18 Burst results for "Thirteen Eighteen Years"

"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

08:17 min | 1 year ago

"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on The CyberWire

"Joining me once again. Ben yellen he's from the university of maryland center for health and homeland security. And also my co host on the podcast caveat. Which if you have not checked out yet what are you waiting for. Listen ben. Welcome back thanks dave We would be remiss if we did not discuss The recent Hubbub from apple's announcement that they are going to be scanning ios devices for See sam which is Child sexual abuse materials Can we just do a quick overview here from your point of view. What's going on here. So apple is doing two things. They are both scanning i messages. If a parent ops in there scanning the messaging application on ios devices for nude images for minors so if a minor is between thirteen eighteen years old the minor would be notified. Would get an alert would them. You're about to send receive a new image. This is a warning that message would go to the parents if it's a child under thirteen. I think there are fewer civil liberties objections to that particular announcement from apple The announcement that presents more significant civil liberties concerns in my view is the announcement that apple is going to scan photos in the eye cloud against a known database of child pornographic images And if they discover that a an image is matches one that's in that database they could potentially share that information with the government and that would lead to a criminal prosecution right now. The the sticky wicked here is that there are plenty of tech companies who are scanning their cloud services for these sorts of images that is routine at this point. Facebook google dropbox. They all do that. What sets apple apart is their plan is to do the scanning on device right so it's not just in the cloud it's on the device itself and there's no technological reason they couldn't scan a hard drive for example they're making a policy choice to confine this right now to photos that are posted on an i cloud but the technology exists to search it on. Somebody's devise even if they don't post that photo to the cloud so this presents many potential civil liberties concerns. It's not per se fourth amendment violation. Because this is a private company But the government of course knowing that apple has instituted this practice. This policy is going to know that they probably have access to information. That would be valuable for criminal prosecutions and we know. The government has tried hard to get apple to reveal encrypted communications to give the government access to encrypted communications and it's not just our government even though this program is being piloted in the united states. It certainly eventually will be available to overseas governments that are far less concerned with Civil rights and civil liberties and even though it's being used right now for a csi am It could be used for other purposes to scan images to scan messages for Disfavored political content or for censorship purposes. So the idea is once you build this technology and once you put it into practice as apple plans to do over the next several months then you have created this back door and even though you are trying you are claiming to confine the use of this technology in the short term. Once the technology is created apple is going to be under enormous pressure from governments around the world to use it for a more expanded purposes. And so that's the inherent danger here. We should mention that users do have the ability to opt out. If you don't use apples. I cloud photos service your photos on your device. According to apple won't even be scanned. They won't be looked at unless you're using their cloud services But that doesn't seem to be putting people at ease. Yes so first of all as i said before. That's a policy choice. That's not a technological choice apple of course still could scan your device They do it for a bunch of other purposes right on fine mall. Malware on your Mac book for example right So that's not necessarily anything new. That's a policy choice that they're making now. And i think the concern is that this is going to be a slippery slope. Where a government says. If you really care about stopping child exploitation. Why can find these searches justify. Does that have been posting. I cloud why can't you also search you know photos that have been saved a hard drive or even you know have been You know just saved on on a single device. So i think that's the concern. That's more of a slippery slope. Think the fact that this is apple kerry's You know an increased weight as opposed to another service provider apple presents itself as You know being very committed to user privacy the protection of users information That's how it sells themselves themselves. That's how they present themselves publicly. And so i think this cuts against One of their professed corporate values which is the protection of private information. They're putting a tough place Because obviously to be against this it seemingly to be against rooting out sexual exploitation of minors right. The intentions here are very noble on. I think we have to acknowledge that. I think we have to acknowledge That the problem that they're trying to solve his of course of the utmost importance right But you know. I think the method in which there Engaging in this type of surveillance of their own users could come back to those users. And so i think we have to be honest about that as well. It also strikes me that this is In some ways apple has a corporate culture. I believe of kind of knowing what's best for our users. yes right. it's and it's that old you know like henry ford said you know if i'd asked my users what they wanted. They would have said they needed. You know better faster horses or buggy whips or you know something along those lines but and so apple along in their history has said you know. You don't need that floppy drive anymore. You don't need that headphone jack anymore. And i think that aligns with apple surprise at the backlash here. I think apple thought that they they did. The hard work of designing would is i think most people agree a very clever technological solution to this and yet people are still having a very strong reaction. Yeah i think a couple of things go into that One is we have values in this country about protecting private information. Some of that is inherent in Our legal system the fourth amendment protects us against unreasonable searches and seizures. So even though this as of now isn't an action the government is taking it does seem contrary to our values where we don't want anybody in our protected private spaces And that certainly includes technological spaces including the i cloud where we store our photos. So i think that's a huge part of it. The other part of it. Like i said is the fact that this is supposed to be the company that most stringently protect sees privacy and so if apple is doing it then what does that mean for every other company that doesn't present themselves as protecting our private information. And what does it mean for. Technological companies that are based overseas and more authoritarian countries. Are they gonna learn from apple. And deploy this technology in a way doesn't just target sensitive exploitative image as that sort of thing it's used to go into messaging applications to go into photos and try and crackdown on free speech or political sense and i think those are. That's kind of the nature of the backlash as i see it all right well. There's much more to this conversation. And in fact we spend the entire episode of Caveat this week discussing.

