back home with my parents without telling them why they knew it was the recession obviously, and they also knew I lost my job, but they didn't know. ABOUT CREDIT CARD DEBT Live with them for year than I. Am I live with my sister on her couch for year, try to figure out my life because back. Then now we're getting the six hundred dollars a week on our stimulus stimulus check. But what was happening then as they just extended unemployment typically, you can get unemployment for up to a year. They extended to two years. So I said, okay, you have two years to. To figure out what are you going to do with your life I was afraid to go back to work for someone because I thought it, you can lose a job as a preschool teacher essential. Then that's not safe. What could be safe? So I tried a bunch of different things I tried on party promoting party planning I volunteered everywhere I can think of, but while doing so I was helping my friends. But save get out of debt all these things in one day. My friend said, you should turn that into a business and I'm like you. Now I had gone to school my bachelor's degrees in business, but I hadn't used it. And so I, tried to charge people one on one. Only to find the people that you're actually helping with your budget. The reason why they hired us because they don't have any money. So that was a bad business. So I, switched my business model to one too few and I worked on getting contracts and I got my first contract with the United, way? And I rose excited 'cause they were going to pay me I think like. Three, or four, hundred dollars a class and I had a six week course that I'd written. For them, and so I did, and that was like my first. Okay. Maybe I can really make a run at this My little sister gave me the nickname, the budget. So that became because she said like, I'm not like the fashion. Easter. Who is really fashionable, but I am very cheap so

Money NBA Tiffany CFO Ansel Preschool Teacher Fallon
Income Share Agreements - Good For Students or Investors?

Money For the Rest of Us

05:58 min | 2 years ago

Income Share Agreements - Good For Students or Investors?

"Welcome money for the rest of us. This is a personal finance show on money how it works, how to invest it and how to live without worrying about it. We host David Stein today's episode three seven. It's titled Income Share Agreements. Good for students. Or. Investors. Over five years ago and upset forty-five of money for the rest of us. I introduced income share agreement as a way to partially fund college. An income share agreement is a contract where individuals agree to pay a certain percentage of their income for a set period of time in exchange for an upfront payment that is usually used to pay for education cost but can be used for other things. For example, a line income share funding says that you can get an essay for home repairs, debt consolidation, paying a medical bill or even planning your wedding. Not sure I would do it income share agreement for most of those things. They are traditionally us to invest in what is known as human capital, our ability to earn money by getting more. Education. Another name for income share agreements is human capital contracts. Income share agreements were first proposed by the economist Milton Freeman in a nineteen, fifty, five essay titled The Role of Government in education. He wrote vocational or professional education is a form of investment in human capital precisely analogous to investment in machinery buildings are forms, of non human capital. Its function is to raise economic productivity of the human being. If it does. So the individual is rewarded in a free enterprise society by receiving a higher return for his services than he would. Be Able to command. We discussed this concept summit upset to forty five is college worth it. And determined, there is a positive financial return in investing in human capital. By attending college, you can earn more, you build your social capital, your network you gain knowledge. Having a college degree allows you to pass filters that many companies put in place with their hiring practice in that, they only hire individuals with college degrees. Freeman continued. If a fixed money loan is made to finance investment in physical capital, the lender can get some security for his loan in the form of a mortgage or a residual claim to the physical asset itself, and he can count on realizing at least part of its investment in case of necessity by selling the physical asset. In other words, the lender has some collateral that could be sold in the case of default. But Freeman a problem if the loan is made to invest in human capital. He writes the lender clearly cannot get any comparable security in a non slave state the individual embodying the investment cannot be bought and sold. Freeman then pointed out that because there isn't collateral that the interest rate charged on student loan would have to be sufficiently high to compensate for the capital loss because there wouldn't be collateral and that the interest rate would have to be so high making the loans unattractive to borrowers. Now. A solution was found. Federal guaranteed student loans. The total US Student Loan Dad. Private and federal is one point six, four, trillion dollars. Only a hundred and twenty, four, billion of that one point six trillion is private. The average federal student loan debt balance is thirty, five, thousand dollars and the default rate is high. Eleven point one percent. It's particularly challenging for individuals that have taken on a lot of student loan debt to pay off. A Brookings Institution study from two thousand eighteen found that the median borrower who had less than fifty thousand dollars in student loan debt in the early two thousands paid off the debt within ten years. While the median borrower, they had more than fifty thousand dollars in student loan debt ten years later still owed about seventy, five percent and most of the students falling behind on their student loan debt are those that have a balanced greater than fifty thousand dollars. Friedman's proposed solution income share agreements. They weren't necessarily called that, but he said that. A contract could be structure where an investor would buy a share in an individual's earnings prospects. To advance him, the funds needed to finance his training on condition that he agreed to pay the lender a specified fraction of his future earnings. In this way Friedman wrote, a lender would get back more than his initial investment from relatively successful individuals which would compensate for the failure to recoup his original investment from the unsuccessful. There seems no legal obstacle to private contracts of this kind even though they are economically equivalent to the purchase of a share in an individual's earning capacity and thus to partial slavery. These. Agreements have been criticized perhaps not slavery, but certainly indentured servitude. Although Miguel Palacios yet us in his book investing in Human Capital felt that the analogy to slavery or indentured servitude was incorrect because the students retain the full freedom of action they're not forced to stay in a given job or even a work in the field in which they trained in. So they have the ability to to work anywhere they want.

Human Capital Milton Freeman Friedman David Stein United States Brookings Institution Miguel Palacios
Rapper Kanye West files for Oklahoma presidential ballot

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

Rapper Kanye West files for Oklahoma presidential ballot

"Rapper Kanye west is qualified to appear on Oklahoma's presidential ballot in November but it's not clear if the celebrity is actually running for the nation's highest office you may recall in July fourth Kanye west announced he was going to challenge president trump in November although west is missed the filing deadline in a number of states he didn't get the paper work and the thirty five thousand dollar filing fee in on time for Oklahoma one of the musicians advisers had told New York magazine that west was out of the running but TMZ is reporting the west campaign has filed papers with the Federal Election Commission west too has said that he has bipolar disease told Forbes magazine earlier this month that if he wins he plans to model his White House on the fictional land in Black Panther adding let's get back to Wakanda I am Jackie Quinn

Kanye West Oklahoma Forbes Magazine White House Jackie Quinn President Trump New York Magazine Federal Election Commission
NASA Needs A Toilet That Works In Microgravity And Lunar Gravity

Woody & Wilcox

02:28 min | 2 years ago

NASA Needs A Toilet That Works In Microgravity And Lunar Gravity

"I. Don't think we actually ended up talking about this yet. Even though it's been something that I think it was on several of our radars for quite some time now we always are getting into some of the unexpected ramifications from the Covid, nineteen situation and I don't know that these are related, but maybe the fact that we're focused on it now more than we would be if we weren't all under this pandemic situation, the fact that NASA is offering people a little side money, a little side Gig. I know you've seen this what he I think. They would like you to Come up with a toilet. NASA. The NASA by the way. The whatever it stands for North American space guys. Matt Sustain. National Aeronautical. Agency came very high and mighty when I didn't get mine anyway. We all know what NASA is. They have the lunar. Lou Challenge sees me. It's administration. I don't WanNa. Leave the people wrong. Lunar Lou Challenge I. Don't think we even said what it was so i. don't think we let anybody wrong the only way they. Yes, they would like to create A. For Space, specifically, it has to do with the moon and the base that they would like to build their. That's why they're calling it the lunar Lou. Qualified for that here's somebody from well. You may not be, but that doesn't mean everybody's not. Here's a dude from NASA explaining a little bit. Hollow it just was not animal tail. Astronauts do not take. The Apollo bad scenario again there's suction involved or any good seal, but. On for going number two, so it's not just sitting on a toilet and going. STRAPS and harnesses. So I you know I'm sure what he has all the answers because he studied how astronauts go to the bathroom for years now, but the headline and I've tweeted out the link by the way you could win thirty five thousand dollars. Maybe I should mention that right upfront which I gotta be honest doesn't sound like enough to me. You create a toilet that they use with NASA. Seems like there ought to be a little bit more donut for you, but thing says help astronauts go back to the moon and twenty twenty four NASA seeks new designs for a toilet that will work both in microgravity and in lunar gravity,

