17 Burst results for "Thirteen Hundred Tons"

"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

03:19 min | 3 months ago

"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on NPR News Now

"In nashville. Were already planning a rally for what they call. Violence interruption. erica. Perry is with the block nashville. Assembly who organized the event. She says it's devastating that the city couldn't make it one hour into the day without shooting what we continue to see what we saw. Last night was the city's obsession with police in cages and that makes peaceful streets. Do not make peace city. The group is calling for the city to funnel more money into housing education transportation. Instead of the metro nashville police department for npr news. I'm page flavor in nashville. Indonesia's navy says a submarine. The went missing this week after the f. The coast of bali has sunk to the seabed and broken up. All fifty. Three crew members are presumed dead. Npr's julie mccarthy reports officials say the discovery of debris has led to the conclusion that the sub is gone part of a torpedo tube agrees bottle to lubricate the periscope pieces of prayer rugs items retrieved by indonesia's navy that it called authentic evidence that the submarine had fractured the navy. Chief says the german made both that failed to make contact during a torpedo. Drill wednesday has been detected in waters. Eight hundred fifty meters deep which is not survivable. The water pressure would be so intense. The steel hull could split why. The sub plummeted is still unclear. The navy speculated that cracks in the thirteen hundred ton vessel may have opened up as the ship descended and said oxygen supplies would have likely run out by now. Underwater drones have been sent to search for the remains of the submarine that had patrolled indonesia's waters under the motto. Steadfast till the end julie mccarthy. Npr news this is npr news. Maryland governor larry hogan says the state's attorney general will review all in custody. Death reports may during the tenure of the state's former chief medical examiner david fowler this after fowler testified as a key defense witness in the trial of former minneapolis. Police officer derek. Chauvin saying chauvin was not responsible. For george floyd death. Jovan was convicted of murder and manslaughter. Last week fowler told the baltimore sun. He's not aware of any review and defended his work while in office but declined to discuss his testimony. The chauvin trial a major worldwide study finds that pregnant women infected with the corona virus are at a significantly higher risk of poor outcomes including severe infections and even death and peers newydd eisenman reports. The findings were published in the journal. Jama pediatrics the lead. Researchers were based at oxford university but they partnered with scientists in eighteen countries to track the pregnancies of more than two thousand women. They're finding those infected with covid nineteen were substantially more likely to develop complications ranging from eclampsia to preterm births when compared to pregnant women who were covert free and the risk of death was twenty two times higher still the researchers stressed that these deaths were concentrated in poor regions with limited access to intensive care also the absolute risk of developing the various complications studied remained low narita eisenman. Npr news and i'm jeanine herbst and you're listening to npr news..

Jovan nashville david fowler eighteen countries Last week Eight hundred fifty meters julie mccarthy Perry erica twenty two times nineteen this week more than two thousand women Last night fowler Chauvin one hour both thirteen hundred ton vessel Three crew members
"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

10:27 min | 1 year ago

"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Capacity of six megawatts which is not particularly powerful in the grand scheme of things according to the article I was reading which is overrun phys dot org P. H. Y. S. dot org this will result in the production of twelve hundred cubic meters of hydrogen per hour and if the test proves promising the black could invest in building a much larger electrolytes or that could operate at a capacity of one hundred megawatts significantly more powerful than six megawatts the article also mentions a similar project in Cologne Germany called refine but it's our E. S. H. Y. N. E. it is a ten megawatt electrolytes this co located with an existing hydrogen refinery that's been using the steam reforming method to produce hydrogen up to that point like the age to future project this is a test of the pilot program it's not going to produce nearly as much hydrogen as the steam reforming process at this level of power it comes down to about a hundred eighty thousand tons from the steam reform process versus thirteen hundred tons from electrolysis but again this technology if it works could be scaled up and then you would see more and more hydrogen being produced through electrolysis and last through the steam reforming process no I focused mainly on hydrogen production but it's still just one piece of making a viable hydrogen economy it's a super important one obviously because if you don't have hydrogen then the rest of it doesn't make any sense at all but even if we were able to make plenty of hydrogen let's say that we've solved that problem we come up with an electrolysis approach these is green energy it's incredibly efficient and now we're just churning out hydrogen like crazy we still have some other challenges for one thing we guide design stuff to store the hydrogen and we have hydrogen tanks but we need to build a lot of them and to to test the various designs out we would have to design stuff to run on the hydrogen at so what are our options here well first you could burn hydrogen fuel like gasoline there are hydrogen internal combustion engines for example and you would refuel them in a way very similar to the G. though the way you re fuel a gasoline powered engine so there are vehicles that use this in the exact same way that cars use gas or petrol or you could use fuel cells which in a way is essentially that electrolysis process but in reverse so with the fuel cell hydrogen based fuel cell I should add there are different types of fuel cells the world specifically talking about hydrogen based ones you on a very basic level you have hydrogen and a fuel cell on one side of the cell you have oxygen on the other side of the cell in between these two gases you have a special membrane with the catalyst on it and the hydrogen passes through the membrane but the membrane requires the hydrogen to ditch an electron first this is our you can come through but your friend can't so the electrons at all but the electron really doesn't want to be with a bunch of other electrons they're a bunch of negative dances and we all know that similar charges repel each other so you have more more electrons building up they do not want to be with each other you provide a pathway for those electrons to follow a circuit in other words you make them do work along the circuit and eventually the electrons are allowed to rejoin the hydrogen nuclei which again are just protons remember that are on the other side and that also combines with the oxygen and you end up creating water as a result so you get electricity water and heat that's the only thing the fuel cell gives off hydrogen internal combustion engines aren't really that much different from standard combustion engines they require some modifications like you wouldn't want to have spark plugs that have platinum tips for example because that would react with hydrogen you what the US special fuel injectors special valves you also would need a specialized hydrogen storage system otherwise known as the hydrogen tank the combustion chamber would also need to be optimized to really harness the most energy out of combusted the hydrogen because remember hydrogen the energy density is lower than that of gasoline so you need to really optimize the engine to take advantage of all that power as much as he can to make it as efficient as possible hi Jim burns way more readily than other fuels so it also burns faster the big advantage of this approach over fuel cells is that a lot of the work has already been done which means making vehicles that run on hydrogen as a combustible fuel is relatively inexpensive a lot of the work has already been done in that field but burning hydrogen in the combustion chamber is not the same thing as burning it with pure oxygen it means combining it with atmospheric air and that also means that there's nitrogen in the air and you will eventually start producing nitrogen oxides as a by product now it's a much smaller amount of nitrogen oxides then you would typically typically get with the gasoline or diesel powered engine but it still means that the hydrogen combustion engine cars are not pollution free and because we need to look at the volumetric energy density of hydrogen those engines produce less power than a comparable gasoline engine fuel cell vehicles get a bit more on file in a similar amount of hydrogen then the hydrogen combustion engines to actually get a lot more of fuel cells can be pretty efficient like around the seventy percentile range they produce electricity so you would pair these fuel cells with electric motor and in many ways fuel cell vehicles and electric vehicles are very similar it's just that electric vehicles run on batteries that have to be recharged fuel cells rely on fuel lives in the name so you have to refuel the fuel cell rather than recharge it obviously vehicles would just be one potential use for hydrogen that could be used as a fuel and tons of different applications but there are still other problems that we would have to solve the big one is infrastructure it took decades to build out the infrastructure we've got for fossil fuels and that infrastructure has grown over the course of my more than a century it's an established and entrenched system in many ways it's an investment in other words so we would have to build up something similar for hydrogen if we were to depend upon that more heavily as an energy storage method so that would be a really big price tag also revising the production issue for just a moment there's the question of where do you get the water if you're relying on the electrolysis method preferably you would be using fresh water it provides fewer problems than salt water but in some areas fresh water is a very precious commodity that's in short supply so would make very little sense to switch to water and have it become even more scarce by dedicating a good portion of it toward energy there are projects they're experimenting with using sea water as a source for hydrogen but the water has lots of other stuff in it they can cause problems from this process and it may be small problems like relatively small problems like corrosion of the electrodes which is no it means you have to replace the electrodes much much more frequently in the electoral as but there are other problems as well like the possibility that you would start producing chlorine gas which is deadly stuff we've been talking about switching the hydrogen as a primary in an energy storage solution for a really long time the term hydrogen economy which describes a holistic system of delivering energy through hydrogen first popped on the scene way back in nineteen seventy talked add General Motors a guy named Bernard Patrick John o'mara Bach Chris or just a John by Chris came up with this phrase Dr Bacchus was a chemistry professor and a proponent of hydrogen for quite some time this concept would see support come and go over the years sometimes it would get a little more focused sometimes a fade into the background in addition to the benefit that hydrogen would produce fewer pollutants than fossil fuels a hydrogen economy would turn a country with water access into a self sufficient nation from an energy standpoint which in turn would bolster national security because it would mean the country wouldn't have to rely upon fossil fuel resources that are produced in other countries so in the early two thousands during the administration of George W. bush the hydrogen economy got a lot of support largely for that reason it would remove our dependence upon foreign oil there are people who oppose the development of the hydrogen economy not saying it was a bad idea that's Zerilli but saying it's going to end up being too costly and not efficient enough to meet our needs so it would at best be distracting and at worst be completely wasteful and and waste time and resources that could be spent on different alternatives and they may well have a point it's really hard to say right now but hydrogen is likely to be at least a component of alternate fuel and energy solutions moving forward it could end up being a huge component if we get fusion to work because fusion would rely upon isotopes of hydrogen and then you're talking to norm this energy densities that more than war the combustible fuels were talking about the how big a part hydrogen is going to play as a fuel remains to be seen they may require breakthroughs in both production and in how we put it to use and until we have a storage and transportation infrastructure built up to support this will not be able to really rely upon it as extensively as we do fossil fuels so can we produce enough hydrogen to meet our needs I think the right answer now is not yet or maybe the answers that's just one part of the challenge and we have to solve a whole lot of problems to make hydrogen practical so let's not worry about too much let's try and solve these problems first now I do think it's worth pursuing I think fuel cells are super cool I know some people who love electric cars and that model and they're totally dismissive of fuel cells but personally I think both models can work and besides even if we don't get fuel cell vehicles rolled out on a wide scale we may put hydrogen to use and many other places that wraps up this episode if you guys have suggestions.