apple Ben yellen university of maryland center ben dave Facebook google government united states kerry henry ford jack seizures
"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on The PewterCast : A Tampa Bay Bucs Fan Podcast, Buccaneers

The PewterCast : A Tampa Bay Bucs Fan Podcast, Buccaneers

07:51 min | 1 year ago

"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on The PewterCast : A Tampa Bay Bucs Fan Podcast, Buccaneers

"So i mean i can't. I can't get the blatant road. Cast bottle of blanton's will last me like three years three years. Yeah i by. No one knows it. I could drinking by the way over. Here are responsible. Well it's more like you're pissing. Everybody off with their sober tone. So you can imagine me like starting starting my fifth blanton's at the bar like oh good gravy but no i'm glad we got w and i'm glad we again another game of books football. Hopefully not against the saints but just take what are we there you go there. You go big man. I still got him lining up on me here. You got people ended outside like us a club on ladies night so i'll let you go all right. Guys go books. We'll see you next week. All right big fudge user. We'll do it. We'll do it ran. We already know that this is an international phone. international podcasts. tonight we've had one call from the uk. We have another one now from australia. Believes tuning in it is it is dawn. It is what time is it in australia's full on daylight down there. It's thirty austin and nice. I gotta tell you. The australian accents my favorite action. Hold in thank you for all the time. I rish is my favorite. But always something. I always say like. Everyone calmed down. The world's not going to end today because it's already tomorrow in australia. You from lockdown where we got locked in a couple of days ago void some carbon. So there you go did news the house. We've had some covert on the podcast but it doesn't go through the internet. Also what's on your mind tonight. Tampa bay buccaneers winning first playoff game in over thirteen eighteen years. I know i know it's been a while miami more in the retro jazzy. Say the super bowl pace. You know it was good. It was just wasn't as clean as what i think. We'll hustle sharm goldwyn art. Let me ask you this. Are we at a point now. With the buccaneers. Where if the team doesn't come out and have like no drops. Everybody's catching an interception. The secondary's not shutting down every wide receiver. That's out there. The defensive line isn't shutting down the run that we're gonna be unsatisfied with the game regardless if we win or not like are we are we at that point as bucks fans expectations hard and what they have been poss but But yeah i think worth. And i mean even donovan. Smith played well it. Wasn't anybody got a job done right. Donald smith played well enough hold on donald smith played well enough. They brought him to the podium for a post game press conference. Oh yeah they only do that with the guys that did well right. Yeah yeah. I was disappointed with the constant toronto pressure the qb. I think they knew that this as a little bit strong guy from constantly. Probably not and he was seeing every taunts and dancing around them. And so i think i think they need to adjust that for next week. Because if i'd say we're playing drew brees so he's not gonna he's not going to He'll be at a sign welcoming obviously. Eat hot as well as heineke. But he'll shut us. The pace selling all adjusts. It'll be interesting to see how we gonna wake up like rent. I think will be in new orleans and the d'arme so i think the bears will will trouble in too much. Yeah yeah i'm with you. I have full confidence of defensive. Game plan will look different than it did from today. In definite look different from did from the second saints game when we got embarrassed on national tv Was a thirty one to three. But you know you're right. Exhortations are are kind of high in canada through the roof and sense. I think this ryan with books fans. And i do it to sometime. It's like what since we only watched the bucks. Mostly you know so. We don't really watch like all of the chiefs games but we don't watch all of the steelers games of so we don't see the games where like like. I didn't watch the game. Where they barely beat the falcons like you know just a week ago or were. They barely beat the chargers like in week. Seven like they had they had to come back late and those are games like. I'm sure cheese sandwich. Like what's going on. But i mean they went fourteen into but we watch a lot of college. And so we see like alabama beat the crap out of everybody clemson just beat the crap out of everybody so that in our minds. That's what like a great team does. So it's sort of this thing. Where sense you know on sundays. Bucks are watching. Buck gains. not the other games but on saturdays are watching these college football team. Does you know. rake over everybody and subconsciously. We think if we don't see that type of performance from our professional football team then it's like you know it's back to the drawing but you know all teams are like that. I'm sure like you know up your buffalo's having the same conversations you know. It doesn't matter how good you are in the big cities like new york chicago With big radio markets these people. That's that's what fans do. So i understand brent saying like it's never going to be good enough but we sorry. Excuse me it's also boring. Come on here and be like hey like survived advance. What do you think everybody have a good night like. There's some things you need to talk about so sure You know defensively to what you said like. I definitely think it's all going to change What we see. Just i just hope That whatever they pick works early and they don't have to change it. You know somewhere halfway through the second quarter changed at halftime But i don't think honestly this offense has really clicking and this was supposed to be you know defense defense like washington why they had never let him over twenty points and this and that and we put up over five hundred yards and thirty three points thirty thirty one but missed two extra points and also went one for four in the red zone and put up over thirty on his defense and we and i know atlanta twice in detroit and minnesota. But you saw the points. We put up on these guys. You know this. This team has like the finished the season from the second half of atlanta game. I think they punted three times. Did a victory formation one interception and scored every single time. They had the ball. That's two and a half games. That's insane so you know we're in it man. It doesn't matter who we play doesn't matter defensively faith. It doesn't matter how bad our defense plays honestly we're going to be in every right and it's going to be fun. I i want to remind people of this Because the soul to this out during the game last week fun fact with every game that. The buccaneers this year have scored over twenty four points. They've won and now in nine of their eleven wins. They've scored over thirty nine of their twelve wins over the season. They have scored over thirty points. So you know the rent. You know we talked about it. I don't remember if it was last week. During the peter cast live or if it was during the buck in the new show we used to say it was raised to forty. Now it's a race to twenty four. Yeah you know. And and that's just gives twenty four. Yeah there you go there you go there you go. What else you got forest buddy on. That's good i Been been listening. Man yeah thanks listener. I've been pretty actually pretty good contingent down in australia. Yeah we do. Yeah we've got a contingent australia show.