Nasa Lou Challenge Matt Sustain Wanna National Aeronautical
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Hundred cocoa Hey Sally here many of us have equity in our homes right now with thirty year mortgage rates way down now is the perfect time to use it I got two words for you that could save you thousands anchor funding I tried my friend Kevin Lyons I've been dealing with Kevin and talking about him for about twenty years here in Tokyo he's the president of anchor finding these help some listeners just like you combine their first mortgages adjustable lines of credit and credit card debt into one low payment I'm talking thirty thousand dollars for the credit card debt into one loan payments savings of six hundred and fifty dollars a month that's a huge relief for them because property values are up they're also able to get thirty five thousand dollars cash back so lower your mortgage payments pay off those extra credit cards adjustable lines of credit get cash out do everything that you need to do with your home and your bills and even if your credit is less than perfect Kevin has access to a variety of programs so it's worth a five minute call that extra money every month adds up call Kevin you won't know how much you could save unless you call right now eight hundred three three three five one five seven that's eight hundred three three three five one five seven or just Google anchor funding equal housing lender California bureau of real estate broker numbers are one two seven six zero eight seven analysts number two three six four one nine not all applicants qualified loans made or arranged pursuant to the department of business oversight California finance lenders law I thank Dr Israel Francis is describes rewatch podcast with Zach Braff and Donald Faison so we're going to do it like this every week we come to you talking about the next episode of the show will hold the you watch along with us because that's kind of the idea during these Hollywood testes as the interview former cast members directors and even show creator bill Lawrence about the wild nights weddings and everything leading up to this cult classic TV show maybe like we just saw your movie and I'd be like oh cool thank you thank you for going let me tell you about our special and it was like only in Hollywood can you go see a movie and then have the star of the movie wait on you for dessert together second dials recall the intimate journey that builds a lifelong friendship oh my god this is where it all originated join fake doctors real friends as they remember their early success and try to figure out if the janitor was a figment of JT's imagination we've already proven that time and time again listen to fake doctors real friends on the I heart radio back or wherever you listen to podcasts from the cal fire weather center this report is sponsored by AFC urgent care San Diego dot com taking a look at the weather partly cloudy and a high of seventy two along the coast today definitely warmer inland it'll be in the mid to upper eighties overnight lows are going to drop down to the.

Unemployment And The Racial Divide

The Indicator from Planet Money

02:14 min | 2 years ago

Unemployment And The Racial Divide

"A few months ago, a team of researchers from the J. P. Morgan Chase, institute and the University of Chicago put together a report from a huge new set of data and Stacey I hate sound too nerdy about this. You love data I know maybe I don't need this. But actually this data sat is really exciting and really quite extraordinarily. The data said that was put together for us for this study was very valuable and doing analysis. That wasn't possible before. That is economists, Damon Jones from the University of Chicago. Harris School of public policy, Damon is on that team of researchers, and basically he says the data come from about one point eight million J.. P. Morgan. Morgan Chase banking customers that is a huge sample which allows his team of researchers to see the different sources of income for families, this income can beat from things like your wages from your job, but also for example, a tax refund or unemployment insurance benefits, and the team can also see how families are spending their money almost in real time month to month or in some cases week. Week to week it's a view into how people make economic decisions, and crucially it lets researchers break down the data by race and ethnicity to offer a picture of the ways that different racial and ethnic households experienced the economy in different ways on one. The first findings that we've found looking at take home pay so that's how much is being directly deposited into your account. Is that we? We found on average that black and Hispanic families earned about seventy cents on the dollar when compared to their white counterparts, the median Hispanic family and the medium black family make roughly thirty five thousand dollars a year, the median white family about forty seven thousand dollars a, and that doesn't matter whether you look at the lowest earners or the highest earners are people who were in the middle. There's consistently a lower level of take home income for the black and Hispanic families, and another finding was that there are big disparities in the money that people have saved up and can use to pay their bills. This money is called liquid assets, liquid assets or things like cash. Your bank account things similar to cash

Damon Jones University Of Chicago J. P. Morgan Chase Morgan Chase P. Morgan Stacey Harris School Of Public
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Welcome back to the Riggleman show let's go straight to the telephone we are to talk with I'm great thanks for having me my pleasure what can I do for you today my husband and I are thinking of retiring I'm fifty four he's fifty five he has the pension coming about one hundred thousand dollars and we've been able to put away five hundred thousand dollars an hour for one K. we're looking to try to get money out of it enough where we don't have to maybe work or if we have to work part time fine but we want to take care of their elderly parents for a little while he had some health issues so you know we're hoping he's here till nine right all these are a hundred but if not we would like not every time a little bit early and we're just trying to figure out the best way okay and we had someone to look at maybe we should look into it nobody's but we're a little bit apprehensive about that because well he's not sophomore Walker money up that much we wanted to have you know some liquid just in case it's something that we want to do yeah and our only debt right now is we have a a hundred thirty five thousand dollar mortgage and what's the value of the house and I have that as two weeks okay and you have any other money you've got you mention the five hundred grand pension balance and the five hundred grand another savings anything else we have about twenty five thousand dollars just in regular savings catcher okay and the five hundred thousand in the pension is available to you as a lump sum yes correct okay correct I I agree with your attitude about the annuity your concern about lack of liquidity in the inflexibility makes a lot of sense especially if there are health risks associated because in many cases when you sign up for that and nobody it's only a lifetime annuity meaning if your husband does died at age earlier than actuarially projected you might not get your value of the.

Riggleman Walker
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KCRW

"If you go to KCRW dot com slash give you can get in on F. thirty five thousand dollars a challenge grant for KCRW board member Sally came if we can raise thirty five thousand dollars by midnight tonight Kane will generously match that so as I said KCRW dot com slash give or eight hundred six hundred five two seven nine Dan out long the best name I've ever heard from San Francisco California said thank you for keeping Josh Ferris programs on the air he and his team do fantastic work and he made a donation today big thanks to Kathryn Williams from Los Angeles he supported a Los Angeles regional food bank you know today is the last day data when you make a donation to KCRW we can double the meals were sending to either the Santa Barbara food bank or the Los Angeles county regional food bank at today's the last day ripple double those it's a great thank you get to take any support to nonprofits with one donation I would think Paul Lawson from Claremont Jeffrey Baskin from south Pasadena Jacob hot hot from Fairview park Ohio is supporting the Los Angeles regional food bank Timothy Mason from mill valley California thank you for your on ending dedication to bringing us a glorious orally and visually enjoyable and meaningful experiences thank you Timothy George winters from Darrington Washington Amy Scott from Long Beach and at the Laurie from Los Angeles KHL inbox from Glendale who supported the Los Angeles regional food bank thanks to Elizabeth brothers from valley to land and Jane Lynch of Los Angeles thank you guys so much for making donations today the case here W. eight hundred six hundred five two seven nine or case here W. dot com slash give it's morning becomes eclectic press play with Madeleine brand is coming.