six megawatts hundred eighty thousand tons one hundred megawatts thirteen hundred tons ten megawatt
"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

09:45 min | 1 year ago

"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on Conversations

"Of wandering security guard comes up to me like what are you doing here. Where's your bad? I realize and left my badge. This shows you again. The humanity of policymaker. I'm like Oh Gosh I don't know my badge and the security guards about to manhandle by eight hundred eight months pregnant body kind of out of the venue when I hear Obama behind me who have not talked to one on one since he got into the into the White House saying. Hey she's with me you know layoffs and I'm so relieved because the band exactly. Yeah completely and I felt like a road because I wasn't having the influence influence I want onto on policy at that point and And so he the security guard goes away and it turns out a bunch trying to use the restroom and and so he sees me like how are you. What are you going to call the baby? The House cast you know. How's it going my responses? I really worried about the Armenians and I just see his against the humanity of leadership. You know his face just falls and you could just tell he's thinking. Can I have one conversation about baby names. That doesn't like lead me to some crossroads of lesser evils. And you're the President Yar. Yeah that's was sort of my views. That's your job. That's exactly but I think in fairness in the same way that I was irritated that there hadn't been a fair process. He he wouldn't want to be cornered is he. Seeking to use the restroom so we end up having this when you think about it actually but anyway sorry having a horrible are. We're probably to this day our most most difficult conversation where it just you know. He Fed me a bill goods. I thought on on his logic for doing what he was doing which was rooted in some bogus argument that had been made to him by one of his advisors is which I would have challenged that. I've been in the room with that adviser when they made the argument but they had more access than I did so in the end he kinda stormed off and within the hour. My water broke oak and so my son declan was born on Armenian genocide remembrance. Day a month early showing you again. At that time how emotional. I was in how how heartbroken I was just with. We said we were going to do something. It was the right thing to do. I thought there were competing at no point. I think his view is unreasonable. I just thought all things considered he should have tipped in the direction of an argument with the president of the United States brought on childbirth. That's how it was in D. and so my son is more ten now now is more conversant in what happened in. The Armenian genocide rightly or wrongly than your average bear but But Yeah I mean this is how it works like you don't cease to be a person. Listen with a family with a heart you know with also I hope an ability you know I tried to put myself in Obama's shoes. I could totally see. Why if you're him Um you just don't want to rock the boat and even if you tell yourself that there's GonNa be some rainy day subsequently where you can have your cake and eat it too but this is not that day? And that's often. What policymakers do they put off the harder decisions? He did it much more rarely than most he tended to sorta own the moment and pull. BANDAIDS off left and right. But but in this instance it was disappointing. You had some successes. In that role. There was a case of the Iraqi translators the translators who worked for the US forces that were in terrible trouble. Some three hundred had been murdered in Iraq and they just had been enough bureaucratic innogy having them come as refugees to the United States. You had you had a great deal of success with that that was that's amongst anything. Absolutely I mean should low hanging fruit. It should have been something. The Bush administration of all administrations had taken full ownership of from the beginning after the invasion. They didn't and so we were able to bring thousands tens of thousands of Iraqi refugees and thousands of interpreters and translators who are being targeted because of their affiliation with US trump is now it looks like ending that program Iran in a way that is going to be absolutely devastating for those who remain so that brings us now just dumping a bit forward for the fortieth twenty thirteen and the bombers appointed you as the United Nations ambassador. The job you really wanted to the you're on vacation in Ireland when you got. Reports of Syrian chemical weapons attack in the suburbs off Damascus. This is terrible attack and the president before had said that if President Assad in Syria had used chemical EMIKO weapons then that would be a red line and the United States would then look to get involved but to involve itself. This came up in the presidency and a terrible moment a terrible atrocities that took place there so bomber was really obliged to act that point having said the report the reputation of the United States on the line saying we must therefore act that he didn't he didn't in the end why. What was the reasoning behind that? Well he did act but he didn't don't act militarily so I want to draw that distinction but you know he in the very wake of the attack decided he was going to use military force. It was is going to be limited. It was going to be designed to get the Syrian regime. NOT TO G- acids people again. The targets by definition could not be Syrian. Chemical the weapons facilities because that would cause large-scale civilian harm. So you're looking at hitting things that are involved in the Syrian military apparatus but not directly involved in chemical weapons use. He and I was his. UN Ambassador all of a sudden. I'm in that role and this happens within weeks as you say of my arrival the role I'm tasked along with John Kerry to build a global coalition to join the United States. I don't think it was a testament to my crummy diplomatic skills. Which I think think I managed other diplomatic assignments More ably but the coalition that we were able to build included to other countries the United Kingdom and France united it kingdom then David Cameron showing the great foresight for which he's now known twice over Decided to go to the British parliament in order to seek the approval of the parliament to be part of the coalition Polish in thinking that he was going to get a rubber stamp there and the promise had no and so now Obama finds himself with exactly one coalition partner for these strikes that are going to be limited and he he does not decide to forgo military force he decides instead to say okay. We're GONNA take our time here. We're going to go to Congress. CONGRESS WE'RE GONNA get Congress's support because to go to war even in a limited way at to retaliate militarily without allies without an International Security Council resolution because of course Russia would block that and without domestic support. That's a heck of a way to start a military engagement so was not forthcoming. No not they would in in the end. What are we will need a resolution to go forward? That would mean dealing with a Senate run by Mitch. McConnell who made it clear he was going to oppose everything everything that Obama proposed not on its merits but just sheely on the base of a posing Obama because he said we must create a successful presidency. Now the president would have done and did he not know that he loves senators on each team. Accent is that it's it was a terrible misjudgment. No question of the Congressional Dynamics Hammocks and Chuck Hagel Joe Biden. John Kerry who had a combined seven plus decades of legislative experience thought that we could get the votes Israel APEC very influential. Lobbying group was staunchly behind President Obama's action we had never had a circumstance where be Netanyahu backing something had produced anything other than Congress going along with it and so I know it seems naive now because it didn't work but I can tell you that. He had every intention of getting the votes in not getting the votes and seeing that fall away. I think he did a good job with President Putin using kind of smoke and mirrors and a bit of bluffing to convince Putin that we're still going to strike such that Putin then took up the opportunity to help destroy series chemical weapons program and that then became my first major task at UN was negotiating the destruction of thirteen hundred tons ends of chemical weapons which I did with the Russian ambassador which is not nothing I mean. That's why I challenge you saying well. We didn't act. I mean getting rid of thirteen hundred tons of chemical weapons. was you know. The entirety of the Syrian declared chemical weapons program. Obviously they kept a small stockpile that they have used subsequently but nowhere near at the scale that they were using at that point. So it's not enough. I'm not pretending it did anything to change the dynamics of the Syrian war if anything this whole sequence I think exposed Obama's lack of enthusiasm and the lack of domestic support for four military action which probably gave the searing government a greater sense of impunity and Putin as well do you think this is largely. We're seeing now a retreat of America from the wool. I think there is a serious fraying of the constituency On the far left and the far-right the trump right which is no longer the far right but the right four for us leadership in part because there is a conflation in the public some of the public's mind between US leadership and the use of US military force there's very very little enthusiasm for the use of US military force. There's great sympathy for the idea of bringing our troops home which unfortunately trump is not done. But that's very different so I think what is going to have to happen for trump's successor. Her is he's GonNa he or she is going to have to do a much better job than we did really bringing home why. US leadership in the world matters tangibly for American constituents silence. It's one thing to talk about. The Paris agreement talk about climate. Change is an abstraction is another thing to talk about it in terms of the harms. It's actually causing people whether farmers or people who live on the coast us in the United States it's one thing to talk about. Peacekeeping as an abstraction or why we should put that fit the bill for for twenty five percent of that. It's another thing to actually talk about. US embassies US businesses and so forth. That are active. You know all around the world and how they benefit from a more stable world we have we need to make the case more compellingly than we have. It's been fascinating speaking with you ambassador so applicable. Thank you so much thank you Samantha. Powers' book is called the education of an idealist this this news conversations.

