35 Burst results for "Thirty Day"

Microsoft Teams getting breakout rooms, virtual commute, and new ‘Together Mode’ backgrounds

Daily Tech News Show

02:09 min | 1 d ago

Microsoft Teams getting breakout rooms, virtual commute, and new ‘Together Mode’ backgrounds

"Microsoft announced new features coming to teams. Not Space or robots virtual commutes reflecting during commute time can increase productivity twelve to fifteen percent according to Microsoft. But if you're not commuting these days, you don't get that reflective time. So you can schedule a virtual commute on teams at the beginning and end of your day starting in the first half of twenty twenty, one meditation breaks in partnership with head space can be scheduled as part of your virtual commute or as its own break during the day Microsoft says, maybe like right before you do a big presentation Kinda help focus Microsoft. Says, thirty days of head space resulted in a thirty two percent decrease in stress in a study workplace analytics is providing the ability for managers to get data. On workers like after hours collaboration focus time. Meeting effectiveness. Cross company connections all users will be able to use the analytics to get recommended actions for changing their habits to improve productivity and wellbeing. If you unplug at the end of the day, it's going to give you credit. It'll help you reclaim time to focus reduce your meeting overload features like that are coming in October for managers and rolling out to the rest through twenty twenty one. There's also new together mode scenes, coffeeshops, conference rooms, auditoriums, and later this year machine language will scale and center participants better in that together mode. If you're like what's together mode, it's what they use in the NBA Games to put everybody together in the stands. Dynamic view is getting custom layouts for how content shows up during presentations. That's what you're standing in front of your presentation. On the video, you can point to it breakout rooms, the ability to split a meeting into smaller groups, and then you can pop around to the different groups and then bring them back into larger meeting. Later, there's also. RECAPS meeting recordings, transcript chat, and file shared in the meetings chat and attendee registration with automated emails, streamlined calling view and new devices. Some USB peripherals with dial pads, Microsoft team displays which Kinda like an Amazon Echo show but for teams team panels outside of meeting space when you get back into the office. audio codes polly and Yale Link will offer affordable team phones designed for common areas as well. So but stuff coming into teams.

Microsoft Twenty Twenty NBA Yale Link
A Million Mortgage Borrowers Fall Through Safety Net

WSJ Your Money Briefing

07:33 min | Last week

A Million Mortgage Borrowers Fall Through Safety Net

"Early on in the pandemic Congress set up a program to protect homeowners with mortgages from losing their homes. But about a million borrowers have fallen through the safety net missed payments and late fees or putting them at greater risk, and that's further heightening fears of an eviction and foreclosure crisis with more on why so many borrowers have fallen behind on their mortgages despite this relief program, we're joined by our reporter Andrew Ackerman Andrew. Thanks for joining us. Hi, Charlie. Thanks for having me Andrew. I, tell us how this program known as forbearance works. It's unique to this crisis forbearance in the past has been used very narrowly for hurricanes or very regional Zaslov this time it's being used to keep as many people nationally in their homes as possible who are harmed rather virus and it just means you can skip up to a year of payments on your mortgage. And then make them up later. Somehow there's a little bit of a complication because it it applies to all federally guaranteed loans which are most of the market Fannie Freddie or fha backed loans. There is a market for private loans or loans aren't backed by the federal government, and some of those lenders are offering forbearance and others aren't, but for most of the market people can get this. Okay. So when we talk about one million homeowners falling through the cracks, what exactly does that mean that means is that there are a million people who have for whatever reason stopped paying their mortgage their at least thirty days behind or delinquent, and they are not in a forbearance plan. This includes both borrowers with Fannie and Freddie loan as well as people who have a private loan alone from a portfolio loan with a bank or something you know securitise in the private markets will don't. They know about the forbearance program are they scared to participate what exactly is going on here? That's a good question and I think the data's kind of murky but the from talking to lenders, some consumers, some counselors, the picture that we have is that a lot of people don't understand what forbearance means so they don't. Really know what their options are. The other thing is that early on especially early on and still somewhat today the messaging from the lenders was you can take a forbearance, but you're GONNA have to pay all of your mis- payments in one lump sum at the end of the forbearance, and that's really scared people that the scripts that the mortgage companies go through with people on the phone have changed significantly and there's a lot more outreach and education efforts that some of the lenders are trying the consumer groups in some lenders. Say It doesn't go far enough. They'd like better marketing but those are the two factors. There's uncertainty or it's an unknown thing and there's this fear that people have to pay everything back at once and that's just not feasible for most people. Why don't you describe for us the process of trying to obtain forbearance how hard is it? It shouldn't be that hard. There's no documentation requirements. You Literally Call Your Service and you say you can't pay and you WANNA forbearance and they're supposed to the the law, the a rescue bill from March called Cares Act. It says that people are entitled to up to a year. It's says six months that can be renewed for another six months. You have to ask for it. A lot of the lenders have been offering customers short of six months at a time they've been doing three-month for. That can be extended another three months and then twice more beyond the initial six months. Just kind of depends on the lenders it's supposed to be really easy to get. It's still confusing even the we've talked to people who got the forbearance and they were also getting letters from their lender saying that they were at risk of foreclosure because they've missed all these payments and so you get these contradictory messages from your from your lender those lenders are saying hey. Just ignore these letters these contradictory letters we were required, send them by state or federal law, and just know that you've got a forbearance but we still talk to people who said that kept them up at night. Well, I was wondering, for instance, people were jumping through hoops trying to find information about forbearance on the telephone well that he has also been a significant issue if. You talk to counselors and some of the consumers we talked to they would say that I mean they describe this kind of bureaucratic nightmare to be honest everything has happened kind of quickly if you talk to the lenders, they say they're moving to kind of implement this forbearance plan on a scale that's never been envisioned for forbearance before. So they're hiring people to take calls their. End Result is at least initially, the times were significant. People were waiting a long time to get someone on the phone when they did get people on the phone calls might be dropped or they'd be sent to voicemail at the servicer and then they wouldn't hear back. So you have to kind of call the main number again, unfortunately, a lot of the servicers that the way. They're set up you can't just call one representative at the servicer. So you just of are dealing with somebody different every time they're following a script. So what they can say can be kind of very tightly controlled, and if it's with jargon people who aren't very skater even people who are sophisticated and don't know a lot about the mortgage market, you know it can be. It can be very confusing. These terms are not it's not intuitive. Are there a significant number of borrowers who've been in forbearance but of defaulted? Anyway that's the peculiar thing. There are significant numbers are what I would I think it's fair characterizes significant. There's about two hundred, fifty thousand people who were in forbearance at one point since the pandemic there now, no longer in forbearance and. They. are still past due on their loan and it begs the question. We don't know why that's the case. I haven't been able to find someone situated like that. But that's what the data shows and we we talked to people who had experience during the last crisis in two thousand eight and there were always people who just the lenders couldn't reach out to you know they. Knew, they were behind, they thought they were in trouble, and so they docked there servicer at every turn and it's speculative. But people think that that's that's this population kind of fits into that camp and so there are some efforts to reach out to those people. I would also say that two hundred fifty thousand is relatively small. There's fifty three million mortgages in this country Million people have been on forbearance at some point since the crisis started were down, it's under four million. Now, most of the people who've exited forbearance are either performing on their mortgage or they have paid off their loan. So it's an alarming number. It's relatively small and the whole universe and the whole mortgage universe. But there is also a concern that as people kinda hit the six month period who still need help that the number would increase because they won't know they actually have to request the extension, the additional six months. What are the next steps to watch for in this forbearance program? What's on the horizon forbearance figures overall spiked In April, May I believe June and they've steadily declined since the summer or late summer and what will be interesting to watch whether or not that trend continues or you see more people who need help, and probably if you see that, you'll see more people kind of falling through the cracks here where they don't know how to get help that sort of based on macroeconomic trends. Major companies are laying people off tens of thousands of people, and that's I think the Big Question Mark Wall Street Journal reporter Andrew, Ackerman. Thanks a lot Andrew. Hey. Thanks for your

Andrew Ackerman Andrew Reporter Federal Government Congress Charlie Fannie Freddie Fannie Freddie Representative FHA
Virtual Holidays: Lessons from our Muslim friends

Can We Talk?

04:46 min | Last week

Virtual Holidays: Lessons from our Muslim friends

"Angelica Lindsey. Ali. My name is Sukhothai. My name is Ben to file. Hardest for all of us was on that was that was a killer think yes. Definitely a killer to not be able to be such a community months as a whole month. And for most of it for all amid were at home was how very first one ever. My entire life remembering having big told that we can't go to the mustard. A typical is version without covet. It's The Best Day of the year. Is Really Fun. So what we do is we wake up in the morning we put our best clothes on put our best perfumes and put a best jewelry. And then we go to the market for for prayers we played shoulder to shoulder some of us stay until midnight I'm the last ten days especially because those are more even more specialties the last than days a lot of people I, truly stay at the much. And then after prayers then we you know we congratulate each other go and visit family and friends. There is always a lot of food. There's a lot of festivities and my family I'm usually the one who cooks for all of our family and friends. I think all of us everything shut down in March. We knew Ramadan was coming in late May tune. I think all of us started to pray hard that this was not going to last until them. Praying shoulder to shoulder is a huge deal for us. It's almost like a transfer of a spiritual energy as we pray together and you you have to stay succeed apart because of covid obviously, I must sheets have been closed. So we had a live streaming of the actual prayer. I might be you know out of turn saying this but I, really think it was the women in Lima Sloan Community who really made the most of it because I think we're used to having to be adaptable to change and I. I really liked the way that there were so many outlets like there were so many classes I've found opportunity as many other women did to sort of take center stage. And so I actually had a class with over two hundred one from fifteen different countries every Saturday during the month of McGaw and that gave me an opportunity at least once a week to connect with women to talk about Ramadan go over spiritual principles and really gained much as we could from the month. So that was really beautiful. There were daily drive-thru if tires that women like put together so that if people need it food that they could drive through or walk through or deliver. So yeah I, think it's a time of. Trauma we're all in a collective state of trauma, but it's also a time of immense spirit of opportunity. So Rahman to actually very fulfilling. It got us to be we missed that community but on the other hand I, think all of us were just surprised that the advantages the positives. For instance, I would often either take all of my kids would break at the mustard or break at home and then pray at the mosque together but schooldays, right I wouldn't be able to do that I would often leave the behind This one though we came up with very. Creative ways of involving the kids. So the whole thirty days of the fast, we were able to private the break with our kids play with them, and then we were able to show them what we do in the mustard here at home we we taught my my son to lead some of the prayers which was I think very. Very in new and interesting for him very you know they're empowering for him so. That was a big positive I will go so far to say this year. Ramadan Ede were a lot more meaningful than they have been in the past because we have to be very intentional about who we chose to spend our time with. we were very mindful about wearing things that we could make ourselves or that we already had because a lot of the shops or close We spent a lot of time cheer rating, the experiences that we wanted to have for our children and with people who were within our bubble. So I'll though the fanfare of holiday was missing I really feel like this was one of the best holiday seasons ever because it stripped off all of the slush and really focus on what the essence of the holidays truly are so that that made unexpected. Beautiful.

Lima Sloan Community Ramadan Ede Sukhothai BEN Angelica Lindsey ALI Mcgaw Rahman
Looking Back On The First Year Sober

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

04:23 min | 2 weeks ago

Looking Back On The First Year Sober

"Let's get to it. Here's heather. We're going to talk about that first year of sobriety today with Miss Heather who is joining US heather is about sixteen sober. So she just triumphed this one year mark that can be elusive for some people. Really. Hard to achieve. This is going to be fantastic conversation just talking about the difference in that first year when you get over that. Hump, and what it's like going into your second year and how did things change and now that you've had some distance and looking back on that first year, what is that feel like and how do you see things differently, those are all the things we're gonNA talk about. But to start, let's welcome heather to the show and heather. Why don't you take a few minutes and just tell everybody a little bit about you and your story. Takes her having me. I'm excited to be here with you definitely a big fan and obviously part of the the group that you have on facebook. So a lot of good information out there to women about my story. I, say it started to get pretty bad. Out Seven years ago so you know growing up drinking at my house it was normal everybody drank every party we got everything was surrounded around drinking and I I. Probably had my first drink at fourteen and that just because everyone else was it wasn't like I felt the urge to drink. But back then I would drink and I wouldn't crave it went on like that all the way through college up until about my first child and then exchanged that point. Something happened where The way that I consumed alcohol was different I thought that I had to have it to calm me down. And it really changed outlook on how I drank, and then I had my second son or my second child. And was I had him it got worse and worse. This whole time may still jobs still have the same family still haven't lost everything, but things did start going bad by took my husband police were to my house things that as a professional women I would never think would happen in my lifetime because I was always quote the good one and didn't have these issues and so it got to a point though where I would wake up have to figure out what am I gonNA drink today how am I gonNa get it in and that would be my constant thought. Lou Up at one point where I finally got sick of myself in my husband was asking me to go to Rehab my family would say to me this is ridiculous your drinking. and. Finally, I had an incident on a business trip where I just. In, the mirror and I said I cannot look at myself anymore and and do this, and so I flew from place I was to Rehab for thirty days and really embraced program. Never Mind I'm not get out of this show home. Someone said. To me, they said, I want you to try. All you have to do is try if you really want to go home, you can try it and see how or extreme. So from that moment, would someone say not to be changed my outlook and I thought well, I, did fly all the way here to try to get sober based on really hitting my rock bottom impact impacted to my job A. Little Bit. That was my last Straw. So I stay stuck it out key back to my hometown and the first thing I did when I got back, which we have suggested was a meeting and so fortunately I did have some contacts air I contacted them and I was home at midnight on Saturday night from Rehab, and then the next morning I was at a women's meeting and so I just really. From, that point I try to get sober for the past four years of four years prior to the sixteen months that I have and nothing would ever work. It just I didn't I wasn't ready but once I decided I was ready and came back and just I just took direction really instead of listening to myself because my thoughts don't leave me to the right places. Or the right thoughts, and then also make excuses when I finally just listen to what other people are saying, and then still continued that. Let's just try to keep to keep trying and I kept saying that to myself an Harry. M.. Now six months.

