36 Burst results for "Thirteen Years"

Front Desk Success with Jerry Durham

The Better

06:06 min | 2 d ago

Front Desk Success with Jerry Durham

"Well, hey Jerry, welcome to show. How are you? I'm very well. How are you doing this beautiful? All day I can't complain. It's a Friday, right? Exactly. All right. So for those who don't know who Jerry Durham the PT is why don't you give us a little background on yourself off? What do we got? We got 27 years in the as a license pts for twenty-seven years in the profession. I early on worked in just about every month in there was except for Pediatrics and neuro rehab for about the first five to six years of my career and then finally went out on my own and then partnered up and down that Journey was about twenty year journey of business running a broad. I mean back up running a practice in a clinic and then running a business and then break out of that about five years ago now. Yeah, I think it's about five years. I get I get lost in the story but about five years ago and now working on basically wage. A game for lack of anything else taking everything I learned in hindsight from those twenty years and going here's the way you here's the way I did it wrong don't do this. And as you age both know and most people listening to this Healthcare tends to focus on the providers primarily and my big takeaway where I am now is this understanding this whole experience of the team roll the team role in patients success the team role and business success, you know, patient experience patient life cycle all those things and that's what I'm doing now. So yeah, it's been a long it's been I mean, it's been a long freaking journeyman twenty-seven years a long time. Yeah. Yeah, you've got a whole bunch of experience and I think it at one point I I found out about you cuz I was listening to a podcast years ago about you've taken your practice which was in network and then pulling into cash and all that and the importance of obviously understanding your patient relationship cycle your patient life cycle, whatever whatever you want to call log. To convert those patients to get them to come in and stay. So tell me a little bit then about your company you run now, it's called the client experience company. Right? Right. So back to what you said just for context for everybody about twelve years ago where and by the way, I don't tell this story as the guy who walked up the hill and snow both ways to school and just for context and I'm not here to say it's easier now, it's harder now. It's anything I just want everybody to understand so about twelve years ago, right? I went out and network and no joke people that nobody even knew without a network box. Right? Nobody was using the word cash practice cash PT everybody, you know, if there was a cash practice it was like a dinky little office with a dinky little person who like had all their clients were judged according clients. Yeah, like 10 people, right? So we made a business decision to go out and network. It was strictly business. Can't remember who the first I think it was wage. That was our first contract that fell below our cost of doing business. So I was like it was an easy. This is what's funny. It's you know, you read all these things and people like I don't know what to do. Do I take insurance or life insurance. I'm like, it's a business decision. It's based on your client and write what you need to generate to pay your bills if Blue Cross is contract is $75 per visit and it costs you $80 to deliver care. That's a no-brainer. I can't yeah exactly at work with them. So twelve years ago, and that's really where the Where I look back and reflect where I was like hm. I gotta do something different and that's where this all patient experience thing and the front desk and then realizing which probably a lot this is the beauty every time I do this like every year that goes by more people are nodding their head going. Yeah, I get that and I'm like, that's cool because when you're ago two years ago three years ago people like I did not get it or that's not true. But this understanding that you know, if If Jerry calls your clinic that that first touch point right the front desk the journey starts there. So the patient success starts Thursday the business success. It's I call it I caught the entry point to the business everybody, you know used to be used to be everybody thought the entry point was well when when they get in the room with the provider with Brad and I'm like, yeah that first experience with the clinician, right? Yeah, and that was already goes I went through that right? Oh, yeah, and I went through that for a long time in my business. We're all I cared about was the providers right home. And so, you know just learning the value of all of a sudden wait a minute we managed and set expectations before they arrived we build trust before they arrived what I call a team Alliance instead. They're reputed client and while look at this magically here's the beauty of it patient numbers improved and buy pay sorry patient measurements patient success. So, yep. Getting better people happier all that stuff improve yet. Then my business metrics change. So I was like what's going on? Right? And that's been that last twelve thirteen years. It took me all that time to start equating. This change here was because of this right going further Upstream. It was like, wow, we changed the first phone call and we stopped getting billing complaints. It wasn't a billing issue. So things like that and that's off the company the client experience company does right we come in we look at the whole kit and caboodle. We look at your whole process, right? Do you understand who your ideal client is do you understand and it could be multiple. Do you understand what you're serving them with right? Cuz no man. Nobody wants physical therapy, right? Everybody wants a solution and then looking at the life cycle and then look up the system's you've built in to create an experience that you want your clients to help

Jerry Durham Blue Cross Alliance Brad
Fresh update on "thirteen years" discussed on Get Up!

Get Up!

00:29 sec | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "thirteen years" discussed on Get Up!

"For Cam Newton, but he's not the most important Patriot on the field are see we'll tell you who is as we continue, and then just how big is this steeler raven showdown for Lamar Jackson car group will tell you why it might just be the biggest game. He's had so far all that and more on the way this football Friday get up on ESPN. Back Get up fifty four year old Mike Tyson fighting fifty one year old Roy Jones junior an exhibition bout next month. Here's the pre fight press conference. My says totally bliss. This is something I've done my license thirteen years. I'm. Involved now than I've ever been. My my Jekyll, a going there with the best intentions of my life. You know disabled my pony. And that's just what.

Cam Newton Lamar Jackson Mike Tyson Roy Jones Espn Football
Interview With Carla Hassan

The CMO Podcast

05:52 min | 2 d ago

Interview With Carla Hassan

"Welcome Carla to the CMO podcast and congratulations the new city CMO. So happy to have you on his, you're just promote it and you were promoted about the time city named its first woman CEO. Jane Fraser did you to celebrate in any interesting or unusual way during Cova? We didn't well, we we We did celebrate over over a phone call. I am a huge fan of Jane's ever since I met her a couple of years ago. I just and I'm so thrilled for her I really really enthralled for her and I'm I'm honored to be working for her and alongside her and. And Look I think. This is just one of those times when you just really proud to to work at the company that you work at bright because the the the. The fact that we are putting our values to action by you know by by appointing Jane the CEO of the company is just such a huge huge nod to the wonderful leader that she is the greatest compliments that she's had and then also values we have as a company around diversity inclusion. I couldn't be more thrilled. I. Couldn't be more thrilled. We're going to get into that later but did you do any celebration with your family or friends? Yeah. Well, you know it's funny I actually. Back to your first question about whether I celebrated with Jane. So my announcement came out a believe it was on publicly on Wednesday and then hers was on Thursday and I wanted to email her and say, you couldn't give me twenty four hours to like celebrating. I. I thought that would be the right thing to do. But anyway she would have she would have gotten a kick out of if I'd actually said that you know we did celebrate at home we have a thirteen year old and I think for her it was a moment of pride in fact, I'll tell you. The week before that, we were driving in the car I was with her and I? And I saw the note that came out the president that came out to to the company about promotion and I. I kind of choked up a little bit and I handed her the phone. She said, Mama. What's wrong and I said nothing's wrong north and sometimes you know your life you know things happen in your life in a good way after you've worked so hard and I had her the phone and she read it and she said she just kind of looked at me. She said, you know Mama I am really proud of you and that was. Honestly, enough celebration for I mean. Obviously, we've got another marketer in the household who was also a very, very happy for me. So we just kind of had it real a quiet. Celebration at home. Sweet story what what? What was it about the letter that moved you? You know I think we all worked so hard right I mean we all just worked so hard and some days we we slug it out and leadership is hard and marketing his hard and. You know I've. I've had ups and downs my career I mean I started off at Kellogg's it at Pepsico and I took very traditional consumer packaged goods, marketing routes, and I kinda knew really where I was headed and then I decided to the one time in my life that I actually made a took a risk in my career. It was such a public failure right and so for me it. Took a long time for me to get when you went to toys R. us. That's when I went to are. Yeah and you know I would not change it for the world. It has opened up so many doors for me and it has taught me so much about the kind of leader I want to be the kind of team I want to be around and the kind of. The way I want to I, want to sort of lead teams in and Dr Visions but. Say was hard right I. Mean it was hard and you know in in the at the risk of being vulnerable, that was not a not a not an easy time for me personally for my daughter to see that and for my my parents who live in Lebanon to see that you know for me it was it just it wasn't a fun moment in my life, and so I've worked really hard to kind of come back from that and so I think it wasn't necessarily the. The words, per se but it really was kind of the moment for me. That was just like all right. You know what a few years after that happened. I worked hard and you know and here I am and so I think that that's more what it was from than than than specific words. Yeah. We're in a very big role now internally externally but that decision of Toys R. US to me is one of the more interesting decisions you made in your life so I wanna come back to that. The podcast. So I've got a lot to say about that. Super before we get too much further into this, this podcast is a first. You're the second member of your family to be interviewed by me. We released their husband Tareq podcast in July. Of course is a CMO at PETCO and our viewers or listeners can hear this but you have a beautiful dog taking a nap behind you on this new. So it's a dog starts to make some noise just bring him in. No, forgive me if he does I, guess. So, did you listen to your husband's podcast? I did I thought he did a really nice job. You know it's funny Jim. I. Don't know if you well, you did you did have conversation about this. You know we tend not. We have in our entire career tended not to talk about. The fact that we're married and in fact, I would tell you that there are so many people in. That will will hear me you mentioned my husband's name not saying who he is and and will will say wait a minute what that Tareq is your husband hold on a second. So we been pretty deliberate about. You know not. Not, sort of mean public about it but I do you know we follow each other? We do. We do love to hear what each other stay and and so I thought that was actually a really thought. He did a really nice

Jane Fraser CEO Cova Carla Petco Kellogg President Trump Lebanon Dr Visions Pepsico JIM
Energy Plan Launched by Tesla in the UK, Short Shorts Update

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

05:24 min | 3 d ago

Energy Plan Launched by Tesla in the UK, Short Shorts Update

"Everybody Rob our here and today we are primarily talking about Tesla Energy Tesla has officially launched its energy service in the United Kingdom, and with that they've shared a lot of interesting details on their plans in that market. We then also have an update on delivery for Tesla's latest product or add. So starting off with Tessa Energy, tussle today, updated their website in the UK you can actually access this from I believe any country as long as you just go to the drop down and ginger location. So in the UK on Tesla's homepage there now, featuring a new product quote, the Tesla Energy plan designed for homes with solar and Power Wall. And Quote Tesla also has a nice little two minute video. They're sort of running through the entire process end to end. But basically what this energy plan does is utilized tussle power walls to create a virtual power plant in which Tesla will utilize their audit or software to manage energy storage levels in different distributed energy storage products such as the power wall. This adds value in a number of different ways, but I think the simplest way to understand it is to think of it as somewhat balancing the grid out Tesla can purchase energy when it's really cheap store it in the distributed network of power walls and then resell it when energy prices. Are High that's all managed in real time automatically by auditor software that helps balance out the grid and then tested profit from the differences in though selling prices. This is, of course, in addition to the normal benefits of having a power wall, which would be to store your renewable energy so that you can use that energy when your power production is not that high, and then of course, having backup energy in case of power outage, what that virtual power plant functionality enables is for tussle to partner with an energy retailer in this case, octopus energy in the UK to provide tuskers that have a power wall with a much cheaper energy plan. Than, they could get anywhere else tussle on the website says it can be up to seventy five percent cheaper for energy than any other available rate. So we're going to go into the details on that but I there are a couple of unique things we have to understand about the UK energy market, the first of which being the terminology. So in the UK essentially, each energy plan is known as a tariff I think generally, we think of tariff as being attacks, and here for the UK energy market, it does involve pricing, but it's broader than that. Basically, an energy tariff here is equivalent to saying an energy plan. So the tariff involves pricing. It involves whether you're power costs are fixed or variable your provider, the energy source that you're using whether that's renewable, -able or something else all of those details fit under what would be described as your energy tariff. So if we focus in on pricing, there are a couple of different charges. The first is what's known as a standing charge that is a daily fee they are paying basically for actively and UK power dot co dot UK says that the average staining charge for electricity in the UK is twenty point, five, eight pence per day twenty, point five pence is equivalent to twenty seven US sense. So that doesn't sound like a lot. But over the course of the year, that adds up to one hundred dollars on average. So that's the standing charge and there is a unit rate. So you're paying per kilowatt hour. Think we're operating used to that and on average that is fourteen point four pence per kilowatt hour sources vary on this, but it looks like the average home in the UK uses about four thousand kilowatt hours per year, which would lead to you `electricity costs five, hundred, seventy, six pounds per year. That's about seven hundred, fifty US dollars. So all in standing charge plus the actual payment for the electricity you're at about eight, hundred, fifty dollars per year and probably higher. If you have to charge electric vehicle. So with that context, let's look back at tussles energy plan and affect you. It says, what are the tariff details? Tesla says quote no standing charge on your bill, a twenty four, seven import rates of eight pence per kilowatt hour for current Tesla vehicle owners and eleven pence per kilowatt hour for non Tesla vehicle owners the lowest flat rate tariff available on the market as of October twenty twenty. So at eight pence per kilowatt hour and no standing charge over the course of the year at four thousand kilowatt hours you're looking at three hundred, twenty pounds or about four, hundred seventeen, which will, of course round. Up to four, hundred, twenty US dollars. So under that example, you're saving more than fifty percent more than four hundred dollars per year or about thirty five dollars a month remember though that's for the average around four thousand kilowatt hours. If you have an electric vehicle charging that, let's say that's double eight thousand kilowatt hours that should get you ten thousand fifteen thousand miles per year from your electric vehicle. Then your annual electricity costs go up to a little over twelve hundred pounds or about sixteen hundred US dollars under Tesla's energy plan that same amount of energy would cost about six hundred and forty pounds or about eight, hundred and thirty, five. US. Saving about seven hundred and sixty five dollars per year or sixty, five dollars per month so that all sounds great. The energy on this plan is all renewable but where the rub comes in as you have to actually by the power wall and in the UK that cost eight thousand pounds, that's a bit over ten thousand dollars. So if you're saving sixty five dollars per month while the payback period on that is about thirteen years. So on the surface, this looks pretty attractive and if you happen to already have power while. In the UK it seems like a no brainer. But unless I'm missing something on the math here, this is a complicated subject to me. It's not clear that this is something that everyone is immediately going to be scrambling to adopt where things get a little bit trickier to understand her on the math on is when we switched over from purchasing electricity actually selling electricity. So in the UK, there are a couple tariffs on that. There's a generation tariff and an export tariff.