President Obama United States President Putin Congress John Kerry UN White House manhandle Iraq United Nations declan Senate Damascus President Assad United Kingdom trump Iran
"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

09:56 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Project and Cologne Germany called refine, but it's our e f h y in a, it is a ten megawatt electrolysers. Those co located with an existing hydrogen refinery, that's been using the steam reforming method to produce hydrogen up to that point like the future project. This is. As a test pilot program. It's not going to produce nearly as much hydrogen as the steam reforming process at this level of power. It comes down to about one hundred eighty thousand tonnes from the steam reform process versus thirteen hundred tons from electrolysis. But again, this technology if it works could be scaled up, and then you would see more and more hydrogen being produced through electrolysis and less through the steam reforming process focused, mainly on hydrogen production, but that's still just one piece of making a viable hydrogen economy. It's a super important one, obviously because if you don't have hydrogen than the rest of it doesn't make any sense at all. But even if we were able to make plenty of hydrogen. Let's say that we've solved that problem, we've come up with an electrolysis approach the uses green energy, it's a credibly efficient. And now we're just churning out hydrogen like crazy. We still have some other challenges for one thing we got designed stuff to store. The hydrogen, and we have hydrogen tanks, but we need to build a lot of them and to, to test, the various designs out, we would have to design stuff to run on the hydrogen. So what our options here. Well, I you could burn hydrogen fuel gasoline. There are hydrogen internal combustion engines, for example, and you would refuel them in a way, very similar that the way you refuel against lean powered engine. So there are vehicles that use this in the exact same way that cars, use gas or petrol, or you could use fuel cells, which away is essentially that electrolysis process, but in reverse, so with a fuel cell hydrogen based fuel cell, I should add, there are different types of fuel cells that we're specifically talking about hydrogen based ones. You a very basic level. You have hydrogen fuel cell on one side of the cell, you have oxygen on the other side of the cell and between these two gases, you have special membrane with a catalyst on it and hydrogen passes through the membrane, but the membrane requires the hydrogen to digital electron. I this is all right. You can come through, but your friend can't. So the electrons all, but the electron really doesn't want to be with a bunch of other electrons, there, a bunch of negative dances. And we all know that similar charges repel each other. So the more and more electrons, building up. They do not want to be with each other. You provide a pathway for those electrons to follow a circuit. In other words, you make them do work along the circuit. And eventually, the electrons are allowed to rejoin the hydrogen nuclei, which, again, are just protons remember that are on the other side, and that also combines with the oxygen, and you end up creek. Eating water as a result till you get electrobi-, water and heat. That's the only thing the fuel cell gives off hydrogen internal combustion engines aren't really that much different from standard combustion, engines, they require some modifications like you wouldn't want to have spark plugs that have platinum tips, for example, because that would react with hydrogen, you what special fuel injectors special valves. You also need a specialize hydrogen storage system, otherwise known as hydrogen tank, the combustion chamber would also need to be optimized to really harness the most energy out of combusting hydrogen because remember hydrogen, the energy density, is lower than that of gasoline. So you need to really optimize, the engine to take advantage of all that power as much as I can to make it as a fishing as possible hydrogen burns way more readily than other fuels burns faster the big advantage of this approach over fuel cells, is that a lot of the work has already been done, which. It means making vehicles that run on hydrogen as a combustible fuel is relatively inexpensive. A lot of the work has already been done in that field. But burning hydrogen combustion chamber is not the same thing as burning it with pure oxygen. It means combining it with atmospheric air, and that also means that there's nitrogen in the air, and you will eventually start producing nitrogen oxides as a byproduct now it's a much smaller amount of nitrogen oxides than you would typically typically get with gasoline, or diesel powered engine. But it still means that the hydrogen combustion engine cars are not pollution free. And because we need to look at the volume metric energy density of hydrogen, those engines produce less power than a comparable, gasoline engine fuel cell vehicles get a bit more of a similar amount of hydrogen than the hydrogen combustion engines do actually get a lot more fuel cells can be pretty efficient like around the seventy percentile range. They produce Electr. Christie. So you had pair, these cells with an electric motor, and in many ways feel so vehicles and electric vehicles are very similar. It's just that electric vehicles run on batteries that have to be recharged fuel cells rely on fuel. It's in the name, so you have to refuel the fuel cell, rather than recharge it, obviously vehicles would just be one potential use for hydrogen. It could be used as a fuel and tons of different applications, but they're still other problems that we would have to solve the big one is infrastructure. It took decades to build out the infrastructure. We've got for fossil fuels and that infrastructure has grown over the course of more than a century. It's an established and entrenched system in many ways. It's an investment in other words. So we would have to build out something similar for hydrogen, if we were depend upon that more heavily as an energy storage method that would be a really big price tag. Also revisiting the production issue for just a moment. There's the. Question of where do you get the water if you're relying on the electrolysis method preferably would be using freshwater it provides fewer problems than saltwater? But in some areas freshwater is a very precious commodity. That's in short supply. So it make very little sense to switch to water and have it become even more scarce by dedicating a good portion of it toward energy. There are projects that are experimenting with using seawater as a source for hydrogen. But see what our has lots of other stuff in it that can cause problems from this process. And it may be small problems like relatively small problems. Corrosion of the electrodes, which is means you'd have to replace the electrodes a much, much more frequently in the electrolysers, but there are other problems as well, like the possibility that you would start producing chlorine gas, which is deadly stuff. We've been talking about switching to hydrogen as a primary energy storage solution for really long time the term hydrogen economy which describes a holistic system of. Delivering energy through hydrogen. I popped on the scene way back in nineteen seventy talk at General Motors guy named Bernard Patrick John O'Mara Bacchus, or just a John Bacchus came up with this phrase. Dr Bacher was a chemistry professor and a proponent of hydrogen for quite some time. This concept would see support come and go over the years. Sometimes it would get a little more focus, sometimes fade into the background in addition to the benefit that hydrogen would produce fewer pollutants than fossil fuels hydrogen economy, would turn a country with water access into a self sufficient nation from an energy standpoint, which in turn would bolster national security, because it would mean the country wouldn't have to rely upon fossil fuel resources that are produced in other countries. So in the early two thousands during the administration of George W Bush, the hydrogen economy, got a lot of support largely for that reason, it would remove our dependence upon foreign oil. There are people who oppose the development of the hydrogen economy, not saying it was a bad idea necessarily, but saying it's going to end up being too costly and not official enough to meet our needs. So it would at best be distracting, and it worst be completely wasteful and, and waste time and resources that could be spent on different alternatives, and they may well have a point it's really hard to say right now. But hydrogen is likely to at least a component of alternate fuel and energy solutions moving forward. It could end up being a huge component. If we get fusion to work because fusion would rely upon isotopes of hydrogen. And then you're talking enormous energy densities that more than dwarf, the combustible fuels. We're talking about. How big a part hydrogen is gonna play as a fuel remains to be seen a may require breakthroughs in both production and in how we put it to use. And until we have a storage, and transportation infrastructure built up to support this will not be able to really rely upon it as extensively as we do fossil fuels. So can we produce enough hydrogen to meet our needs? I think the right answer now is not yet. Or maybe the answer is, that's just one part of the challenge, and we have to solve a whole lot of problems to make hydrogen practical. So let's not worry about too much. Let's try and solve these problems I now I do think it's worth pursuing. I think fuel cells are super cool. I know some people who love electric cars and that model. And they're totally dismissive of fuel cells. But personally, I think both models can work and besides even if we don't get fuel so vehicles rolled out on a wide scale, we may put hydrogen to use in many other places that wraps up this episode if you guys have suggestions for future episodes of tech stuff..