blanton Donald smith australia saints football buccaneers Tampa bay buccaneers drew brees donovan super bowl austin miami uk toronto Smith steelers new orleans falcons chiefs
"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on The PewterCast : A Tampa Bay Bucs Fan Podcast, Buccaneers

The PewterCast : A Tampa Bay Bucs Fan Podcast, Buccaneers

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on The PewterCast : A Tampa Bay Bucs Fan Podcast, Buccaneers

"Know just a little bit normally don't but i was a little weird today. Ref is going to cost us game but we pulled it out. I'm glad there's another week of bucks football and another day for me to drink a lot of bourbon. So what your suburban choice. I'm in kentucky. Boy what's the bourbon choice turkey lately. I've been drinking this e. h. t. stuff from buffalo trace distillery buffalo choice. I'm in. I'm an old woodford reserve guy i really am. It's that's a personal chew. Blanton's automaker index money though. So i mean i can't. I can't get the blatant road. Cast bottle of blanton's will last me like three years three years. Yeah i by. No one knows it. I could drinking by the way over. Here are responsible. Well it's more like you're pissing. Everybody off with their sober tone. So you can imagine me like starting starting my fifth blanton's at the bar like oh good gravy but no i'm glad we got w and i'm glad we again another game of books football. Hopefully not against the saints but just take what are we there you go there. You go big man. I still got him lining up on me here. You got people ended outside like us a club on ladies night so i'll let you go all right. Guys go books. We'll see you next week. All right big fudge user. We'll do it. We'll do it ran. We already know that this is an international phone. international podcasts. tonight we've had one call from the uk. We have another one now from australia. Believes tuning in it is it is dawn. It is what time is it in australia's full on daylight down there. It's thirty austin and nice. I gotta tell you. The australian accents my favorite action. Hold in thank you for all the time. I rish is my favorite. But always something. I always say like. Everyone calmed down. The world's not going to end today because it's already tomorrow in australia. You from lockdown where we got locked in a couple of days ago void some carbon. So there you go did news the house. We've had some covert on the podcast but it doesn't go through the internet. Also what's on your mind tonight. Tampa bay buccaneers winning first playoff game in over thirteen eighteen years. I know i know it's been a while miami more in the retro jazzy. Say the super bowl pace. You know it was good. It was just wasn't as clean as what i think. We'll hustle sharm goldwyn art. Let me ask you this. Are we at a point now. With the buccaneers. Where if the team doesn't come out and have like no drops. Everybody's catching an interception. The secondary's not shutting down every wide receiver. That's out there. The defensive line isn't shutting down the run that we're gonna be unsatisfied with the game regardless if we win or not like are we are we at that point as bucks fans expectations hard and what they have been poss but But yeah i think worth. And i mean even donovan. Smith played well it. Wasn't anybody got a job done right. Donald smith played well enough hold on donald smith played well enough. They brought him to the podium for a post game press conference. Oh yeah they only do that with the guys that did well right. Yeah yeah. I was disappointed with the constant toronto pressure the qb. I think they knew that this as a little bit strong guy from constantly. Probably not and he was seeing every taunts and dancing around them. And so i think i think they need to adjust that for next week. Because if i'd say we're playing drew brees so he's not gonna he's not going to He'll be at a sign welcoming obviously. Eat hot as well as heineke. But he'll shut us. The pace selling all adjusts. It'll be interesting to see how we gonna wake up like rent. I think will be in new orleans and the d'arme so i think the bears will will trouble in too much. Yeah yeah i'm