Miss Heather United States Facebook Lou Up Harry
How Long Does it Take for a Plant to Be Considered 'established'?

Your Gardening Questions

02:11 min | 2 weeks ago

How Long Does it Take for a Plant to Be Considered 'established'?

"Because I have a forty five year old oaken, my front yard long time established roots probably into my neighbor's yard nothing to my side yard and so on. I still. Give. That plant a good thorough soaking when it's been nearly thirty days since the reign of any significance I don't mean something to settles the dust but something significant because much like people although however, very different a plant that has a good summer's growth. Is Far more resilient plants. Plants manage their internal characteristics be for insect protection for Disease Protection for growth it's it's a very complicated story that I only partly understand but even on a great big old, tree. I will consider it established a time back, but I'll still water after thirty day period when there's been nothing substantial. So to to Tom's question I would say that most plants won't. Be established. Even even basically until the third year of growth and then on the fourth year, probably often running more or less on their own. Now, I know a great number of plants that are catered to. To the point of drowning them be have to be careful there. I also know a plant where people don't think anything beyond the first thirty day they plant they water and they walk away and that's it. The plant suffers on or dis. Tom figure year one, it's like a new child. And A. Quality bottle baby, and then the second year child is starting to move around We'll be standing up soon. Pulling things off the coffee table and then the year. Hide everything that could move. The. Child is becoming established so too is the plant, but then I I I'm serious about this business of four years for full establishment. to where you've made in most cases, a pretty significant investment in landscaping.

TOM
How to Get More Podcast Listeners

Marketing School

03:34 min | 3 weeks ago

How to Get More Podcast Listeners

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric Su. And I'm Neil Patel and today we're GonNa talk about how you can get more podcasts listener. So podcasts are still exploding right now I definitely recommend everyone checkout just Google Edison podcast reporters at annual report that shows you how podcast are continuing to grow interesting enough throughout the spend Amick we actually we almost touch one point three, million in last month I don't know if you saw neil. So we'll do not were growing through this thing which is crazy. So more podcast listeners like kick it off I one thing that you can do. One thing you should do. This is basic. You have to be consistent most people give to easily most people are like after thirty days of doing it or sixty-two, even sixty days of doing it. It's like. Know I'm not getting much not getting much but you gotta keep going as long as you think you are learning as long as you think you getting better just like with the leveling up podcast I wasn't getting anything for the first two years. If you have the right goal in mind that you are here to educate yourself and learn more articulate to a small group of people that will continue to grow don't just come and be like, oh. These people have millions and millions of downloads I'll never be that way come with with that mindset you'll never get there. Yet you know an Eric if you look at his podcast, he did well, because he was consistent on top of that when everything your podcast promoted through all your channels, let people know about it and not just once let them know every single episode whether you want to push your content and do through emails or social channels. Heck wanting that we even do and you can copy. This is every time you're doing a podcast recording, go live on your social channels and that a hub bring more attention to your podcast and actually caused you to get more listeners as well. Yeah. repurposes much as you can kind of doubling down on meals point there's a service called repurpose house of repurpose house dot io you can use them I mean it's like two hundred to five hundred dollars a month but these videos like Neil I were were live right now but these videos can be recorded into small little social pieces and we can push it out in social sometimes. I'd do it, and if you don't have time for that. I recommend using an APP called Shuffle I. Think it's an it's called get shuffle I believe and you can make though transcribed for you and you could share to instagram stories. You can also do the same with overcast. So sometimes, I'll take fifteen minutes or fifteen second segments and I'll I'll push to stories but the point here is You, WanNa make the most of what you have and a lot of people. Now, everyone still at home right now, people are still down to do video interviews and you can just go further with beautyrest. You're finding a time why don't you make the most of it? And then another thing to keep in mind as you're oldies are goodies. So podcasting everyone folks on their latest episodes wanting to know is your old episodes can keep getting traffic that every game traffic google also is ranking podcast episodes end search now. So make sure you're putting them on a website make it easy to find so that way you can get the Seo juice from it, and also when you're listening to podcasts in the stores, don't show your latest ten episodes you're one hundred episodes showcase as many as they allow you to showcase because even the old wounds will still get searched and get traffic. As, well YEP and the other thing too is whatever hosting platform you're using podcast host pushes the spotify push soundcloud, push it to all these other channels because it's free to do it it's not gonNa take you much more effort dealer thing I'll add to that is if you're doing an interview podcast collaborating with people making it easy for them, maybe you give him a little tweet maybe you give them a little social image or whatever it is you decide but oftentimes whenever I do interviews someone and they promote it, it goes way further and the podcast grows a lot faster I found to be really effective.

Neil Patel Eric Su Google Spotify Instagram
Dont Mess Up Your Recovery

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

05:25 min | 3 weeks ago

Dont Mess Up Your Recovery

"Hello Mike Brands Welcome to episode Number One, Hundred Twenty six of the addiction unlimited podcast. I'm your coach, Angela Pugh. Thank you for hanging out with me today listening to the pod today. We're GONNA talk about some of the most common ways I see people when they are trying to stop drinking and just can't get it to stick right. Some of the most common ways we screw up or sobriety, and one thing I want to be clear on with this many of these are not struggles specific to addiction, right? These are struggles specific to being human. But we focus on recovery. So I'm going to make it fit with that but this is not a thing that we have and nobody else has it right? These are all things that everybody struggles with in every area of life. Some of our greatest obstacles in this journey are just human nature. We're all super committed to the big change we want to make in the beginning it's easy to be committed in the beginning you feel good your motivation is high on top of your game. The hard part is staying committed for the long game. In this is something that ninety eight percent of the population struggles with. I. Just made up that number by the way I don't know. I would say might be more than that. But so does it yourself up about it like there's something wrong with you there's nothing wrong with you. It takes practice to learn how to do things differently than you've done them for your whole life or for many years. These habits and mistakes will also pop up in different parts of Your Life at different times for me. I've made huge strides in being committed when I want to achieve something and that doesn't mean that I'm easily committed in every area of my life. Okay. I'm fantastic with commitment and dedication to my sobriety, and I'm pretty good at it with entrepreneurship because I'm a workaholic and my work is so much fun. So that's kind of easy for me. But I really struggle when it comes to other things. Time management isolation food sugar. I still fall into the trap of binge-watching, a new TV show when I should be recording a podcast or creating social media graphics or returning phone calls, and then I get way behind on things and I don't feel good about it and start beating myself up about it and Yada Yada Yada. We're not perfect creatures that will do things perfectly and make the right decision one hundred percent of the time and never make mistakes and never hurt each other's feelings and always do the right thing. Forget that thought. It's not about trying to do everything right all the time. It's about consistently learning from the decisions and actions that don't work and consistently making an effort to do the things that are good for you and make you a happier person. And you have to do it like a million times to get good at it. I get the feeling sometimes that we have this misconception that if we do things a few times, we should be finished like I went to a five or six times so I should be cured. or I worked out for two weeks. So I should totally be in shape. I ate healthy four meals. So I should have lost that ten pounds. I put in five job application so I should have a job by now. We are hard wired for instant gratification in that definitely makes things a bit more challenging, but it won't you to start thinking about it as a long game instead of a short game think about it like the actions you take today may not give you instant results. But you know by doing the right things over and over again, you're building your future in creating long-term relief in results. So, let's dig in to this list I. Put together. Number One. You've heard me say two million times. Being noncommittal meaning, you are not making an actual commitment to stop drinking. Many of us want to stop drinking for a little while. We make deals with ourselves that will stop for thirty days or sixty days or ninety days, and then you're shocked when you start drinking again and it goes terribly The truth is you wouldn't be stopping drinking if you were able to drink in moderation, right? None of us would do that if we could control it, we would. and. The unfortunate part of this lack of commitment is that it puts you in a position of having to constantly. All Day long every single day of your life you're having to decide over and over again whether or not you're going to drink. and honestly it's exhausting. Nothing will wear you down faster than being in a nonstop argument with the committee about drinking or not drinking.

Angela Pugh
China’s new tech export rules could further complicate TikTok’s U.S. sale

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

00:22 sec | 3 weeks ago

China’s new tech export rules could further complicate TikTok’s U.S. sale

"The Chinese government laid on Friday updated its export rules in a way that could delay the sale of tiktok revising list of technologies that would need to get approval before export such approval could take thirty days. Even as the trump administration has said a mid-september deadline to complete the sale of tiktok US operations to one of several. Suitors including Microsoft Walmart and

United States Microsoft
30 60 90 With Mike Simmons

Daily Sales Tips

05:24 min | 3 weeks ago

30 60 90 With Mike Simmons

"Talking about things in the context of thirty, sixty, ninety, you guys have heard me talk about this kind of Nauseam. It's like a cue go since talking about thirty, sixty ninety again. What does this mean? This is? A PROJECT MANAGEMENT FOR DUMMIES WHY? Because I'm a dummy and I'm not. Certified I know the. I know who? Is Is. Project Management Book of knowledge or body of Knowledge Project Management Instituted Project Management Professional. Anyhow. That's not what this thirty sixty ninety. Why are we going? Accomplish the next thirty days? What are we going to accomplish in the next sixty days? What are we going to accomplish in the next ninety days? Notice I say next thirty next sixteen next ninety reason why next three next sixteen next ninety or important to me because I'm not GonNa just wait. The next period before I deliver that I'll anger try to deliver those things as soon as possible. But these are the things I want to accomplish in the next thirty days. Next Sixty S next ninety days you've heard me talk about this before in the design backward execute going forward. So if I know that I need to get a contract and in order to implant something I've going to have to get a contract. So my implementation gate is on. must do simple math your wonders in December. Center I might implementation. In order to implement on December I probably have to do some kind of proof of concept or some kind of soft launch is called the soft launch radio soft launch inside the organization to make sure things work technically. So back off. You thirty days to do that soft launch. So. In order to do that soft launch and thirty s actually got a contract in place. That means I doubt the contract in place by November I well, in order to get the contract in place by November, I gotTa have due diligence done. GotTa. Have whatever contracting process done now my take let's say that that takes fourteen days. Let's say it's really really vast. We're talking about a single page paper release things in and out the second do that fourteen days. So now by November fifteen, I've gotta have contract in hand of the person on the other end. Now I didn't factor in his what's between November fifteenth and December verse. The thanksgiving, right so got skin which is going to be a holiday period that I gotta work on. So I'm to back this up another seventy S. so now were November seven contract people were can hand. That's just if we're gonna hit everything on time. Now beyond that I've got to agree to the terms early in the contract well, that might take a couple of weeks depending on who is going to be involved. We have to give people from purchasing to get people from. Other groups do have to get the technical people involved who else needs to be part of. So what we want to have in here is an implementation plan that gets us all the way to December I kinda walks out what is that entire period look like so then we know that we at least we're nine point where we're talking about something. Let's say October first the likelihood getting that deal done is actually really really low. So if you WANNA deal done and you want to get something implemented I December probably need to be talking with those folks those folks in getting organized around things by the first of October. We don't have that place in the likelihood of US getting that deal done pretty low now if we got longer. Cell cycles than we've got to extend those in the thirty, sixty ninety becomes more challenging. So my first thirty days. My next sixty is next ninety days. Ninety days out might be we go ahead and we watch to the audience. So launch. By the end of sixties within that first sixty days, we have our soft launch plan we know who the stakeholders are. How things are going to be communicated Guy Maybe. We've got our success criteria established. Thirty years before. We've got our scoped out. And we got general buying or decision on putting these things. Now, we could plug in a lot of these things and to be honest with you. Hate when people say that. So here I go saying that I said that I can go three different occasions today including on another video recorded by what I? WanNa. DO IS WANNA. Look at this in the context of this could be three hours, six hours, nine hours. So the next three hours next six hours, nine hours I want to get in the next three days sixty days nine days next three weeks, six weeks, nine weeks. Very. Sixty ninety three months, six months, nine months. Three years, six years, nine years just break it up into smaller pieces of three so they can always start attacking those. Point time in this area and I'm not hitting on those marks I know where my risk is and I see I might have to adjust before I get too close right out here kind of work at something that's supposed to happen in ten days and the reality is we have been front of Trinity. So that's why thirty sixty ninety day are so important to me these do not need to be really complex couple ballpoints these milestones or mile markers that we want to get through the movies died posts in your journey from. One July or mcnabb drive from Austin Texas to Orange California.