Cologne Germany George W Bush General Motors Bernard Patrick John O'Mara Ba Christie Dr Bacher John Bacchus official professor one hundred eighty thousand to thirteen hundred tons ten megawatt
"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"We needed to respond in a way very quickly and shortly thereafter before he started to maneuver and puts civilians into buildings and other things would it have Syria have no outcome and soon have been different. No. And that's very important. And it's why I was able look with president never made a decision David not to bomb the president in response to what David Cameron did Britain today's earlier when he'd gone parliament and lost and and based on the history of wars in which presidents undertake something goes wrong, and you don't have congress with you. The president made a decision that he thought congress would respond and by the way, vice president Biden myself believe that we would get congressional support very quickly only says rice call that one correctly, by the way and said they're not going to do. The national security shouldn't ask those guys. And so we were wrong. Congress didn't wanna move quickly. And then, you know, foreign minister lower often, I were able to reach an agreement on behalf of our countries and presidents to remove thirteen hundred tons of chemical weapons that would not have happened. If we immediately we'd bombed so there was a benefit that a lot of people don't want to ignore but bottom line bottom line. And I write this in the book. The fact that the president didn't wind up bombing. And didn't and was viewed as going to congress did cost us in perception in the region. And I spent a lot of time trying to address just a reality. What do you make of the relationship with Saudi Arabia now in the what's Shoghi the I mean about to in this very room later today. I'll be teaching a course on American power in the twenty first century and the tools of diplomacy and. Nothing. You know, we balance values and we balanced interests. Sometimes your interests overpower that us for one reason or another there many places where we've had this difficulty. I think the administration has not struck the right balance in. Well, they pretty much said values are not not hardware equations what we do here. I think you could have had a better response to it. But there are interests that need to be. We do have a relationship with Saudi Arabia. We do think it's important. We do believe that maintaining that is. Is is key to other objectives that we have in the region and the same presumably with Egypt as the same sixty-five listening, brisk. Egypt is is a pillar with respect to the region in so many different ways historically, its relationship with Israel, the protection that it provides some of the security measures that are taken in the Sinai other things that happen. These are very important thing. So they don't lend themselves to quick and easy to you know, bromides you throw out on the table. But the bottom line is that. The United States is now I e delated itself through President Trump's approach foreign policy, it's foreign policy by tweet. I mean when you have your distinguished four star general who is serving a secretary of defense who got relieved of his command of Centcom while you were there. I think it was over the issue of Iran, right there were disagreements agreement over whether or not we should be. With ROY in a different way on a different timetable at cetera. But I think the point is that. Any serious. Student of foreign policy and diplomacy in the world affairs. Anyone and you hear this more and more now from Republicans would would would say that the United States now is is relating itself and creating a conflict rather than finding diplomatic ways to solve problems. Example that is the current situation with China China is critical relationship for the United States..

president congress Saudi Arabia United States Egypt David Cameron vice president Syria President Trump China China Britain Biden Centcom Israel rice Sinai Iran
"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on Harmontown

Harmontown

04:19 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on Harmontown

"Well, the story of the first thanksgiving start skin, fifteen seventy four with pirates named Martin Earl Butz. Pirates in this story there sure is for sure. Had an eye patch and everything loss is I- privateer for the English crown. So was your private care or a pirate? Well, he was both. The share was an Englishman who had contracts with the crown to go explore the northwest passage. But he also participated in piracy, probe assures letter of Mark, basically government license to attack England's. Enemies at sea was also fide. So he was a pirate. Yeah, basically, but in fifteen seventy four, Martin received the crowns approval to explore new routes to the Pacific Ocean through well, though he didn't get the funding Fraga share was forced to pursue financing through his friend and director of the cafe company. Michael luck America's first thanksgiving stories have way more murder, Jeff left him. Brandon showed up. Oh, Dave, Brandon. So for Oba sure, weighed anchor and took his fleet of three ships west because of some bad weather. He was pushed into Baffin island and landed in an inlet that Martin named for obese, your pay and have the first Canadian thanksgiving. It's really picking up out there. The cure is. And interestingly enough, that was not the first thanks giving because while sure was on Baffin island, he discovered gold and that was the first Canadian thanksgiving. No, not even close. You see happy with his find of Martin loaded up two hundred tons of mind goal for Bishop bay and hold it back to England to present to the Queen. He was celebrated by high society welcomed into new circles. People no longer mocked his one eye and Martin wanted more. So he requested another expedition to retrieve even more goal from Canada. He also finished petitioned to be named high Admiral of the northwestern seat. She agreed to one request, but not the other. And Martin was forced to, again, beg for financing from his friend, Michael law and the cafe company. Did he get it? Like, did he go back to Canada for more goal? He did, yes, yes. And this time he took a fleet of fifteen vessels and fine gold chain around his neck, a gift from Queen Elizabeth or self. This time the storm that hit the expedition, it was truly awesome and they limped into fro Fisher bay with a fleet of only twelve. And this was the first Canadian thanksgiving? Yes, yes, yes. Martin was so happy to make land that the four hundred men on the expedition sat down to a lovely supper of salted ham biscuits, and mushed appease mousse thing would have been more Canadian, Spencer no, no, no. Martin saw says a majestic animal larger and more powerful than a horse. He would never have thought to slaughter one for food, and that's the story of the first Canadian thanksgiving. Well, yes, but there's more much much more throw this, your mind. The goal. Old and bribes. Thirteen hundred and fifty tons of back to England. Is that an animal, it's a moose. I'm going to get another beer. So per dash, Ian rich when he got back Inc. Not exactly. Return to England with his thirteen hundred tons of gold. But when he anchored in London, he received unsettling news. The gold had brought back from Canada had been smelted at turns out, it wasn't gold at all. What was iron pyrites. Gold..