with you. I have full confidence of defensive. Game plan will look different than it did from today. In definite look different from did from the second saints game when we got embarrassed on national tv Was a thirty one to three. But you know you're right. Exhortations are are kind of high in canada through the roof and sense. I think this ryan with books fans. And i do it to sometime. It's like what since we only watched the bucks. Mostly you know so. We don't really watch like all of the chiefs games but we don't watch all of the steelers games of so we don't see the games where like like. I didn't watch the game. Where they barely beat the falcons like you know just a week ago or were. They barely beat the chargers like in week. Seven like they had they had to come back late and those are games like. I'm sure cheese sandwich. Like what's going on. But i mean they went fourteen into but we watch a lot of college. And so we see like alabama beat the crap out of everybody clemson just beat the crap out of everybody so that in our minds. That's what like a great team does. So it's sort of this thing. Where sense you know on sundays. Bucks are watching. Buck gains. not the other games but on saturdays are watching these college football team. Does you know. rake over everybody and subconsciously. We think if we don't see that type of performance from our professional football team then it's like you know it's back to the drawing but you know all teams are like that. I'm sure like you know up your buffalo's having the same conversations you know. It doesn't matter how good you are in the big cities like new york chicago With big radio markets these people. That's that's what fans do. So i understand brent saying like it's never going to be good enough but we sorry. Excuse me it's also boring. Come on here and be like hey like survived advance. What do you think everybody have a good night like. There's some things you need to talk about so sure You know defensively to what you said like. I definitely think it's all going to change What we see. Just i just hope That whatever they pick works early and they don't have to change it. You know somewhere halfway through the second quarter changed at halftime But i don't think honestly this offense has really clicking and this was supposed to be you know defense defense like washington why they had never let him over twenty points and this and that and we put up over five hundred yards and thirty three points thirty thirty one but missed two extra points and also went one for four in the red zone and put up over thirty on his defense and we and i know atlanta twice in detroit and minnesota. But you saw the points. We put up on these guys. You know this. This team has like the finished the season from the second half of atlanta game. I think they punted three times. Did a victory formation one interception and scored every single time. They had the ball. That's two and a half games. That's insane so you know we're in it man. It doesn't matter who we play doesn't matter defensively faith. It doesn't matter how bad our defense plays honestly we're going to be in every right and it's going to be fun. I i want to remind people of this Because the soul to this out during the game last week fun fact with every game that. The buccaneers this year have scored over twenty four points. They've won and now in nine of their eleven wins. They've scored over thirty nine of their twelve wins over the season. They have scored over thirty points. So you know the rent. You know we talked about it. I don't remember if it was last week. During the peter cast live or if it was during the buck in the new show we used to say it was raised to forty. Now it's a race to twenty four. Yeah you know. And and that's just gives twenty four. Yeah there you go there you go there you go. What else you got forest buddy on. That's good i Been been listening. Man yeah thanks listener..

blanton buffalo Donald smith football australia saints Blanton Tampa bay buccaneers buccaneers kentucky drew brees donovan super bowl austin miami uk toronto Smith steelers new orleans
"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