Glendale Madeleine Elizabeth Darrington Washington Timothy George Fairview park Ohio Pasadena Claremont Josh Ferris San Francisco Sally KCRW Jane Lynch Kane Long Beach Amy Scott mill valley California Timothy Mason Jeffrey Baskin Paul Lawson
Human Life Is Literally Quieter Due To Coronavirus Lockdown

Environment: NPR

07:11 min | 2 years ago

Human Life Is Literally Quieter Due To Coronavirus Lockdown

"Life on down inside our homes might be noisy outside. The streets and skies are noticeably quieter. And because there's less human sound out there. Many people are hearing more wildlife as invisible. Is Amy Wendell reports? The relationship between human noise and the rest of nature is often discordant. So is our quiet in this moment. Having any impact the Internet is humming with rumors of animals. Reclaiming cities and towns. Dolphins are allegedly swimming in Venetian canals. Black bears are supposedly rating trash cans in La and mountain. Goats have been seen descending the Welsh hills to stroll through town some of these quarantine silver lining stories have been debunked though for now at least the goats seem legit but other anecdotes about nature being more present in the absence of humans. Come from reliable sources. Npr's Eleanor Beardsley observed for the first time in years birds singing throughout Paris. But what really we've on is. I'm sitting by the San River right now on a sunny evening and I just heard a river bird like egrets on polls and stuff. Is that not wild? I have never heard that before. Yeah we can hear subtlety of life around us that we haven't heard in a long long time this is Bernie Krause. One of the founders of a field called soundscape ecology that studies. How all the sounds in an ecosystem interact with each other and with us. Crouse has been recording the natural world for more than fifty years and in that time he's observed lots of ways are noise is disruptive to wildlife to the fraud in Jeff. He tells this story of how back in the Nineteen Ninety S. He was recording thousands of frogs that gather in the spring at Mono Lake in California and Croke in unison Buddhist. Really big almost like all the little frogs have joined together to become one giant frog. It's actually a defense mechanism helps keep predators from locating and attacking individual frogs but cross says the military started doing test flights over mono basin and the roar of the jets would cause the frogs to fall out of sync. Say would take like forty five minutes before they could get in sync again and during that period of time we watched as a couple of great horned owls. Coyote came in and picked off a couple of frogs. Eventually this led to significant population decline. All because of a jet across says it's not just jets it's helicopters and chainsaws and tractors and traffic messages endless mounts of noise until now with billions of people stuck inside our noise. Sprint is dramatically quieter in Paris. For instance a group that monitors noise pollution saw as much as a ninety percent. Drop in human sounds since the city went on lockdown so how is this relative? Quiet impacting wildlife. There was a question trending on Google. Arbor D- singing louder. This is Megan goal. A sensory ecologist and professor at Vassar College. If anything I would actually guessed that the birds are not singing as loud. That's because goal says they aren't having to compete against human sound which could be a good thing for the birds for one thing. All explains noise has been shown to increase stress hormone responses in birds which affects immune function. So less noise right now might equal less illness plus birds living in bustling cities or even busy suburban neighborhoods. Have to expend a lot of energy singing louder so now that things are quieter she says the birds might have extra energy to us on different things like spending time foraging saving energy to feed your kids etc so possibly will see animals that have larger broods or healthier offspring. You might also get changes in how females are selecting meets now out of that speculation of course but I think there's a lot of really interesting things that could be happening while how this all plays out for wildlife is for the time being left to informed speculation one impact of our stillness is ringing clear as a bell so the earth is like literally humming underneath our feet that's right. Yep. Any for Seto is seismologist. Who recently observed along with colleagues in Brussels in California a huge drop in human caused vibrations on the Earth's crust it was impressive It was just a reminder that we as a civilization have a noticeable imprint on the world in ways that sometimes we don't appreciate I for one did not appreciate that. Humans rattle the earth like a tiny earthquake. But we do mostly from transportation automobiles planes trains even are walking registers on seismographs as a kind of constant static and now that static is way less noisy giving seismologists a unique opportunity to perhaps detect more subtle vibrations that usually get drowned out like the ones coming from inside volcanoes close to cities. I think it's an open question. How strong this changes? But it's something that I know. People in the seismology community are really interested in exploring and some scientists are attempting to measure this strange and profound sonic experiment above ground. The silent cities project is a call for scientists journalists artists. Really anyone with good enough audio equipment to record what they're hearing while stuck at home to me. It's very peaceful to walk and be able to hear liberty. Tiny sounds Amandine. Gas is a soundscape ecologist in France who helped create the project back insects moving in leaves for example. Does eating the flowers. Also it's spring right now so so increase also annoys the wildlife. Sounds you hear so far? Participants are recording one hundred and sixty one locations all over the world and the data an expected thirty five thousand dollars or more audio will be available for any researcher who wants to analyze it in the future. Listening to our new sound environment is not just for researchers though ecologist making gall says it can be for everyone one of potentially positive things that could come out of. This is that people are having a chance to interact with the world around them in a way that they may be having interacted with before and those interactions could lead people like eleanor. Beardsley to not only consider the wildlife around them now. The birds singing on the sun but help them keep it in mind as things get back to being noisier.

Eleanor Beardsley Paris California Researcher Amy Wendell Bernie Krause Nineteen Ninety San River Mono Basin Mono Lake La And Mountain Vassar College Google Crouse Coyote NPR Megan Arbor Fraud Sprint
Supermarket throws out $35K of food after woman coughs on it

Markley and Van Camp

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Supermarket throws out $35K of food after woman coughs on it

"This in Pennsylvania because the grocery store thirty five thousand dollars in food what they do it happened yesterday at the supermarket in Hanover township the co owner said the woman came into the store and proceeded to purposely cough on all the produce a section of the bakery the meat case other spots in the store estimated the food value was well over thirty five thousand dollars he also said Lee efforts are being made to make her be tested for corona virus the she's not

Pennsylvania Hanover Township LEE
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Investigation resulted in a thirty five thousand dollar settlement to an African American man was improperly identified and wrongly arrested for the crime time now for your weather forecast partly cloudy skies through the evening with overnight lows in the upper three we'll see rain likely for Monday with scattered showers highs in the upper forties and low fifties more rain for the work week from the car seventeen point weather center meteorologist clearly understood it's currently forty four degrees in downtown Seattle for Cairo radio I'm Alex down and listen on your smart speakers Amazon Google home and apple homepod Cairo radio ninety seven three F. as Tom and Curley now on your drive home delivery you loading up on things from Walmart yeah I use my new Capital One moment rewards card earns unlimited five percent back on everything I buy from Walmart online see what's five percent back five percent what with the Capital One Walmart rewards card earns unlimited rewards including five percent back at Walmart online on top of Walmart's everyday low prices what's in your wallet terms and conditions apply Capital One USA NA earning on CBS news radio good morning I'm Jane Pauley and this is Sunday morning on the radio from corporate offices to the primary debate stage we've been hearing.

Seattle Alex Tom Walmart Jane Pauley Cairo Google apple Curley CBS
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WTOP

"Vibrant campus community and the access Washington DC offers that choose Georgetown dot com Jackie the WTOP traffic that writer has our storm team four four day forecast Matt guess already here for this rain is headed our way yeah we've already had some last night and early this morning that's the kind of moving off to the east but the next big swath of rain will be coming up from a southern West Virginia and southwestern Virginia the Roanoke area that'll be moving in during the midday hours into the afternoon just some passing showers and drizzle and fog this morning but this afternoon into this evening into the rush that's we'll get some periods of rain that could be heavy at times working for weather alert an ace and a of flood watch goes into effect at one o'clock this afternoon last until seven AM tomorrow highs today will be in the upper forties and foreign with Maryland loaded fifties elsewhere rain will continue heavy at times overnight tonight some street and some creek flooding will be possible a Los will be in the mid forties to near fifty but tomorrow morning around this time to study rail be tapering off just some scattered showers tomorrow windy and mild early highs in the mid upper fifties but falling in the afternoon and the evening temperatures that is over the weekend Saturday sunshine with some increasing clouds a few showers arriving again later in the day highs being low forties Sunday with a mix of clouds and sunshine just a couple sprinkles maybe a free flurries highs only be in the low to mid forties thirty eight right now in Hightstown thirty nine in Woodbridge and thirty seven here fresh bites right at six fifty one with all that rain on the way it's important key some things in mind as you drive through that JYJ NBC four chief meteorologist Doug Kammerer says they can't repeat this enough turn around don't drown is what we always tell you if you see water over the roadway it does not take much for that water to move your car so please never drive through flooded roadway for folks in flood prone areas even some sandbags are not a bad idea in some locations Kammer says another thing to think about if flooding happens often where you live check the sump pump is that working make sure that you can turn that on to make sure it's ready to go for you just in case you do have some flooding in the basement with Anderson WTOP news prosecutors at Harvey Weinstein's rape trial around a schedule to rest their case today after more than two weeks of testimony including some graphic accounts from the accusers the woman who broke down in tears today earlier told jurors she wanted them to know Harvey Weinstein is her rapist the defense contends the woman is a manipulator and evidence points to a consensual relationship that she enjoyed the perks of knowing the former Hollywood producer the woman push back saying her relationship with winds dean was complicated and difficult and doesn't change the fact he raped her the woman's allegations are the basis for some of the most serious charges at issue in wine stains trial I'm a Donahue search efforts have resumed in eastern Turkey following to avalanches that killed dozens of people rescue workers helped by dogs were conducting scans to find the missing some three hundred emergency service workers were called to a highway shortly after the team was struck by a second avalanche the death toll from two avalanches is climb to thirty nine now no it Johnson a senior at DeMatha high school is the winner of the coveted Madden championship belt and his victory last we put them on track to compete in springs at Madden NFL twenty bowl the ultimate prize in that sport the seventeen year old from Ellicott city beat professional gamers in San Francisco last week to become the youngest ever to win the Madden Belton thirty five thousand dollar price now he heads to the bowl competition in April were total prices are two hundred twenty thousand dollars well prepare in is I'll play against other top guys like guys over at the tournament video gaming is growing by leaps and bounds and no was as far from being a solo endeavor it builds relationships and develops real.