Martin Earl Butz England Baffin island Canada Brandon Mark Michael Queen Elizabeth Fisher bay Pacific Ocean London murder director Dave Ian rich Bishop bay America Jeff Spencer
"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

03:55 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"In addition to your negotiations with the Iranians, you spent a lot of time with Sergei Lavrov the Russian Foreign Minister for people listening. He's a slick, smooth operator in DC fancy suits, you know, MARTINI lunches. I'm wondering what it's like to constantly Robinson. He's a whiskey. It was constantly negotiate with someone like him who you know what they're doing. You know, they're hacking our elections, you know, they're lying to us about Syria, then you know they're lying about Crimea, but you. That's your guy. That's your interlocutor. How do you manage relationship like that? You do it. I mean, it's not dissimilar from the politics of Capitol Hill where Trump has to sit down with Mitch McConnell who's declared that is one goal in life is to make the president one term president. I mean, come on, you learn, it's a hard thing and it's it's not the most glorious component of being in politics, but you learn how to compartmentalize. And we had to compartmentalize in big ways because Crimea Ukraine consistently remained a major problem in our relationship, and we were always fighting to get the Minsk agreement implemented Roy's fighting to get the little green men with no insignia out of the country is they deny, they have them and so forth. It's laughable in a way it's kind of it's kind of sick and pathetic. If you want to know the truth that they say the things they say. I mean, I had some non conversations with Laverov some days we're telling them what we know about the Assad chemical weapons, and he sitting there on the other phone in total other universe assist. I, it's bizarre, but you have to get through it because you have to look for the places where you actually can find that they have an interest in wanting to cooperate or satisfy something. So we actually I met with Putin many times. I always saw Labra a lot and we got things done and. When we got the Iran nuclear agreement done, Russia was actually very helpful. They took on major responsibility on fuel and on the stockpile and Lavrov who's actually helpful in working the Iranians on certain issues where he said, you're not gonna, have our support in this. You got to do this. You got to do that. Would they were supportive on climate change? They've supportive on the roc- becoming. I got Putin after ten years of objections. I got him to lift his objection to making the roc- in an article, the largest marine protected area in the world, and they were helpful on the airline reductions of emissions. And so you know, we've found they were helpful. We would not have gotten the thirteen hundred tons of chemical weapons, declared chemical weapons out of Syria, and we knew they have some that were undeclared, and we started to go after those almost immediately afterwards, but wouldn't have. We wouldn't have gotten thirteen hundred tons out of there without Russia telling. I said, this is happening escanaba fast, and here's how it happens now. Assad lies to them too. Yeah, and he hit some weapons and so forth. But the fact is that if we hadn't done that when ISIS ran across, when you know the Islamic state ran across the country in, they would have had chemical weapons. Yeah, that was the horrible or ended data. Chemical weapons. You seen a whole different thing happening in Paris, subway or London or wherever. So it is fortuitous. We got the result, we got what should the response have been from a democratic president or a normal Republican president to Russia's interference in the two thousand sixteen election? How do you balance the need to obviously respond to such an attack but also not go so far as to have another sort of Cold War breakout? Well, I think the president actually managed that as as carefully ineffectively as you could under the circumstances. Because I remember I, I don't know if the president knew sooner, but I don't think I learned about that kind of interference until the early summer..

president Sergei Lavrov Russia Assad Putin Syria Labra Robinson Crimea Ukraine Russian Foreign Minister Crimea Mitch McConnell roc escanaba Iran Laverov
"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:03 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on KQED Radio

"By the way with you. Because I wanted to go there for just a moment, we've got to cut, and I want you to respond to this, particularly in light of the fact what you learned from being swift boated attacks. Let's hear by surface. John Kerry, I served with John Kerry, John Kerry has not been honest about what happened in Vietnam. He is lying about his record. I know John Kerry is lying about his first purple heart because I treated for that injury. John Kerry lied. I know I was there. I saw what his account of what happens we're all had Hominum all against your. Well, it was fake news alternative facts. But let me give you an example. The last comment was John Kerry lied to us Brian star. I was working as aid to an Admiral in New York City. When I came back from Vietnam, and he called me and one day and said, congratulations, you're receiving the bronze star. I said what I knew nothing about it. I had no input to it. A an army captain by the name of Jim Rasmussen who lives in Portland, Oregon or outside of Portland, Oregon. He personally put me in for it. Because he wanted to thank me for saving his life because he was blown overboard because he was riding on our boat. When a mine went off underneath our boat. He fell into the water. Our guys noticed him later because we were in the middle of a firefight. We saw him taking fire up river. We turned around went back pulled him out of the water. And he personally put me into that. That's the kind of lider was they accused me of having killed some sixteen year old kid behind a hut. And and and the ABC news went back to Vietnam interviewed the people involved in that ambush, the wife of the man that was killed. Said no, my husband was twenty six or twenty nine years old. He was a professional. His job was to kill the swift boats guys on them. I mean, it was lie after lie of disorder. Due to counter that I mean, you got where you have to counter it by countering with television ads you go you go for the same media market. You might you. He comes down to money where you have to be able to beat back the message. Now, we did that in the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, the Miami Herald, the New York Times Washington Post all those facts, and there are still people are going to say because they don't they don't believe you because a lot of people. They don't read those. They don't read that number one. And number two, you go to the television market, and you're reaching a whole bunch of different people. You know, people said to me, you know, carry you win five hundred thousand more votes than Al Gore did know how you're going to be president. We'll guess what we did win more than five hundred votes thousand votes, but the Republican party put a referendum against gay marriage on the ballot and that brought three hundred thousand people out that have never voted who wanted to vote against gay marriage. So, you know, there are really these are wet election battles are about. And you have to get. Deep into the fight to to be able to win and to fight back against these things. Will you run about coming back? You autobiographies a roadmap for this. And I know you said publicly it's not a political book, you're not necessarily putting it out there for another presidential run. But the fact that matters you've lay things out in this book. And I wanted to talk about that specifically in terms of what some might see as perhaps I'll use were today that somehow this bipartisan notion of you working with McCain and working across the aisle, and all that sort of thing this is the party of Trump. Now, this is the argument, I'm sure you've heard you can't work across the aisle like used to its who polarize. And yet to a great extent, you believe it's like Chris Matthews saying we gotta go back to the days when the Democrats and Republicans who worked together, but the difficulty today, Michael is that the they have total power in the sense that they have the White House that both houses of congress. So what do you do about? The fact they have total power. You got to take that away. How do you take it away? We are democracy. We value that that's at the heart. And core of who we are Lila's guys who died in World War One World War, Two Vietnam Korea. They died and today in Afghanistan right there carrying the flag of democracy. They are defending our values. We have to live our values. We have to go out and actually take part to make that democracy meaningful. And by the way, you know, everybody in the world has tried every form of government. You've had monarchy's constitutional monarchy that communism socialism. Everything's been tried Winston Churchill said democracy is the worst form of government except for everything else, and we have to and we're not making ours work when you only have fifty four point two percent of the eligible voters come out and yet Obama won with sixty two point. I mean, that's the story. Right. I wouldn't even mentioned the fact that Harari was on yesterday, and he was talking about possibly the real decline of liberal democracy. But we've got a caller pinpoints on something. You just mentioned that's Afghantistan and Eric join us you're on the air. Hey, thank you. Carey. I served in Afghanistan. The two thousand ten eleven in the same district of Helmand province with. Thank you for that. We were the marines. I was in the Marine Corps. We took the heaviest casualties of any unit since two thousand one you get your perspective what is going on with current policy. Overseas and Afghanistan winter troops coming home because I lost three. Good friends. We had twenty five K two hundred wounded we found over a thousand. I if the fight that cannot be one, and we need to bring everybody home. I'll take my answer out there. Well, thank you, very very much for your service. First of all, I visited you guys in Helmand province not use. Specifically does certainly, but I went down to Helmand province. I marveled at the job. You guys were doing. It was extraordinary and yes under the toughest of circumstances. We went into half ghanistan in order to prevent Afghanistan from having ungoverned spaces in which a platform for terrorism could be launched against the United States because that's where Osama bin Laden was. And we went in there to get Osama bin. Laden, and Al Qaeda. We did that job. Ultimately, President Obama had the courage to send our forces into Pakistan and took it out. And and that was a very courageous decision by president United States because we all know what happened to Jimmy Carter when he tried to rescue mission in desert one with the Iranian hostages. So. I think in Afghanistan. However, the mission has dare. Garrett about mission creep crept into this broader effort to support the government and create something that may not be creative. While we don't know the answer to that yet. I think we need to change the basic strategic goal to go back to what we were doing is prevent the prevent the platforms of terror and their ways to do that. They don't require the kind of level comment we have today. But at the same time, we have to get the government there to transition into a self sustaining capacity, and and there's got to be a transitional process. I think there's a way to do that. I don't want to go into the details of it because yours get cornered with the setting of a date or not a date. I think a lot of that private has to happen in the context of private conversations. And and you need to keep the Taliban and others off balance. You don't want to telegraph everything you're doing, but it does have to transition because ran year seventeen. I believe. And we're spending billions of dollars there. And I think we have to change the modality brings up another question that I'd like to ask you in terms of serving as a major diplomat and secretary of state and fighting in a war and everything where do you think right now, I remember Bill Clinton said aside from the Middle East the most dangerous hot spot in the world is India, Pakistan. I think now one could argue maybe North Korea. But then President Trump has tried to Jimmy things up on that score and say, they're moving toward denuclearization ISIS. He said he takes credit for although Obama did a hell of a lot against ISIS. Talked about serious. Let me just be very just ask you directly though. What do you think right now is the most serious hotspot in the World Series place to be concerned about because of all the tele- your danger peril? Whatever. Well, I don't wanna get into most. I think there are three or four key things happening. Maybe even five we got a lot of trouble spots career is one of them. Absolutely. No question about it. And I hope the president can get more precise about what denuclearization means about. Who accepts what definition but between them, and what will happen to begin to determine the location and numbers of weapons that they have and how they're going to proceed to gain control over it that were far cry from that. But the Middle East remains a powder keg in many different ways. You you have. You have radical extremism in that region. That is fed by many different things are different ingredients. What's happening in Syria is an utter disgrace. And the international community is responsible for not coming together in order to leverage Assad into a different posture center. I'm coming up all, but I have to ask you because President Obama was so severely criticized about that red line in Syria. Well, obviously, and and and we paid a large price for the perception of that. But the fact is we got thirteen hundred tons of declared chemical weapons out of Syria in the middle of a conflict, and the OPCW the did it won the Nobel peace prize for carrying out that so obviously something significant happened. But it was not a good message. It gained a mythology. Let me just put it that way. And it costs us. Let me remind listeners that you are listening to forum we're talking with John Kerry, and this is a fundraising period for public radio for more information about how. To support this radio station. Simply go to kqeDorg, Michael Krasny. And we'll go to another caller, and let's have Philip China's Philip you're on. Yes, Senator Kerry. I wanna ask you what Faustian? Agreement you have with the devil you and Barack Obama for not submitting the Paris accords and the Iranian agreement to the Senate Henry Cabot lodge submitted the league of nations agreement to the Senate Bill Clinton submitted NAFTA to the Senate, perhaps you should go windsurfing and the San Francisco Bay, so everybody could get pictures of you. And you could take your catch wife with you. Then the people would understand why sixty million people did not vote for Hillary Clinton. And they did not because they detest the actions of arrogant Ivy leaguers like you and Barack Obama..