07:39 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Of the more inspired ways to use like a product and I think I have the perfect example so first of all have you ever heard of this superhero cyborg camp I have not but it sounds pretty awesome does where'd you has okay is this weeklong design education event that's organized by San Francisco nonprofit called kid mom and they've been doing it every year since two thousand twelve though I I guess now it's called the superhero boost body mod workshop and anyway it still sounds awesome the ideas for kids are dealing with different forms of upper limb loss to come to this camp and learn a bunch of new design skills and then they could put what they've learned to use and actually design and build a new arm with its own set of superpowers that does sound really cool so are you going to tell me that someone actually built a prosthetic arm out of lego bricks so it's not exactly that people have paired lego bricks with these server motors to create prosthetic arms as well as like and it's super impressive to see them in action but in this case this is a nine year old named Eden Robinson made a different kind of like a hand so while attending the superhero camp in two thousand thirteen eighteen years old toys and spare parts from a hardware store to fashion a threaded metal rod into which you could attach different parts so for example one attachment had a Wii remote built into it and and the other one had a built in for but the coolest one by far with this life size version of the yellow claw like hands you could find on a lego minifigure I don't know how practical that is exactly but it would definitely be a fun way looking for Rideau's and yeah just burritos I mean I do like the idea of having all these different attachments that you can swap around including the a few that would just be for fun like that yellow claw hand but I mean honestly like why not do that exactly and one of the best parts is that one of the artists at the camp with so impressed with aids creation that he actually help them refine the concept and build a working version later that year and not only that the to them also brings during these other specialty arms like there was one with this poetas meant so aid can actually play the violin in the school orchestra and the one with the super soaker arm which is just so awesome I mean you really won me over one Chris okay I could have definitely used one of those this past summer but I will here's another example of how lego pieces have been making people's lives easier back in two thousand fifteen the natural history museum in London took up a really unique and honestly daunting challenge that over the course of the next five years they wanted to digitize their entire collection of more than twenty million ten specimens now to do this they would need to take pictures of every kind of insect imaginable and of course they wanted to be able to capture the fine details of each of these things like LED cares and wing tips and so the photos we need to be taken from all different angles now this is easier said than done because you know some of these specimens are over three hundred years old an incredibly fragile hollow bastion anytime you're picking up one of these things are definitely running the risk of breaking off an antenna or a leg or some other truly fragile part of these so I am curious how lego figures into this because I I mean it does seem like entomologists have been handling pinned insects for centuries and photographing them so don't they have their own like specialty tools that exist already like why he's like this well that's the thing I mean those kinds of devices do exist but most of them are pretty unwieldy and and actually really expensive too and that's why one of the museum's entomologist this Danish guy name steam dupont he started looking for an alternative solution I was looking at this article in the Atlantic about this and as they described a dupont wanted something quote cheap portable and customizable so that he could observe the wings of his moss easier and since you've been born and raised in Denmark he naturally thought that his favorite childhood toy might be the right tool for the job and he was right so use a bunch of those black and gray building blocks and a handful of connector pieces and in doing this he was able to fashion you know several of these and segmented Bellator's that can easily position and even rotate these pens specimens as other devices range in size from like thirty pieces some of them have more than a hundred and fifty pieces but even the biggest of these designs only takes about ten minutes to build and all of them cost less than twenty Bucks which you know is a lot less expensive than most of the scientific equipment people would have been using yeah but the best part is that dupont put all the designs and building instructions up online for free so professional and amateur entomologists across the globe can now piece together their very own insect manipulators I think the crazy thing is it's not even the first time I've heard of museum workers using like a race to generate these solutions like there was this other museum in England that had this three thousand year old sarcophagus but because the air is so damp and chilly there the relics face and the chest eventually caved in on itself and the museum just stuck the whole thing in the basement for decades so what why can they just repair the museum's restore artifacts all the time right yeah but because the sarcophagus was made from this paper mache like material repairing it would involve wedding the case so they could be reshaped but there's a strong chance the relic would have gotten even more damage in that process but thankfully the site Cambridge grad the student and David Knowles came up with this pretty clever workaround he built the six adjustable lego platforms or mommy Jackson's he called them and they basically propped up the collapsing part the cough against and this is a limited that concerned you know over these further cave ins and and allow the team to get in there they Moisant and reshape the money back into this original safe and it was really simple and low tech and perfect for what was this really complex problem huh I mean I feel like that kind of sums up lego toys pretty perfectly don't you think I mean you got this toy this deceptively simple on the surface just a bunch of plastic blocks that snap together and they're not super detail there's no elaborate backstory I catching gimmick to this and it was just a handful of these breaks you can create literally anything you can think of yeah and you're absolutely right that a handful of bricks is really all it takes an in fact there's this mathematician named Soren Eilers and he helped the lego group determine exactly how many possible structures you could make from just six standard lego bricks wow and and what kind of peace was using for this he was using a four by two break which you know is rectangular and after reading this computer program that modeled every possible combination of six of these bricks Eilers ended up with a truly massive number because it turns out that with just six of these breaks you make over nine hundred million different combinations oh wow I mean that maybe that's not an endless array of possibilities but that's pretty that's a big number and I I would have to mention though like as you continued adding bricks that number of combinations with just spiral out of control pretty quickly yeah I I always said that if you want this program to calculate nine or ten breaks like it would probably take years and maybe even hundreds of years sometimes maps just doesn't make any side well let's leave that challenge for the next generation of lego maniacs to take up and I'm I'm sure there won't be any shortage of them in the future but in the meantime what do you say we piece together a few of the straight facts we couldn't fit in today's episode and maybe see what kind of fact off we can build with them sounds good to me we may have seen the story but sometime last year in fort worth Texas there was an off duty police officer that was.