Washington Georgetown
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Fundraiser by family friend has raised more than a hundred to thirty five thousand dollars to help support Goebbels girlfriend and their young daughter I'm too ugly so I can't tell NPR news and this is WNYC in New York I'm John Carlson New York governor Andrew Cuomo wants to try again to install high speed rail across the state carried away that's more politicians have talked of high speed rail across New York for decades studies have been conducted and then abandoned now governor Cuomo says he wants to try again will convene a group of private sector engineers to re examine past high speed rail plans and rethink some of the assumptions made in those proposals to try to find a better way to actually achieve high speed rail in New York Cuomo says most of the state's population lives within a short distance from existing train tracks but he says the lines average a speed of fifty one miles per hour meaning it's often the slowest method available for new Yorkers to travel Cuomo does not say how much a conversion to high speed rail might cost a study completed in twenty fourteen found the price tag could be as high is over fourteen billion dollars if new tracks had to be built I knew NYPD unit formed to investigate far right hate groups is looking into racist robo calls that bombarded Barnard College and Columbia University staff earlier this week and my P. intelligence commissioner John Miller says the racially and ethnically motivated extremism unit is still investigating but that the department did that knows the group behind the calls and their motivations are clear the calls were certainly hateful in nature certainly racially motivated and comes from unknown entity that has been buying calls like this before in a statement on the university's website Columbia officials said the calls were related to the fatal stabbing of eighteen year old Tessa majors in Morningside park earlier this month prosecutors in Westchester county are reviewing all cases involving a Younkers police detective accused of falsifying a search warrant district attorney Anthony Scardino said the review of detective John Fogerty follows a federal lawsuit filed by a wrongly accused man who spent almost five months in jail on drug charges that were dismissed prosecutors say they do not yet know how many cases are affected the detective had been assigned to U. S. Drug Enforcement Administration task force the new site lowered reports that he's taking early retirement because of the suit for tonight here.

John Fogerty Drug Enforcement Administratio Younkers Columbia NYPD John Carlson NPR Goebbels New York Anthony Scardino Westchester county Morningside park John Miller commissioner Columbia University Barnard College governor Cuomo
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:20 min | 3 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Page and there's my virtual cattle my goal this year thirty five thousand dollars for the salvation army we of which I have about six hundred so I got so now is the time to make that donation if you can the voice you just heard belongs to a lease dog me she's a program manager for a up a program that they have at the salvation army that I did not know from my work with them over the years I did not know exists it's the stop yet initiative against human trafficking is that right it is welcome to the show thank you so much for having me so how did you come into that line of work so I've been with this topic program for over eleven years now I worked for a different salvation army program that was running out of funding and they just happen to have a need for a bilingual worker when I was looking for a job you speak Spanish thank you is that the language that's most helpful when we're talking about trafficking in Chicago after English yes yeah sure and what is trafficking means so when we're talking about trafficking in the US we're talking about two different forms sex and labor trafficking so basically when someone is forced tricked or threatened either into a labor situation or a commercial sex situation does mean you're crossing borders this is not the emigrating are emigrating of people correct it can involve crossing our borders but we serve a lot of individuals who were born and raised in Illinois born and raised in Chicago who are experiencing trafficking here in Chicago so they're not going anywhere they're staying in Chicago with somebody else is controlling their destiny they're using them as a commodity for profit exactly and that's a big deal in Chicago relative to other cities or can you just give me a handle on it yeah it's a really big deal not just in the city limits of Chicago but really across the northern side of Illinois and we see a lot of human trafficking both forms both sex and labor trafficking an example what we talked about here what would be a scenario which you would get involved yeah so we work with a lot of individuals right now who did come to the U. S. from other countries but came over on temporary work visas and once they arrived to work as a nanny their rights were kind of exploited and and taken away and they were threatened with deportation if they didn't do exactly as the family desired not paid a fair a livable wage not allowed to go and told that if they would leave maybe their family members would be insured and so they felt like they had no option but to continue working and that nanny situation as an anti so that that's indicted direct expect that I mean it would seem to me like somebody with the resources or the need would not be so monstrous is to put these people in some sort of indentured servitude like you're describing that that happened so it does happen but these are not people who are being sexually exploited but rather just as in home labor yeah so I think there's a lot of misinformation around trafficking we do have a significant problem with sex trafficking but we also have a huge problem with labor trafficking and it just goes largely unaddressed an unacknowledged in our communities what's another scenario that you guys might get involved yes so another scenario might be someone who was maybe fifteen had lots of vulnerabilities in their life had lots of moments when someone could approach and build relationships and so they someone approaches and they start to build relationship becomes a romantic relationship and eventually that romantic really relationship might turn into a you know I love you I need a really big favor because I'm having trouble making rent this month and that young person who's fifteen has to go out and trade sex for money in order to make a payment towards Renton not night that one time favor can turn into a nightly exploitation how do these people find you then so they say when did they know they can reach out when do they reach yeah so I think an important part of our program is this recognition that we need to really restore choice in people's life and that starts at the beginning of what it looks like to engage in whether they're ready to engage in support of services at all and when they're ready to leave knowing that there's a a resource available so we do a lot of trainings with community providers who are already actively engaging with folks who are experiencing trafficking so that they know about our resource and can offer support of someone's ready and then we build relationship with people with a lot of young people just so that we can talk about healthy relationships talk about what exploitation is because the reality is most folks who are experiencing trafficking would never identify if you said I work with survivors of human trafficking when we start talking about the specifics of the situation people not being paid what they're owed people being threatened people being tricked into the situation that's when it starts to resonate to go it is that's me exactly I know and maybe they don't even think that the person's breaking the law they're just not very nice right in effect is that always the case I mean maybe I'm asking you is in any to work longer hours than you want and I'm not very nice to you but I my breaking the law by virtue of this so human trafficking is both a federal law and a state law in all of our states across the country so by committing human trafficking either labor or sex trafficking you are breaking the law I guess I knew that but I'm wondering what constitutes that because maybe they're not paying me a lot that but when did they cross the line so I so I think there's a lot of situations that are labor exploitation also really big deals that don't rise to the level of trafficking or talking about trafficking you're talking about someone feeling stuck like they can't get out of the situation and it might feel like I really want to leave and I can't get out because I signed a contractor because my family will be hurt it could also be a more psychological control of I have nowhere to go and this is I this person a lot because they've really stepped out and committed to me do you contact police or attorneys do these people get criminal charges the people that are exploiting them so that is our goal so we actually co facilitate the cook county human trafficking task force along with the cook county state's attorney's office and the US attorney's office for the Northern District of Illinois and the purpose of that task force is to comprehensively addressed trafficking both from victim services as well as through the criminal justice system to have a safe house then how do you help these people yes we work to identify housing options at both locally and Illinois as well as across the country I'm really working to identify housing that people are willing to go to so some folks are willing to go to shelters some people are not and have connections in the community where they're willing to stay that feel safer than with a family member stay with a friend stay with somebody you know of that will help you exactly then you're kind of guiding them in this process yeah and then we act as intensive case managers finding all the community resources that folks are interested and so how do you just not get a baseball bat go to the house of the people that are doing this these people lack of money had a couple of times I mean I would be this is so bizarre it is and it's it is pretty infuriating but our focus really is on it meeting people with where they are in serving the survivors and and really focusing on what they want to achieve in their life so you don't want people to donate baseball bats and words not so much now shame on me so but I guess monies to go to the salvation army fund your program as well correct I just get my head around all of this two people have the reaction I have and having now sometimes absolutely absolutely so here's my web page so be it when I make a donation salvation army can I dedicated to a specific program or no you have your funding as long as we donated to the army you'll get your.