Tesla United Kingdom Tesla Energy Tessa Energy United States Power Wall ROB Dot Uk Auditor Partner
Willow Smith Calls Out Jada's Parenting Style

Daily Pop

05:18 min | 3 d ago

Willow Smith Calls Out Jada's Parenting Style

"Are you running for some daily pop? Cuz we've got some Smith family drama for you today. Willow is coming after her met her mother questioning her parenting skills at her own red cable. Are you kidding me? This is Jaden was harder on her than on her brother Jaden during a new episode of red table. Talk on Facebook watch Willow shares just how differently they were treated great up. There is a difference between how black moms will treat their daughters and their son. Oh, oh my goodness, right? Let's go back through is true something as simple as just like getting up at the right time. It would be like you might like to maybe like, oh no school school is about to be you better get dressed. We need to get it would be like wage in my room like, okay got it. But then Jane is actually like nothing listed. Are you ready to and he'd be like, maybe one moment off? Thank you. She is asking for a debt said it's right there honey you to me where you have a black bar? But you don't question her parenting in front of everybody. I do think Jade is one of those people that's very open communication. Tell me how you feel kind of mother one hundred percent. But I also think in black families and I will save this growing up in a big family and the hood a lot of times moms and parents are harder on girls because there's this thing ingrained in your head that if something happens with your daughter your daughter gets pregnant or becomes a birth mother. It's a direct reflection on you. So a lot of times like people don't even care about the father they like, oh near that boy knocked her up, but the mother there's a lot of shame that goes on the parents and growing up my mother never talked to me about the birds and the bees at all. My sister got schooled in it from the time. She was thirteen years old and it's weird that that's how it works like, yep. Just saw this whole thing happened with t i, yeah and how crazy everybody was like, oh my God. This is so insane. Meanwhile, I'm like, oh that happens. All those on you know, I think has a lot to do with also on the Note just you know, as a mother myself. I feel like for a woman you have to be very strong. Like I wanted to be so secure in her self-confidence seems to be like the most important thing you can instill in my daughter and being confident means like you get up you show up on time. You work hard you put in your best and you feel good about it. And so like I can see that and it's so funny that example because literally off hook up Chase from a nap the other day, he's to mind you and I said Chase are you awake? You ready to go? Five more minutes mom and I was like, okay honey UT five more minutes. You need a rest. I don't know if it's just a little boy, but it was just a funny example. I'm like, this is already a happening in my life. And there are only two right I feel like mothers and suck. So that Dynamic is very unique. Like I definitely think that women and parents think that they can be harder on girls because I feel like they think girls can handle it. I feel like with boys. I feel like a mom. I see it with my own mom and my own old dog, like he has always been regardless of what drama or what he's had to go through. He's always sort of Taken extra good care of him. I just feel like if it's a boy and you're a mom you just have an extra soft spot regardless of race or anything like that. I just think moms and sons have a different Bond. It's like dads and daughters. I feel like whatever child you have. That's the opposite gender of you. You are a little bit softer towards I can see that I totally can totally stay. I think the dynamic is now shifting I think with the world shifting and now, you know having to have harder conversations with boys at younger ages kind of the same ones you kind of have a girl about consent and about sex and all of those things. I feel like with everybody being mindful of this patriarchy Society. I think that's going to flip and it's going to change a little bit. Yeah. Yep. Think yeah, I hope I mean I still feel like just because of how I'm positioned. I'm like I already feel like I have to be like, you know, you you fight for what you deserve you are equal to your counterparts, you know, I feel like that stuff you have to like push into daughter still because if you don't if they don't think that going growing up then they accept less than and that's where I feel like we've gotten to the point where we got to where women, you know, they were traditionally taught that it's okay. If a man makes more, you know, if and then finally now we're getting to the other side of that and we just have to keep that momentum going like we're equal. We're all very equal talk to your son and your daughter the same way is what I guess. It's still to me and Society like I'm going to still push up for Chase, but I feel like it's almost a given still for a man to get equal. I mean, I'm still like given like he's going to get it cuz he's got that leg up because he's going to be a man. Yeah and the woman I have to be like make sure you get your your peace Honey Pig. To caution her you have to prepare her for that reality because men don't face that as much which is the problem. I mean, even in our own lives and our own circumstances, we know people that are of different genders and might make more than us or do more than us, but they don't work as much as we do, that's happening right now. So it's just one of those things you just constantly have to be aware of I

Chase Jaden Facebook Willow Smith Jade Patriarchy Society Jane
Ways To Get Women Highly Involved in Retirement Planning  With Marcia Mantell

Top Advisor Marketing Podcast

07:31 min | 3 d ago

Ways To Get Women Highly Involved in Retirement Planning With Marcia Mantell

"Hello and welcome to another top advisor marketing podcast. We don't often bring somebody on like my guest Marsha today. And here's why most wage. I don't think there's enough people like her out there. She has an author blogger a retirement industry expert and the author of a couple of books that we're going to talk about today. Now. My favorite thing about March is be fundamentally understands how important it is for you as a financial services professional to Market communicate and help women make decisions when it comes to retirement because it is different you can think to yourself that it's not but you're wrong and we're going to talk about being wrong today and how to make it right Marshall. Welcome to the boss man. Thank you so much for having me. And that was quite an intro. Well, thank you a static. Well, I did we had such a fun pre-call and I was so excited. I saw your on my calendar today and I'm like, I love this lady so wage. All right. First off it just does give us a little bit of a foundation here. How did you become a retirement industry expert in an author of multiple books? Well, you know like many things Matt wage was I fell into it happenstance and sometimes you just walk through a door because someone opened it for you and Wallah you end up having a thirty year career change in my case. I ended up walking through the door at Fidelity Investments back in nineteen. Ninety two as they were I call it inventing the rollover IRA and I got put on an account team that needed to support the marketing and product efforts for the rollover Ira which of course now has become the be-all end-all of our entire business. I thought it was exciting. It was like the wild west and it lasted for thirteen years, which was all good. But meanwhile, I had these two amazing young girls, I was trying to raise at home. And Corporate America and motherhood does not always quite aligned. So I stepped out at Fidelity and said, you know what I need to figure out something different so that I'm not always screaming at my poor kids and I started mental retirement Consulting and just hit fifteen years of doing business consultancy work with the financial firm and financial advisors around the country. Is it specifically directed at women or just your experience in the industry overall? Great idea question here. The women piece evolved over time is what I would say we started out just trying to Grapple with and get our arms around this thing called retirement, you know, in nineteen. Ninety two, the 401K was only twelve years old. Well ten years old really and we were all just trying to figure this thing out and saving for retirement. What did that mean? And you dabbled in it off? Well after thirty years, it has become abundantly clear that women have very different retirements than men they're ill-prepared and they don't even often know how to get their arms around getting themselves prepared for another 30 year chapter. So it has happened over time. It has built over time and for me, I mean you May notice Matt I am a woman. So I'm particularly concerned, you know self-serving for my own benefits and my own retirement and my own ability to navigate the very complicated Financial world that we all live in and so just over time things evolved from being broad retirement zeroing in on two women and what women really nice and how to get in this money game. So that's my travels through retirement and getting two women. I'm going to ask you a really dumb question because just me formulating the question just seems awfully ignorant on my behalf. But why is there such a difference? I mean, you know, we live in society together. Why is there such a fundamental need for financial services professionals to understand the differences in how women want to prepare for retirement and men want to repair for prepare for retirement? Why is there such a big difference wage? Well behavioral Finance would probably have some really academic wonderful. Research to answer that but I'm going to go a different route and I would tell you it's because men and women are fundamentally culturally Society wise. I live in the same Society. We see it differently in our roles are different add to that. The laws that have been written around retirement have been radically different for men and women. I'm going to give you two examples. The first is social security when Social Security was written it's a law so I mean keep in mind here. We've got some thousand five hundred pages of legal doctrine that supports Social Security and Medicare it is a law in in nineteen thirty-five when the Charming men in Congress were fighting this law called the Social Security Act. Society I'm using that in quotes Society was very much what we would consider today a traditional white family. The man worked outside the home the little woman stayed home. She certainly didn't have a job for pay and she raised the children. So the laws were written literally to protect her that the expectation was the man would be out in the world working wage earning a living and providing for his family up until age sixty-five at which point he would enter retirement so he couldn't retire early by the way, he would enter retirement and provide for her still by having earned a paycheck along the way so that's one example, so just even in our laws it set up where men and women are different and have different access to their money the other one though, that just slays me to this day. When I started in the retirement business again, nineteen, ninety two moms at home moms who did not have wages could only contribute $250 to an IRA 250. That was it the working dad the working husband could put in $2,000. She could only put in a hundred and fifty it wasn't until Nineteen Ninety Six, you know, that's like yesterday for me as a baby boomer like oh 1996, you know, I know that era only then could at home moms make equal contributions into an IRA. I still find that stunning. It's jaw-dropping. So women were not even allowed to stay home to raise their kids and be able to save for retirement. So yeah, we live in the same Society but the laws look at these gender roles these traditional roles. Yep. Very differently in the laws are written in that era it can sometimes take a really long time to change them. Yeah

Same Society Matt Advisor Fidelity Investments Marsha Marshall Corporate America Congress
Grow and Scale to Unlimited Processing with KhaazRa MaaRanu

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:00 min | 4 d ago

Grow and Scale to Unlimited Processing with KhaazRa MaaRanu

"Cadre say was up to fire nation and sure something interesting about yourself that most people don't know fire nation. Hello. How're you doing? So glad to be here John One interesting thing about me is that I'm really. Fun Guy I just love doing things by Tanis -ly travel at the drop of a dime I'll do anything and everything at least one time fire nation where Zesbaugh. Naty like you can't blame Cova forever. You still have to be spontaneous from time to time and I think that that is something that caused red definitely has in spades there'll be communicating over the past few weeks I feel like you're just always traveling cadre. Used to travel a lot more before this whole pandemic thing. So that bug is absolutely there unlike you I loved tropical vibes. Places A Beautiful Landscapes Yeah, absolutely. I love her brother and I also personally love your arch Merill Journey, but I want to share with fire nation now. So talk to us about Your Arch Moreau journey to get you to where you are today. Sure. Many years ago with been around for maybe twelve to thirteen years. Now Time Flies John and I started as a door to door sales. Read Right I was working at an Elementary School in Orlando Florida and working my tail off to get into like twenty eight, thousand dollars a year a two weeks vacation hoping seven thirty to three thirty at whatever time off of work and I wanted to do something they gave me more time. Gives me more time and I work hard is up. Can I do something that doesn't can't my income but I, really just wanted to have more time. I'm like you after I just WanNa sit at the beach I. Just WanNa look out the window I just want to play basketball or actually I wanted to do with my children by how can I do that and so I went online inbound a position In a one, hundred percent commission sales opportunity. before and to California wasn't successful at all initially. Because he was trying to do with the corporate way with you know the sales pitch in the book and. Corporate approach in just got turned down. At. Every business that I went to drop it right now. So you know what? Let me just Relate to people from Detroit Michigan School of hard knocks in the thing I I know how to do is connect with people. You know winner talk we're not to talk sometimes and I did that in super. Just to speed it up really quick I. had a triple my income that year a quadruple did the next year. But then I realized that what I was doing wasn't what I thought. I was doing meaning that I was selling the product that I didn't even understand myself rice. Even though I had dropped the sales pitch book, still have the spirit of that particular company in the industry itself, and that is the spirit of confusion. So you know I was selling merchant programs where the be rates were. There'd be tough with at least not by Terminal Benign, bucks you Lisa for three hundred bucks. This is especially for brick and mortar businesses. You can lease terminal could cost ninety nine dollars you can. Literally Lisa the terminal but three to sometimes a thousand dollars per month for forty eight months in into the least they do not own the machine and it was just you know even the in the way we would pitch them. It was just a real messy thing once I realized what I was doing because I had never read the contract I had never really met the contract myself. I was just starting the program. And once I realized I had to move decision it was totally against particular companies I guess goes to really client on what's really happening behind the scenes by the time decline realize what going on it was too late they were locked into. A four, five year contract with all kinds of these anti get out of it was it will require legal entanglement right with them as you have to hire attorneys go through this other stuff in its contract. So it's Kinda hard to get out of it. So. I had to make a decision to leave that company, lead all the money that had all the recurring incumbent had to. It's up deleted lead cable right and so I did that I went to work with another company and in six months I had. Replaced the incumbent Henry the other company, man those bags were not. They were robbing me and I was by taking advantage of announced robbing Murchison's basically right or Robin clients. So. Same thing had been there all of a sudden. They create money out of thin air when I say thin air veneer. So as an example, there's something called Pi compliance that every business needs to happen in particular Brigham mortar businesses by you don't necessarily. Do but something healthy you it helps protect

John One Lisa Your Arch Moreau Zesbaugh Cova Elementary School Basketball Henry Orlando Florida Detroit Michigan School Brigham Murchison Robin California
Interview with Bethenny Frankel

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:05 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview with Bethenny Frankel