"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

07:23 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Of the more inspired ways to use like a product and I think I have the perfect example so first of all have you ever heard of this superhero cyborg camp I have not but it sounds pretty awesome word yes okay it's a weeklong design education event that's organized by San Francisco nonprofit called kid mom and they've been doing it every year since two thousand twelve though I I guess now it's called the superhero boost body mod workshop and anyway it still sounds awesome the ideas for kids are dealing with different forms of upper limb loss to come to this camp and learn a bunch of new design skills and then they could put what they've learned to use and actually design and build a new arm with its own set of superpowers that does sound really cool for are you about to tell me that someone actually built a prosthetic arm out of lego bricks so it's not exactly but people have paired lego bricks with these server motors to create prosthetic arms as well as like and it's super impressive to see them in action but in this case this odd nine year old named Eden Robinson made a different kind of like a hand so while attending the superhero camp in two thousand thirteen eighteen years old toys and spare parts from a hardware store the fashion threaded metal rod into which you could attach different parts so for example one of jasmine had a Wii remote built into it and and other one had a built in fork but the coolest one by far with this life size version of the yellow claw like hands you could find on a lego minifigure I don't know how practical that is exactly but it would definitely be a fun way thing for Rideau's and yeah just burritos I mean I do like the idea of having all these different attachments that you can swap around including that a few that would just be for fun like that yellow claw hand but I mean honestly like why not do that exactly and one of the best parts is that one of the artists at the camp was so impressed with aids creation that he actually help them refine the concept and build a working version later that year and not only that the to them also brings during these other specialty arms like there was one with this boat catchment so it can actually play the violin in the school orchestra and the one with the super soaker arm which is just so awesome I mean you really won me over one super soaker I could have definitely use one of those this past summer but I will here's another example of how lego pieces have been making people's lives easier back in two thousand fifteen the natural history museum in London took up a really unique and honestly daunting challenge that over the course of the next five years they wanted to digitize their entire collection of more than twenty million ten specimens now to do this they would need to take pictures of every kind of insect imaginable and of course they wanted to be able to capture the fine details of each of these things like LED cares and wing tips and so the photos we need to be taken from all different angles now this is easier said than done because of some of these specimens are over three hundred years old an incredibly fragile hollow bastion any time you're picking up one of these things are definitely running the risk of breaking off an antenna or a leg or some other truly fragile part of these so I am curious how lego figures into this because I I mean it does seem like entomologists have been handling pinned insects for centuries and photographing them so don't they have their own like specialty tools that exist already like why he's like this well that's the thing I mean those kinds of devices do exist but most of them are pretty unwieldy and and actually really expensive too and that's why one of the museum's entomologist this Danish guy name steam dupont he started looking for an all turn of solution I was looking at this article in the Atlantic about this and as they described a dupont wanted something quote cheap portable and customizable so that he could observe the wings of his moss easier and since you've been born and raised in Denmark he naturally thought that his favorite childhood toy might be the right tool for the job and he was right so use a bunch of those black and gray building blocks and a handful of connector pieces and in doing this he was able to fashion you know several of these and segmented Bellator's that can easily position and even rotate these pens specimens as other devices range in size from like thirty pieces some of them have more than a hundred and fifty pieces but even the biggest of these designs only takes about ten minutes to build and all of them cost less than twenty Bucks which you know is a lot less expensive than most of the scientific equipment people would have been using yeah but the best part is that dupont put all the designs and building instructions up online for free so professional and amateur entomologists across the globe can now piece together their very own insect manipulators I mean the crazy thing is it's not even the first time I've heard of museum workers using lego bricks to generate these solutions like there was this other museum in England that have this three thousand year old sarcophagus but because the air is so damp and chilly there the relics fees from the chest eventually caved in on itself and the museum just stuck the whole thing in the basement for decades so why can they just repair the museum's restore artifacts all the time right yeah but because the sarcophagus was made from this paper mache like material repairing it would involve reading the case so they could be reshaped but there's a strong chance the relic would have gotten even more damage in that process but thankfully this Cambridge grad the student and David Knowles came up with this pretty clever workaround he built the six adjustable lego platforms or mommy Jackson's he called them and they basically propped up the collapsing part the call for guests and dis eliminated that concern you know over these further cave ins and and allow the team to get in there they Moisant and reshape the money back into this original safe and it was really simple and low tech and perfect for what was this really complex problem huh I mean I feel like that kind of sums up lego toys pretty perfectly don't you think I mean he got this toy this deceptively simple on the surface just a bunch of plastic blocks that snap together and they're not super detail there's no elaborate backstory I catching gimmick to this and it was just a handful of these bricks you can create literally anything you can think of yeah and you're absolutely right that a handful of bricks is really all it takes an in fact there is this mathematician named Soren Eilers and he helped the lego group determine exactly how many possible structures you could make from just six standard lego bricks wow and and what kind of peace with the using for this he was using a four by two break which you know is rectangular and after reading this computer program that modeled every possible combination of six of these bricks Eilers ended up with a truly massive number because it turns out that with just six of these bricks you make over nine hundred million different combinations oh wow I mean that maybe that's not an endless array of possibilities but that's pretty that's a big number and I I would have to measure the like as you continued adding bricks that number of combinations with just spiral out of control pretty quickly yeah I I always said that if you want this program to calculate nine or ten breaks like it would probably take years and maybe even hundreds of years sometimes maps just doesn't make any side well let's leave that challenge for the next generation of lego maniacs to take up and I'm I'm sure there won't be any shortage of them in the future but in the meantime what do you say we piece together a few of the straight facts we couldn't fit in today's episode and maybe see what kind of fact off we can build.