thirty five thousand dollars eleven years
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

09:55 min | 3 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Is there and I believe it has one hundred and seventy five dollars in it which is not thirty five thousand dollars now is it and that's our goal that's ambitious but I like our chances more about that after thanksgiving a warrant peeler is in our studio he works with the salvation army the salvation army used to work for him welcome to the show how are you doing okay how bout seltzer so tell me a little bit about yourself where do you live what our lives well other uses the the salvation army back at fifteen fifteen and I'd really met them back in two thousand and one that's when I became a resident there your resident or a yeah line and how high and how did you fall into the services our home is being homeless industry for about five years on the streets of Chicago mysteries is called a five year where abouts did use them looking at maybe a hundred fifteen Mishkin round of an era they're not usual miles's outside seven I can Drexel why would you like yes what we hope will I lost everything you know I drinking and drug and selling drugs I lost my wife I lost my children but it hurts sometime around the holiday season but you lost them because because my drinking and drugging their lives they live there we're not going to associate with you any longer right are you from Chicago I'm from Chicago morning raise your family around here too all I got right now is the salvation army yes my family so I am always fascinated that's and and sad yeah sure about people who live on the street I literally don't know how they make it I don't know how they survive how many nights a year would you say during that five years you were you on the street sleeping outside for about maybe man these six days six days out a week later on the cars and abandoned buildings on the boxes to how we can get food of people just just bring us food he was coming to this food under about out in other cars you mean from the salvation army no just regular people off the street I've seen that this guide near my viaduct all the time to get off the lake shore drive did you get a guy there and he's using got a sign was that could you have a sign of god have no sign I mean some of them get is that among I get get with a couple of guys ahead size spam what a man we know things like that I'm always intrigued by the sort of you know means by which they use to try to get my attention or my sympathy or my money or my food yeah some of them play music and some of them walk with you and tell you free up a couple of Bucks some of them volunteered to shine your shoes some of them just sit there yeah and that was your existence for five years five years to limit salvation army back in two thousand how did you meet the salvation army I got put up a hotel I used to be in a hotel of seventy nine Dorchester and the guy got tied to meet standards look over my is stolen I used to work on so he put me out and after a couple of days I went to Saint Francis hospital and that's one that salvation army to the program somebody was there that call Dave dare call three one one for emergency service and they took me to another place called kill Patrick that was a six month program I did a six month program and I got put out on the fifth month so I'm sorry somebody called makes a call myself a story comes and says we're going to put you in our treatment program no Chicago Human Services called the salvation army say they had somebody I see and it was me were you agreeable were you a willing client at account was kind of scared shaky because I will I just want to drinking drugs and I don't want to try to body going he's going to institutionalize anything like that also I thought people to recover usually have to hit bottom and yeah they have to want to change evidently you were there yeah I was there not changed six months you in that program six one thousand a program to kick me out I mean they kick you always get high and you know you can't you can go to an institution and come to the door Tom out well I just moved to join you don't put you out because they don't drop your time you go in so then what happened then after that next thing I know this guy named Vince Gill practice took me over to the salvation army he took me there now they run treatment program right at the mobile so you went into the salvation army St Avenue that program yeah I was that one different was different I had a lot of structure and I got this out with an army and lot of people talk to me people love me for just being me and looking in my eyes is a you you need to help we're going to give you some help I see what if I don't want any help that's up to you Mr filler whether you take this help or not or you wind up get on the streets I gave you three choices god gave me three choices he said you won't jails death institution also that extends to fill out he's a jury so I got in and right now seventeen years going SO one working for salvation army on a mobile feeding unit mobile out reach twelve years that's interesting so now you are hand in the food to the people yes just who used to be like you yes yes what do you see out there which had what is yours as he paints the sorrow but just that one bowl of soup and a piece of bread and Ecole late and a nice kind words I love you brother take a cell to tell them Hey you can get off the street I got off the street are they a given testimony every time I see him all you are in fact you your judge job description for the salvation army is is an eight and eight account or a yeah I pass out cards I get out and talk to him I pray when and if they want me to free one it doesn't make any difference you work for the mobile out reach out a lot reach yes Sir mobile out reaches two components right the food delivery and then the counseling again it sounds like you have a thing called a chase a van with all the counselors sickness van and when you get a bowl of soup I direct into the chase a van they can either go to detox that's up to them what they wanted to help get the license get their birth certificates back the so security because I got all mad to salvation army so when I see somebody panhandling on the street wanting food wanting money maybe wanting liquor yeah should I give them some money out of my pocket or should I direct him to the self directed to salvation on I give them money sometimes a lot of piano what I do to my man my wife drive past and sound we see a guy and I just give a dollar my friends in the army say I did that I'm that I'm a betting their bad behavior now when I do that that they're just going to continue to live on the streets not gonna help if I do have you given him a Buck directly to the salvation army we can help him I mean help the end and if they need food they will always have a meal at the salvation come to my truck you'll always get a meal how do you know where does your truck go my truck goals medicine one role we go up north I would come back south so you do a route we will route every three days every day medicine always one of our biggest what's medicine awareness in Albany of Chicago so where is that in relation to its center has ten south kids he so you are you are you still are United at seven ninety seven yeah right yeah and it makes the route this to rouse truck people know the stock even though the line up every time we pull up are you in that truck come in a truck faithfully in that truck yeah I know you say you see her you see pain pain tell me about some of the people more well I personally or specifically what I got a couple people out Tom songs to knock up the guys that is geared to going to institutionalize get get the Celtics ourselves no problem all you got is give give up the will to do what you want to do when you want radio well they're free to get his stuff stolen you know talked about like the dirty and nasty or anything like that why get a positive cream I given good positive attitude all the time not all these ads I think we forget that those are people like you human beings like human beings you get more respect as well then I will give you respect and that's how dangerous is the job that you have right now was dangerous I don't look at is being dangers I'll stay away from you know once they see things is going to happen on on to get to get a truck and lock it up your release which you can kill a person just wearables we say I love you today I need is a card can you take a cell what's the literally tell me the menu for today you mean you today's only beans and rice with maybe pork or beef and I we get jobs we get water and I have great and most of them sometime have snacks on it to like today we had serial given three boxes of zero today with a bowl of soup war thank you very much are you going to be out here thirty four thanks given as as long as I'm still breathing you will see anywhere to the voicemail out there on Thursday to would be thanksgiving yep and then where did they eat that food someone to take it home some almost a new grass we don't offer the garbage can you do for them yeah but just just like I miss these people because I'm going on vacation I come back warm where you ban a seven week is why did you leave us we need your is a funny thing the feel loved by somebody else a stranger but you know it would seem to me like somebody like you would almost want to just grab them by the S. HA control missing from the soul exactly get all of that street yes Sir but we can't do that we talked to him I give them cards call this number made each ID call Richard Wagner is you can call Andrew you call a couple of the guys that we have the company come and pick you up take we gotta go all you gotta do is just do what you have to save your life yeah jail is a douche the death men women talk about the age and and and and who these people are yeah I don't get into it all in a business all that counts is together I just given that bowl that card to push along the before do you suppose if you get too inquisitive then they're gonna stop may be showing up for the hot soup well they mostly all people I have right now two years I worked had been almost every day every day just to see this so I guess the salvation army has bills to pay I mean if this conversation is to motivate the people listening to make a donation jazz salvation army yes were it not for your vehicle you and your colleagues handed out that food right I wonder what would happen to those folks yeah I wonder what happened I me is light the donation helps us keep our wheels on a roll and keep us going and prepares the food for the kitchen keep service new year gases and free you got about as I thought about that the salvation army yeah yes every every dollar helps the way that.