"Hey everyone. This show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches. The skin is still working from home for the time being because of coca nineteen. Today Bethany Franken joins us on skimmed from the couch. She is the founder and CEO of Skinny Girl, a company that offers lifestyle solutions for women, but you also know her name from her time as a cast member on the real housewives of New, York, and as a guest shark on Shark Tank Bethany we have found your career for years. We are so excited to have you with us today welcomed to skin from the couch. Hi thank you so much as we're GONNA start the show with our question that we open every show with which is skip your resume for. Cod a resume. I've never really I haven't had a resume in so many years but I would say entrepreneur author. Mom Philanthropists Entertainer I guess TV media personality PODCAST PROPRIETOR One thing we wanted to say actually from the beginning was that our chief of staff is from Puerto Rico and her family is there and she wanted to thank you for the work associated with be strong and she raised about. Thirty thousand dollars for the global empower mission and just wanted to thank you for the work that you did there. So wanted to make sure that I said that from the top. Oh, that's amazing. We promise the I. Would Tell You. So obviously, for those who have like Danielle, myself who've watched fear years on TV and studied your. A businesswoman, we feel like we know everything there is to know about Bethany, but it's probably impossible. So what is something that we can't Google about you or that we haven't seen on TV that we should now. I think people I don't know I'm seen as a homebody. Pandemic has been that different for me from. The landlocked being home perspective at all I say on ninety percent home by ten percent lunatic. But it's really probably ninety five percent homebody that was one of the things that was probably good about reality TV for me. It gave me a reason to wear my clothes. It give me a reason to put makeup on and I think that you fit in really well with Daniel and I are also big homebodies and our lives have not changed that much. I'm not really that social. I'm sort of antisocial in a way I have a very, very tight circle and I like it that way and I really don't let people in I really don't knock would get burned and I just don't spread myself too thin I don't I don't connect dots. It's so funny people people are dot connected and they don't even realize they're like, Oh, I just saw this person and they were doing that and did you go there of did use it like people always want to know what you`re Doing what information and connecting dots about you and I'm not a doctor at all I just don't need to provide any extra information than is required. I love that phrasing 'cause it does describe a lack of people that I know. So one of the things that I think is you know you've been so on us about is how you grew up you spoken about your childhood being raised around the race track and you've talked about how that upbringing influenced your understanding business. How did that frame the hustled that you clearly have? I mean it's only what we can speculate I can't know because I didn't live any other life in any other environment but I know that I grew up. Very quickly, I was going to nightclubs and I was thirteen years old getting myself in handling myself. I used to go from I have some island into the city and take training and. I was just living like an adult when I was thirteen years old but handling myself, I worked at the racetrack. I was a hot walker which meant that when the horses come off the track after they've exercise I, would you walk them? You give him a bath and then you walk them around the shed row until they cool down and so I was working I was a hot walker the when I was like. Seven if I had to get six seven until later in my life and I used to. Spend the day at the racetrack. Around gambling, going up to the betting window myself meeting all kinds of crazy unsavory characters. This isn't like the fancy wearing hat Kentucky Derby part of the race struck with the backside. My father was a horse trainer. So you're hanging out with jockey agents and bookies, jockeys, themselves grooves, and it's very gritty. and. The race track itself is about gambling and that's the whole thing. So that's how they make their money. So you're basically growing up growing up casino, and in fact, we used to go to Vegas again when I. was like thirteen years old and I would be going to the craps tables and so I just had a very nontraditional life very, very young. And it was really well that I knew a lot of violence in my house and you know drinking and just fighting and just being an adult as.

Founder And Ceo Bethany Franken Daniel Bethany York Danielle Google Chief Of Staff Puerto Rico Kentucky Derby Vegas DOT
Trump's Treatments & Nobel Prizes

The Naked Scientists

04:59 min | 2 weeks ago

Trump's Treatments & Nobel Prizes

"With me this week are one of the world's leading Patio Anthropologists. He's at the University of voters rand in South Africa, and that's Lee Burger. We'll have the British medical, Journal excecutive editor, Theo blooms. Hello to both of you great to have you with us. Hi Chris in between us we'll be talking to a range of guests who are going to be joining us over the next hour. LE- I think. It's actually this year thirteen years almost to the day since we first met in Johannesburg thirteen unlucky for some. But definitely, not for you I gather that you've discovered not one not two not three but now four new species of ancient human ancestor. It's only three new species. So we'll work on that though with these new discoveries I'm. In the middle of discovery right now and Cova kind of pushed us into a strange space and figure out something to do when we get back once lockdown levels and covid actually lowered here in South Africa and I'd already dispersed my my laboratories in there was site that we had discovered early on in the exploration activities back in two, thousand, thirteen and It was a difficult site. It was going to be a site that was hard to work. It was going to be a site that had every reason it was dangerous that I didn't do it and. I decided to take a chance on day one we hit an extraordinary discovery that that we're in the middle of right now, and so this is really the third big discovery that we've had. It's full of hominids and we're very fortunate to be able to work under these conditions. So this is a cave signed is this where Homo Naledi the smaller ancestors were burying their dead. Inside this I two hundred meters away from where we discovered Homo Naledi. It's different cage system. It was right in front of us. It's an entirely different kind of creature from Homo, Naledi. It's big tooth and it's extraordinary and how old is this? I have no idea this this whole discoveries three and a half weeks old when he heard about it here on the naked scientists first theo over to you for second what does it been like running a Medical Journal juryman covert? We've heard from what it's like trying to fill work as you make extraordinary discover new Ford what's it been like at the J.? Busy is is the one word that comes to mind I mean we. Probably most medical journals have seen attend to one hundred fold increase in submissions of papers with people very anxious to get out the latest findings about covert and we've had to sort of scale up to handle those, and of course, we've been trying to get results out very quickly if they're important the public needs to know as soon as possible. So we we're working round the clock and a lot of my colleagues working. At home with small children and nevertheless trying to do more than they ever did before. Too busy time. Is a mixed bag in terms of the quality of what you've received received some stuff that you think my goodness. That's amazing and if you also receive some stuff that makes you my goodness, I can't believe someone actually sent that to journal did their toddler ride this Yes we we we pretty much always get a range of quality I think what's happening now though is that Everyone thinks every single funding about covert is really really important and they want to get it out as fast as possible maybe when it's not quite ready. Of course, the the most recent high profile person who has succumbed to the new current Avars is Donald Trump and his doctors interesting. They've put him on a whole raft of different treatments including an antibody therapy might by the American company general also a number of other drugs and supplements. It has been unclear though how ill he actually has been summer saying he's actually been downplaying his symptoms. It's been a very interesting journey. I learned a lot about cove. I learned it by really going to school. This is the real school. This isn't the let's read the book school and I, get it and I understand it and it's A very interesting thing going to be letting US know about it. Charlotte some as intensive care consultant, she's at Adam Rex Hospital in Cambridge. She also advises the UK governmental managing the condition. CHARLOTTE, what what was your reaction to the cocktail of treatments that the president of the United States was or appears to have been given? After that it was quite surprised. They pass when the best dogs verity that I would have weeks four had I been? Lacking off the him I think most. Is probably the gentleman therapy, but he had ten of two antibodies. I'm the ADS to neutralize the virus I'm actually the company that makes these had any the I h of miss a few days before they were given the president and it was any based on two hundred and seventy five patients on trials ongoing. So we actually know whether this therapy what's not so I was slightly surprised that a very experimental therapy. Promising is greed given to the president of the United

Donald Trump Homo Naledi Theo South Africa University Of Voters President Trump United States Johannesburg Chris Lee Burger Editor Cova Medical Journal Charlotte UK Adam Rex Hospital Consultant Cambridge
Interview with Adam Lowry and Eric Ryan

How I Built This

04:46 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview with Adam Lowry and Eric Ryan

"If, you're looking to start a business in the late nineteen nineties. You probably didn't have to spend a Lotta time convincing friends and family that it was a good time to go into tech. This was the height of the DOT com bubble and it seemed like the future was literally being written by companies like, Google and Yahoo Ebay and Amazon. So it can be kind of hard to imagine why to twentysomethings who lived in San Francisco in the nineteen nineties would survey this promising landscape and say. You know what the world really needs right now. Soap. So that will do a good job cleaning your kitchen counter or your toilet, but that won't destroy the planet in the process. And that is exactly what Adam lowry and Eric Ryan set out to sell in two thousand the very year that dot com bubble burst. And the company they founded method with its sleek bottles and products smelling like cucumber or bamboo it actually went on to compete with some of the big is soap companies in the world but before they went into business together, Ataman Eric were actually childhood friends. They met when they were kids maybe twelve or thirteen years old because they were both super into sailing and both of their families worked in the auto industry which Adam says was pretty much what everyone did where they grew up in Grosse Pointe Michigan. Almost everyone that I can remember with their families were involved in I. Think Eric Your family. Yes. My great-grandfather dropped out of pharmacy school and moved to Detroit to work for Henry for five dollars a day and ultimately Henry Ford. I've I've has some Ford stock that was when Henry was still running the company by my grandfather. My grandfather and grandfather together started a machine and stamping. If you ever see like this giant presses that come down, so they would make a lot of the parts that went on the automobiles. In so I kind of grew up in the shadows of my great grandfather and grandfather being these entrepreneurs who created something from nothing. At Eric both went off to college was in the early nineties. Adam went to the west coast. He studied chemical engineering at Stanford and Eric went to the East Coast and studied business at the University of Rhode Island. Both of them were actually recruited by the university's sailing teams. They were serious sailors and to be clear in college. Adam and Eric, didn't really keep in touch. They were the kind of. Friends who were happy to hang out and catch up just whenever they were back in Michigan. So after graduating atom stayed in the bay area to work for the. Carnegie. Institute of Science was doing research on climate change and Eric got a job in advertising and eventually he made his way out to San Francisco as well and shortly after that they both just happened to run into each other on a flight. I, think it was Thanksgiving if I'm not mistaken one year, maybe ninety, seven, ninety, eight, I walk on a plane I see Eric and I didn't know that he was living in San Francisco. You only move there the couple of weeks a couple of weeks earleir right and so there was an open seat I ended up sitting next to him on the plane. We for five hours got all caught up. It turned out we were living on the exact same block just out of. Pure coincidence and I was living in a flat with four other guys from Stanford and Eric was living by himself in a one bedroom and so when one of those guys rotated out, we invited Eric to move into the apartment and then we re just one you could actually live in San. Francisco for a reasonably low amount of rent I paid six hundred dollars a month in rent. Oh my God this is nineteen, Ninety, seven, Ninety, eight. Amazing. So you move into this group house. Doing doing your early twenties or whatever, and the house was just like a six guys in a presumably not super clean. It was exactly as clean as you would expect it to be got it. All right and I mean, did either of you at that time in your minds were either of thinking. Business or you just kind of grinding away doing your day to day jobs. For me personally I I, knew since the third grade I wanted to be an entrepreneur obviously annoying neighborhood kid who's constantly selling buttons or anything else I could. So I just I always knew I wanted to start a company and I loved I fell in love with advertising and branding but I knew it's pretty uncommon as an entrepreneur you're first company will be successful. So I kind of wanted to build a little bit of a safety net of a career, but I was constantly noodling on ideas for me personally just coming up with the right one that would eventually take

Eric Ryan San Francisco Adam Eric Adam Lowry Henry Ford Google Ford Grosse Pointe Michigan Stanford University Of Rhode Island Detroit Institute Of Science Carnegie Amazon Michigan Ebay Yahoo East Coast
Remembering Eddie Van Halen with Steve Gorman