"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"There used to be healthy contingent of Republicans in New England's congressional delegation now there's just one one of those Republicans tells us what happened under Donald Trump you cannot set to find the Republican Party as being compassionate a big tent or particularly power why the GOP is struggling in the northeast this afternoon on All Things Considered from NPR news week day starting at four on W. NYC welcome back to the takeaway I'm a red van Gogh Paul the twenty fifteen Lauren but short of Penn state university senior was studying abroad in Spain during one of our last nights in the country Lauren was out celebrating her twenty first birthday when she ran into Manuel Blanco available a local tour guide she previously met but after a night of drinking Lauren fell off man was balcony and died a tortoise rule that her death was an alcohol fueled accidents however in twenty thirteen eighteen year old Gabrielle Vega was in Spain as well and visited Morocco our tour guide was also Manuel Blanco available years later Gabrielle publicly said that during the trapped men well had drugs or drink and allegedly assaulted her your she's in twenty eighteen telling her story on NBC's Megan Kelly today I'll just convinced that he put something in my drink it was it was on rails what I was feeling it was if you say I wasn't even close here I was like I couldn't even stand up I had to support myself on the wall when I was walking is there any doubt in your mind that he raped you I am one hundred percent in the days following Gabrielle's media parents more than thirty women contacted.

New England Donald Trump Republican Party van Gogh Paul Lauren Spain Manuel Blanco Gabrielle Vega Morocco NBC Megan Kelly NPR NYC Penn state university
"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