Wanna United States Mcnabb Orange California
My Garden Has Been Taken Over by Weed.  Kill Them Now or in Spring?

Your Gardening Questions

02:49 min | Last month

My Garden Has Been Taken Over by Weed. Kill Them Now or in Spring?

"Oh. We also had a question at Fred at plan talk radio DOT COM from John, and he says due to reasons beyond my control. This this goes for a lot of us. This year my garden has been taken over by weeds and grasses, and he says, should I sprayed kill them before plowing under this fall? Well, I'm going to say it's probably best to do. So especially if he's let them into the flower head stage and seed stage. Now. It's not gonNA make a tremendous amount of difference. And it depends on a bit what. What the composition of the weeds a- If they're perennials. Then, I'd go ahead and do the spraying the by perennials. I mean plantain Buckthorn But Korn. Danta lines, clover, violets, those things that will come back on their own route. I would say it's best to get them killed and knock down however when you turn new ground. there is a range of seed content in that soil in the top at least eight inches. If not more, you're going to bring up some fresh seeds. You don't get rhythm all at one time. However, I guess ask to answering the question. If there if it's heavy and perennials, I would go ahead and get my just if it's just foxtail and crabgrass and well, I don't even know what else to say I don't think he would have to. But because the first frost or freeze here is GONNA kill those guys but the the the ones that I mentioned I are. Coming back there on on their own route, the dandelions the little puff balls at. Around in the Are Now plants of on new route they're anywhere from an inch and a half to three inches wide and they're just waiting to be ugly later this fall and or next spring. So I think to kill is probably going to be an advantage but just so he doesn't think he's going to have all clean soil to start over with in the spring some of that stuff's going to come back and come back but I think the the starting point would be to spray and kill and Most of the things that you would. will be needed to will need to go onto live growth be absorbed by the plant taken to the root root dies, and then the top ghost is more or less the essence of it, and therefore I would say get it done soon. A. Most. Is and so on the veggies have been more or less harvested and done. So I think soon here because we've got less than thirty days now for well approximately thirty days for for lawn grows grass growth and so on I think that's the best way to go.

John Fred OH.
What AI Readiness Really Means - with Tim Estes of Digital Reasoning

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

05:08 min | Last month

What AI Readiness Really Means - with Tim Estes of Digital Reasoning

"So, Tim will kick things off and get your perspective on what Ai Reading this means. When an enterprise says walked, we want to become a I ready. We want to start using a I what kind of components have to go into that? Yeah, well, I think the first thing is you had to have infrastructure that sounds so basic especially with the cloud bud, the larger enterprises a requires a good functioning process to allocate infrastructure with their on premise or cloud. And then data governance of data can be used for training and validation around any process it's going to be tested. So it's all too often that you know one group in enterprise wants to try something. The aren't really the owners of the data that is required. To validate what they want to try. And they are not the suppliers of the infrastructure. So you might run into a substantial gap. The could take you know a sixty day or thirty day pilot. Or PSE and make it a nine month process because you're waiting on them to sort out data governance and infrastructure availability. So those are two pieces you know something about the education side of it. In terms of you know this this dictation you want to build and educate yourself to understand the difference between certain techniques, but it's always overalled because in the end of the day I I'm a little bit more pragmatic I think there's certain techniques which are better for. Some things and others, but obviously, the most sexy technique that talked about the time or different variations of deep learning. Yeah and we could go into braces but the phillies he'll is in most cases, the customer doesn't have the data sets available to train a really good deep learning class fire and so or an engine of some kind. So I I think that what you find actually is it's not just that they have data general had dated is prepared a certain way. Often to teach a machine that the machine can perform the task and that's really the that's the area. So these maybe the this question you elite in some other things but you know basics, infrastructure data governance I can pull they need to run the test fast and as a as a vendor or someone the outside I mean I would becoming in asking these questions now because I lived through being wishful thinking and. This is really exciting CTO and they want to do this and they have a business stakeholder that wants to do this kind of application. They think we're the answer I've been through that whole dance, and then you find out that of the whole dance that dance might take months four and then you wait nine months for data and infrastructure to be available in the large bank. Yeah. Well, not surprising at all within a large bank you're lucky it's not a eighteen months or something. So you bring up infrastructure you're bringing up data does this mean in the process of speaking to whoever your initial? Champion as your your initial kind of point of contact who you think is GonNa either signed the Checker help sign the check the you really have to be clear that sort of what infrastructure you need to access of what kinds of data you'll need to access of the state of that data with that person and or with whoever they need to rope in serve as part of the process of working to a pilot. So like doing that diagnostic I, guess as you go as you progress forward. Yeah that's right. So I mean I'm naturally gonNA give it more from the vendor sides, of course. But if I flipped the hats and I'm I'm actually in the buyers persona what I wouldn't WanNa do is the last thing I want to do is to put a lot of energy into something that could create real value get excited marketed internally, and then find out that getting infrastructure having data governance process in place where we can get the data necessary to test the system is not really well figured out or is figuring out but the restrictions that make this not work. So I, think that there's a good upfront investment in that but there's a difference between that and sort of what I might call the the Data Lake Panacea. We're everyone wants to have this. Highly Organized Library of data with the Dewey. Decimal system in their enterprise. And that's not gonNA. Prize is unfortunately function. So many it efforts in an enterprise are responsive the business as a higher priority to eating across business lines. That you'll almost never find as you will a pristine data infrastructure. So you really WanNa make sure the process to pull data, put it in the compute environment do that safely and would security sign all's that should be enough to get moving, and so I think if you try to go four steps beyond that. You have much bigger challenge and essentially trying to boil the ocean and I think a lot of people went down that road with all the WHO do vendors to be blood. You know the idea that just got to spend all this money on that and then from that. You end up having all this application. These applications become so easy and here we are five years later it must. We're seeing what applications besides restoring my you know might my loan scores or some other batch structure process? You could probably done some other way.

Data Lake Panacea TIM Phillies CTO
Conversation With Cheryl Walsh

PhotoBiz Xposed

06:34 min | Last month

Conversation With Cheryl Walsh

"We're going to jump into this interview with Cheryl Wash in just a second, if you are hearing this announcement doesn't mean you are listening to the free version of the podcast that means you won't be here in the full interview today was show. So if you want to hear more printing in house had generate siles from your fine art photography had a mock it. You'll find out photography and find buyers for your work. If you want to hear more bet all of that grab a pre-membership, he can trial it for thirty days for one dollar of red photo basics. Dot Com Ford Slash Tri. Photocopies X DOT COM slash try sign up, get full access to the interview with. Today plus get access to the full back catalogue and everything else that goes along with premium membership. Hopefully, I'll see you in this soon. Isis it's time for Andrew. Special guest. The time fine art photographer gets thrown around a lot in our industry. In some cases, it feels like the photographer is purely looking for liable to place on their work that files to successfully deliver an idea message on emotion. Today's guest is a portrait and underwater fine art photographer and she does not fall into that category. Her photography has a dream like appearance featuring floating goddesses that appear to be more like masterful paintings than photographic. She says, I shoot dramatic underwater portrait's that are reflective of overcoming troubles in my life. She only photographs in our pool and she maintains full control over her work by doing all the printing herself. Time was divided between high school, senior photography and fine out underwater and portrait photography. But now it's one hundred percent underwater photography and she's earned way too many awards to list here that include to mention just a few international portrait image of the year winner of the coveted wpri Grand Award two thousand and sixteen triple massive distinction from WPI. I'm talking about, Cheryl? And I'm rat to have a he with his now Cheryl. Welcome. Thank you so much. It's my pleasure when you hear about Y- I, guess you photography business does it surprise you that you are where you are now? Oh, absolutely. Yes. Yeah. I'm a middle aged mom with a minivan. and. That's Kinda how I think of myself. The rest is sort of all been you know fill in the time. A to get the sense on I'm not sure these dotted at photographing seniors and then failing to the underwater photography at the white went. Yeah. Yeah. I started out like a lot of photographers do knowing I wanted to you know to make a living with my camera tried a lot of different things tried weddings and babies families, and and very quickly discovered that my passion was for these seventeen. Year olds who were not quite adults yet but not children either, and that's the only time in their whole life. They get to be in that kind of inbetween place and I just loved working with them and capturing them who they were not based on Taga Fi trends but really truly an editorial style who they were and I absolutely love doing not. So that's where I put my focus. And in the process of that I sort of fell into trying underwater photography with a senior with her prom dress on and the very first time I. Did it. I realized that this was going to become a problem. I really liked it a lot and Kinda got hooked. Yeah. So. How different was that I image will those first images compared to what you're creating did I I would say like night and day but night and day are both times of the day. So they have something in common. No my work when I first started looks absolutely nothing like what I'm doing. Now it's certainly evolved completely you know I from a technical standpoint and then from an artistic standpoint, I have a pretty clear voice in my work. Now that I had no idea I was even going to want to have from the beginning. I said in the intro there and I read I. Think it was in you'll bile summer online. That's you looking to overcome troubles in your life. What kind of troubles are you trying to escape for a more to hide or to mask? Well at one point, I was very heartbroken and you know kind of depressed about that and I couldn't seem to make that feeling go away. And I certainly didn't want anybody else feeling that way. So I thought, you know the feeling isn't going away I might as well move forward with my life and just do what I can. So the least I can do is create artwork that brings a sense of calmness and peacefulness to the world. So that's where my focus was I didn't want anyone else to feel bad. So why make depressing work? So I may stuff that sort of light and escapism. Just to give people a few minutes to sort of escape from the world and get lost in something. Beautiful. Like that. Do. You feel like you're doing that when you In images that Ukraine today. Actually, you know I got through the last like four years or so I really worked through that situation and And really happy now and very fulfilled and find sometimes it's harder to make artwork when unhappy and distracted with other aspects of my life. Yeah. So have you actually noticed a difference in your photography now that you're actually feeling happier I do yeah I really do a lot of its storytelling has most all of my images are based on stories and just the stories themselves have changed. So the focus of what I'm doing has changed and now I'm working on a project that isn't even based on on a story that revolves around me in my life. It's sort of a whole separate set of photographs and I'm excited about that. I'm excited about doing something that's different. So

Cheryl Wash Taga Fi Grand Award Ukraine Andrew
How to Manage Cash Flow Through Uncertainty