Bobbycast

06:35 min | 3 weeks ago

Remembering Eddie Van Halen with Steve Gorman

"Joining me now is Steve. Gorman who was the drummer in the Black Crowes who now plays with trigger hippy and before we talk about some of the Black Crowes stuff in your book I. I saw tweets even it was talking about Eddie Van Halen, which is Kinda. Why you here you say there will be many many words written and spoken about Eddie. Van. Halen, over the next few days, weeks, months and years those millions of words will never come close to expressing what he meant a rock music what he meant to guitarist and what he meant to the guitar itself that's pretty powerful statement Mr Gorman what did Eddie and remind me to rock music I. Think it's it's pretty simple. You can say that he and Jimi Hendrix of the two guys. That truly, and and only the two guys that moved the needle for the guitar itself I mean Hendrix. came out of a blue based. seem. And took the playing and the tone he could get to a new place but even hail and. Really almost came in from another country. Another planet I should say another he's like an alien life form I mean, he was a virtuosic player obviously but he He reinvented what what you could do is to guitar and the fact of the matter is this. Like Hendrix. But even to a greater degree, anybody tries to play like Eddie. Van Halen. Just sounds like a mind a mimic they. It's like rich little doing Johnny Carson okay. Yeah. That kind of sounds like him but. There's nothing nobody's ever been able to do any van. Halen. Did it make it feel a certain way? That each just the and he was that way at twenty two I mean, this is this is not a guy like it's not like David Blaine magic tricks where he gets bigger and better every year he started with card tricks that other people did I even Halen hit the ground running with Van Halen one playing an instrument that have been around for centuries unlike anybody else had ever done I mean he was on the Mount. Rushmore. Of Great Depar- players. At twenty two years old and then, and then he stuck around for another forty years still playing unlike anybody before sin. So I just think that in terms of. You know. Sheer unique. Mindset ambition combined with just. Great talent obviously. But but also phenomenal work ethic I mean he's just a complete unicorn in every sense of the word. How would you describe his guitar sound and I say that I know what I think of it but I wasn't I just messed van Halen like I came around right as you guys were blowing up honestly so that for me the van Halen was slightly classic rock slightly old rock to me as A. Kid. So as someone 'cause, you're just years older than I am but how would you describe his guitar sound someone who was in in it and living it in love and Van Halen? Well I can tell you that that was thirteen years old the first time I heard Van Halen and I remember it. I remember where I was I remember who I was with. It was going home from school in Hopkinsville Kentucky. You really got me there kinks the you know the their cover, the kinks song came on the radio. And and it was playing already and I said, Hey, mom turn that up. It was me and my mom and my friend Brooke. Lofton. The three of us in a car and she turned it up and I my first thought was. That must be like a live version of the king song and I was thinking like we don't they don't rock or do they. But when it hit that Solo and then by the time, the song ended I realized well, that does that's not ray Davey seeing this is clearly a cover version but what on earth is this and it was like making my? Hair on the back of my neck stand up. This is a time when I thought punk rock was the coolest thing in the world. and. The truth is Van Halen was more punk than the punks because they were truly breaking down a bunch of barriers if you will or they were going in their own. You know there hasn't been a band like Van Halen since led Zeppelin in terms of. Rock band hits the ground running at full steam and it obliterates everything in their path in a certain sense and. Jimmy van Halen sound it sounded like California was in my head. You know soon as I realized soon as I heard about them, they're from La, and as soon as I saw David Lee Roth and then as soon as I heard more than you know the next thing I heard was eruption Guitar Solo and you know hearing just two pieces of their first album and seeing what they look like it just. It felt brand new and it already felt like they're going to be around forever. You just knew from the jump and this is me as a thirteen year old kid who is obsessed with music. This band is one of the Alzheimer's like there's nothing like this and they all have the chops and the other thing too as long as I'm just rambling incessantly any van Halen was a great rhythm player. It wasn't just about the Solos he led the band rhythmically and he's also it needs to be noted not that it's not obvious. He's a hell of a songwriter I mean he really was. As I said before he's a true Unicorn I mean, just just nothing like it. What does this sound like do you? It sounds frequent and right in right in the zone near your your key. That's one thing because listen I played a little bit I don't play even as good as my friends who are real life musicians, but it's perfect frequency and frequency is in the tone or the, but as because it's a lot. I mean Brad Paisley plays unnoticed Brad. Paisley. Because I hear the chicken Pickin I hear a very distinct sound and again I didn't catch van Halen as it was happening in my childhood. But when I hear Van Halen Song even if I, it's I, don't know who it is. Just hear the guitar part I hear the Eddie van Halen because I how fast he shreds but the pattern that he does it, you can just tell. By By his fingers and it just kind of again it's hard to explain when you ask about music but that's what I think about and I try to. Always try to. Prepare analogies and most of the people who listen to this podcast here between twenty to forty, and if you were to make an analogy to another band, it's GonNa be tough because Van Halen was massive. But who later on had the kind of? Impact or. Reflected the mass listening that Van Halen had well. What band what yeah. What band can we look at now or in the last ten years and see? Okay. Well, that's how big Van Halen was to the people that were the kids in the eighties.

Van Halen Eddie Van Halen Jimmy Van Halen Halen Jimi Hendrix Black Crowes Mr Gorman Johnny Carson Steve Hendrix. David Blaine Brad Paisley Kentucky Alzheimer David Lee Roth LA Lofton Ray Davey Brooke
Mars Astronauts Could Tote Inflatable Heat Shield to Ease Landings

Innovation Now

01:19 min | 3 weeks ago

Mars Astronauts Could Tote Inflatable Heat Shield to Ease Landings

"The largest rover we've landed on Mars is about the size of a car, but sending humans to Mars will require a much bigger spacecraft and that means new technologies to lend the payload. This is innovation. Now, bringing you stories of revolutionary ideas, emerging technologies and the people behind the concepts that shape the future to land astronauts on Mars NASA is working on an inflatable heat shield that would take up less space in a rocket than a rigid heat shield, but still survive the intense heat as the spacecraft enters. The atmosphere of Mars, here's Josh Foti a thermal engineer at NASA Langley. Research Center. It's an inflatable heat shield that is meant to safely land. A large payload at Mars someday, and that requires a flexible thermal protection system, flexible heat shield, and this technology had to be developed from scratch here in our intention is to apply technology and test methodology expertise that we've developed here at NASA Langley during last twelve or thirteen years, we're going through seventy, eight, thousand, ninety different materials, and we're screening material combinations, and we're figuring out what works what doesn't this inflatable heat shield would expand and inflate before entering the atmosphere allowing heavier spacecraft to approach the surface and land safely in an area astronauts went to explore

Nasa Langley Mars Nasa Josh Foti Engineer Research Center
Why young people sued the U.S. government over climate change

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 3 weeks ago

Why young people sued the U.S. government over climate change

"People today will be living with the effects of climate change for decades to come. Some such as thirteen year old Levi drama Florida have watched their hometowns flood as sees rise. Others like nineteen year old Jimmy Butler of Arizona have experienced water shortages and those young people deserve presentation to stand up against the systems there imperilling their future. Julia Olsen is a lawyer representing dre Heim, Butler and more than a dozen other young plaintiffs five years ago they filed a lawsuit against the US government asserting that it had violated their rights by permitting and supporting the burning of fossil fuels which drives climate change. Since then the case has been making its way through the courts, it was most recently dealt a major blow when a federal appeals court dismissed it. Also, Menor team are in the process of appealing that decision, but she says despite the setback, the cases given the youth, a public platform to explain what's happening to them personally and what that means for their lives, and though she's hopeful, her plaintiffs will ultimately succeeding court. She says, they've already helped to ignite the growing climate movement.

Jimmy Butler Julia Olsen Dre Heim Florida Arizona United States
Stressed Out; Not Sleeping? Nutritional Solutions To the Rescue

Dishing Up Nutrition

05:38 min | 3 weeks ago

Stressed Out; Not Sleeping? Nutritional Solutions To the Rescue

"As we all know, it's a very stressful and high anxiety time for all of us. Currently, we're in our tenth month of this worldwide pandemic and from all reports, you know this could continue to be the situation for the next few months. Maybe the next year we just don't know some of you are living in areas are locations where the corona virus infection rates are increasing, and we know that's causing a lot of stress. Stress comes from different places and for different reasons. One example is I'm sure many of you are experiencing this or at least know someone who is it's business both old businesses new businesses they're shutting down. So many people are out of work rent and mortgage payments are due in addition to that. A lot of us are worried about family or friends or loved ones. Getting covid nineteen some of you might be frontline workers and worried about your own health. He know this corona virus anxiety can often show up opposite people having a lot of seriously problems. So that is a little teaser about what our topic is today. Yes. Definitely and I WANNA talk about sleep problems for minute. Do you have ongoing problems either falling asleep or staying asleep? Lack of sleep, which means not getting at least seven and a half to nine hours asleep most nights can affect your coping skills engineering. Zayed's level will just continue to climb. So does that sound like you last week I promise you that car and I would come back to the studio today to dig deeper into the connection of anxiety and sleep problems, and we got some questions from listeners and we will get to the. Back last week Joann gave her email and that's right and she didn't get some questions that's going to be interesting. Now, some of you if you're tuning into dishing up nutrition for the first time, we want to just make sure we re introduce ourselves. If you are a longtime listener, I'm Karak Harper and my background I'm a certified nutrition specialists I have a master's degree in holistic health I'm licensed by the State of Minnesota I've actually been a nutritious for thirteen years. The reason that I believe I was asked to be on this show today, and maybe you're listening to it as a podcast is because I have a history of having a lot of restless nights lying awake staring at the ceiling waiting for sleep to come, and if you can relate to that, you know how stressful that is to not be able to fall asleep or more to be waking up in the middle of the night or too early in the morning and not be able to get back to sleep. So today I really WANNA share my personal and professional knowledge and successes and things that have helped me. And I am excited to be back in the studio with Joe? Today? Because we were just here last week together we were. It's good to be back here with you today car. So good morning everyone. My name is Joanne right out and I've been a registered and licensed I- Titian for a very long time many years and I am fortunate to have worked at traditional weight and wellness for the past seven and a half years I always tell people it kind of my blessing in disguise I had gotten laid off from a job and this was a great opportunity to learn a new version of nutrition from the one I used to practice and I'm loving it I spend my time working with clients individually or teaching a number of classes including are popular menopause survival seminar. So to all of the covid nineteen restrictions, all of my client appointments are done either by phone or zoom. And you heard why Kara was chosen to be on today's dishing up nutrition and some of you may be wondering why I was picked to co host this radio show and podcast about sleep and I also have firsthand knowledge of this topic both professionally and personally, and I wanted to share some sleep solutions also that have worked well for me and my clients. Yeah that's another great point sharing. We'll be sharing clients stories. Yeah. Because that's where we get a lot of our knowledge right? We do appliance. During this really trying time, it's critically important to take care of your body and to take care of your brain. At least three habits I'm sure there are more but we're GonNa talk about three habits to take care of your body and brain, and we'll kind of do like the top three that come to mind with our topic of sleep and stress. So, sleeping at least seven and a half to nine hours most nights. Eating real food and moving your body. So we want to just keep this simple and keep focus on the things you can control. There's so many things out of our control right now. But most people have some control over sleep food and movements Joanna and I wrote down some habits and I think we both really try to live by these as much as possible to manage stress and anxiety especially during this pandemic. So we'll share these habits you might WanNa be jotting these down just get a little post it. You can put it on your refrigerator she's going to be three tips.

Kara Joann Joanne Karak Harper Minnesota Zayed Joanna JOE
The Russell Martin Case

Casefile True Crime

04:55 min | 3 weeks ago

The Russell Martin Case

"The nineteen seventy seven stole gift came into win with no sign of Russell Martin. On Maithri Bev and her mother Ellen visited the local police station to fall a missing persons report. It had been three and a half months since Russell left town unexpectedly without offering goodbye. Bevin Dublin you better than most that Russell was not a perfect person. He had these vases mainly drinking and gambling and was hot headed and turn to violence. But he loved his children. Whenever he was out of town Russell would at the very latest KP in touch with these kids. Yet they hadn't from him. Knowing her sons ten percent ellen feed that Russell would cause if he returned to town. He would bain sense to find out that he's wife Helen had moved another man into their marital Russell and Helen's relationship dated back to when they were teenagers. Russell's siblings disproved if the pairing from the outset. Helen wilcock had a reputation as a wild child and Russell was possessive prone to Jealousy They advised against the couple marrying, but Russell and Helen went ahead with the ceremony. In nineteen, sixty, four, they became Mr and Mrs Martin. Both when nineteen years old. They had four children and eventually said Odi into a three bedroom where the board has online goes straight not far from the main street of stole. Their doors lay in Kelly shed one room. This sons Stephen and pole shed the second Russell and Helen had the third. It wasn't an idyllic marriage russell and Helen Wood products of disadvantaged backgrounds and at influenced their treatment of one another. Russell was the sixth of seven children born on July ten, nineteen forty-five. He's parents Michael and Ellen were problem drinkers. They would often stay out all not until they spent all their money. All were escorted home by police. Some of their drinking binges lasted wakes. Die fought loudly and frequently Ovadai many problems including Ellen's flagrant infidelity. Throughout his Childhood Russell was at the center of a room out regarding the identity of his biological father. He was also bullied for being the child of the town drunks as well as for his poor Jane and academic struggles. The Martin Children was severely neglected by their parents. Child protection offices visited the household, but the children would heart in the nearby forest to avoid them. Sometimes, they'd slave out death and days at a time and arrive at school dirty and unkempt. Russell was taste for having burs doc in his nutty hair. He would try to remove them himself, but the results were disastrous and only caused more ridicule. Russell learned to retaliate with these fists and became known as a feast for who wasn't afraid of anyone. Helen had experienced her husband's violence firsthand. Police officers attended dietrich disputes at the couple's has sometimes as often as once a month. But charges were rarely laid. Helen fights sorry for Russell. Shape believed, he only acted the way he did because of his upbringing which had caused him to hate women. When reporting her Son Missing Ellen Martin expressed concern for Helen in particular. Shea feed that Russell would harm his wife if he found out, she had moved on with another man. Ellen said the only way Helen would have new boyfriend was if Shane you ashore that Russell was never coming back. Russell's sister. Bev Felt Helen had been behaving suspiciously since. January. For New Year's Russell and Helen, took their children on a like saw camping trip one hundred and sixty kilometers west of store. It was the couple's first holiday together in that thirteen year relationship.