President Obama Senator Kerry Afghanistan president Vietnam Helmand Middle East Bill Clinton Osama bin Laden Michael Krasny New York City Syria Pakistan Jimmy Carter Hillary Clinton Al Gore Portland Oregon ABC
"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:46 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Served with John Kerry, John Kerry has not been honest about what happened in Vietnam. He is lying about his record. I know John Kerry is lying about his first purple heart because I treated for that injury. John Kerry, lied bronze star. I know I was there. I saw what his account of what happens. We're all had Hamadan all events your attack. Well, it was fake news alternative facts. But let me give you an example. The last comment was John Kerry lied bronze star I was working as aid to an Admiral in New York City when I came back from Vietnam, and he called me in one day and said, congratulations, you're receiving. The bronze star said what I knew nothing about it. I had no input to it. A an army captain by the name of Jim Rasmussen who lives in Portland, Oregon or outside of Portland, Oregon. He personally put me in for it because he wanted thanked me for saving his life because he was blown overboard because he was riding on our boat. When a mine went off underneath our boat. He fell into the water. Our guys noticed him later because we were in the middle of a firefight. We saw him taking fire up river. We turned around went back pulled him out of the water. And he personally put me into that. That's the kind of lie. There was they accused me of having killed some sixteen year old kid behind a hut. And the ABC news went back to Vietnam interviewed the people involved in that ambush, the wife of the man that was killed. Said no, my husband was twenty six or twenty nine years old. He was a professional. His job was to kill the swift boats and the guys on them. I mean, it was lie after lie of disorder. That. I mean, you got where you have to counter it by countering with television ads you go you go for the same media market. You might you comes down to money where you have to be able to beat back the message. Now, we did that in the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, the Miami Herald, the New York Times Washington Post all those facts, and there are still people are going to say because they don't they don't believe you because a lot of people. They don't read those. They don't read that number one. And number two, you go to the television market, and you're reaching a whole bunch of different people. You know, people said to me, you know, carry if you win five hundred thousand more votes than Al Gore did know how you're going to be president. We'll guess what we did win more than five hundred thousand votes, but the Republican party put a referendum against gay marriage on the ballot and that brought three hundred thousand people out that had never voted who wanted to vote against gay marriage. So there are really these are went election battles are about. And you have to get. Deep into the fight to to to be able to win and to fight back against these things. You're coming back your biographies a roadmap for this. And I know you said publicly it's not a political book, you're not necessarily putting it out there for another presidential run. But the fact that matters you've lay things out in this book. And I wanted to talk about that specifically in terms of some might see as perhaps values were naievety that somehow this bipartisan notion of you working with McCain and working across the aisle, and all that sort of thing this is the party of Trump. Now, this is the argument, I'm sure you've heard you can't work across the aisle like used to it soup polarize. And yet to a great extent, you believe it's like Chris Matthews saying we gotta go back to the days of the tip O'Neill when the Democrats and Republicans who work together, but the difficulty today, Michael is that the they have total power in the sense that they have the White House. They're both houses of congress. So what do you do about? The fact they have total power. You got to take that away. How do you take it away? We are a democracy. We value that that's at the heart. And core of who we are Lila's guys who've died in World War One World War, Two Vietnam Korea. They died and today in Afghanistan right there carrying the flag of democracy. They're defending our values. We have to live our values. We have to go out and actually take part to make that democracy meaningful. And by the way, you know, everybody in the world has tried every form of government. You've had monarchy's constitutional monarchy, communism socialism. Everything's been tried Winston Churchill said democracy is the worst form of government except for everything else. And and we have to and we're not making ours work when you only have fifty four point two percent of the eligible voters come out and yet Obama won with sixty two point. I mean, that's the story. Right. I would have you mentioned the fact that Harari was on yesterday, and he was talking about possibly the real decline of liberal democracy. But we've got a caller pinpoints on something. You just mentioned that's Afghanistan and Eric join us you're on the air. Hey, thank you secretary. Kerry. I served in Afghanistan. The two thousand ten eleven in the same district of Helmand province with. Thank you for that. We were the marines. I was I was in the Marine Corps. We took the heaviest casualties of any unit since two thousand one this year perspective, what is going on with policy overseas and Afghantistan one or troops coming home because I lost three get friends. We had twenty five K two hundred wounded we found over a thousand if the fight that cannot be one and we need to bring everybody home. I'll take my answer out there. Well, thank you, very very much for your service. First of all, I visited you guys in Helmand province not use. Specifically does sorry about I went down to Helmand province. I marveled at the job. You guys were doing. It was extraordinary and yes under the toughest of circumstances. We went into half ghanistan in order to prevent Afghanistan from having ungoverned spaces in which a platform for terrorism could be launched against the United States because that's where Osama bin Laden was. And we went in there to get Osama bin Laden, and Al Qaeda, we did that job. President Obama had the courage to send our forces into Pakistan and took it out. And and that was a very courageous decision by president United States because we all know what happened to Jimmy Carter when he tried to rescue mission in desert one with the Iranian hostages. So. I think in Afghanistan. However, the mission has we'd heard about mission creep crept into this broader effort to support the government and create something that may not be creative. While we don't know the answer to that yet. I think we need to change the basic strategic goal to go back to what we were doing is prevent the prevent the platforms of a terror. And there are ways to do that. They don't require the kind of level we have today. But at the same time, we have to get the government there to transition into a self sustaining capacity. And and there's gotta be a transitional process. I think there's a way to do that. I don't want to go into the details of it because yours get cornered with the setting of a date or not a date. I think a lot of that private has to happen in the context of private conversations. And and you need to keep the Taliban and others off balance. You don't wanna tell? Graf everything you're doing, but it does have to transition because ran year seventeen I believe, and we're spending billions of dollars there. And I think we have to change the modality brings up another question that I'd like to ask you in terms of serving as a major diplomat secretary state and fighting a war and everything where do you think right now, I remember Bill Clinton said aside from the Middle East the most dangerous hot spot in the world is India, Pakistan. I think now one could argue maybe North Korea. But then President Trump has tried to Jimmy things up on that score and say, they're moving toward denuclearization ISIS. He said he takes credit for although Obama did a hell of a lot against ISIS. Talked about serious. Let me just be very just ask you directly though. What do you think right now is the most serious hotspot in the World Series place to be concerned about because volatility your danger peril? Whatever. Well, I I don't wanna get into most. I think there are three or four key things happening, maybe even five and we got a lot of trouble spots Korea is one of them. Absolutely. No question about it. And I hope the president can get more precise about what denuclearization means about. Who accepts what definition but between them, and what will happen to begin to determine the the location and numbers of weapons that they have and how they're going to proceed to gain control over that were far cry from that. But the Middle East remains powder keg in many different ways. You you have. You have radical extremism in that region. That is fed by many different things, different ingredients. What's happening in Syria is an utter disgrace. And the international community is responsible for not coming together in order to leverage Assad into a different posture center. I'm coming up, but I have to ask the because President Obama was so severely criticized about that red line in Syria. Well, obviously, and and and we paid a large price for the perception of that. But the fact is we got thirteen hundred tons of declared chemical weapons out of Syria in the middle of a conflict, and the OPCW the did it won the Nobel peace prize for carrying out that so obviously something significant happened. But it was not a good message. It gained a mythology. Let me just put it that way. And it costs us. Let me remind listeners that you are listening to forum we're talking with John Kerry, and this is a fundraising period for K Q E D public radio for more information about how..