The Small Business Radio Show

16:08 min | Last month

How to Manage Cash Flow Through Uncertainty

"Well as your company grows or looks to save money especially people expenses. It's always good to look at the best tools and process run your business. The right tools and processes can help you either scale, your business, or running more profitably hit help and Tony Ward with the President of zero for the Americas. He has twenty years of experience in senior leadership positions with global technology companies including Microsoft Australia linked in spark, serving monkey and dropbox Tony Welcome to the show. Bearing talking. So first of all, tell me how you doing doing this pandemic you and your family. Yeah, it's actually we moved here from Australia in January? So my twelve year old my wife Celts in. I would say, pretty easily the worst time deposits. Hundred Years So. One Thousand Nine Hundred Eighteen Exactly, it's all upside from your very I would agree with that. Well, a lot of small business owners right now are trying to figure out how they can more effectively run their business with better prices with cost-saving apps where do you start? On The first thing I would say is that cloud technology I think has been we'll be seemed to be a real. Savior for a lot of businesses particularly through coded and. I give you an example I think everything from the front end of Your Business. So you know looking appointments things like timely. I can see a of people using figuring out new ways to market their business like your facebook and Google. In fact, if you'll get facebook's recent results that added a million new advertisers, a lot of those are going to be small businesses trying to figure out how to get more people in the door and then things like zero put back. Then to figure out what is actually going with your business and I know everyone is all talks about Cash is king and casual super important. But when you have a shoebox little receipts, it's very difficult to figure out what's happening with cash flow. So and I, kind of you don't running out of cash is almost like. An Iceberg and the sooner you could see coming the sooner you can potentially avoid it and so things like that. Help you do that are really really important always. But in this time, even more important to figure out what's going on your business and just automate as much as you possibly can to free free up your time to work on the business versus in business I think too many small businesses. Honesty that they're gonNA try diy everything and there are certain pieces of software that you can use action at free up to do things in your business. So Tony and your point of view where you actually start because I always say that you can't do everything at one time. What's really the tip of the spear? We'll the first thing that I would do, and this is a really interesting stat when you compare the US versus other markets that were unlike strapping young candidate UK in the US around thirty only thirty percent of small businesses have an accountant or bookkeeper. It's very much a diy mentality and what I would say to people is look we we get personal trainers we get coaching all the time and our daily lives. Yes. Seventy presenting small businesses don't have a coach don't have someone to go to and really talk about their business. And when you think about it, it's a lot of small businesses of debt their house on their business yet they don't necessarily see the value or having thought about getting our coach. So I would say getting a calendar bookkeeper, get a businesses visor it's going to be the best money era we're GONNA stand. So let me ask you a question about that. Why don't people do that? Because I agree with you so many people have no idea what's financially going their business why don't they take that step? Is it that they don't think they need it or they don't want to know what's really going on. Inching. Research over the last six months in their research. It's something to do the pioneering spirit of America where people believe I can do myself do it yourself and what we're trying to say, we tried to move people from Diy d I t do it together and so our research shows us that if A small business ties zero, and they're using an accountant bookkeeper, their survival rates, Shuki sixty percent higher over five years so. Logically. You think I should do that I think part of it is people get so passionate about their dream of writing because they just get into it and usually take some sort of compelling events tax issues or whatever, and when the most secret lies are I would think you know. Clan up from what you're GONNA do and you're probably enemy our data shows you can be more successful Malaga. So that's the first thing I do. Then you're kind of bookkeepers probably GONNA look how you're running your business and and work out with software like zero and others where you making money where you're losing money record to save money. You know and right now what you should be doing is you know renegotiating with your landlord if you can't if you have physical space figuring out of their other avenues, other ways, you can actually get your product to market that maybe aren't a traditional retail sense. So you seeing things like shop with Wind Amazon just explode 'cause you know businesses are trying to figure out how can I sell more product or service in the virtual world because physical world is so challenge that Obama. Tony I wonder if these are the same people that don't balance their checkbook. I don't have the date on that, but you'd argue, yes, I think that's probably true. You know what? They say the penny look after the pennies. The dog themselves. So yeah to it's probably reasonable. It's because we're not really taught these kind of financial concepts in school. Actually it's hard to understand what the profit and loss statement says. The balance sheet says the cash flow statement says and many times there with the wrong accountant that really doesn't take time to explain to them. So they kind of keep their distance from this stuff. I think it's been a chicken and egg I think a lot of our accounts into the paper is there really they want to get into advisory services? That's all they see the growth and Really are passionate about the small businesses that they look after. Talking to some of our Council peepers, curious cove experience, they're really struggling because they're talking to small businesses who are potentially business potentially losing her house. So I think small accountants want to do this, but they kind of need to be invited into the Party needs created a couple of products lately to try to help on accounts to give a reason to actually have that conversation. So something called the business sack shot thirty castles state and our new. Features inside zero where you can literally see in real time what's going on in your business and the thirty day cash will actually give you some insights as the white new should do Ingram plain English for a small business like collect these bills. Hey, this you're gonNA run into cash unless you collect these deals unless you delayed payment of these other bills so. And one thing zero does really really. Well as we we talk in Layman's terms. I think about my Mama's a hairdresser right Sheila Ramos along for twenty five years. She didn't get a peer now or anything like that. Say we use terms like money owed money owing inside zero because like okay I kind of that because I get money all money that's oats me I don't really get profit and loss credits and debits into council I think. Financial Literacy to your point area in small business is is not great because people just want my mum's London runner hairdressing Salon. She didn't WanNa do the books and I think making it easier for people to run their business and having software advisers that that do the boring accounting stuff is really critical to successively small. Wanted to brag about financial literacy because when I sold my last business in one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine told this toward many times before I lost a million dollars off the sale of the company because I send my balance sheet nine MBA for northwestern university. So that's nothing to be proud of. It's it's really really challenging running a small business. You brand businesses I've had small businesses you spend so much of your time and effort certainly some people think are GonNa start a cafe a lifestyle. It's a lifestyle business. Alright sixty seventy, eighty hours. It's it's really really challenging. So anything that software due. To free up some your time to have more time with your family or to grow your businesses is really what we're trying to achieve. This idea of the three day cash flow because again, every business goes out of business. The exact same reason they run out of money and during the recession cash definitely slows down what suggestions would you have for small business owners for managing their cash flow during this period of time. The first thing I would do I would be really really hard core on any money that's actually ot you to collect that to be the squeaky wheel because a squeaky wheel gets the oil in this where we are right now there's a lot of money owed and certainly there are the ones that are actually really persists. are the ones that are going to get it. I'm I would be as I said before I be trying to renegotiate any kind of a large expenses that I have either get more favorable terms or reduction in order to protect your cash flow and then I would be thinking really creatively how I could get on routes to market for my product or service. So if I could I sell more online, there's really creative things that people are doing like I was talking to somebody today who they got a haircut for the first time in you know since March since the lockdown started. Your hairdresser had a physical salon. She wasn't able to have people in anymore. So she was literally going to people's houses and she said now that she probably wasn't going to reopen her physical business that this is really going to be the future of her business and then she was selling product, which you know is generally high margin she had that on. A website where she was promoting products and All the same time. I think you're gonNA see more and more of that sort of creativity. My Wife's still you know getting a personal trainer she's doing it over soon call right so she's not physically going to see this personal trainer personal trainers still making money, but they're doing it over in know a virtual environment versus a physical environment. It's really amazing because there are things that we're doing now that we never thought could be done remotely like my wife again, it's teaching Yoga classes remotely and I'm taking karate class remotely. It's really quite amazing what you can get used to. Yeah I just think it's the Sunders. Certain the research that we have is they're growing they're actually seeing this as as an opportunity and you know there are other business I really feel for you know Pasta Taliban businesses retell the that are doing it really really tough with someone are figuring out new channels new ways to do. So for sure there's GonNa be winners and losers. Like. There isn't every single economic downturn. Feel like it's kind of like a game of musical chairs things are going well in the economy. Excuse me. Things are going well in the economy and all of a sudden the music stops you don't know if you're gonNA have a chair. Yeah and I think you know the really smart service savvy entrepreneurs out. There are going to figure out ways to be successful, and there's going to be just like integrates recession. This is going to be a whole bunch of starting the kind of the hypothesis that we haggas. Particularly millennials every Neil you talked to, you seems to have some side side-hustle right and what's happening is is a lot of people are losing their their jobs, their side hustles becoming their main hustle. So you're gonNA see a whole bunch of new businesses come out of this, and some of them will be really successful on some will some won't make it, but you're definitely seeing green shoots in new businesses starting out. When should people actually choose zero? Of course the elephant in the room is always quickbooks. Why do people choose zero over quick? Book Solutions. I think one of the main reasons they choose it is very easy to use. It's very simple. It's very non accounting language. It was you know we created the category of small business cloud accounting. So we we don't have a desktop business we've always just had a class business so. It's it's built for the cloud doesn't it's not coming from the desktop and moving to the cloud. So I think ease of use. And just. Talked about being Hashtag. Beautiful. It's really nice piece of software to use very intuitive. and. One of the things I find that small business owners make as far as mistake is they don't set up a separate accounting system for their business. They just do it as an extension of their personal accounting system, which really is a problem. Yeah sickly sole-traders when they start out a lot of rooms are mixed kind of discolored business and pleasure or their personal encounter banking account. I would say that that is you know five starting a business. The first thing I do is I would set up a business bank account right and I would basically get some sort of accounting software whether it's you know zero or what have you I would look for the line of business software that is kind of the market leader in the category that I in. So you know in construction, they'd be Pro Gore finding you know running a hair salon. Be Timely find getting all my kind of soft were sorted out, and then I would find a really great accountable infect around flights ten percent of our accountable keeper channel. The people that are zero advisers are almost acting like managed service providers were there. Basically providing a stack of software plus advisory services to small businesses for a monthly fee. So the small business doesn't need to worry about. Well, what should I choose choose? Their their adviser is basically saying if you're in this particular industry, this is the the bundle of software that you need to run your business and all manage it all, and I'll help you with coaching. You run your business and I want everyone to hear what Tony is saying because to many times we don't spend any time setting up the infrastructure for our company and that's really easy these days with these cloud. APPS Tony. It's interesting. You know long time ago when Islands University announced doing. It. Guidance was eighty percent of your time. You're doing it should be planning twenty percent doing and I don't think that's much different for business I think, generally some small. Rush out and getting to it, and they don't think about the planning side of it. But if you don't build the foundations thinking about building a house with the foundation isn't rock-solid. You know, how are you going to build that twenty story building? If you have aspirations to grow your business, you gotta get the foundations down. You GotTa get a coach just set it up right from the start in your our research shows you're going to drastically improve your chances of being successful. We'll Tony I appreciate you joining the show where can people get more information about and that's spelled x. e zero? Zero DOT COM and check it out. There's you can get on there for a free trial and. I hope everyone loves it up everyone stay safe I. Hope all the small businesses out there. I know you're doing itself. We're here to help. Just, take care good life and. Hope you're joining continues to grow.

Tony Accountant Cloud Americas Cash President Of Zero Facebook Tony Ward Australia United States Tony I Microsoft Australia Barack Obama MBA Sheila Ramos Islands University Google
Lawn Renovation Do's and Don'ts.

Your Gardening Questions

05:58 min | Last month

Lawn Renovation Do's and Don'ts.

"You know this is you mentioned his midsummer were getting into August and between now and the the middle of August when you like to start lawn renovations. Means Mark and and most of it is getting ready showed. So to speak up until August fifteenth now that's not a magic day, but it's it's a period of time where I like to get the seed purchase. The fertilizer purchased I like to you. If I need to use it, I like to get the roundup ready to kill off the weeds and so on and it depends on this year in my limited travels. Because of the virus and so on I have not seen longs in great suffering condition. Now, they're getting a little brown from here to there but then depending on where you are in varying spots, it does rain get things going again and so on. So in any event to get things around then if I'm watching the calendar, which is just a generality, the August fifteenth period where it's still haunting drive is when I like. To get started on lawn renovation. Now, this when I say renovation, it's where you may be lost lawn and in my case, it's a smaller area. Thank Heavens but it's north of my house. It's it's a spot where somehow some annual bluegrass that started it is always luscious spring to the point of getting well over into the the perennial beds in one place. Then all of a sudden come roughly all this one, it just dies. Flat to the ground, it's done. It's done. It's thing for the year and that leaves me a bare spot or spots spot is not now it's not so big. But at the same time, I, go in with a shot around up. Well, I have in the past this year I don't think I'll need to I'll knock out any weeds that are being substantially nasty and then around the I I'm sorry around the fifteenth. I will scratch that up with a steel Tien Rake and be v. lets you say because of its size and area I will be ready to cede that at any point thereafter I get it scratched up and so on. I usually don't have much breed rakoff I kinda great it out after I've kinds of the ground, half an inch or more and more is better there's no question about it but a half an inch will give me a seedbed. So I get to see down a little fertilizer on top of I have in this case, I use compost that made. It just literally dusted over the top mainly just to keep those seeds moist during the heat of the day of and we'll go on with that thought where now if you have to really renovated lawn, it's a good time to win anytime now and thereafter after good rain or watering, you get the junk weeds grass and so on all growing then you hit them with around up then he weighed maybe ten days or thereabouts to see that everything has been in fact killed if so fine. If not give it another shot of round up then I think it's a ten day week period before you can see then at that point, you have some options and I caused guy great caused a nation and a significant aren't argument. One time we took in the slice Cedar. loaded. The top rack, each of the seed. Each of the little times on the bleed. have their about an inch and a half apart the seed drops in behind those the fertilizer, etc and up comes the grass. Well, the grass was coming up in rows and he's Hey, call me just more than a little bit anger. I didn't want a striped on I wanNA hold on I said, well, we've used bluegrass which will spread it is going to do so take a picture now just for fun sake Fun He's at I'm looking at it is a different situation. Anyhow, he did take the picture and years. Later we talked about his stripy lawn being quite lush and beautiful I happen to use the slice cedar on its own, just sometimes for cultivation sake under circumstances but it's a wonderful tool forgetting seed into little troughs or slits in the grass Amsoil seed should not be very deep into that most seeds well, generally speaking mark on seeds it you put it in the ground twice the deficit it is in diameter. Now with bluegrass seed that means you lay it on top. With with the perennial well with the Turf Type Pretty Well Ryan you put down another sixteenth of an inch but in any event you've made these little flips the. You put the grass seed down and at that point, then you start watering and the seed in terms of setting the depth of these knife blades. So to speak, I would not go any deeper than a quarter of an inch into the ground. You don't want to bury the darn seeds you want them where they can stay moist, they can be rooting into soil. By contacts but you don't want them down buried in in in do much shade from the We'd like up and so on. So you're going to be putting down seed you will come up and rose and give it then Well you have to allow on the BLUEGRASS itself. It's going to take twenty one days for it to germinate in in terms of generality, and I'll SOM-, maybe in fourteen days some maybe as late as thirty days but but twenty one days, it takes to get the bluegrass going in the meantime that they've type tall fescue will be up giving us some color cover and it Cetera, and we're back into a