Russell Martin Helen Ellen Martin Russell Martin Children Helen Wilcock Helen Wood Maithri Bev Bevin Dublin Mrs Martin Stephen Kelly Jane Dietrich DIE Shane Bain Shea
Quim Torra, the president of the regional government of Catalonia, has officially been disqualified from office

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:33 min | Last month

Quim Torra, the president of the regional government of Catalonia, has officially been disqualified from office

"Last November in the build up to a general election in Spain Kim Torah, the president of the Regional Government of Catalonia hung a banner on the building in which the government sits demanding the freedom of certain of his colleagues presently in prison or in exile, and what we are going to ask Mister Sanchez. Okay. Obviously and of repression to sit together in these table of negotiations with no conditions that means that we are going to put on. The table, these referendum, these right of Catalonia to self determination, and we want to ask Mr Scientific for the amnesty for our colleagues imprison this week. This act appears to have caused cream Torah his job Spain's Supreme Court has upheld a previous decision banning him from public office eighteen months a consequence of him disobeying an earlier court order to remove the poster which was held to violate election laws against displaying political materials in were indeed on public buildings. He was also fine. Thirty thousand euros treated to a judicial wigging for his quote stubborn blunt repeated and obstinate on quote refusal to do as he was told. Others naturally be afraid of these magistrates if the Supreme Court would decide whether to disqualify democratic and legitimate president for having defended freedom of expression justice prisoners, coalitions, and the return of the exiles these traits today have in their hands. Something much more important than my political futures wanted. Not For any banner. But for banner that defended the fundamental rights denied I mean stylish kitchen. Inevitably given the nature of populist nationalist movements of the tight which Mr Tara leads he and his supporters will regard this damnation as a ringing endorsement. The practical upshot of this decision is that Catalonia has a new acting president, vice president and Economy Minister Arrogance and the Embassy of Catalan independence have been stoked once again with potentially combustible consequences. For Listeners who've been sufficiently bewildered by recent global events that decathlon succession crisis feels like something that happened circa the battle of Salamanca as opposed to three years ago a brisk recap is possibly in order. In October, two thousand and seventeen, the procession regional government of Catalonia through a referendum on independence. This vote had already been declared illegitimate by Spain's national government ruled illegal by Spain's constitutional. Court. and was widely boycotted by pro unionists within Catalonia. What they are pushing is not democracy it's a mockery of democracy travesty of democracy. Referendum do not equal or do not equate democracy. The result was ninety percent in favor of independence but on a turnout of only forty three percent. Nevertheless on October twenty, seventh, two, thousand and Seventeen Catalonia's parliament. Independence Solutia. The COLOSIO Delta repetant parliamentary get rather sit down. Though in Punta. The worst Zimba. Spain's national government was unimpressed by this and accordingly sacked Catalonia's leaders dissolved its parliament and instituted direct rule from Madrid Catalonia's. Can Preach Demont and a few other putative architects of the Catalan nation skipped the country. Wisely, it turned out those who stayed were arrested and charged with treason several received hefty prison sentences including Catalan vice president, Auriol Carris, currently serving thirteen years. President preached amount remains in exile in Belgium from where he has managed to get elected to European Parliament as a representative of Spain Vice? President John Carey has also been elected to European Parliament although for obvious reasons is yet take his seat. Absolutely none of which has caused the idea of Catalan independence to go away at least not entirely though recent polls do suggest dwindling enthusiasm for the idea from nearly forty nine percent at the time of the referendum to perhaps forty two percent. Now, President Torre has strongly suggested that regional elections may be held early in two thousand, twenty one, which he is already framing as a choice as he puts it between democracy and freedom or repression and imposition. The, difficulty with this argument is that in the present dispensation, Catalonia is not short of either democracy or freedom. It is the richest part of what is by global standards a wealthy country. It enjoys considerable autonomy electing its own parliament flying signed flag, speaking its own language, controlling its own police and many of the public services, including schools and healthcare. The Catalan independence movement often looks and sounds less like some heroic struggle to slough off a brutal imperialist yoke. The net does populist insurrection like Brexit, another self indulgent tantrum thrown by the complacent citizens of a prosperous and orderly nation rebelling against some imaginary tyranny door is breaking. Independent United Kingdom. The difference of course is that Mr Torah his colleagues and supporters do have a case on the repression and imposition front as well. The referendum of two thousand and seventeen was a stunt which all, but begged Madrid to overreact and indeed. Did Not just in its heavy-handed persecutions of the independence movements, ringleaders. But in the ham-fisted response of the National Police and Guardia Civil, which left hundreds of pro-independence protestors injured and Spain's government looking like exactly the authoritarian overlords that Catalonia's government was accusing them of being. Versus the cycle of Grievance keeps turning in firing president. Torres Spain might be about to discover again the folly of punishing those who want to be punished.

Catalonia President Trump Spain Regional Government Of Catalon Vice President Seventeen Catalonia Spain Kim Torah Madrid Catalonia European Parliament Supreme Court President Torre President John Carey Torres Spain Acting President Mr Torah Mr Scientific Mr Tara
Interview with Misty Copeland

Skimm'd from The Couch

07:23 min | Last month

Interview with Misty Copeland

"Hey everyone it's currently this show might sound a bit different today because the scam is still working from home for the time being due to cove nineteen. Today Misty Copeland joins me and skin from the couch she the most famous ballet dancer in the world she made history when she became the first black female principal dancer with the American Ballet Theatre. She has also a bestselling author philanthropist and advocate her new children's book. Bun heads comes out this September mystique. Thank you so much for being here. I am so excited. To, be talking to you welcome to skin from the couch. Thank you so much. I'm really excited to. So I was kicked out of ballet at age four. So naturally made sense that I. Did this interview with you very excited for a cer- bond over all things ballet. So we're going to start how I like to start all interviews with just skim your resume. I started bollywood thirteen years old. It was not something that I had thought possible or knew anything about a my stumbled into it was discovered at my boys and Girls Club, the local community center across the street from public. School in San Pedro California, it was there that my valley teacher taught me my first class on a basketball court and she told me I was a prodigy after an hour of working with her she ended up inviting me to train with her in her studio on full scholarship and I ended up moving. In with her and her family to be able to train lean tensely for the next three years I trained for another year and a half at a different studio. By the time, I was seventeen about four years of training. I was living in New York City dancing professionally for American Ballet Theatre I went on to dance as a quarter ballet member for seven years I was the only black woman in American ballet theatre for the first decade of my career I then went on to become the third black female soloist in their history. In in two thousand, fifteen I became the first ever black principal Ballerina. Ballet, theater now, in their eighty year history found a lot of incredible opportunities along the way amazing opportunities for endorsement deals things that you don't typically see ballet dancer getting the opportunity to do estee lauder in Saco in. Getting the chance to perform with Prince and Taylor. Swift. I've had a very diverse career adding author to it. Extremely excited that I have the opportunity to. Children's books along with other genres but I'm really excited about this upcoming book on heads. I just got the book and it's fantastic. So I'm very excited to give it to people as gifts. Obviously you've lived in the public eye now for many years and you have a lot of fans especially, it's Kim H. Q.. What is something that your fans don't know about you something we can. Google. Recipe Ah. So this is proof of this. I'm I'm probably one of the clumsy as people we recently moved into. Will me my husband bought a home and amazing designer newly renovated everything and yesterday I was enjoying my Sunday with spicy crab kind of jump Eliah and I tripped over the carpet in spilled the whole thing on our Blue Velvet Sofa and how did you have an emergency let cleaner come in and clean like deep clean. The entire thing I am very surprised you. I would. Never Clumsy. How can you be a clumsy Ballerina I think there's something that happens when you're not on stage you're not in the studio where you're so focused. So much of the time on I mean naturally I'm coordinated but I'm there's just so much focus on my body that when I'm not having to do it I feel like I just completely let go I. Think the title of Your next book should be the Clumsy Ballerina just putting that out there. Yes. Next Children's book. I WanNa talk about your childhood. This career podcast, we talked to you so many amazing female leaders at the top of their respective names and obviously so much who each of us are because of how we grew up and the mark that are our parents family structure leave on us, and that informs how we can go out into the world top. Tell us a little bit just about your childhood and what it was like growing up. Yeah I mean absolutely shaped informed how I saw the world and approached everything that I did I was born in Kansas City Missouri, which a lot of people don't really know that I was two years old when my mom left my father and took her four kids on a bus. We drove from Kansas City Missouri to southern California where that was kind of the start of my life That's pretty much in my memory. All I remember is California growing up we moved a lot my mother married two more times had to march children my. Life which is constantly in motion and it was constant. There just wasn't a lot of security and so I think that it made me into the extremely introverted girl that I was I was embarrassed about the way that we lived We didn't have a home a struggled to put food on the table. I'm mother ultimately ended up raising six children on her own, and there was just a lot of hiding things. I wanted in no way to stand out which is pretty crazy. I ended up in a field where I'm out there exposed in performing for. So many but but it was on my terms and so when I could, when I could be a part of something where I could share my voice and my experiences without speaking, it was exactly like what the doctor ordered. It was just what I what I needed as a young person in I didn't have arts in my life until I was thirteen and so it was really difficult for me to survive by the time I started dancing. We were living in a motel just constantly moving from different places whatever we could afford I think that had. I not experienced. You know just no stability a lot of abuse There were so many things that I just felt like I learned to be a survivor and I was just constantly in survival mode. So stepping into the world of ballet, it was like peace and balance and security and consistency, and it was the opposite of what my world was in. So I think that's one of the reasons I was so drawn to it as well as you know I, think a lot of people look at the ballet world and they think you know it's Mean, it is difficult to thrive and to be successful in. All the hardships I felt like if I can get through all I have in my thirteen years with the life I've been living I can get through anything so I felt like I was so prepared not only as a young person to be in in the ballet world, but also as a black woman that was probably the one thing that I really felt secure in my identity was the fact that I mother raised me with the understanding that as soon as I leave the house every morning I'm a black girl in that so I'm going to be viewed and treated in. So there was no a lack of understanding in that area. Of My identity and so I think that really served me well when I entered the very white valet worlds.

American Ballet Theatre Principal Kansas City Missouri Misty Copeland California Saco Google New York City Basketball Girls Club San Pedro California Kim H. Eliah Missouri Prince Taylor
Being a carer with Penny Wincer

Scummy Mummies

05:19 min | Last month

Being a carer with Penny Wincer

"Penny tell us about your family my family here in London me on my two kids are my son opposite ten and Mrs Eight and offer is autistic and has learning difficulties and the rest of my family. All right. So. You had your children over here in England and went from your family. Let me and you become a single mom early on about five years ago said, the kids were three and five, and that is still around and he's he's with them every other weekend main Keira but that's not really only experience as a Keira So part of the reason I wrote the book about caring in general rather than just being a parent to a disabled child. was because it's not the first time I've been Akara I was a carrot to my mom when I was a teenager and I think it's when I started putting all of those pieces together when I had my son. It was funny. A few people have said Oh when he was diagnosed, you must be my aunt kind of Thomas Thomas can handle this. I was actually at first. It was kind of the opposite because I had looked someone else before and I knew how hard it was, and so I think at first I was a bit overwhelmed because this was like this was my child now. So this is forever I'm going to be. Supporting him in some way or another forever. I think in some ways, it was more overwhelming in the beginning but then quite quickly I realized I meant so much from my experience my mom and they were even though the two things are really different my mom. Had Depression and she died by suicide when I was twenty two and obviously they're really different situations but at the same time. There was a lot there had in common, and in fact, actually was when I went back to Australia a couple of years ago and I was catching up with A. Friend and she's one of my oldest friends in the world and we grew up in same street together apparent each other really well, and her mom has Alzheimer's and it's early onset. So it was probably about twelve thirteen years ago. So she's coming to the end stage is now and we would just having a catch up. and talking about days and. I couldn't stop off at how much there is in common between looking after a parent or child if you're looking for someone that has a cognitive impairment and so. Actually when I I'm just really interested in caring in general because we talk about parents over here looking after autistic child or or toppled down senior Muslim you know that and then there's people looking elderly. Parent or this to on we all have stuff in common. We all need a huge amount of support that we're getting from the government and from society, and there's often this common problem of not really up to speak about what's happening inside your house for lots of different reasons and I just thought that's that's my talk about I want to talk about caring. Both on a personal level, but also on a political level as val. So how old were you when you started looking off your mom? Then she was eleven when she started getting panic attacks and things like that. So it happened a bit gradually she was really well when I was young before then and then so between eleven and thirteen gradually got west, and by the time I was about thirteen she was. In and out of hospital and in bed for weeks at a time and just from then on, I just gradually took on more responsibility. But that's what's kind of interesting about it. Because people I didn't know what word I didn't know the word care when I, when I was teenager I didn't know that's what I was doing, and in fact, I think I was probably like fifty even heard the word young. And I think and it's interesting 'cause I. Didn't I didn't really talk about my experiences at the time with anyone outside of the house. Particularly if people knew what was going on, we had we did have a bit of support as a family, but I didn't really talk about with friends that didn't talk about it with openly with anyone I. Don't think my teachers school particularly new but I didn't I didn't have language talk about it and I think that's still a massive problem even much better at talking about depression and different mental illnesses now I think particularly. For the kids of people who have mental illnesses, it's really difficult for them to talk about I. think part of that's because it's not happening to you directly. It's somebody else but you massively affected by what's what's happening. So like for me, I think like a lot of people. Being, careless. Cap Someone WHO's dying o? Washing them fading them. Physical Health and of course, lots of people do that kind of caring. But carrying his sorry much broader than that and it can be providing emotion really huge amount of emotional sport somebody could be running much more financial support. It could be taking on extra responsibilities for them. So they can consider the energy something else or it can be lots of different things as a parent. Now, lot of my caring responsibilities. Having arguments with Farsi and going through. Extensive. Legal wrangles to get education and things like that. That says much of my experiences Akara as actually looking to my son is and so it's kind of carrying very broad and I think we sometimes talk about it in very narrow terms and so. I think why that's problematic is that it can take a really long time for Congress to identify to self identifies A. and. So they can be taking on more and more responsibility over years and years and years, and actually a guard. Or guards anyone else help until they are falling apart and having our own Ben out and having their own mental health problems because they can't cope with the responsibilities anymore.