five years six month six days thirty five thousand dollars seventy five dollars seventeen years twelve years seven week six months three days five year two years
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

06:08 min | 3 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"You sign did you say yes to their occupancy we we house not a date we said yes we can move forward and then late on Wednesday up to sign the lease the only change their minds with a sorry we help other applications I think I think I think you're okay I think you saying yeah I think we have a deal I don't think that's enough because any any real estate deal has to be in writing anything involving real property has to be in writing and I believe that extends to our leasing property to so you know then they can argue detrimental reliance they relied on you what was the period of time between you when you said yes and then you told them no three two days you gonna be fine you're gonna be fine thank you so your argument is going to be once again is we had five applications does that mean four of those applications who didn't get it now so me for discrimination I mean that's the question and what if you had ten applicants does that mean you have nine lawsuits you're looking at see it doesn't make any sense I think you're fine especially since it was only a two day period Jennifer leave out the business of walking up the stairs or disability none of that none of that is appropriate here okay are you gonna screw yourself all right okay yeah yeah of course discrimination but let me tell you this everything in life discrimination but is it legal discrimination people call me all the time to go discrimination yeah you know when you get fired in someone else guy gets a promotion all right were you will get a promotion I've been discriminated against of course sure someone else got the job you didn't when I when I got married I had twelve women who are desperate to marry me on keeping hold on don't don't let's just an example okay so I had twelve women who are desperate to marry me I chose the one actually the other way around I chose one does that mean eleven of them are now screaming at me in suing for discrimination with that's yes I discriminated against you all day long now if I discriminant bases of race or creed religion ethnicity gender that's a problem although I could easily say if there if there was a game man who proposed to me and I said no that is discrimination probably based on sexuality so I have to accept our marriage offers from every kind of gender out there now maybe I'm stretching it a little bit this is me stretching the law this is why you call me for this fabulous legal analysis hi Dave there you are hello Dave Dave you there I can press a button enough all right there you go day sorry what can I do for you no problem you're a little over ten years ago my dad took out a home equity line of credit for about a hundred and thirty five thousand to a load of my brother and she's been making the interest payments for ten years still no principle pay down on it but my dad's just turning ninety was not doing so good and I'm just wondering he also my brother also wore a commissary noting I promised to pay back okay my dad fair enough I do have you had it might get if my dad died yeah is he responsible to pay back to the siblings that money just like for these responsible to pay it back to the estate okay your dad's the state and you can actually open up a probate just with that amount of money owing because the asset the house is a note that is all wings of a hundred thirty five thousand dollars note so here is a very important question when was the last time a payment was made last month okay sure she is still good so there's no statute issue but the quick answer there is yeah he still owes it to the estate and if all the estate is handed down to you and your brother all right yeah then the no transfers so yes so you are covered yeah he doesn't get away with that that's for sure Philip hello Philip yes Sir yes Sir what can I do bill bill yes Sir well I I guess got a cyclone is thirty yesterday you can earn free legal services for class action case and I'm just trying to figure out what I'm getting myself into because they made me like a representative for the need you a leader lane if you have to find out because usually you know who the lead plaintiffs are are and so I would do is I'd call the law firm and asked what the hell is going on all right now our our went there yesterday and didn't like it the clerk told me everything I need here like yeah okay yeah you've got to do you what you're doing is you're allowing yourself as a lead plaintiff too I they can use your like this they can do whatever they want with you any state statements you make you got to read this carefully to see if you're open to that now as a lead plaintiff you're not talking about a lot of money it's a lawyer is gonna make all the money so read it very carefully and if you're open to that if you're open to your wife being open but then you know you go for it all right give that all right all right let me tell you about researchers and a popular smart speaker and this week I speaker it turns out is open to a whole bunch of wifi vulnerabilities that allows something called crack key in reinstallation attack basically allows a hacker or to have the ability to view and control the traffic that goes across your wifi network and tens of millions of the smart speakers been sold in the U. S. yeah we have to understand how are connected world and how cyber criminals work and how they can.

ten years hundred thirty five thousand d three two days two day
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Thirty five thousand dollar vehicle the scene is that you own a depreciating asset in the banking system owns your money the other thing is that a unique financial tool can utilize its inherent leverage in collateral qualities to cut your vehicles that cost you one hundred and seventy five dollars to find out more call Nancy at eight one seven two three nine six four four one that's a one seven two three nine six four four one or I'm down money dot com unbound money dot com it's almost here twenty six shooting lanes fifty R. V. I. P. lanes to training rooms and seven thousand five hundred square feet of retail gun a knife inventory Texas gun experience D. F. W.'s newest and best thirty five thousand square foot indoor shooting range located just minutes from DFW airport on South Main street in grapevine Texas got experiences offering pre opening membership discounts starting at sixty nine dollars visit Texas gun experience dot com to learn more that's Texas gun experience dot com member here for metro golf cars I want to tell you about the all new club car on word this is a poor passenger personal transport vehicle and your path to freedom and it comes in gas or electric beyond where it is not just a golf cart it's a golf cart with style perfect for you to get around your gated community cruise around the lake and if you need something for business you've got to check out the in death you're great club car Kerry all lineup carry all models can carry up to eight people and the utility models can carry up to three quarter ton of payload just go online and take a look at metro Goff cars dot com re paving aside worker Dr William pouring concrete cost thousands of dollars won't create lifts the problem by injecting polyurethane underneath uneven concrete to raise the level of support it faster cleaner less invasive and at a fraction of the cost of a day to replace it after being overrun even faults in your walk where Ford get rid of the ponding on the side of your house or flat your driveway so you can use the garage again no replace it raise it schedule free estimate today visit long creek dot com that's L. O. N. G..