Bluegrass Mark Amsoil Cedar.
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | Last month

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. 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The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
Determining Your One Thing with Gary Keller

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:19 min | Last month

Determining Your One Thing with Gary Keller

"Hey. If you're a small business owner by now, you have figured out that you can't just work in the business you got to work on the business you've got to get above it gotta do strategic planning and team building all the things that cause a business to actually scale to the next level. That's what it takes to achieve your dreams. But how do you do that? It's not that easy. From the Ramsey network this is the entree leadership podcast where we help business leaders, grow themselves, their teams and their profits. I'm your host Daniel. Tardy, and today we're GonNa talk about how you actually scale a business. How do you get out of that startup stage the treadmill stage you know the bootstrap thing where it's hard and just grinding whatever you WANNA call that stage you've got to break through it to get to the next level. But, it all starts with what we call humble beginnings. All businesses start, but they don't have to stay there and they should stay there had you've got dreams of this thing becoming a big deal and my guest today it's GonNa teach you exactly how that works. Gary Keller is the CO founder, chairman and CEO of keller-williams maybe you've heard of them well, in fact, they're the world's largest real estate firm by agent count he's a titan of his industry he's built a dynasty. But it didn't start that way. And a Gary's, case. He was a real estate agent. With no track, record. So I didn't have any real focus in college and my dad, my sophomore year says, Hey, you probably need to get a major. So he had me that summer spin a day with a lawyer David account a with a banker with a realtor not like the real tournament went back to college and turns out they were just a major mural state. So that's how I came to get my degree allstate was the dad said, just go shadow these people. As exercise I mean most dads don't have their sons do this. So that's that's fascinating to me. He was an educator. So my mother and father were both educated so that that made sense to him. I got to college study real estate came out attributed like a job. So one of the biggest mistakes the independent contractors make is they don't treat it like a job, right they get in there for the freedom and the flexibility and the possibility of untold wealth, and what they do is they take advantage of the freedom and flexibility and they overtake advantage of it, and then they never get the wealth. It's a job it's a job. So I came out of college come to Austin I'd been here once before my. Family I didn't know anybody at the time other than a former school friend and join US Real Estate Company and start selling real estate and all I did was treated like a job that is I got up early and I went to work. So I showed up and by the way there was nobody there and literally would pull my little Volkswagen into the office and there was nobody there and I just got to work and they said look you're gonNA have to generate because we're not going to give you any clients. And of course, I went oh my gosh and they didn't talk about that in college at all. You know they talked about real estate they never said you to generate a client, right? and. So I had to go learn to Lee generate and I read some books and two classes and I went out and I saw five houses my first thirty days in a city that actually never been to write other than once and I did it just by following the books I did what they told me I. Didn't one of the mistakes that we make. I think is that we try to be creative on the front end of doing something instead of the back end and when I mean is is that I had a college professor say Gary Pretty Smart. But if you look around, you realize that people have lived before you. And you might WanNA study them before you go and try to reinvent the wheel and that had a profound impact on me because my went. Okay. So what he's saying is I, should go find out where people who are doing this the best are and just mimic them until I internalize what they're doing. So I, understand it and then I can be creative off of that but. I shouldn't go in and just be creative on the front end because what do I know it would take me years to get smart by doing it and learning from me doing it. I could really speed that up I copy and other people in the beginning. So that's really what got me going. What I came to understand was sales is helping people make good decisions and I didn't. Care in the end I had no real vested interest if the decision was not to buy or if it was to buy because I was looking for clients for life and in the short term, you would think well, I needed everyone to buy because I or or sell with me because I need to make money now but I looked up and I realized pretty quick I wanted to. Have a great career, not just a great year in the way to have a great career was to not overly emphasize the moments income focus on doing right by people they'll do right by you. Right people don't care how much you know until they care right? Did you it these mantras that are not really just mantras they're actually golden rules in philosophies about how to look at things.

Gary Keller Us Real Estate Company Business Owner Allstate Chairman And Ceo Daniel David Austin LEE Keller-Williams Professor Co Founder
Determining Your One Thing with Gary Keller

The EntreLeadership Podcast

04:13 min | Last month

Determining Your One Thing with Gary Keller

"Gary Keller is the CO founder, chairman and CEO of keller-williams maybe you've heard of them well, in fact, they're the world's largest real estate firm by agent count he's a titan of his industry he's built a dynasty. But it didn't start that way. And a Gary's, case. He was a real estate agent. With no track, record. So I didn't have any real focus in college and my dad, my sophomore year says, Hey, you probably need to get a major. So he had me that summer spin a day with a lawyer David account a with a banker with a realtor not like the real tournament went back to college and turns out they were just a major mural state. So that's how I came to get my degree allstate was the dad said, just go shadow these people. As exercise I mean most dads don't have their sons do this. So that's that's fascinating to me. He was an educator. So my mother and father were both educated so that that made sense to him. I got to college study real estate came out attributed like a job. So one of the biggest mistakes the independent contractors make is they don't treat it like a job, right they get in there for the freedom and the flexibility and the possibility of untold wealth, and what they do is they take advantage of the freedom and flexibility and they overtake advantage of it, and then they never get the wealth. It's a job it's a job. So I came out of college come to Austin I'd been here once before my. Family I didn't know anybody at the time other than a former school friend and join US Real Estate Company and start selling real estate and all I did was treated like a job that is I got up early and I went to work. So I showed up and by the way there was nobody there and literally would pull my little Volkswagen into the office and there was nobody there and I just got to work and they said look you're gonNA have to generate because we're not going to give you any clients. And of course, I went oh my gosh and they didn't talk about that in college at all. You know they talked about real estate they never said you to generate a client, right? and. So I had to go learn to Lee generate and I read some books and two classes and I went out and I saw five houses my first thirty days in a city that actually never been to write other than once and I did it just by following the books I did what they told me I. Didn't one of the mistakes that we make. I think is that we try to be creative on the front end of doing something instead of the back end and when I mean is is that I had a college professor say Gary Pretty Smart. But if you look around, you realize that people have lived before you. And you might WanNA study them before you go and try to reinvent the wheel and that had a profound impact on me because my went. Okay. So what he's saying is I, should go find out where people who are doing this the best are and just mimic them until I internalize what they're doing. So I, understand it and then I can be creative off of that but. I shouldn't go in and just be creative on the front end because what do I know it would take me years to get smart by doing it and learning from me doing it. I could really speed that up I copy and other people in the beginning. So that's really what got me going. What I came to understand was sales is helping people make good decisions and I didn't. Care in the end I had no real vested interest if the decision was not to buy or if it was to buy because I was looking for clients for life and in the short term, you would think well, I needed everyone to buy because I or or sell with me because I need to make money now but I looked up and I realized pretty quick I wanted to. Have a great career, not just a great year in the way to have a great career was to not overly emphasize the moments income focus on doing right by people they'll do right by you. Right people don't care how much you know until they care right? Did you it these mantras that are not really just mantras they're actually golden rules in philosophies about how to look at things.

Gary Keller Us Real Estate Company Chairman And Ceo Allstate Austin Keller-Williams Co Founder David LEE Professor
Jeff Simone of Reaction Recovery

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

04:35 min | Last month

Jeff Simone of Reaction Recovery

"Hi Jeff First of all let me start by saying. Thank you so much for doing this episode with me. I am super excited to learn more about you and to get to meet you. I, guess not in real life, but in virtual real life. I grey. Hello Angela. My pleasure yet thanks for doing this. So let's just start with telling the listeners a little bit about you and what you do. Yeah. Yes. My Jeff I'm I'm a doctor of pharmacy. I'm a certified nutritional supplements adviser I'm a person in long term recovery from drug addiction specifically opiates amphetamines but I identify with. All of it. I started reaction recovery at this past summer reaction recovery is a snow online consultation service. You know specifically to help people following a drug detox stabilized physically attacked through diet nutrition supplementation. Kind of look at how all that? Plays in with any prescription medications that you're taking just like the whole picture moving forward into kind of help you glide into term recovery. Just, just a sort of bridge that gap between detox and long term recovery. Okay. I'm glad you said that because I wanNA dig into that a little bit. So are you more about the actual like a? Withdrawal Detox stage or are you a little beyond that? It could be both I work with people in both the majority is the Aq-. Okay. So so for my perspective, I believe that we have done collectively we've done a great job recently of getting people in detox forgetting identifying people get figuring out how to get them into detox physically separating them from you know whether it's drugs or alcohol, and even even long-term on long-term approach is whether the time-tested twelve step groups that have been around for eighty years that are doing their thing it even even even a lot of this. Yoka long-term approaches to dig into trauma history like how that plays into the root of addictions. I feel like we've done just in the last ten years even ten fifteen years phenomenal work I mean there's just incredible authors, speakers researchers in into that area that I feel like are making God they're just doing it's such good stuff but from my perspective and this is sort of the reaction I guess part of reaction, recovery is. Not Everybody makes it to that point. So most people do make through that I detox period you know one of the misconceptions there. So many one of the misconceptions out there especially as it relates to the OPIOID epidemic is. The problem. Okay. The big problem why it's not going away because these drugs are just so darn addictive in people get stuck on them. They tried to get off to get sick. Of course we've all seen the movies. We all know what that looks like, and that's the reason that everybody just stays in this cycle of addiction at. Yeah. Mean of course anybody who's in that world understands that if that were the case if the case were that the problem is that the the drugs ill whether it's heroin or Sticking to the opiates for the moment if that were the problem anybody that completes that detox is home free, you know you should only have to do a detox. Once if the problem is the physical addictiveness of the drug, you know it's terrible. You're all the you're sweating you can't eat your thrown up your diarrhea. You do that for seven, ten, fourteen days. If you make through a thirty day little treatments stint, you're done you. Know, you should never have to go back to that same facility began to another. Of course, that's just not the case. So there's something else going on, of course, something something bigger and like I said I I, you know I know people that are are able to easily make that transition from MMA treatment into say it is a twelve step group and they hit the ground running and they stay sober in that program in particular has. Created a some unbelievable sobriety. The everybody that is in this industry knows people that have just just these miracle cases where you hear their stories and you see them now and it's it's hard to even. Imagine that this person was this way before. So I just you. You've seen a miracle but not everybody not everybody can make it through that that first phase you know and it it's it's very uncomfortable for a lot of people's very painful

Jeff First Angela Diarrhea Heroin
"thirty day" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

03:30 min | 11 months ago

"thirty day" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Free thirty day trial in this day and age why would anyone want to be the White House press secretary will ask a former today at five thirty five John how old double back this is the Ben Shapiro show self update on this whole whistleblower scandal that just broke in the last forty eight hours in which an ABC news insider who exposed a buried abstinence story was fired by CBS news media they cared deeply about whistleblowers are constantly wanted to prevent whistle blowers from being exposed unless it was a large are in the media and they expose BC in which case yes will fire them according to take bearing reporting over daily wire one Friday the ABC news insider who obtained the tape of ABC anchor Amy Robach is distressed over the spiking over Jeffrey obscene story by ABC news came forward after CBS reportedly fired the staffer quite access to the tape the insider remains anonymous row paragraphs address to my fellow man my fellow ABC news employs those wrongfully accused any role batch and ABC news here is the open letter written by this insider quote to my fellow man I get bored with this information hearing no motives other than to have this information public I did not and do not see any personal gain from this information whether it be financial or otherwise it'll always decline but I became aware of this moment I had the same reaction many of you did anger confusion sadness I care not about petty political quarrels only hope for the best in all of us to my fellow ABC news employees I've walked the halls experiencing similar feelings they're all having right now all of you regard your own personal differences in one form or another and do an outstanding job I sincerely enjoy working with each and everyone of you will continue to do so throughout our careers sos wrongfully accused is terrible you been laughed out by the company I know some of the burden of guilt I meet my conscience is clear to any role that you're the only person deserving of an apology and most certainly sorry not my actions one for this to center around you but what is clear to happen when I first stumbled across this my initial reaction was outrage but this soon turned toward empathy I cannot imagine doing all the hard work to only have a child in the past few years have taught us anything it is the truth that some of us have enjoyed many hardships in this industry from the cycle of stories regarding prominent and powerful people in this world and yours I believe you're not standing reporter JVC news I sit right here with you all in complete shock I like many are at a loss for words and how this is being handled instead of addressing this head on like the company has in the past it is put into a mission of seek and destroy that of course is true so again pretty incredible meanwhile Facebook announced that they will be removing any news reporting that mentions the alleged whistle blowers identity which is a pretty wild policy I mean truly awhile policy so if you mention was a large name which is perfectly legal and illegal you mention was lowers name and face will not remove the story Facebook removed Breitbart post on Wednesday evening reporting on the fact that other respected news outlets have already reported the identity of the alleged whistleblower many Facebook user attempts to click on that article is given a message that says this content isn't available at the moment administrators and Breitbart news is Facebook page began receiving notifications on Wednesday evening saying the brake parts page was at risk of being on published finally they were told any mention of the potential whistleblowers name violates our coordinating harm policy which prohibits content outing of witness informants or activist well that's bizarre I mean really bizarre because the fact is there is no legal obligation on break part not to name the whistleblower and was what was obviously a person of public import at.