Akara Depression Keira Thomas Thomas Mrs Eight Penny England London Alzheimer Congress BEN Australia
FROM FARM TO CITY

Big Book Podcast

06:49 min | Last month

FROM FARM TO CITY

"Story number eight in part one of the story section of the second edition of the big book published in nineteen fifty five. It's entitled from Farm to city and was written by Ethel M. One of the first female members of Akron group one that met on Wednesday evenings at King School in Akron Ohio though. She didn't get sober until May 1941 along with her husband Russ by the time the second edition was published in 1955. Ethel was widely known as the longest sober lady in the Akron Cleveland region. Around the time that Ethel got sober with the help of many male members of a there was noticeable resistance to women joining the men in meetings much of which was expressed by the wives of those men the social mores of that era were much harsher on women alcoholics than on men and there was concern about whether men would be able to stay sober with women alcoholics around wage even doctor Bob initially expressed consternation about allowing female alcoholics into a a but later capitulated, ironically turning women alcoholics, including Ethel M over to his wife and for indoctrination into the program this early grappling with the differences between the Sexes with regard to their experience with alcoholism pave the way for a program in which men work with men and women work with women and yet all work with the common purpose of staying sober and helping other alcoholics achieve sobriety. Ethel M's story is a fine example of this Noble purpose. and now part one story eight from Farm to City. She tells how a a works when the going is rough a Pioneer Woman member of a haze first group. I come from a very poor family in material things with a fine Christian mother, but with no religious background. I was the oldest in a family of seven and my father was an alcoholic home. I was deprived of many of the things that we feel are important in life such as education particularly because of my father's drinking mine was far from a happy childhood. I had none of those things that children should have to make them happy we moved in from the country at the age when girls want all sorts of nice things. I remember starting to city school coming from a country school and wanting so very very much to be like the other girls and trying flour on my face for powder because I wasn't able to have any real powder. I remember feeling that they were making fun of me. I feared that I wasn't dressed like the rest. I know that one of the outfits I had was a skirt and a very funny looking blouse that my mother had picked up at a rummage sale. I look bad. I can remember these things because they made me very unhappy and added to my feeling of inferiority and never being the same as other people at the age of Sixteen. I was invited to spend the summer with an aunt and I very delightedly accepted the invitation. It was a small town Liberty Indiana when I came to my and she knew that I had had an unhappy childhood and she said now Ethel, you're welcome to have boyfriends in our home but there are two boys in this town that I don't want you to date and one of them comes from a very fine family one of the best month, but he's in all sorts of scrapes because he drinks too much for months later. I married this guy. I'm sure his family felt that it was a marriage that well. I was a girl from the wrong side of the tracks. Definitely. I felt that his family were accepting me because it was good sense. I could do something for their R Us but they didn't do anything for me to build up my ego and rust didn't tell me he'd stopped drinking and he certainly didn't stop it went on and grew worse and worse. We had two daughters. I was sixteen When we married and he was seven years older. I remember one in Thousand when he took off and went down to Cincinnati and was gone a week on a drunk finally. It got so bad that I left him and went back home and took my two children with me. I didn't see him for a year or even hear from him. That was seven or eight years after we were married. I was still bitter because I felt that drink had completely ruined my childhood and my married life and I hated everything pertaining to it. I was about twenty-five then and I had never touched a drop. I got a job in the Woolen Mills in Ravenna. Very hard work. I looked much older than I was I was always large and I went back to work in this job. I kept my children with me at the end of the year the children got a card from their father, which I still have and cherish. He said tell Mommy I still love her. I had gone to an attorney to see about getting a divorce during that year. Then he came into town on the bomb. He had taken up light work and had a safety valve and a pair of Spurs and the clothes on his back and that was all I welcomed him with open arms. I didn't realize how I still felt about him. He told me that he would never drink again and I believed him as many times as he would tell me that I still believed him wage partially. So anyway, he got a job and went back to work. He stayed dry for thirteen years Doctor Bob often said that it was a record for what he felt was a tip-off. alcoholic We built up a splendid life at the end of these thirteen years. I never dreamed that he'd ever take another drink. I had never taken one our oldest daughter got married and they were offering at our house. Our other daughter was in her last year of high school and one night the new son-in-law and my husband went out to a prize-fight. I never was concerned anymore anywhere he went he hardly ever went to anything like that without me we were together all the time. But this night I got up and saw it was late. I heard my son-in-law coming upstairs and I asked him where Dad was he had a very peculiar look on his face and he said he's coming he was coming on his hands and knees up the stairs as I look back very broken up about it, but I don't believe now that it was with any deep feeling of resentment that I said to him the children are raised and if this is the way you want it, this is the way we'll have it. Where you go? I'll go and what you drink I'll drink that's when I started drinking. We were the most

Ethel Ethel M Doctor Bob Farm Akron Ethel M. One Akron Ohio Russ King School Pioneer Woman Indiana Woolen Mills DAD Cincinnati Spurs Attorney Ravenna
"thirteen years" Discussed on The Daily Article

The Daily Article

06:39 min | Last month

"thirteen years" Discussed on The Daily Article

"This Week Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be come the first woman in history to lie in state at the US Capitol her casket will be placed in the National Statuary Hall on Friday where a formal ceremony for invited guests will be conducted. Beforehand, her body will lie in repose at the Supreme Court Wednesday and Thursday a private ceremony attended by her fellow justices, relatives and close friends will be held in the Great. Hall of the Court. Building. At nine thirty am tomorrow her casket will then be brought outdoors for viewing under the portico at the top of the front steps. Next week her remains will be interred alongside her late husband in a private ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery after her death last Friday, I, read my own words a collection of her most significant writings. The first appeared in the compilation was published in. Her School newspaper in June nineteen, forty, six, she described and assessed the four great documents that have changed the world the Ten Commandments. The MAGNA CARTA The sixteen eighty, nine bill of rights in England and the Declaration of Independence She. Then affirmed the Charter of the United Nations as a fifth. She was barely thirteen years old at the time later that month she published in the bulletin of her local Jewish center? An article which includes there can be a happy world and there will be once again when men create a strong bond towards one another a bond unbreakable by studied prejudice or a passing circumstance then and only then shall we have a world built on the foundation of the fatherhood of God and whose structure is the Brotherhood of man how many of us could have written that paragraph when we were thirteen years old? The more I read about Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The more I was impressed with her intellectual brilliance and her personal story when she was fourteen months old her older sister died of meningitis at the age of six. Her mother died of cancer at forty eight years of age two days before Ruth's high school graduation ruth was one of only nine women in her class of approximately five. Hundred, at Harvard, law school, her husband once introduced her as a person of great intelligence fine judgment, personal warmth, unremitting hard work, and an advantageous marriage, which is just what I expected after our second date fifty three years ago the more I learned about Justice Ginsburg the more I wished respectfully that she had used her amazing gifts in the service of more biblical Worldview the national abortion. Federation a statement after her death calling her a crucial defender of abortion rights. A website devoted to lgbtq advocacy headlined. RPG fought like blank for lgbtq plus equality. It's our turn to fight for her legacy consistent with the relativistic claim that truth claims are subjective and personal justice. GINSBURG advocated a view of the US Constitution as living and thus subject as Justice Antonin Scalia derisively noted to. Whimsical change by five of nine votes and the Supreme Court such whimsical change discovered a right to abortion in nineteen seventy-three predating her elevation to the court in Nineteen Ninety three and to same sex marriage twenty fifteen where she voted in the five to four majority. Imagine the impact Justice Ginsburg could have had if she had reasoned according to God's changing word on life marriage and truth. Shits Creek received seven emmys last Sunday night. One of the winners is a gay actor who plays a gay character. He told the audience, our show at its core is about the transformation of facts of love and acceptance. We need it now more than ever before time said nothing captured our collective thirst for comfort positive energy and familial togetherness more than the shit's creek sweep on biblical morality has become more normalized by the supreme. Court and the Court of public opinion than ever before in our nation's history. In these perilous days, we can learn from Ruth Bader Ginsburg the importance of intellectual excellence and persuasion. For example, let's note that changing our opinions regarding. God. And his word changes neither God nor his word as C. S. Lewis observed denying the sunrise does not harm the sun. Some ninety declares Lord. You have been our dwelling place in all generations. Dwelling place translates the Hebrew for home and refuge. God has been this for his people in all generations because from everlasting to everlasting, you are God the most. logical description of God I have found comes from ANSELM OF BERRY TEN thirty three to eleven o nine, who characterized him as a being than which nothing greater can be conceived God cannot change or he would be at times less than God nor can his word change its truthfulness for it reflects the one who revealed it when we change your opinions regarding the truth we do not change the truth president. Lincoln once employed a popular riddle. If I should call a sheep's tail leg how many legs would it have his audience answered five Lincoln replied no only four for my calling a tale a leg would not make it so. Are you living by the Court of human opinion or the council's of God if your life were to be even more aligned with your father's unchanging word, what would change are you using your influence to encourage those? You Influence to live by Biblical truth whatever it costs us to declare and defend. God's Word is a small price to pay for the privilege of partnering with the King Whose Son died that we might live with him in paradise forever Saint Gregory Eighty Five, forty, two, six, zero, four observed that the world seems very small to a- soul who contemplates the grandeur of God how small does the world seem to you today? If you like what you heard, please leave a rating and review for the PODCAST. Thank you for listening to the daily Article podcast today..

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Court Supreme Court US Court of human Justice Antonin Scalia National Statuary Hall United Nations Arlington National Cemetery Lincoln Shits Creek C. S. Lewis England Court of public president
"thirteen years" Discussed on The Daily Article

The Daily Article

07:16 min | Last month

"thirteen years" Discussed on The Daily Article

"This is the daily Article podcast published by Denison Forum or Culture Changing Christians to receive the daily article directly to your email inbox week day morning visit the daily Article Dot Com. Now here's Today's news discerned differently. I deeply appreciate the feedback we received from readers and listeners to the daily article. For instance, one reader wrote in to say that our website is the only place on the Internet that I can find Godly Perspective on current events or that gives beautiful testimony of what God is doing in our country that reader understands what we're working toward at Denison forum that our audience might have and maintain a biblical perspective on the. Day's news if you have been encouraged challenged or inspired by our work, please consider scheduling a gift to our ministry for North Texas giving. Day. At the daily Article Dot Org note anyone in the world may participate and no to that. A generous donor has offered to seventy five thousand dollars matching grant, which means your gift will be doubled until he reached that match. So please consider donating today at the daily Article Dot Org. At least thirty, five people have died in west coast wildfires. As of this morning, we are watching apocalyptic images of scorch trees, buildings reduced to rubble and burned and blackened cars. The fires have produced a smoke cloud, the covers, almost a million square miles and traveled thirteen hundred miles. Oregon officials are bracing for a mass fatality incident after wildfires in their state have burned over one million acres. One story is especially heartbreaking three. Year old victim was found with his in his lap, the remains of Wyatt, toft his grandmother and Wyatt's dog were discovered inside the family car in Marion. County Oregon. A family member told reporters he got in there and tried to drive the car and started coming down the hill and then went off to the side. For some reason I, guess, all the tires were just burned up and everything the pavement was so hot. Tropical Storm Sally. is expected to become a hurricane today and appears likely to make landfall near the Louisiana Mississippi border. It could bring up to twenty four inches of rainfall with life threatening storm surges and hurricane force winds. Meanwhile, farmers in Louisiana are dealing with a gruesome result of Hurricane Laura thick swarms of mosquitoes driven from swamps and marshes by the storm have moved inland and. are killing cattle and horses. The bugs bite the animals so many times that they die from blood loss and exhaustion trying to evade the swarms, add wildfires, canes, and killer mosquitoes to the coronavirus pandemic that has taken more than nine, hundred, twenty, four, thousand lives as of this morning Christians claim that there is a God who is all knowing? All loving and all powerful we explain. Natural disasters as a consequence of the fall when human send all of creation was affected as well. Prior to genesis three there were no wildfires, canes or viruses. We've further explain much of innocent suffering as the consequence of misused freedom. If someone misuses their free will to get drunk and rex their car, this is not God's fault. It is not even his fault if this person. Rex Your car however, our all knowing all loving. All powerful God sometimes intervenes to prevent the consequences of the fall and misused free. Will Jesus calmed the Stormy Sea of Galilee the Lord Protected Peter From King is plan to execute him if the Lord sometimes intervenes to prevent innocent suffering, why does he not always intervene if he could save Peter? Why didn't he save? Wyatt? Toft. My father had rheumatic fever in high school. The disease weakened his heart leading to a heart attack when he was thirty three years old and his death from a second heart attack at the age of fifty five our oldest son was diagnosed with cancer several years ago and had to undergo surgery and follow up radiation. He is now well, but his suffering was another consequence of our fallen world I'm sure you can identify times of such suffering in your life and among those you know in this light, can you still believe in an all knowing all loving all powerful God the logical answer is that we can the practical answer is that we must. On a logical level the very fact that God is all knowing. All loving and all powerful assures us that he redeems our suffering for greater good because he is omniscient he knows our pain because he is all loving. He wants only what is best for us because he is omnipotent, he can redeem anything for a greater purpose. We may not understand such redemption on this side of eternity, but we can believe what we cannot yet see in the meantime we walk by faith not by sight on a practical level we must not reject the love and power of God when we need. Them most it is when we do not understand our suffering that we especially need to trust the one who sees what we cannot, and who loves us with unconditional grace. It is when our pain is greatest that we most need our great physician and it is when life is most painful that God's people should be most on our knees. We can pray for rain where wildfires are raging. We can pray for protection and strength for those responding to this unfolding tragedy. We can pray for those in the path of Hurricane Sally those endanger from wildfires and those who are struggling with covid nineteen. We can ask God to use us to answer our prayers in practical ways that incarnate his love and grace. Lauren dangles you say released more than two years ago has now become the only song ever to spend one hundred weeks or more at the top of any of the billboard hot songs charts. Here is the chorus that is touched so many hearts you say, I, am loved when I can't feel a thing. You say I am strong when I think I am weak and you say I am held when I am falling short when I don't belong Oh you say I am yours. Our Father is offering you the same assurance right now. Did you know that the daily Article podcast is available on most major podcast platforms it's also on Alexa Flash briefing. Perfect for your morning routine consider subscribing to the daily Article podcast on your preferred casting platform and you for listening today..