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:32 min | 3 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"His thirty five thousand dollar toilet yet Vestron faint he of the thirty five thousand dollar toilet that kind of behavior got thing fired up a pretty quickly he found himself running another bank called C. I. T. and that's where stain wise when his neighbor came calling so that banks that Stephen nutrients group bought off the government for zero dollars five years later he approached John saying he's upstairs neighbor and they agreed on a price three point four billion dollars but people was to be raised by this I mean didn't we just go through this whole crisis were banks were considered too big to fail and now we're going to create another make a bank run by this guy yeah and it would have been the first new mega banks since the bus okay so what happened when the news of the deal between the new chin and John Thain got out and how was seen the jolly involved well the new set off a ton of protest across the country homeowners in consumer advocate mobile lies to try to stop the sale that brings us back to sandy jolly she was one of the activists to force the federal reserve to hold a special hearing she testified about what happened to her family but in August twenty fifteen the sale went through anyway you want to give up in it's not in my nature to give up remember sandy had been fighting many chins bank for years and she still lost her family home then she paid tens of thousands of dollars in rent to live in that same house as she battled many agents bank sandy heard from a lot of other families hundreds of them families who had the same problem she did her phone rang off the hook with desperate people seeking advice well what I did learn along the way in losing every step of the way was I learned how to use every step of the way to the benefit of the next person so that it wouldn't happen to them and I should talk to these families were trying to hold on to their homes she realized this wasn't just her problem and I was just looking for a bigger solution an alternate solution because that's always when I'm trying to look for what are my next options sandy became convinced that the bank was constantly breaking the law and she wanted to do something about it so she went online and found David sure a Washington DC lawyer one of the top whistle blower attorneys in the country he specialized in a particular type of case representing people who say they have evidence the government has been defrauded my personal first conversation with sandy I remember because I remember her story is being different she wasn't a typical insider sure got his firm's private investigator involved the Czech sandy out and to be sure she was telling the truth he decided to take the case she was like in the industry or something she was someone whose parents were a victim of this fraud and I found that fascinating Cindy came armed with piles of documents she'd spent years accumulating about her own story and the other family she heard from the fraud sandy allege was really complicated there are a lot of consumer protections many chins bank was supposed to provide for families with reverse mortgages for example they were supposed to give the bears a chance to keep the house when elderly bar were died but sure this is the bank can follow these rules he says they broke the law she basically set up a system whereby this company would as quickly as possible immediately for close minu chin and build the government for his cross on the foreclosures for things like attorneys fees and appraisal costs because the foreclosure was improper those fees are not legitimate so is a couple of thousand dollars per house which may not sound like a lot but it added up to a hundred two hundred million dollars or something by the time that you know you at all like I told you earlier the government had agreed to back up all these bad mortgages even picking up these other costs if there was a foreclosure but if these foreclosures weren't legitimate and Steve minu chin would be breaking the law so David share called a friend in the US attorney's office and soon sandy was headed to Washington for a meeting at the justice department several members from Hyde the department of justice FBI agents and they grilled her for hours that's my recollection of the meeting I got very intimidated and after all that grilling the government decided.

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:46 min | 3 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KCRW

"His thirty five thousand dollar toilet yet Vestron faint he of the thirty five thousand dollar toilet that kind of behavior got thing fired up a pretty quickly he found himself running another bank called C. I. T. and that's where stain wise when his neighbor came calling so that banks that Stephen nutrients group bought off the government for zero dollars five years later he approached John thing is up steers neighbor and they agreed on a price three point four billion dollars but people was to be raised by this I mean didn't we just go through this whole crisis were banks were considered too big to fail and now we're going to create another make a bank run by this guy yeah and it would have been the first new mega banks since the bus okay so what happened when the news of the deal between the new chin and John Thain got out and how was saying the jolly involved well the new set off a ton of protest across the country homeowners and consumer advocates mobile lies to try to stop the sale that brings us back to sandy jolly she was one of the activists to force the federal reserve to hold a special hearing she testified about what happened to her family but in August twenty fifteen the sale went through anyway you want to give up in it's not in my nature to give up remember sandy had been fighting many agents bank for years and she still lost her family home then she paid tens of thousands of dollars in rent to live in that same house as she battled many regions bank sandy heard from a lot of other families hundreds of them families who had the same problem she did her phone rang off the hook with desperate people seeking advice well what I did learn along the way in losing every step of the way was I learned how to use every step of the way to the benefit of the next person so that it wouldn't happen to them and actually talk to these families were trying to hold on to their homes she realized this wasn't just her problem and I was just looking for a bigger solution an alternate solution because that's always what I'm trying to look for what are my next options sandy became convinced that the bank was constantly breaking the law and she wanted to do something about it so she went online and found David sure a Washington DC lawyer one of the top whistle blower attorneys in the country he specialized in a particular type of case representing people who say they have evidence the government is being defrauded my personal first conversation with sandy I remember because I remember her story is being different she was in a typical insider sure got his firm's private investigator involved the Czech sandy out and to be sure she was telling the truth he decided to take the case she was like in the industry or something she was someone whose parents were a victim of this fraud and I found it fascinating Cindy came armed with piles of documents she'd spent years accumulating about her own story and the other family she heard from the fraud sandy allege was really complicated there are a lot of consumer protections many gins bank was supposed to provide for families with reverse mortgages for example they were supposed to give the bears a chance to keep the house when elderly bar were died but sure this is the bank can follow these rules he says they broke the law he basically set up a system whereby this company would as quickly as possible immediately for close minu chin and build the government for his costs on the foreclosures for things like attorneys fees and appraisal costs because the foreclosure was improper those fees are not legitimate so is a couple of thousand dollars per house which may not sound like a lot but it added up to a hundred two hundred million dollars or something by the time that you know you at all like I told you earlier the government had agreed to back up all these bad mortgages even picking up these other costs if there was a foreclosure but if these foreclosures weren't legitimate then Steve minu chin would be breaking the law so David share called a friend in the US attorney's office and soon sandy was headed to Washington for a meeting at the justice department several members from Hyde the department of justice FBI agents and a grilled her for hours that's my recollection of the meeting I got very intimidated and after all that grilling the government decided to take the case but they told sandy it was a secret can't tell anyone can not tell a soul that's incredible secret oh my god there were so many times when I wanted to tell somebody anybody and.

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:30 min | 3 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is thirty five thousand dollar toilet yet veteran faint he of the thirty five thousand dollar toilet that kind of behavior got thing fired up a pretty quickly he found himself running another bank called C. I. T. and that's were saying was when his neighbor came calling so that banks that Stephen nutrients group bought off the government for zero dollars five years later he approached John Thain his up steers neighbor and they agreed on a price three point four billion dollars but people was to be raised by this I mean didn't we just go through this whole crisis were banks were considered too big to fail and now we're going to create another make a bank run by this guy yeah and it would have been the first new mega banks since the bus okay so what happened when the news of the deal between the new chairman John Thain got out and how was saying the jolly involved well the new set off a ton of protest across the country homeowners in consumer advocate mobile lies to try to stop the sale that brings us back to sandy jolly she was one of the activists to force the federal reserve to hold a special hearing she testified about what happened to her family but in August twenty fifteen the sale went through anyway you want to give up in it's not in my nature to give up remember sandy had been fighting many agents bank for years and she still lost her family home then she paid tens of thousands of dollars in rent to live in that same house as she battled many agents bank sandy heard from a lot of other families hundreds of them families who had the same problem she did her phone rang off the hook with desperate people seeking advice well what I did learn along the way in losing every step of the way was I learned how to use every step of the way to the benefit of the next person so that it wouldn't happen to them and I should talk to these families were trying to hold on to their homes she realized this wasn't just her problem and I was looking for a bigger solution an alternate solution because that's always what I'm trying to look for what are my next options sandy became convinced that the bank was constantly breaking the law and she wanted to do something about it so she went online and found David sure a Washington DC lawyer one of the top whistle blower attorneys in the country he specialized in a particular type of case representing people who say they have evidence the government has been defrauded my personal first conversation with sandy I remember because I remember her story is being different she wasn't a typical insider sure got his firm's private investigator involved the Czech sandy out and to be sure she was telling the truth he decided to take the case she was like in the industry or something she was someone whose parents were a victim of this fraud and I found that fascinating Cindy came armed with piles of documents she'd spent years accumulating about her own story and the other family she heard from the fraud sandy allege was really complicated there are a lot of consumer protections many chins bank was supposed to provide for families with reverse mortgages for example they were supposed to give the there's a chance to keep the house when elderly bar were died but sure this is the bank can follow these rules he says they broke the law he basically set up a system whereby this company would as quickly as possible immediately for close minu chin and build the government for his Clawson the foreclosures for things like attorneys fees and appraisal costs because the foreclosure was improper those fees are not legitimate so is a couple of thousand dollars per house which may not sound like a lot but it added up to a hundred two hundred million dollars or something by the time that you know you at all like I told you earlier the government had agreed to back up all these bad mortgages even picking up these other costs if there was a foreclosure but if these foreclosures weren't legitimate then Steve minu chin would be breaking the law so David share called a friend in the US attorney's office and soon sandy was headed to Washington for a meeting at the justice department several members from Hyde the department of justice FBI agents and they thrilled her for hours that's my recollection of the meeting I got very intimidated and after all that grilling.