forty eight hours thirty day
"thirty day" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

10:10 min | 1 year ago

"thirty day" Discussed on Pro Rata

"Harada we take just ten minutes to get your smarter on the Clinton Tech Business Politics I'm Denver Mac today show Softbank Pays Adam Newman to go away and how one Virginia Town is getting drugs via drone I thirty days of impeachment so it's now exactly one month four Tuesday's ago that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced an impeachment inquiry into president trump and the big story so far is speed remember to call between trump and Ukraine's president took place just this past August less than two months ago and we've already had tons of witnesses document requests widespread expectations that the house will wrap up and kick things over to the Senate by Thanksgiving now compare that to the Nixon impeachment where took eighteen months between the Watergate break-in in house authorization of an impeachment inquiry and the Nixon resigned six months later before the House voted to impeach or look at the Clinton situation where nine months it's passed between the first media report of affair with Monica Lewinsky and the House inquiry launch with another ten weeks until impeachment itself the bottom line here is that the White House in Republican points about process aren't slowing down well slowing down the process and the Senate trial could come well before Christmas in fifteen seconds go deeper with axios political reporter Elena trine first this there's more news out there than ever before but these days it's harder than ever to find it and to know what to trust axes am takes effort out of getting smart by synthesis housing the ten stories that will drive the day and telling you I they matter subscribe at sign up dot axios dot com and now back to the podcast it we're joined now by actress political reporter Latrine let's start here just state of play were thirty days in but what happens this week and kind of what's the most important thing that happens this week this week there are three depositions behind closed doors I'd say one of the most important things will see this week is today actually the bill Taylor the person who replaced the former ambassador to Ukraine Marie Ivanovich is going to be testifying behind closed doors to the House Intelligence Committee oversight and born affairs committees he's expecting to have a very damaging testimony to the president he was someone who was revealed to have a lot of concerns with potential for investigating well he was he was the guy the famous text exchange with Sunlen the the ambassador to the U The you know the call may raise the one who was supposed to call right and he was someone who was very clear that he had concerns he wrote that there was this nightmare scenario he referred to several other trump officials who have come forward and testified about this for the impeachment inquiry referred to that the idea that the president might withhold aid to presidents Alinsky of Ukraine in order to have some sort of agreement that he would investigate his political opponent Joe Biden but then also there's a lot of concerns like what if he never falls through on this what if this is helping Russia he someone who really was thinking about all the repercussions of this while some others were like no don't overplay it he was someone who was very concerned you still a State Department employee correct Bill Taylor yes so he then testifying in contradiction what the there was a State Department told him not to and he's showing up anyway or the State Department giving them a green light the White House and the trump administration has very much encouraged anyone not to comply is there alignment yes we are not complying or helping the Democrats in what they see as a witch hunt against the president but bill Taylor is coming in and sure I don't believe that he was subpoenaed but I should probably look at that but he is coming in today and it's definitely not in line with what the White House would want the maybe it was two weeks ago this whole thing seems to be running in dog years I said it's very quickly in the intro except it does also feel like it's gone on forever you know the the White House not complying is that slowing down Democrats at all because clearly there Arthur Democrats want that they're not getting so they're really going around the White House as best they can they recognize that yes they can subpoena people left right and center but the problem there is they want this to be wrapped up as quickly and efficiently as possible and in order to really have to enforce subpoena you have to go through the court system so what they're doing is trying to bring and trump administration officials both former and current who can come in and give them some of the details that perhaps people like secretary Mike Pompeii or Rudy Giuliani who were he figures in all of this they won't be able to get them when you talk to folks on the hill particularly Republicans on the hill I think there's a a a pretty general perception that this is the opposite to democratic run impeachment but Democrats want impeachment Republicans don't impeachment and this is ultimately a partisan food fight is there from what you've can tell any crack on the Republican side you obviously one or two who people here or there but anything bigger than that and more substantive or not yet I think that's still to be determined it's possible that there could be a bigger cracking this I mean that's what the Democrats are hoping for that's what all these depositions are for they're hoping that there will be something else that comes out of this the Democrats jobs they hope Donald Trump decides to resign tomorrow is reasonable like I mean from what you hear I mean do you get that sense that there are people who are potentially on the fence and could legitimately be convinced if compelling evidence was arrive evening Republican Republicans yeah it's very unlikely there is a potential we had that interview with Mitt Romney on our axios on HBO show the other day where you know he would be one person that you could see I think if one person falls there could be a domino effect people Republicans one hundred percent behind closed doors are criticizing what's going on people are pulling their hair out over what Rudy Giuliani what they call the shadow foreign policy they are you know kicking themselves when they are defending the president and saying you know at first one of their spoke with a committee source of their news like yeah of course it's like the most frustrating experience ever route defending the president saying no he didn't ask for any help to investigate and then the president comes out and says it himself on the White House South Lawn so there could be people who fall but as of now Republicans are sticking to the Party line and are not planning to play this game to the Senate let's assume that they will impeachment at least Democrats obviously will vote to do this and this kicked over to the Senate Mitch McConnell has said there will be a trial once he says that how much control does McConnell have come pared to John Roberts Chief Justice Supreme Court technically is the one who oversees impeachment and other McConnell just like bring it up and say hey let's vote and then go home or does there have to be a real trial with witnesses all everything that entails those details are still being worked out and honestly they haven't worked out really at all I spoke with McConnell team over the weekend and yes McConnell has said that he wants the house impeachment they want the house to vote on articles of impeachment by Thanksgiving so that any sort of Senate trial can be wrapped up by Christmas and so that it doesn't extend into a essential election year but that timeline is totally that is not something that they've all agreed on he has not spoken with Nancy Pelosi or Chuck Schumer yet on any of this the hope is that if and when and everyone thinks when is the question it's not an f. when the house will vote to impeach the President Chuck Schumer and McConnell they're hoping will come together Aaron get together in a room and work out some sort of definitive timeline so that it's not left up to the Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts because then they get along well enough they can do this on scalper their total art says of course but I do think that no one wants this to drag out no one wants this to potentially affect the the twenty two thousand presidential election and thing things on their terms will benefit both sides final question for you speaking of affecting twenty twenty presidential election give me odds here I know they're low but what are the odds that come November twenty twenty from now Donald Trump is not sitting president of the United States I mean very risky game to play people part of this in two thousand sixteen and it didn't work out well for them so I'm GonNa win he's not when we go to the polls the incumbent I honestly think this whole how this impeachment stuff plays out less so more about whether he'll be removed I don't think right now it's very lear that he probably won't be removed in the Senate but how the messaging does affect him if enough people there are some cracks that are showing some GOP voters are starting to get fed up with all this craziness around the president despite supporting him so if there's enough that comes out in this that does sway people there could be a chance that he doesn't but as of now now I think he still has a great chance of winning twenty three and actors book reporter who covers politics enough that she is good enough to avoid a direct answer to a simple question thanks for joining us. Thank you Dan final two right after this axiom chief technology correspondent Dana free chairs breaking news and analysis on the most consequential companies in players intact from the valley to DC subscribe to get smarter faster and sign up dot axios dot com and now back to the podcast was already an investor valuing we work just this past January at forty seven billion dollars the new deal will cut that down by around seventy percent second the board of directors really have a say they're voting but they don't really get to vote because former CEO Adam Newman still has so called super voting rights whereby each of his shares counts ten times as much as everyone else's shares and Softbank is giving them around two hundred million dollar golden parachute to pick their deal over rival offer from J. P. Morgan third some Softbank employee's will indeed get paid through this deal so-called tender offer but most employees were hired in the last couple of years they get wiped out and finally don't be spread see we worked co-ceo Biko CEOS by day's end not because Softbank is firing them but because they're expected to quit and finally this morning people in Christians Bird Virginia can now get their drugs be a drone now to be clear I am talking about approved pharmaceuticals here a google affiliate called wing is running a pilot test or pilot let's cast drone delivery for walgreens pharmacy it's also running similar delivery programs for Fedex and a local gift shop called Sugar Magnolia these are the first FAA approved commercial drone delivery his anywhere in the country and Times can drop off just minutes after an order is placed proving I guess that impatience can pay and we're done thanks Confront Producers Tim Chauffeurs and Jesse Lee have a great national nut day and we'll back on Thursday with another pro rata podcast..

Softbank CEO Adam Newman Harada Virginia Town Denver Dan Fedex google Christians Bird Virginia technology correspondent Dana free FAA Biko co-ceo J. P. Morgan Jesse Lee Tim Chauffeurs thirty days
"thirty day" Discussed on Half Size Me

Half Size Me

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"thirty day" Discussed on Half Size Me

"In our thirty day challenge called back to basics there. I really walk through with the community entity on how to do this. If you would like to get more structure on this and more individualized help I do have coaching cast called refuse to quit again that coaching cast I go through this idea of basic minimum preferred referred really lay it out for you so you can implement it into your own life. Basic concept is starting to learn what behaviors constitute your minimums your basics and then your preferred activities and habits and that's going really be your toggle switch to either holding where you are not quitting you making sure you're maintaining or if you're picking your preferred it means that you're moving forward with your goals. Your weight loss goals your health goals. Whatever the goals Zarya focusing on so for you where you would be looking in the shop is the refused to quit again coaching cast and I really dive deep into those three things that you mentioned so? I hope that helps aren't the next question comes from Rachel. Her question is how do you recover from binge. Eating session aren't so Rachel when I was struggling with my own binge eating before I really worked on my own recovery. Would I would do normally was beat myself up and then the behavior would continue because I felt like well. I've already screwed up so now I might as well just continue on this path and that really is what big time led to my weight gain. It was my binge eating behaviors so when I was really working on prioritizing my binge eating recovery every I realized I had to take point of action where I could and I had tried so many times to stop binging on what I call the front end. which is the avoiding the binged not doing the binge? I tried going thing for a walk taking a bubble bath calling a friend like I did all the things they recommended him books and I just kind of got to the point where I felt really frustrated with that because I felt like nothing I did would ever get me to stop having a bench so then I said Okay and viewed. It is a cycle so heather binges. She then feels horrible about herself. She then attempts to restrict the next day she ends up binging again by the end of the day in the cycle just continues in continues and continues.