John Kerry President Obama president Vietnam Afghanistan Helmand Middle East Syria Osama bin Laden United States Portland secretary Oregon Pakistan Jimmy Carter New York City Al Gore ABC Republican party
"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"That's essential to democracy that you find the capacity to compromise. And that you can come together. No matter your party, no matter, your beliefs, and John McCain's the tribute to him that day in the cathedral was a real recognition of that. And I am frankly, you know, I thought it was quite significant that you had President Clinton President, George W Bush, and you had that President Obama there two of them. Speaking of this quite remarkable. Now, you remarked in the book at length about in the chapter on Syria, the open wound chapter that John McCain and Lindsey Graham disappointed you that they knew you had a quote uphill battle internally inside the administration to strike it aside, and they let you down. Did they ever explain? Did they ever regret not March? I asked this during the presidential debates. Have Marco Rubio did the Senate and the house fail the country by failing to support the president. I think the president is truck Siri. Anyway, it appears to me you thought. So as well. Correct. I did I believe that's correct. But, but I think in in a context, I mean, I thought that as I said continued to violate ceasefires and continued to drop barrel bombs and continue to use gas. It was critical for all of us to hold him accountable to that I, but I remember though, we we did have as a consequence says the threat of bombing that the president made we got all of the declared chemical weapons out thirteen hundred tons of chemical weapons were taken out. Just stay listening online if you'd like, and we will post the entire rest of my audio a secretary Kerry hughhewitt dot complex, seven tomorrow..

President John McCain President Obama Marco Rubio George W Bush Lindsey Graham Syria Senate Kerry hughhewitt Siri secretary Clinton thirteen hundred tons
"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Hope to God is not gone because it's absolutely essential to American democracy. It's one of the great traits of our system. They know I mean, George Bush should I squared off. Obviously, we had a we had a fun thing. We did at the south or cloud last year where we both were standing opposite each other for the public part of the evening, and and it worked if people appreciate it. I think it's important. John mccain. Had a wonderful capacity. Forgive us. He, and I forged a friendship and the partnership because we work together on the issue of POW MIA. We we put together the strongest close to countable system working with the military and the Bush administration of any country in history to account for its missing or its potential prisoners. And you know, I think if if I mean that's essential to democracy that you find the capacity to compromise. And that you can come together. No matter your party, no matter, your beliefs, and John McCain's the tribute to him that day in the cathedral was a real recognition of that. And I am frankly, I thought it was quite significant that you had President Clinton President, George W Bush, and you had that President Obama there two of them. Speaking of as quite remarkable. Now, you remark in the book at length about in the chapter on Syria, the open wound chapter that John McCain and Lindsey Graham disappointed you that. They knew you had a quote uphill battle internally inside the administration to strike it aside, and they let you down. Did they ever explain did they ever regret not March? I asked this during the presidential debates at Marco Rubio did the Senate and the house fail the country by failing to support the president. I think the president has struck Siri. Anyway, it appears to me you thought. So as well. Correct. I did I believe that. That's correct. But, but I think in context I mean, I thought that has continued to violate ceasefires and continued to drop barrel bombs and to use gas. It was critical for all of us to hold them accountable to that. I, but I remember though, we did have as a consequence of the threat of bombing that the president made we got all of the declared chemical weapons out thirteen hundred tons of chemical weapons were taken out. Just stay listening online if you'd like, and we will post the entire rest of my audio secretary Kerry, hughhewitt dot complex or seven tomorrow..

John mccain President George Bush President Obama Marco Rubio George W Bush Senate Syria Lindsey Graham Siri secretary Kerry Clinton thirteen hundred tons
"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

04:39 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Hello, get strain. My gosh. This one's short. But it really cracked me up, especially when I saw the pets. Are we describe you many times? Yeah. Why am short breakfasts up? Right. There is something fishy. Going on here. A store in Kuwait has reportedly been shut down after it was discovered that its owners were sticking googly eyes on fish in an attempt to make them appear. Fresher exerts, really googly eyes be refined the craft store. Oh, great. This one's still alive. I think she closes is before they served us. I don't think fish could close arise. Credit credible. Mr limpet. Oh, you're right. I don't think it's fantastic. It really would look like, whoa. Fish look. He's winking at me. Eyeballing me fish. Yeah. So so much for that. You know, you talk about pizza a lot you find this one interesting. There's a New York City pizzeria that serves Detroit style pizza, but instead of tomato sauce on one of their pizzas. It uses mustard Orne, beef, sauerkraut and cheese. Ruben. Yeah. Yeah. I don't know. I love a Reuben sandwich. That I don't think I want to waste a pizza on a Ruben Sam. No, I gotta be honest with you. I like it when I have it in my boys like to get the Italian beef pizzas. But why don't we just get an Italian beef? The pizza on an Italian beef lions. And Tigers and swears the pizzeria says that it is a Trenton, New Jersey thing Detroit, pizza's good, and it's it's. Right cut into squares. We had someone a foodie Friday. It was really good. Yeah. I don't remember the name of Chris Christie's. Yeah. I think. Square piece of cheese on it instead of shaving the cheese. It's just a piece of cheese laid on top. It's more like the crust is gut cheeses. Mr. It's good. If you ever if you're ever in Detroit, and you get the chance to go to buddies or shields. Do it. We'll do or this cr- fat fed. Chris Chris, it was authentic. Yeah. Well, here's some beer to go. With that pizza beer. Brewer Carlsberg has created what it believes is a world. I six pack held together even letting us guess anymore. Faxed yelled at me last time. So he did not yelling you yell at you. It would be off the air. Well, some of them. I mean, it's like it's hard to narrow it down. But then I thought we agreed on just one guests each. Okay. Well, guess what they did it next week for next week. Okay. Next week. No problem. So me to yell at you know, we just get frustrated. Anything and Brandon is so competitive, he won't stop guessing. Yeah. It does those like. Yeah. Frodo yelling at Brendan. Okay. Or whip as I call it. So Carlsberg has come up with a six pack held together by glue. So no more of those rings. So now, I don't show. No dolphin. Dolphins blowhole will be glued shut. Yes. More convenient. The Danish brewer says it's been three years developing the technology to misplace the plastic rings a good idea. They snap. Packs are expected to reduce the company's plastic used by more than thirteen hundred tons per year or the equivalent of sixty million plastic bags as Carlsberg that's Carlsberg. I used to like that beer beer. Carlsberg? I've never heard of old timey beard skirt. And I'll drink it. If they're. For the dolphins. Mammals a drink more. Every time I drink a beer 'Save. A dolphin is another one another blowhole left open. Think also say that they've come up with recyclable Inc. A special coating to extend the life of refillable glass bottles and a new cap that absorbs oxygen to help beer stay fresh longer. Good for the Danes. What about recyclable beer? I know. Probably. It looks like it's been recycled. As well. Saltier that I remember shouldn't this be called? As.