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

05:42 min | 3 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Which was Franklin Roosevelt's presidential yacht he really had a good heart especially in this instance he wanted to give it to the March of dimes to be preserved as a national shrine but unfortunately the March of dimes was concerned over at the time maintenance cost and they had to regretfully declined the offer of FDR's presidential yacht as a gift but Mike I did some math and this is pretty interesting if in nineteen eighty four Elvis paid fifty five thousand dollars for the Potomac with inflation that would be about four hundred and thirty five thousand dollars today that's a lot of money yeah I am very proud of you but first of all if that be first wanted man I don't know where the Potomac is now I forgot it if he had bought it for fifty five thousand dollars it would be worth way more than four hundred five thousand dollars today okay so you're not at Barrie on math is wrong know your mother's right translation is for hunger yeah yeah you can buy for for her thirty five thousand dollars today that's a that's true yeah well I mean grand it would be an old the odd but still it would be it would have been Roosevelt's yacht so that's a big deal okay so let's just look at it from a yacht perspective then a yacht in nineteen sixty four compared to a yacht today huge price difference yet it's still the same vessel type to accomplish the same thing this question thing is very real it's extremely real we think about it I did it in in my terms you know when I turn sixteen I could buy a gallon gas for less the dollar right and that's not a great example because it fluctuates based on things other than inflation but still when you take a look at paying over two dollars or three dollars or in certain point of time over four dollars for the same gallon gas look at things like milk look at a house right go back and for most of our clients look at what they paid for their first home to what it would cost to buy a retirement home now the the numbers are obviously huge and people know why but they don't really sit down and do the math on inflation so we tend to live in the now and take a look at what something costs today and I see this going on with a lot of financial plans that the people are putting together and they're planning for an income that's good in today's dollars but it doesn't take into consideration inflection moving forward things in a cost a lot more down the road and what I would encourage people to do is just think of what things cost thirty years ago versus what they cost now whether it's your house whether it's your car whether it's clothing groceries electricity what you know whatever just go back to that point in time then imagine that if your in your a late fifties early sixties at this point you probably have at least thirty years left in retirement if your in your seventies you probably have twenty years left in retirement inflation is going to have a very very big impact and if you're not incorporating things like taxes inflation fees into the portfolios the efficiency of your portfolio you may very well come up short in the future you have to allow for all those things are Christian all the financial plans that we put together we're taking all that into consideration we assume three percent inflation moving forward technically that's a little aggressive inflation rates aren't that high but if when we put together a financial plan for individual we assume inflation rates are three percent moving forward we're technically being conservative or gift and probably giving them more money than they need moving forward but then if we also do calculations for them about taxes and how to reduce taxes moving forward and be efficient and if we also take into consideration things like requirement distributions and all that moving forward now you're getting into a financial plan that makes sense and and time and time again I see individuals with financial plans that only take into consideration the underlying about right they're just saying Hey listen if you invest this way your projected average and return moving forward is X. amount that's great but if you don't take in consideration the fees which are gonna reduce that the taxes which are gonna reduce that inflation which is going to reduce that you run into problems down the road so you just have to be very very careful and you know going back to something as simple as this yacht Kristin yes fifty five thousand dollars seems like nothing freon today would be worth four thirty five if not more we have to be very very careful moving forward and and that and that's why in again I'm a broken record every weekend here back in financial planning is extremely important you have to understand your money understand what is likely to do moving forward and then just take control that don't settle for hang in there approach person our clients are looking for that they want a relationship with an investment adviser is to be very active in managing their portfolio be proactive not reactive so if you'd like more information about what we do and how we do it and you're concerned about things like fees taxes inflation performance you don't want to hang in their portfolio give us a call will sit down and do an analysis of your current portfolio will help you get more efficient there but at the same time will put together a truly comprehensive financial plan that shows you all the steps you need to be successful in retirement so Christians is most useful for individuals under age fifty five or older you've already got that nest a you're getting ready to transition into retirement or you're currently retired this planning if you don't already have it or you're not satisfied with the one you have I think could be very beneficial so just give us a call in the next ten minutes so we can do that for you complementary inflation definitely a key part of a true retirement.

Franklin Roosevelt fifty five thousand dollars thirty five thousand dollars three percent thirty years four hundred five thousand dol three dollars four dollars twenty years ten minutes two dollars milk
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"The tuition wanna take a trip around the world you want to do home improvement is a special loan for that I can go up to a hundred percent of what your house is going to be worth after you do the home improvement. okay under this under the special FHA loan here's how it works is a bill I know I owe to forty and my house is only worth three hundred the way it sets but I want to put a new kitchen in for fifteen thousand dollars and I'll I don't want to put a new bathroom in for ten thousand dollars and I want to put new carpeting hardwood floors so I need fifteen twenty five I need thirty five thousand dollars and nobody is willing to give me thirty five thousand when I two forty and my house is worth three hundred I can all you do is give me contractor bids you have to use a contract you can do the work yourself but you give me the contracted Bates fifteen thousand for the kitchen ten thousand for the bathroom and ten thousand. for the for the carpeting hardwood floors so you give me the contractor bids I will give the contractor bids to the appraiser and say appraiser I know this has only were three hundred thousand dollars right now how much is it going to be worth after they do these three things now he it might not go up thirty five thousand dollars but I bet it goes up to three ten or three twenty. and I can go up to a hundred percent of what the appraiser is gonna tell me it's worth it's going to be worth he is the reason I can do that I don't just hand you the money and hope you put the new kitchen and the new bathroom in the carpeting and hardwood floors I put the money in an escrow account. you have six months to get your contractor out there as he starts to do the work I came in from the escrow account in draws that's the way it works so if anyone wants to do home improvement and even though you don't have enough now if you have enough equity the easiest thing to do is just a cash out refi up to eighty percent but for those of you who don't have enough equity you want to do a lot more work than you have equity in the house you know especially at that eighty percent level than the way to do it is the FHA renovation loan we do so many of these loans I have a little book on the program I wrote a couple years ago you can call the office and gravel loan officer.

Bates officer FHA thirty five thousand dollars hundred percent eighty percent three hundred thousand dollars fifteen thousand dollars ten thousand dollars six months
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"David mentioned multiple times when you're expecting a child the kinda hit hard on the baby steps my wife and I are currently on baby steps you and we're working through that that that we do have a vehicle that we about twenty two thousand on but it's worse anywhere from thirty five to forty and that was pretty much wiped out if we sold that our entirety of our debt and we probably still have some they'll put to an emergency fund so I wasn't sure if it was worth either selling it and putting the money in the savings are selling it paying off the debt and having some left over before the baby comes because we are stuck in a child here and your service center out what direction to make sense either sallam save or self pay off debt and save a little while yeah Adam again you said you have much how much that again. our total we have about twenty seven twenty two in a car and about five and credit cards and how much is the car worth Kelley blue book. we could sell it's actually are able to get there we actually converted it into an Arby's so that we could sell it on the market for around thirty five to forty and if you sell this car you you will have other means of transportation correct. correct yep two other cars are paid off go ahead and how do I feel about this as she what she wanted to. all she got bored she's ready to go with that so yeah we're kind of ready to pull the trigger yeah the I'm a more with you and your wife is well you know here's the thing we want you to be as as that free as early as you possibly can now yes Dave does say and I do believe this as well that if you are a dead and you're having a baby to pause to getting out of debt you so me making your minimum payment on that because we want to make sure that you have some funds in the savings account for the baby to come this will be some expenses with that so we don't want to take it anymore dead when that comes so if you can sell this car and get a thirty five thousand dollars this is what I want you to do I want you to sell it and then save the rest for the baby now once you all get into a season and you know the baby the baby is good you have no more surprise expenses coming from having a baby Dan was several left out of that savings take that back out and put it towards your debt but as of right now I'm so I'm putting that vehicle on the market today I'm selling it tomorrow and I'm put to rest of the funds in my account on Sunday and I'm preparing for a baby to come but congrats on you guys have a boy or girl. the boy the boy bringing a young man into this world I love it man and congrats as. sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex sex.

David thirty five thousand dollars