Rachel Zarya thirty day
"thirty day" Discussed on The New How Podcast

The New How Podcast

11:41 min | 1 year ago

"thirty day" Discussed on The New How Podcast

"William men within <Speech_Male> cnn after <Speech_Music_Male> he wasn't around for years <Speech_Music_Male> and years and years <Speech_Music_Male> like philadelphia <Speech_Male> became <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Silence> prostitution <Speech_Male> written <Speech_Male> it became dirty <Speech_Male> and in seventeen <Speech_Male> forty ben <Speech_Male> franklin other men <Speech_Male> found in <Speech_Male> a union <Speech_Male> with an idea cleanup <Speech_Male> philadelphia <Speech_Male> be employees <Speech_Male> got together with employees <Speech_Male> employees are <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> these <Speech_Male> literate <Speech_Male> industrialists <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> that we're able to <Speech_Male> build their own little thing <Speech_Male> that you're company dirty <Speech_Male> boyce fifteen boys <Speech_Male> water <Speech_Male> cooler talk <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> never <Speech_Music_Male> created america <Speech_Music_Male> so the founding <Speech_Music_Male> fathers they get together <Speech_Music_Male> and they start the union <Speech_Male> now seventeen seventy six <Speech_Music_Male> is way far out i would <Speech_Music_Male> argue that suzy inception <Speech_Music_Male> of ideas <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> on technology drives <Speech_Male> us by <Speech_Music_Male> contrast to accept <Speech_Male> yes <Speech_Male> they <SpeakerChange> were able <Speech_Male> to make <Speech_Music_Male> ends meet without <Speech_Male> the help of england <Speech_Male> and even in the best <Speech_Male> time ever <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> they believe <Speech_Male> they were being taken advantage <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> better technology <Speech_Male> so because <Speech_Male> i remember because <Speech_Male> of technological <Speech_Male> development <Speech_Male> they could see through <Speech_Male> the veil of the <Speech_Male> poor leadership <Speech_Male> of the manager <Speech_Male> william penn <Speech_Male> who was <Speech_Male> a disconnect <Speech_Male> from king george <Speech_Male> and it trickles <Speech_Male> on the top and <Speech_Male> the kings <Speech_Male> jor it would <Speech_Male> set up a failure begin <Speech_Male> with because <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> there was no cultural <Speech_Music_Male> item yeah he won <Speech_Music_Male> some <Speech_Music_Male> people that just landed <Speech_Male> here they were <Speech_Male> able to build <Speech_Male> new technology <Speech_Music_Male> their own ecosystem <Speech_Music_Male> like their own <Speech_Music_Male> role economy <Speech_Male> through their <Speech_Male> own ecosystem <Speech_Male> of shared <Speech_Male> and he's brilliant <Speech_Male> literate man <Speech_Male> got together <Speech_Male> and attempt to decrease <Speech_Male> the first <Speech_Male> company <Speech_Male> of that nature <Speech_Male> this democracy <Speech_Male> and we <Speech_Music_Male> go no no you understand <Speech_Male> the point <Speech_Male> why don't you toppings <Speech_Male> and you understanding of <Speech_Male> human behavior <Speech_Male> on less <Speech_Male> and creating ideas <Speech_Male> i mean <Speech_Male> walmart <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> like any of these like <Speech_Male> i could be wrong <Speech_Male> or died <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Male> sam walton that <Speech_Male> in his book <Speech_Male> because when i watched <Speech_Male> a podcast recently <Speech_Music_Male> of a seal mardi <Speech_Male> dancing <Speech_Male> what's your favorite book <Speech_Male> and even saying made <Speech_Male> america <Speech_Male> hey <SpeakerChange> pastor <Speech_Male> what's your favorite

cnn william penn sam walton philadelphia prostitution boyce
"thirty day" Discussed on The New How Podcast

The New How Podcast

09:48 min | 1 year ago

"thirty day" Discussed on The New How Podcast

"Is the last time so <Speech_Male> hey verbally about <Speech_Male> this jake <Speech_Male> paul you're only give users <Speech_Music_Male> pilots i'm gonna see when <Speech_Music_Male> you believe in <Speech_Male> the jobs home <Speech_Male> exhaust homeward you're gonna <Speech_Male> you're gonna be there when he thinks <Speech_Male> up their own selling <Speech_Male> the big lead they <Speech_Music_Male> are recalling <Speech_Music_Male> feel like i <Speech_Music_Male> could still say the thing <Speech_Music_Male> if they lose in years and <Speech_Music_Male> years and years here's who is <Speech_Music_Male> ingrained in my mind <Speech_Music_Male> the point of <SpeakerChange> that is it <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> before <Speech_Male> i picked up the phone <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> if i wasn't <Speech_Male> unconsciously <SpeakerChange> confident <Speech_Male> questions <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Advertisement> how <Speech_Male> am i gonna <Advertisement> listen to understand <Speech_Male> how to apply <Speech_Male> correct <Speech_Male> and i did enough of it <Speech_Male> enough of it enough of it <Speech_Male> it completely <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> changed <Speech_Male> how <Speech_Male> i view the world <Speech_Music_Male> and another level <Speech_Music_Male> of of traction <Speech_Male> of utility because <Speech_Male> i need <Speech_Male> so many friends <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> with people that i <Speech_Male> would call at seven thirty <Speech_Music_Male> in the morning <Speech_Male> andy <Speech_Male> that ended <Speech_Male> up becoming <Speech_Male> may what a <Speech_Male> utility <Speech_Male> via useful <Speech_Male> competency <Speech_Male> so then be able to <Speech_Male> teach create more meaning <Speech_Male> in my life and <Speech_Male> others through teaching <Speech_Male> and the <Speech_Male> arts and also the reason <Speech_Music_Male> that i know so <Speech_Male> many of the interview about <Speech_Male> forty real estate <Speech_Male> owners and top <Speech_Male> performers <Speech_Male> and last year <Speech_Male> and a half over <Speech_Male> the one hundred and thirty <Speech_Male> people i interviewed <Speech_Male> dish <Speech_Male> in because <Speech_Male> of those phone <Speech_Male> calls snoop <Speech_Male> connected in <Speech_Male> connecticut and connected <Speech_Male> and then when it came down <Speech_Male> to <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> that my first workshop <Speech_Male> where i call <Speech_Male> people <Speech_Male> first down the owner <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> a live on <Speech_Male> speaker and <Silence> got appointments <Speech_Male> had conversations <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in the whole room is like <Speech_Male> <Silence> wow like <Speech_Male> the real thing <Speech_Music_Male> endo right <Speech_Music_Male> languages live <Speech_Music_Male> the difference <Speech_Music_Male> in theory <Speech_Male> yeah and <Speech_Male> i would like <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> it's tied <Speech_Male> up rome <Speech_Male> this i did i <Speech_Music_Male> accomplished so now <Speech_Male> is never <Speech_Male> i would never interested <Speech_Male> in like selling <Speech_Male> a million hauser <Speech_Male> and i think it <Speech_Male> was like i think a lot about <Speech_Male> you know this <Speech_Male> millennial conversation <Speech_Male> or generation z <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> it's okay <Speech_Male> to learn <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and and <Speech_Male> and not be in <Speech_Male> a rush <Speech_Male> it's like <Speech_Male> it's okay to invest <Speech_Male> sherline so learn <Speech_Male> to go <Speech_Music_Male> through the motions of learning <Speech_Male> things i think <Speech_Male> you have not been able i think <Speech_Male> you have to do that now <Speech_Male> in today's age size <Speech_Male> like you like <Speech_Male> i wanna know how to <Speech_Male> run facebook ads like <Speech_Male> my mother was googling <Speech_Male> out a run a facebook <Speech_Male> ad for a little side <Speech_Male> hustle she's working on like <Speech_Male> it's it's crazy <Speech_Male> you have everybody <Speech_Male> now has to take the <Speech_Male> time to learn these new <Speech_Male> skills and piece <Speech_Male> of technology that are coming <Speech_Male> out because if not <Speech_Male> you're literally in <Speech_Male> the cave in <Speech_Male> air would you <Speech_Male> say is okay here's your <Speech_Music_Male> pop <SpeakerChange> culture that <Speech_Music_Male> matter <Speech_Music_Male> our life <Speech_Music_Male> is <Speech_Music_Male> you'll find a platform <Speech_Music_Male> away go <Speech_Male> existed our own people <Speech_Male> do but i think <Speech_Male> they'd be relevant <Speech_Male> it's like you have to be able <Speech_Male> to quickly learned things <Speech_Male> i mean it's one of the ways we <Speech_Male> hire airport rickles <Speech_Male> like i don't care <Speech_Male> if you don't know something <Speech_Male> i care about how <Speech_Male> quickly you could learn something <Speech_Male> yeah <Speech_Male> no i don't see any people <Speech_Male> pick up spanish <Speech_Male> or mandarin come <Speech_Male> teacher you know <Speech_Male> not put under rosetta stone <Speech_Male> but they're gonna have to <Speech_Male> go through software learning <Speech_Male> something <Speech_Male> that they've never experienced <Speech_Male> before no matter how <Speech_Male> long they've been in are <Speech_Male> in are professionally have <Speech_Male> to learn quick <Speech_Male> here and <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> mentioned thirty <Speech_Male> days of thought <Speech_Male> yeah i feel like <Speech_Male> i've been thinking or even thirty <Speech_Music_Male> days <Speech_Music_Male> you gotta tell me <Speech_Music_Male> what thirty days <Speech_Music_Male> of falling as

thirty days
"thirty day" Discussed on Giant Beastcast

Giant Beastcast

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"thirty day" Discussed on Giant Beastcast

"Thousand dollars, he's dinner selling the blades con before that one for like four grand unscratched surprises me that should I don't know. I wish I I wish that fucking Morlock constant wasn't attached to my level. Thirty Warlock sitting in some fucking purgatory hell on a blizzard server turned on you fucked up black mirror. Right. They're checking in on those poor little guy. So that's the reason I bring it up is I almost I logged into the blizzard website to see. If is there any way can check if I actually turn this in or scratch that fucker off or like on. I think I'd have to sign up for a world of warcraft account log in or renew and like logging, don't you? Eric Lipton history or something on there? I couldn't find it on there. So I think I'd have to actually get in the game. And see if I have it in my inventory that almost got me to sign up. They have the free trial. But I think you can only do a new character from one to twenty. Yeah. And then it's. I don't know. I get really into. Wow. No, no. Feature. I think maybe the first feature on this website thirty day trial. And I think. Doing free trial. We should restart that thirty day trial, but just do trials of bunch of stuff trial game rising Rory every once in a while does his well streams, always hilarious. I watched because like the u I is just insane. He's got like all the weird Mods, and you is just buttons in the middle of the screen off to the side. And he's just like sitting there smashing these. I've no idea what's happening world of warcraft anymore. Not since they introduced the blood vampire, there's people. And then there's orcs and they're mad at each other. What else not hand is? Yeah. There there's elves and then there's blood L dollars. There's the well of spring of life ill regar-, there's scarecrows a guy with a the bandana around his is he was trapped in a tomb. Can she shreds to real tree IDs anyway blizzard? And then this one this three. Stories on here that make close to no sense. Okay. Then what's the lab VR because I have a picture. It was just women with a goose looking through goose's. They make good on that bird. The bird abbey. You should right now. If you have a computer in front of you look up, the press image for lab Lovie are. And it is hilarious dairy into our it is just it is people holding like animals up to their face and smiling as doing like a checking their it's all children. Wow. There had to be some awareness. Right. Like, this is interesting. So it's all children. There is a kid just looking right into birth acts. Child. There's another kid who has like an elephant face with the trunk. But. Sort of weird swan enough. Just like a bunch of children like open now that is cover man this. This is this is this will get you arrested. I want. I have not done anything with lab. Oh, but can we do a lab? Oh, stream a-this things. Is that? Alie swap these lab to like. The Nathan for you with the posters, or this is what were they thinking? I don't know ever thinking need to do something brand. To finally kill it. And here you go also. Okay. So I see a press photo here of a child sitting on a block has a square thing to face smile, real big. And then he has something as foot like some kind of kick pedal that he's clearly just like mashing, it's all like motion blurred. What is this? I'm not sure maybe some kind of maybe he's looking at drumming an can't wait to look in birds ass. The idea here is that like your switch is now of VR strain and the way that like gear VR, I guess is daydream thing does. Although I think I don't know. What's more powerful a high end smartphone or switch or a piece of cardboard? That's a good quite high today like smartphones with so frigging quickly saying the resolutions, definitely the higher. I come..

blizzard Rory Eric Lipton bird abbey Lovie Nathan thirty day Thousand dollars
"thirty day" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"thirty day" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Dot org. Message and data rates may apply. When did it become ok for men to be Lazier softer fatter? We need to bring the men of this country back to greatness, and it's easier than ever with ageless male max a patent pending formula with an ingredient that helps boost your total testosterone promoting greater increases in muscle size and twice the reduction of body fat percentage that exercise alone. Plus an amazing sixty four percent increase in nitric oxide, which can be handy in the gym and in the bedroom. Take your manhood to the max by your first thirty days bottle free just pay shipping and handling not ten days not fifteen days, but a full thirty day supply free. When you text the word mega to seventy nine seventy nine seventy nine finally a formula that boost total testosterone if you'll results with ageless male max are two in intents, please decrease use for your free bottle text mega to seventy nine seventy nine seventy nine text M E G A to seventy nine seventy nine seven. Ninety nine. Hey, dan. Can you believe it's our tenure anniversary of getting a great night's sleep? I know Trina for ten years quiet has been helping couples like us kick snoring outta bed. Think of the millions of lives. We've changed and that'll happen years before other snoring companies showed up on the scene. Z quiet. Really started a revolution. Hi, we're Dan. And Trina as the founders of z quiet, people often ask what sets us apart from the competition. It's easy. Snoring was our problem. And we know what night after night if snoring does to our relationship. Visit Ghezzi quiet dot com. Z quiet was developed to treat my snoring. And we realized there were other couples that were desperate for a simple and effective solution. We're so proud that. Z quiet has become America's trusted name in snoring solutions. Ghezzi quiet and kick snoring out a bed. Forever. Z quiet fits both men and women. Try it risk free for thirty days for just ninety five. Text go to two four six eight ten or go to get Z, quiet dot com. Text go to two four six eight ten or go to get Zeke choir. Dot com. In original.