Carlsberg Chris Chris Mr. It Detroit Mr limpet Ruben Sam Tigers Chris Christie Kuwait recyclable Inc New York City Brandon Brendan New Jersey Trenton thirteen hundred tons three years
"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on Embedded

Embedded

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on Embedded

"The white house team starts what ben calls a full court press to get the votes in congress bainer says he supports it personally but won't help with any votes the administration realizes house is a lost cause they push for a resolution by the senate foreign relations committee but it starts to look like they won't be able to get enough votes in the full senate then obama ben and the team go to a g twenty summit in russia and on the flight home obama tells ben something surprising about says he talked to putin and suggested that the us and russia destroy syria's chemical weapons and putin agreed for days later the syrian government also agrees which means the us will not bomb syria my fellow americans and then neither wanna talk to you about syria obama announced the plan to destroy the chemical weapons in part because of the credible threat of us military action as well as constructive talks that i had with president putin the russian government has indicated a willingness to join with the international community in pushing assad to give up his chemical weapons the assad regime has now admitted that it has these weapons and even said they joined the chemical weapons convention which prohibits their use the us and the un eventually removed thirteen hundred tons of chemical weapons and destroy them experts say that's more than any us air strikes could have accomplished but for so many syrians it's heartbreaking like look assad got away with it again he destroys some chemical weapons and the international community leaves them alone to keep his own people america's not the world's policeman terrible things happen across the globe and it is beyond our means to right every wrong but when would modest effort and risk we can stop children from being gassed to death and thereby make our own children safer over the long run i believe we should act.

senate russia obama us syria syrian government russian government assad white house congress ben president putin un america thirteen hundred tons
"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"On your wakeup call kfi am six forty more stimulating talk some of the other stories we're watching this morning the escondido city council has voted to support the trump administration's lawsuit over the sanctuary state law competing groups of demonstrators faced off before the boat last night and then the council had to sit through three hours of public comments you want to not worry about being deported not worry about being separated from your family don't cross that border attack mexican americans in this city the four to one vote makes s indeed oh the first city in san diego county to support this lawsuit demonstrators also gathered last night and lisa viejo where the council's considering citing with the feds the port of long beach is made a big lift toward zero emissions goal the ported started pilot projects to electrify nine big moving cranes socal edison president ron nicholls says cleaner energy is the goal today word about forty percent carbon free energy we have a plan on going forward that we think the gnarly we but all the state should move towards getting eighty percent carbon free energy by twenty thirty the program will cost fourteen million dollars and it's expected to cut more than thirteen hundred tons of greenhouse gas emissions every single year the project is the largest of its kind in the country all right just take a guess for a second before i give you this actual story how many driver licenses do you think the dmv in california has issued to illegal immigrants over the past three years take a guess how many okay ready california dmv has issued more than one million driver licenses to illegal immigrants in just over three years licenses became available in two thousand fifteen through the safe and responsible drivers act that was signed by governor brown the former democratic assembly member who wrote the bill says it's worked the same way it was intended by improving the lives of a million migrants and their families now that you've got man you talk about that fight that was that the eskin dido city council last night i bet you could almost draw the line right down the middle again on this too because you have a lot of people who say wait a minute they're here illegally so they shouldn't have the.

san diego county ron nicholls dmv california escondido city council s president governor brown three years fourteen million dollars thirteen hundred tons eighty percent forty percent three hours
"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on KOIL

"1055 another rockfall and yosemite national park thursday injured the driver of a car under the parks iconic el capitan rachel evans says she and her husband were driving out of the park when debris came smashing through their car sunroof we were tried to outrun it was like go let's go and at the same time it has been reached out and he was like oh my head my head because it was bleeding profusely and hurrying evans husband was airlifted to hospital with head injuries abc's alex stone has more on the slides at the famous national park this ron fall came one day after thirteen hundred tons of rock fell off l capitain killing a british tourist and badly injuring his wife thursday's rockfall was much bigger than wednesday's putting a large cloud of dust into the air above yosemite climber said it was loud and made the ground shake nearly five hundred people have been arrested in a nationwide operation targeting sanctuary cities officials say more than three hundred of those arrested had criminal convictions michelle franzen abc news go delicacy knows who city traffic center jfk northbound afford eighty northbound in i eighty westbound is open along with four eighty northbound from eighty westbound looking at normal slowdowns on the expressway expect delays in all directions of nutty if and maple traffic report is brought to you by h h buick gmc amac race oh the forecast from the field sporting goods weather center and kgb news one seven on newstalk twelve ninety.

rachel evans head injuries alex stone kgb newstalk yosemite national park ron michelle franzen buick thirteen hundred tons one day
"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"Who used to be an attempt at bracket are now what does europe percent bracket because they get their exempt their first roughly twenty thousand dollars of income for a family show no nobody tax rates are going up under the plan everybody is going to get a and if you pay taxes harry the problem gotta pay taxes you get a break steven more thank you so much for that i appreciated i'm larry elder you're listening to the larry elder sure california headline news who matic audio your hard yesterday seven rock falls smell capitain send thirteen hundred tons of granite 1800 feet down on the people below rescue teams found a man in a woman from great britain hit by the falling rock the man was dead delman seriously hurt rockfalls or common and yosemite with about eighty occurring every year house minority leader in california congresswoman nancy pelosi criticizing president donald trump for his ongoing attacks on nfl players who neil in protest during the national anthem any time he's going to lose a healthcare bill an election alabama whatever it is he's got something else he's trying to divert attention to and he said since trump says the protests are unpatriotic and players who do it should be fired us customs and border protection officials in san diego say a construction workers okay after falling 43 dollar hole while building a prototype for the border wall suffered only minor injuries john wetteland california headline news your round for a job unions uzun win win smells like rodney eggs meanwhile verse is swirling in the year and you hear his in north no dude and his in sound swirling dirt or rodnay goater could mean there is a natural gas leak natural gas lines could.

tax rates britain nancy pelosi president donald trump alabama europe steven larry elder california yosemite nfl neil san diego natural gas twenty thousand dollars thirteen hundred tons 1800 feet 43 dollar
"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"thirteen hundred tons" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"At a port in puerto rico because of a lack of trucks a lack of drivers there were concerned that the drivers didn't have security oxygen or for griffin at the pentagon which sent a threestar general to the island today to oversee the federal relief efforts the president's homeland security advisers has security will be provided for those delivery trucks white house spokeswoman sarah sanders the ireland studying presents logistical hurdles that do not exist on the mainland were trucks from around the country can cover converge on disaster areas he says the president is actively monitoring recovery efforts this morning he waved at shipping restrictions to try to speed more relief a deadly rockfall on a famous mountain in california fox's jessica rosenthal with this live lisa in a statement you seventy national park officials say seven rockfalls happened over a four hour time period wednesday resulting in about thirteen hundred tons of fallen rock from el copy ten one man was killed a woman was badly hurt both are from great britain we work for the solar abdurrab more of a process of britain family notifications from been quote is seventy spokesman scott gettleman says the woman was flown out of the park to a hospital the rock fell over a popular area and it is climbing season there but no one else was injured and no trails were impacted while rockfalls even of these sizes are common this is the first rockfall fatality at the park in eighteen years lisa jessica actress julia louisdreyfuss announcing she has breast cancer the vpns seinfeld star confirming the diagnosis in a tweet like address hosts going faster than i've ever gone before it yet it all seem to be happening is almost he doesn't mention her prognosis or treatment but she does make an appeal for universal health care saying not all women are so lucky to have insurance like sheet us fox news fair and either the soot worth hello aloha her yo hey or less it takes a lot of voices cruise disowned vaas y welcomes all with open arms from.

puerto rico griffin pentagon president ireland jessica rosenthal britain scott gettleman julia louisdreyfuss white house sarah sanders california national park thirteen hundred tons eighteen years four hour