Wyatt Oregon Denison Forum Denison forum Hurricane Sally North Texas Louisiana Hurricane Laura Louisiana Mississippi border Marion Stormy Sea Lauren Peter King
"thirteen years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"thirteen years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Well done well done well done. Wow. That was an amazing job. Well, done fifty six thousand paid off in thirty months as a single mom, but her college age daughter does it man. She does it. That's amazing. She say, she saves money, the family trees, change sheep cash for car. She's paying for her education. She goes, this is awesome. Very very well done. Shelly. Congratulations. Very proud of you Amy is with us in Los Angeles. Hi, amy. How are you? Hi, I'm well. How are you better than I deserve? What's up? All right. I recently went through a divorce, and I am in the process of rolling over the Lynch to a traditional IRA, I called the company, and they asked me they surprise me and told me that about half of that is coated as after tax contributions. In which case, I have the option to either role that portion over to a Roth IRA more I can pull it with no taxes and no penalties. I double check that with the tax professional, and they confirmed that I can pull that portion without taxes and penalties. So given that I'm wondering if this still counts as cashing out retirement, only to avoid bankruptcy foreclosure, or if because there's no taxes and penalties. Should I treat this like a non retirement assets? And use it to pay off a lot of my death be a non retirement asset, not pay off your debt, you're coming through divorce. Everything's changing how long were you married? Thirteen years, and what is your income? Well, I am a home school mom, but I'm in the reserves disabled that so I have a lot of different sources. So putting it all together. It's actually pretty good about ninety five ninety five thousand. Okay. That's my my style. My time that I serve and that includes a timeshare that includes child support that does that includes my child's for selfless for everything. Okay. How much are you getting out of this deal? I got. So I actually divorce was final almost almost exactly one year ago. Okay. I came out with fifty almost fifty seven thousand in the last year, I've paid off almost twenty four thousand got another thirty three thousand ago. And how much? How much is non how much is that you can pull out as we're gonna treat like a non retirement asset twenty two five just about enough to finish thousand five hundred. I'm sorry. I didn't hear. Okay. I'm just thinking. Well, here's the trade off. Okay. There's nothing wrong with cashing that out and using it to pay off this debt, and I probably would. Okay. The possible trade off is is that your only about fourteen months from being debt free. Right at your current pace. I mean, you paid off twenty four last year. You only have thirty three right? Right. And so I'm kind of tempted to let this money lay there and make you a millionaire even faster since it's already in a retirement program. Because once we pull it out of this retirement program. You can't put it back.

Amy Los Angeles Shelly Lynch fourteen months Thirteen years thirty months one year
"thirteen years" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"thirteen years" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Nothing else going on why not get some swimsuits in your mailbox. David Johnson's it. With the latest from Wall Street. Now, David, you know, that's why Atlantic City put all the the Miss America contest. They put it on after Labor Day September the whole idea was to sort of extend the summer little bed. Stock market. Let's hire Alekseev sixty. That's better than the last time. We spoke when it looked up forty four a left for burnings reports. Goldman Sachs just blow out numbers. United Airlines beat expectations really sort of a long list of pleasant surprises. We've got a big deal today. Five serve buying first data. Both those stocks are up at twenty two billion dollar deal in the financial services. Technology realm. We have a sparse about of economic news import prices down two percent export prices down six tenths of a percent. We really should be talking about right now, though are the all important retail sales numbers. Well, it turns out commerce is closed, and we don't have any retail sales numbers. Can't look back accurately what the overall picture was of the holiday selling season. It is really important because we've got all these big numbers MasterCard says, you know, I it was just fabulous. It was the best period in thirteen years. And nordstrom's down three percent this morning because their holiday sales and their guidance were weaker than expected. Maybe we'll just never know. Daleks of fifty-six, David Johnson NewsRadio today to KRLD. All right. David. Thank you fifty five coming up. We'll take a look at.

David Johnson Goldman Sachs nordstrom Atlantic City MasterCard United Airlines America twenty two billion dollar thirteen years three percent two percent
"thirteen years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"thirteen years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Vehicle extra thirteen years, new technology, and I wanted to compare it though with a Honda and Toyota the reason that I got a Subaru in the first place. I certainly was not intending to was I got my little consumer report. And I was looking for safety, and I was looking for a back deck to throw all the fertilizer and everything more easily in and I did not want a bottom opening back deck how like the top opening one of the Forrester. What what compares size-wise safety wise and back, deck wise. I guess. With a Honda and Toyota to the Forrester. Oh my goodness. That's that's am not. I'm not quite following you on the back deck thing to be honest. You know on on the forest or you lift up your back door, and then you've got a flat. Platform in there. And it's real nice. I even have one of the custom trays. You know made out of forever. And it's very convenient for me too. Unload and load bags of fertilizer mulch. All that sorta thing that yard owners have to take care of. I think you'll find that with all the SUV's today that wasn't always the case, especially back when you bought your last one. But I think today you're gonna find I I don't know of any that have any kind of lip or anything that you'd have to pick this stuff up over the top of a typically just slide whatever's in there out. How much the Forster's going to have more cargo room than the CRV or the rat for? It's it's a larger vehicle. And I just had the nineteen four stir maybe a month ago. I've got a review in video my website. If you wanna take a look at it. I thought it was spectacular. I aside like a broken record. And I realized that, but I don't know what else to do about it. But the system on that Forster is a true life saver and there's nothing else out there. You. And gail. I if I had a loved one I'd put him in a Subaru. That's just the way it is. I like I like the quality of the ramp for and the CRV. But today, I think I'd put the to right there with it as far as longevity typically, the Ravin the CRV or good for two hundred and fifty thousand miles. I think this Forrester does really close to that without any issues at all. It's a very understated sixty five thousand. Okay. Have you ever? Have you ever want used the wheel drive system? Oh, well, I like the four wheel drive. You know, it's easier to turn. Yes. And two wheel drive. A really do like that. I do too. And don't like about a Subaru is. It is no easy. I think you'll see that that has changed dramatically. I noted that in my review that that was one of the things that they really had made good strides on it's it's it's not day from the one you've got trust me on that. But Dr one and make sure that you lack aside is now standard on all the Forster's is what I understand. So it's going to have it. But that's something that I I would strongly make the case the you should make sure that you got just make sure there's there and gilmer Subarus are dealer. If.

Forrester Subaru Forster Honda Toyota gilmer Subarus Ravin gail thirteen years
"thirteen years" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"thirteen years" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Well, it took thirteen years for the CASA me it'll be on the front page of time magazine. It's just gonna take time, and it will get there because patients are gonna take this to the doctors and pointed out as they did glucose Amee. The revolution starts with patients and people that have issues and want to have healthy, joints, and skin and hair and eyes and want to see some of these useful levels of HA restored in their body. Now Bill you've written a great deal about the role of hydraulic acid in the body's connective tissues. How does H a work in the joints and the connective tissues? It's a natural cushioning agent. And Pat, we're talking about between the bones. It also surrounds the nerves. There's a sciatic nerve as an owner nerve, there's a carpal tunnel nerve. All of these are going to need the special cushioning, the HA can give them. There are people that tell us this stuff works. Here's Ernie writing who's actually teaches and plays golf in Dover, Delaware. He found this purity joint formula, and we're telling you it worked miracles for him. Why? Because purity is not only taking the HA, but they've taken a brand new substance called hydrates that's taken from olives. Pat, you notice you can put a bowl of olives on your table at a year later come back, and except for a little bit of shrinkage due to just the loss of moisture, they're very stable. They're still there. They didn't shrivel up and waste away due to fungal contamination. So there's something very strong and all we've known it for a long time. Dr Roberto Crea, an Italian researcher who's now here in this country doing some research on hydroxy Tyra, Saul extracted from all and found out that it does some of the same things that the molecules do that trigger like estrogen does the production of HA. So we began to think why don't we combine this.

Pat time magazine Dr Roberto Crea Bill Saul Delaware Ernie researcher Dover thirteen years
"thirteen years" Discussed on WWL

WWL

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen years" Discussed on WWL

"I mean, I had a Rottweiler for thirteen years the two thousand four. I got him in two thousand one and he was a picked him out of a widow of a Christmas tree rottweilers. Also much is here. He got the papers all of his stomach with everything. So about him amount. We got I used to put a bell without a snack Fani way. Roundabout a house whatever so little he was in a shoebox and will be a hundred and fifty two pounds. Wow. This rottweiler. It was gentle. He wasn't being teaching to be made. I mean, you know, people would come over he balk, and we put it in a different room. But when my wife cooked red beans and rice every Sunday morning. He would put it his big old, buddy. Does she start cooking at sausage onions, she's spoiled, and I get it it and you could not get anywhere near. I mean, you hear any where he was protecting the red beans and rice and to. I mean, you could you could you tell us a two. Walk his big old move at all. Is he got cancer because Rottweiler cancelled? Put it down in the past. So my birthday in two thousand. I got a phone call from Slidell said he ain't gonna make it. Oh, God saw brought up some sugar doughnuts and pops. It goes cook my wife spoiled each we get. Regular food. But when they get that old you give them what they want. Even wanted. I said, okay, we all got together. So let's let him go because he would have been incontinent. You know, you couldn't do that stuff with a dog. And, but you know, I got attached. When I seen that. There was another. Something that happened. Maybe a year year a half ago with another dog with somebody. Maybe a police officer something this shows dedicated these dogs, all they are and and cats catcher dedicated to. To scoop. No more pets will be. I got dish. Birds in the backyard 'cause I e SEO would know motions here on the same way. I'm on the same way. I mean, I had to let two cats go kind of kind of back to back about I don't know but seven years ago, I can't bring myself to have another cat because I'm afraid it's going to die. A fifth of Jack Daniels on the front porch winning pass, man. I don't blame you peer. Thanks for. Thanks for sharing the story. I mean, I know I know I'm selfish because that would be a great pet owner. And I think I would you know, I mean, I love dogs, but also cats, and I've had cats, and I just I I had a real hard time letting the last two Casco when it was so devastating to me that I just I can't bring myself to have another cat. In the late eighties. When I lived in mobile. I lived on the eastern shore from mobile in in Daphne, and I was doing radio and television for w k g there, and I owned a Amana beautiful Palomino registered quarter horse stallion, and I would quite often riding Bareback riding the stallion Bareback. It was the first day of fall. And you know, how animals get frisky when they feel at first breath fall or out on a trail. And he threw me. And I was unconscious. I remember waking up and he stood there. Waiting for me. And I really didn't expect that kind of loyalty from from that dog. I'm sorry from that horse is amazing. Yeah. I can't stand these sad stories. But you know, the the overall message here.

Jack Daniels Slidell Daphne front porch officer Amana fifty two pounds thirteen years seven years
"thirteen years" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen years" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"For thirteen years. This was the tip of a lifetime to solve this case. He said Talbott was never even on their radar. But at the time of the murders. He was twenty four years old and living not far from where the bodies were discovered. Police tailed Talbot collected his DNA from a discarded Cup and turned it over to a crime lab technician for analysis, and she told me that we had a match to the suspect that killed tenure in Jay. And it brought tears to is. And then I screened. Yeah. You know, we got him when I give these names to law enforcement. I am really sure because all those pieces have to come together really specific way. And then for them to end up right in the town where these crimes happened. Can't be a coincidence. Do you remember the day when you figured out who it was? Yes. I remember I remember the moment when I finally get to all of these people it's because it's a pretty profound moment. Zero in on that. It's certainly a heavy discovery. Why? Well, if I'm right, which I believe, I am I know a secret that only the killer knows are only rapist knows it's you know, it's it's a profound thing. This has changed lives and. You know, I see what I believe is the answer. One of the hardest answers to come up with was who killed eight-year-old April Tinsley who was abducted while playing outside her home in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight her body was discovered three days later in a ditch outside Fort, Wayne, Indiana, she'd been raped and murdered the police had the DNA of her killer, but could never find a match for thirty years he taunted investigators scrolling threats on a barn door in tying notes, two girls bicycle seats. The amount interviews man hours that went into this case is unbelievable. Brian Martin has been a Fort Wayne homicide detective for six years. He was the one who got the call in July from CC more saying there had been a breakthrough we began looking at the individuals that she had given us and within four to five hours fourteen days later that individual was taken into custody and is currently in the Allen county jail. The suspect is John Miller for fifty nine year old loner who worked at WalMart and lived in this trailer six miles away from where APRIL's body was found. He's pled not guilty. But according to this affidavit when police went to arrest him, they asked Miller if he had any idea why they wanted to talk to it. Miller looked at them and said, hey, Bill Tinsley exactly what was for. Sat satisfying part of the job. There's two things that are satisfying. Finally, having the pieces come together is very satisfying. And then giving these families some Justice to have an arrest. That is the most meaningful thing to me. The support for genetic genealogy in the war enforcement community is virtually unanimous Nanno labs, the company CC more works for. It for years. It's already marketing technology to police agencies that creates computer generated composites of suspects predicting eye color, skin tone in perhaps even facial structure based on their DNA, arm and trout, Girban CEO. So you're ready when the Golden State case happened the wheels are already in motion, we set back and watch the public response. It was overwhelmingly positive. This was like a starting gun to go ahead and move out. Arman, trout says already has more than one hundred cases in the pipeline. But there is no shortage of cautionary questions being raised by civil rights groups and bioethicists about the reliability of crime scene. DNA lack of standards in protocol in this revolutionary new field in whether website users have become genetic informants on their relatives the field is so new it's almost impossible to predict consequence. None of the cases have gone to trial, and no one has pled guilty. Do anticipate that there will be legal objections. I would think any good defense attorney is going to challenge. This just because there has never been a precedent setting decision on specifically using genetic genealogy and Jeb match. So I look forward to the day that we get that decision..