Trina testosterone America thirty days sixty four percent fifteen days thirty day ten years ten days
"thirty day" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"thirty day" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"And download a fully functional thirty day evaluation version anytime that you can yeah people people you know anyone who thinks you're you know unless they really obsessed with finding find a needle in a haystack dr people like that continuing relationship seriously consider the services they want to become a fisher as serious about their data and its management i think is one of the most important data management tools out there in my opinion and so i am a haystack found yes that's right looking in tudor finally let the software find adult you don't you do that all right so let's talk a little bit about something that has really driven this headlines particularly in here but it's going to happen it's already having an a ripple effect in the united states and california is talking about doing a similar law you know so if you're doing business in california beware and that's gdp are which is the general data protection legislation that the european community pass and now california talking about passing one of his own it all happened so quickly it happened months ago that the place and then all of a sudden american companies will became aware of all this could affect us and i think all women affect in may if i recall correctly and so explain a little bit would gdp are is and talk about it in the context of the use of of the search gdp are is fairly groundbreaking now i'm not gonna put myself force as an expert on pr because it is an e you law related to data for you customers but essentially it requires companies like facebook and google particularly to make sure that they treat data that they receive in the course of their searching and social media the online searching social media in a certain way now but for the rest of us basically it also has ramifications for the type of personal data that is stored inside of information and argue laws here basically encourage companies not to willy nilly have random credit cards available on there other networks they could be hacked yeah.

united states california facebook google tudor thirty day
"thirty day" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

Clark Howard Show

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"thirty day" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

"On there but then they also received an email thing that this credit monitoring membership thing is also available where you can lock and unlock your credit file with push the button by yourself and you have fried resolution agents and all this other stuff thirty day trial i never heard of it how much do they want to charge you for the i was going to check into that by hitting the button for the thirty day trial and i don't have said i almost have i don't have an account set up with the titular credit monitoring files bureau i have i i had done the final by phone and then we're going gonna do the freeze on and i have a police report and everything so i could get it free freeze but definitely do the credit freeze especially because you can do it free is much more protective of you doing a credit freeze than doing one of these credit walks in addition the credit walks if the credit bureau has an oops you have no rights with them they force you into a kangaroo court arbitration and so they face essentially zero liability for being careless at the credit bureau so for that reason credit freeze especially in your case not even close since since there's no cost issue credit freeze is vastly superior yeah in the frank print that i did see an email and it was from the credit bureaus off it wasn't a fraudulent thing it they called it a density theft insurance they're selling you something has monthly or annual fee you don't wanna do anything like that.

theft thirty day
"thirty day" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"thirty day" Discussed on 100 PM

"Totally so yeah my role is for the from the top of funnel through the end of our thirty day trial that a customer discovers everything that they need to to to make that purchase decision and make it on from an educated sandpoint so i'm across cutting across all the the different features to make sure that we kind of service them and a lot of different ways and there's a collaboration with those with those different teams but you you kinda hit the nail in the head we have features specific teams that they deliver new features in each of those verticals i discussed the publishing engagement in reporting in my role is to make sure that those are surfaced trials and and as be kind of grow into our subscriber base make sure that our subscribers are are more aware of those new features of the come out tuck a little bit about far listeners talk a little bit about the difference between the objectives for i think you're describing activation in a lotta ways right so i for whatever reason i discovered sprout social i saw an ad i was at a trade show i heard this podcast i go to the website i determined that it might be something interesting to me and i sign up for the free trial and the thing that's going to convert me to a customer is really rooted in how much value that free trial brings to me which is i think tied to the discover ability of the features whether or not those features speak to me so a lot of your work it sounds like is let's make sure those features discoverable let's make sure that the person on the other end is engaging so that they can become a potentially happy customer and move through through another funnel in a way one hundred percent are myrow is making sure that a customer understands the value we have then like i said before it means so much so so many different things so many different people and so we are tasked with making sure that whatever there they came to do and we're we're really focused right now on the first five minutes of their their uses making sure that we connect them and how convey the value of of our features in the first five minutes so if they came in to answer to to use them boxes a customer service tool do they have.

five minutes one hundred percent thirty day
"thirty day" Discussed on Hollywood Handbook

Hollywood Handbook

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"thirty day" Discussed on Hollywood Handbook

"Well buller able it is very relatable at times everybody knows about the show in the music i just wanted to tell the story behind the music chapter two early yes books only three chapters and the whole third one is just describing same's motorcycle and how loud it is so loud and he puts leaf on the on the whether it's on your fun three your car from tablet or at home on an amazon echo you can get tons of books while doing anything audible you let's switch seamlessly between devices picking up exactly where you left off start a thirty day trial in your first audiobook is free go to audible dot com slash the boys or texts the boys to five hundred five hundred you've got to do that up shit i never even heard of that you get to text the boy text the boys to five hundred five hundred thirty day thirty trial one word to five hundred five hundred that's so cool whose phone text it just for whatever yeah who got the number five hundred five hundred maybe that's what you're next books about brett oh there you go the greek parts you brett to the greek part two away offers high quality luggage it is designed to be resilient resourceful and essential to the way you travel available in a wide variety of colors and four sizes yeah yeah very wide variety of colors including some frigging special limited edition colors shall we get into it.

brett amazon five hundred five hundred thir thirty day
"thirty day" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"thirty day" Discussed on 100 PM

"Totally so yeah my role is for the from the top of funnel through the end of our thirty day trial that a customer discovers everything that they need to to to make that purchase decision and make it on from an educated sandpoint so i'm across cutting across all the the different features to make sure that we kind of service them and a lot of different ways and there's a collaboration with those with those different teams but you you kinda hit the nail in the head we have features specific teams that they deliver new features in each of those verticals i discussed the publishing engagement in reporting in my role is to make sure that those are surfaced trials and and as be kind of grow into our subscriber base make sure that our subscribers are are more aware of those new features of the come out tuck a little bit about far listeners talk a little bit about the difference between the objectives for i think you're describing activation in a lotta ways right so i for whatever reason i discovered sprout social i saw an ad i was at a trade show i heard this podcast i go to the website i determined that it might be something interesting to me and i sign up for the free trial and the thing that's going to convert me to a customer is really rooted in how much value that free trial brings to me which is i think tied to the discover ability of the features whether or not those features speak to me so a lot of your work it sounds like is let's make sure those features discoverable let's make sure that the person on the other end is engaging so that they can become a potentially happy customer and move through through another funnel in a way one hundred percent are myrow is making sure that a customer understands the value we have then like i said before it means so much so so many different things so many different people and so we are tasked with making sure that whatever there they came to do and we're we're really focused right now on the first five minutes of their their uses making sure that we connect them and how convey the value of of our features in the first five minutes so if they came in to answer to to use them boxes a customer service tool do they have.

five minutes one hundred percent thirty day
"thirty day" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"thirty day" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"This is not a thirty day make it easier the 21day no complaint experiment and you can put this near calendar certainly there is an overabundance of negativity complaining and criticism on the internet and we lose fact of we lose sight of the fact that it is really a positive reinforcement applauding what you want uh and not exclusively punishing or criticising what you do not like or want that elicits change you do need certainly at least both and positive reinforcement that goes for yourself and your inner monologue your inner voice as well so you want to improve your life and this has already been tested by tens of thousands of folks via the blog if you want to tip the domino uh like we discussed earlier that affects many many other domino's inc increases your quality of life doing a 21day no complaint experiment is a really really effective way to go about that and it also very quickly eliminates just how often most of us complain without any type of outcome or action coming out of it so check it out if you go to tim's blog forward slash complaint i created redirect so timid up log forward slash complaint that will take you to a blog post which you will see his little dated two don't mind the discussion of switching to the mac that was some time ago but the headline is real mind control and then subtitle the 21day no complaint experiment and it takes to rate through exactly how to do it and exactly how i'm going to be doing it starting outright meow so.

domino tim 21day thirty day
"thirty day" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"thirty day" Discussed on WGTK

"Thirty day or shortterm extension now this is can clots so much art 'but everywhere heads were exploding explain to people why well you know this is obviously that's a chip is a children's health insurance program it's something that's popular republicans and democrats no one wants to see kids fall off of health insurance and so the idea is can we figure out some way now ship is actually has to get refunded every couple of years and so now running up against another funding deadline much like with the government of the question is are they going to figure out some what you permanently extend the funding of a challenges this is something both parties want but it creates a little bit of a prisoner's dilemma and it also means at its subject to the kind of hostagetaking that we've seen these negotiations reasons the problem we have is everyone wants to get this done but unfortunately you know it's been a challenge it's been a challenge against the angle meaning that it it's one of the things that bring democrats to the table for a short term it donald trump negociator does not want to give away the chip that his chip for a thirty day think however that's the best he can do because right now they're also getting a suspension the medical device tax you and i have talked about before the cadillac tax would you explain to people what the cadillac tax is basically what obamacare did as it put in place a tax on certain what are called high value plan so people who get very very generous health insurance plans from their employers over a certain value that a certain amount of that value that is going to be taxable to the employers to the ideas at some point employers may start to scale back their plants so this is not been very popular as you can imagine and so the republic look at.

health insurance donald trump negociator Thirty day thirty day
"thirty day" Discussed on Women Inspiring Women

Women Inspiring Women

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"thirty day" Discussed on Women Inspiring Women

"And listened to the information that was put out there again i have i have access to the same information that you do it's just that some people do it in some people doubt i run this thirty day coach training university is what i call it right and people join my team and a combination and a tell me either amazing big goals right that they wanna hats right and so i have all kinds of different people people that come in and the joy and they do the coach university exactly as is laid out and they achieved their goals and then at other people that come in and they never get started or they do the first meet in all of the waggin and then they ask themselves or why is that hirszon successful in the end i not and the answer is always the say i just did what she told me to do i just followed her i just actually did it most people do not actually do the work but they're still quick to sit back and blamed the company their apply the support system when in reality you've got to take a look in the mirror and say is my responsibility to be successful in this business try let's take a look at you know people that have been around for multiple multiple years in the business right in any kind of business if you do not continue to innovate you own a brick and mortar business rate and you don't innovate pace as the times change your business will come to a halt a stall you may seize a lack of growth people may stopped coming to your business because it's like the same they're not getting anything new on maybe you may you when they walk in the door you're just not as excited anymore and so you don't bring the energy you'll run the energy that actually brought people in in the first place so they stopped showing up.

thirty day
"thirty day" Discussed on Quit

Quit

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"thirty day" Discussed on Quit

"And it it makes everything easier their simplifying tasks like invoicing tracking expenses getting paid online fresh books has drastically reduced the time it takes for over ten million people to deal with their paperwork nova that if that right there that doesn't make you want to go and sign up listen to this they have completely rebuilt fresh books from the ground up they've taken simplicity and speed to like a whole new level adding powerful new features and you're gonna save two working days per month by using their stuff it's going to save you that much time that's huge all you have to do to get a free unrestricted thirty day trial obviously it's only for listeners the show here's what you do go to fresh books dot com slash quit you'll get the trial when you're signing up in there a little how did you hear about a section it's a must yang quit put quit in there then we'll get credit for that and they'll continue to sponsors will continue doing the show you'll continue benefiting from this incredible wisdom that we do on show fresh looks dot com slash quit code to put in and when you in the how did you hear about a section is quit and you'll get that 30day free trial we use this constantly had he does all our invoicing whether or not on it when we get invoices from like the designers and developers and people i work with from the host whatever their invoicing us i demand require them to use fresh books because because i'm afresh books user when they use it fresh books thinks that up so i can be in fresh books i can go and see all the invoices that are coming in and do yeah it's it's fantastic even let you take online payments do people echoed you take credit cards you know like what do you mean take credit cards i'm like an loan web developer in idaho the answer's yes yes you do you can with fresh books so check them out fresh books dot com slash quit by i'm gonna do this next email here come on a roll with these emails and i was gonna say.

web developer idaho thirty day 30day
"thirty day" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"thirty day" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Us this in britain whether a thirty day wbz the weather is as follows sixty three degrees well and it's 330 i wonder who gets it what we get to sixty and fifty nine today is a sixty eight hear filter it's so good that if it smell something it goes at a higher rate and there's a light the changes colour and lately it has been doing that and i think it's a high pollen counts sixty three degrees here deputies you know in this area and having trouble getting this whether i might have to skip it yeah i'm not gonna just but there it is so today sixty eight tonight low fifty nine wednesday tropical rainstorms ten in the morning otherwise mostly cloudy thursday sun giving way to clouds warmer shower or two around eighty for a high and you know and dumb on it's 47 and in arlington it's 47 is that true arlington comey you tell me as legit look it's a thermometer arlington belmont what do you get chelsea says fifty nine nearly fifty one this is interesting weather.

chelsea britain arlington sixty three degrees thirty day