John Miller Talbott Bill Tinsley Brian Martin April Tinsley Talbot Nanno labs Arman WalMart Jeb lab technician Allen county attorney Indiana Girban CEO Fort Wayne
"thirteen years" Discussed on The EVRYMAN Podcast

The EVRYMAN Podcast

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen years" Discussed on The EVRYMAN Podcast

"Ugly in lived in western Massachusetts. Now for twenty five years. I'm sure I'll get into a little bit more background about me where I came from before that. But I've been in the Ben in the Happy Valley of a pioneer valley western Massachusetts for a long time. My wife and I have been in Springfield for fourteen years little over fourteen years. I'm married thirteen years, married in August. I'm a dad. I'm an adoptive father of two incredible kids. Who were fourteen in just about twelve middle schoolers. Yikes. One going into high school. And you said before we started coding that there's a lot of sleep and then going on right now. There's it's summertime in the living is easy here in the Hodgson Cologne household. The kids are sleeping in any way. My wife and I are still get nothing go. Kids are doing a lot of sleeping in genitals it singing camp this this week, which I'm really stoked for her. Is that like a sleep away or or is that just known? It's date. They camp. There's a, there's a wonderful little community music school in. She's been doing a singing group there for this third year doing the scene group there. So my son is is only two, but I'm already looking forward to sending him away for the summer. Does that something? Is that bad. No, it's good. Jas a fourteen year old. Just got back from a week, sweet sleep away camp up in New Hampshire that this was their second year up there. Yeah, I think it's cool. That was it as is it as awesome as I envision it to be sending children away. Well, what what did I do? I caught up on yard work. Primarily what I did. That you know it is what it is. All right. So you so okay, so adoptive family and your role at KP. What else? What else do you wanna share? What else do I want to share? What's you know? What is really important to me in this is how I'm preaching kind of everything in my life is like I did the initiation weekend in two thousand four about six months after I met the woman who can Kendra who's my wife. And went through that process gotta language, three months later, Kendra went through weekend called the woman in power weekend within credible batch of a.

Kendra Massachusetts Happy Valley Hodgson Cologne Springfield Jas New Hampshire fourteen years twenty five years thirteen years fourteen year three months six months
"thirteen years" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen years" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Remember that when that was happening it was there's there's another part of the evolution so it's but there's no doubt there's no pressure right now on the republican party to have any fiscal restraint so that's that's the change i've seen in the last thirteen years with the republican party with the democrats their change really came at least you know you and i work together the big change in two thousand six and that's when they took back congress two years before obama and all of a sudden mean all the way through because i've been a talk show host since eighty nine and a really in the nineties during the clinton administration when when bill clinton got in power the democrats were really really focused on let's focus on being about the middle even though our instinct is to be far left let's just and that's when you started hearing while they're running for office and so they're moving to the middle there moving to the middle or moving to the middle by the time we got to two thousand six it was democrats felt emboldened emboldened to just tell people what they really thought and that's when you started the beginning of the radical philosophy that you see the modern democrat party right now how absolutely radical they are as to what they want where the california democrats even though the people this is the whole point i'm talking about the party not necessarily the voter because we saw you were just mentioning our pre show meeting about the california democrats saying dianne feinstein nah we don't want her when we're not going to endorse her but voters have overwhelmingly she's going to beat her opponent likely if the if the numbers hold but the the the democrats don't want it the party itself alf is becoming extremely radical and that's why you saw some of the defections you saw in two thousand sixteen with trump right they've looked at it and said where in the world is this party going where in the world are they going did you see what was it the miss universe pageant contestant was from spain whatever who's a transgender woman a man who's a woman and said finally that at you know this is on twitter finally that was from the article that i saw on twitter of a finally a woman a woman is not based on your i i'm paraphrasing here not based on your physical attributes or your genetics if you feel you're a woman you are you should have seen the response from feminist oh yeah yeah sure just went cool yeah remember that you kaitlyn you didn't live your life as a woman while the the appropriation of gender charges coming from feminists liberal feminists are but that's how that's how insane and then we talk about the whole trans racialism obama just before he left office stating that he's come to know that race is more of a social construct which means you're the race that you think you are at that is there said that oh could you that would have been that would have been these story for at least a week and so you see the radical miss that that that is coming out of the democrats and and so that's really in the the two parties that's really been the change since we've been together for the last thirteen years at i've noticed but happy anniversary anyway in order myself some shares berries okay eight six.

republican party thirteen years two years
"thirteen years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Calls on that i remember that when that was happening it was there's there's another part of the evolution so it's but there's no doubt there's no pressure right now on the republican party to have any fiscal restraint so that's that's the change i've seen in the last thirteen years with the republican party with the democrats there change really came at least you know you and i working together the big change in two thousand six and that's when they took back congress two years before obama and all of a sudden all the way through because i've been talk show host since eighty nine and a reserve in the nineties during the clinton administration when when bill clinton got in power the democrats were really really focused on let's focus on being about the middle even though our instinct is to be far left let's just and that's when you started hearing while they're running for office and so they're moving to the middle there moving to the middle there moving to the middle but the town we got to two thousand six it was if democrats felt emboldened emboldened to just tell people what they really thought and that's when you started the beginning of the radical philosophy that you see the modern democrat party right now how absolutely radical they are as to what they want where the california democrats even though the people this is the whole point i'm talking about the party not necessarily the voter because we saw you were just mentioning our pre show meeting about the california democrats saying dianne feinstein nah we don't want her we're not we're not going to endorse her but the voters have overwhelmingly she's going to beat her opponent likely if the if if the numbers hold the democrats don't want it the party itself alf is becoming extremely radical and that's why you saw some of the defections you saw in two thousand sixteen with trump right they looked at it and said where in the world is this party going where in the world are they going did you see what was it the miss universe pageant contestant was her from spain whatever who's a transgender woman a man who's a woman and said finally that at you know this is on twitter finally that it was from the article that i saw on twitter of a you know finally a woman a woman is not based on your i i'm paraphrasing here not based on your physical attributes or your genetics if you feel you're a woman you are you should have seen the response from feminist yeah sure they just went cool yeah remember that hey caitlin you didn't live your life as a woman while the the appropriation of gender charges coming from feminists liberal feminists but that's how that's how insane and then we talk about the whole trans racialism obama just before he left office stating that he's come to know that race is more of a social construct which means you're the race that you think you are that is rapid said that oh could you that would have been that would have been these story for at least a week and so you see the radical miss that that that is coming out of the democrats and so that's really in the the two parties that's really been the change since we've been together for the last thirteen years at i've noticed but happy anniversary anyway order myself some.

thirteen years two years
"thirteen years" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen years" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"Took thirteen years for doctors to dopp glue casa means sulfate it's a regular dietary supplement now drugstores health food stores people ask me well why hasn't my doctor told me about hyler onic acid well it took thirteen years real good casa me it'll be on the front page of time magazine it's just gonna take time and it'll get there because patients are gonna take this the doctors and pointed out as they did glue casa me the revolution starts with patients and people that have issues and want to have healthy joints and skin and hair and eyes and want to see some of these useful levels of ha restore in their body britain a great deal about the role of hydraulic acid in the body's connective tissues how does h a work in the joints and the connective tissues it's a natural cushioning agent and pat we're talking about between the bones it also surrounds the nerves there's a sciatic nerve there's an owner nerve there's a carpal tunnel nerve all of these are going to need the special cushioning that ha can give them there are people that tell us this stuff works here's ernie writing to me who's actually teaches and plays golf in dover delaware he found this purity joint formula and we're telling you it worked miracles for him why because purity is not only taking the ha but they've taken a brand new substance called hydroxy that's taken from olives now pat you notice you can put a bowl of olives on your table and a year later come back and except for a little bit of shrinkage due to just the loss of moisture they're very stable they're still there they didn't shrivel yup and waste away do the fungal contamination so there's something very strong and olives we've known it for a long time dr roberto crea an italian researcher who's now here in this country doing some research on hydroxy tyra saul extracted from all his then found out that it does some of the same things that the molecules do that trigger like estrogen does the production of ha so we began to think why don't we combine this wonderful.

time magazine britain delaware researcher pat dover dr roberto crea thirteen years
"thirteen years" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen years" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"He's thirteen years old today and he's an asian boy getting younger and younger every second of the day is insane listen dog power house is going to be such a bob we need to see you miguel she's been added you can get tickets now at ticketmaster dot com over twenty acts more names to be announced demand that is very true i love that dog listen speaking of powerhouse we got tickets out in the streets right now let's settle was out there he's hitting the streets right he's out right share repin which means if you're an uber driver or lift driver and you have how one zero six on the shuttle orders your ride and you pick him up and you've got power one we're not kidding this is not a joke not a prank cameron when you a stammer he quiet row hey tony you are going to powerhouse tony brother nobody mold all good what you headed into neck let your car and you got power one for my birthday.

cameron ticketmaster tony thirteen years
"thirteen years" Discussed on CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen years" Discussed on CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

"And his sentence was an effort to reflect that she sentenced him to thirteen years in prison louis wing guard who had a long list of other charges from his past received two life sentences elissa was in an adult jail isolated from other inmates for her own protection her case dragged on and on she hit rock bottom she went to jail she sat alone for really long time and as she sat alone with nowhere to run she says she had an opinion i just wanted to help people like i wanted to do something differently like the battle will be won if i just don't give up that transformation how big of a deal is that maybe as big as saying with a renewed sense of hope elissa while in jail got her high school degree and valid to prevent others from following in her footsteps by giving talks to troubled kids even when she was staring down life in prison she was helping others and if she could believe that she had a future not behind bars than i could believe that too while shinhan was still working to resolve lists case in florida across the country in california ashton kutcher and his team thorn had a breakthrough in two thousand thirteen they created spotlight a confidential software that had the potential to transform the way law enforcement fines victims quietly authorities begin testing it we basically take victim otherwise is just opposing online and we turn them into a human being and then we take that and connect.

elissa shinhan florida ashton kutcher thorn louis wing thirteen years
"thirteen years" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen years" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"Is to telephone number if you pick up the phone and give me a call right now we can get you on the air and i can talk to you about mortgages we talk mortgages in real estates that's all we do on the show um i had a friend of mine who was telling me you know what i can't believe you can talk that long about mortgages every single show and i'm saying well with every mortgage this a story and anybody out there who's listening to the show has a story about how they got their mortgage how easy it was how hard it is is the difficulty finding real estate in this market really difficult to find real estate that you can afford it you can get and that here there isn't a fifteen offers on it so i know that there's tons of things to talk about and so if you call me mean we can talk a little bit about on air off fair but what you wanna talk about it will enhance the show and what we try to do email is info malibu funding dot net we're on youtube where on facebook where are my twitter is at jeff six four nine three all kinds of ways to get in touch with us maine thing is trying to get a conversation with you the listener about what it is that is intriguing or interesting for you about what we do on air are we bring great guest to the show each and every week this is a first time guest on the show from wire send financial sandra pugh lee is that correct senator i get that right that's correct uh paul ryan i got it right well you know what i really appreciate your coming on the show of known you for several years and and we've done some business in the past but let let the listeners know who you are what you are in where exactly you're doing most of your raw mortgage business uh i might not necessarily by i i am in inland empire and prior actually in rancho cucamonga and we've been in the business for about thirteen years but i guess yeah so we you meet me italy we are like me and my husband and if a team that my husband during.

youtube facebook sandra pugh lee senator rancho cucamonga italy malibu maine thirteen years
"thirteen years" Discussed on Full Court Press

Full Court Press

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen years" Discussed on Full Court Press

"Chant where you clap over the top of your head and case keno muslim the team and skull chance after the minneapolis miracle as they called it over the the saints so ask goal illustrates because i once you receive georgia lose to alabama on a kind of a crazy long pass in overtime where you were looked at third defensive coverage like what are they doing in sympathy with like how do they end up with just two guys they're far back it up but there was a very kind of similar experience but this is the basketball podcast but to get a feel for where the city is kind of sports wise it would be remiss of us too not mention that there is so much excitement in it's kind of a coalescing around both teams at the moment if you will which is weird for the temples and i mean the term roles had been so low on the minnesota totem pole for literally decades i mean since garnaut left some thirteen years since they last met the playoffs i think eleven years since garnett has been here and yet the fan base has galvanized around jimmy butler i think there wasn't a lot of two rolls fan there are a lot of people watching wolves over this very lean period but a lot of people who like loved basketball and so a small quantity but um very intelligent fans i would say who really kind of one a dig into it for the i mean to be watching games sixty of a to rural season when the teams fifteen and 45 you know takes a special kinda person but it's cooled it now see some of those people that have been in love with the team for so long get a little bit of reward and now targets on starting to sell out skull chance and the past month usman a shocking development for me honestly i on the record said before the season that i was kind of more than like the forty six win ranging the vegas at the over under at forty eight and a half and and assad i mean at one thirty one games last year so beal just a massive jump to get up puts fifty and it would require butler working teague in gibson not being cooked or massively underperforming their contracts.

georgia garnaut garnett jimmy butler basketball beal teague gibson minneapolis alabama minnesota assad thirteen years eleven years
"thirteen years" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen years" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"And wish to boost this was all about judd judge written spans eagle he was lie will he did his sentence he owes me nothing alinsky pleaded guilty to applying guy ever with champagne enforcing himself honored during a photo shoot in march of nineteen seventy seven she was thirteen years old at the time but he fled to france a year later and has been on the run ever since the judge said he would take her request into consideration but did not issue a ruling new jersey were woman fell six feet down that hole on a sidewalk take a look as she tax on our phone and walk straight into the barrier causing her to flip into that gap medics pulled her from the whole and she was taken to the hospital even the video shows the harsh lesson in distracted walking the woman's son says she is legally blind bystanders say the woman seem nauseous before she tumbled she wasn't badly hurt the doors had apparently been left open to repair gas lines world turned upside down a rare drumming death out of the water a one film is using your lost the war and others plus the fda is now urging patience not to use a certain prescription painkillers before we go to break all use now air live special coverage of lay as homecoming she is expected to arrive in honolulu next saturday on julie seventeen so be sure to tune in at seven am over on our sister station kgmb stuck in traffic we've got the answer earlier problems are gone no on the east side traffic back to normal dow going out to hawaii caught the wonder drives good on the publicly kbk the h three they're going to the west though we've got extra slow traffic because of earlier problems the driving time now for downtown to be h one h to split is forty minutes and it's it's the same whether you take the h one or the you'll pick up speed though after the whole lob emerge and it's clear at the h one h to split have you racked up more than ten thousand dollars.

champagne fda painkillers julie hawaii judd alinsky france honolulu ten thousand dollars thirteen years forty minutes six feet