12:28 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Byline offensive tackle who played his entire thirteen eighteen year career up in Seattle with the seahawks and he was elected to the hall of fame in his first year of eligibility and the sea hawks have retired his number number. Seventy one on also helped ricky watters achieve three consecutive one thousand yard seasons for the seahawks and later paved the way for Shaun Alexander's. NFL Record setting outing success. And he became the first Seahawk Offensive Lineman to play in the pro bowl water. When you hear me say all of those things what impresses you the most just about what you were able to do in pro football Being able to do it for so long saying to put twelve years in and to to have the accolades I say to myself. When I hear I hear would you stand there or go to a van and they say all those accolades delays all? I'll say is that you know I did it. The right way that anybody could go back and look at me and look at. What have I done show and and hopefully that? I can help those those people who say that. I did it the right way. You know I hear most people tell me especially sports People tell me that the respect and admiration that their peers. Here's give him give them as something that means a lot to him and I know Burcin Bury the pro bowl pass rusher said when you say Waller Jones I think of the best tackle I played against in my career. There was nothing he wasn't good at. He had great feet. He was strong as a bull and also very smart way. Wall was one of the stronger guys I ever went up against. If he gets those hands on you can forget it. He was so physically strong and gifted at the same time. Just one of those rare combinations. Nobody really played the game quite like he did. How does it make you feel good matic as a as a I think you say we live out his game by our peers and and this game amos definitely by peers and You know you try to go out there and you know when I became office lobby and I tried to be the best at it and and when I came into this game I had some great Offense alarm has been. I could watch it kind of my game out there Tony Boselli Jonathan Ogden Orlando Pace. So I had some great guys and you know when I got introduced into football by first video my take my coach gave me Epidemic Anti had a had a inscription. No video coach Sean. How to pass that so I'll watch that all the time? So I kinda mimic those guys want to be very consistent and be great at at the left tackle position you know wallner when I think about pro football the skill positions you know they are lot of speed and and individual talent well but when I think about an offensive or a defensive lyman other words attack like yourself is it more physical or is it more mental I would say is more physical I think about it I think for me personally I tell people all the time once you figure out what you're good at you honing your sales I you know I can tell people it can be from like it'd be skies quickness do you but I I learned that my goodness have to be clicking a box so I figured that out early that's what I had to quit at the do it in a quick buck on how the how you get ten yards are you could tell the running my skill set was I got to be good on a quick box guy give me a swim move guy give me anything I gotta be able to respond in a quick burst so that's how I learned to play this game by doing everything in a quick burst because my my my part of my game ain't don't laugh and probably like what five ten seconds at the most so that's Kinda how I try to home in on my field you grew up in Alice Still Alabama. What kind of town was that? A very very small town man You know everybody knew everybody but I think for me personally to Kinda gave me That the the knowledge of family come first and always looking for your family. And if you if you make it you always take your family. So that's something that I learned from coming from a small town so you know just a hard working tile and families. You always took care of home as they're still the billboard on the road leading into the town that says he grew up in Alice. Ville and boy did he grow up. It's definitely there man you know. We got what four inches into the house. House of. They put him at all those interests. That was a very special moment because you never think about. They were growing up. You see that stuff when you're traveling over me to have that in my own town is pretty awesome that you know. They were at a my what I did Playing football so that's pretty cool to see that every time I go on you eight eleven pounds. Fifteen ounces at birth. I think your mother's probably still screaming and your older sister. Beverly said one time when she described you big and beautiful but I know when a child is growing up and they're a big. There's a Lotta taunts from their peers. Everything what was that like for you being a big child. I you know what I didn't have that much problem. I think I come from. A big family was eight of us and actually say a big and beautiful and I was the second to the last Baby Yeah and honestly man. They treated me like a baby so I didn't have to worry about that going up and Kinda uh made me so when I got to school it was pretty easy to deal with with people. I didn't have that issue. I how I got along with everybody so whenever issue where I was the biggest kid on campus. I'm not like that but you know I think I get my credits on my older sister and brothers man they really really took care of me and to this day you know I take them on trips with me. I'll take them everywhere and when they introduced me to their friends and stuff they still that people are saying. Oh that's your professional. Oh Brother Day like stay. But he's still the baby so they stay on. Let me know that. I'm the baby in the bud so it's pretty cool. Though I think I saw all the Muslim Brotherhood for definitely take care of me and those younger years and you know as well as I do Walter when you're really big. Nobody is going to mess with the right exactly. You know what I'm saying. I think about it and I had kids all the time when I meet kids or sometimes you'll meet a kid Sometime bigger than some of the kids in the classroom or something like that a- and all I tried to tell kids to embrace it you know I learnt that a very young age. Brace whatever you know whatever God gives you it and bracing I think a Lotta time with kids. That'd be the hardest thing to do that. Brace who you are the person so I just try to tell them that bracelet of you. You're the biggest person in the room when you walk in that role on the room so I try okay that all the time embrace it and be thankful of what the law of bless you it one of the things that I've always said tough decisions for kids as they're growing up as one and if they're being recruited where they end up playing their bald or sport and the other is in your particular case. Do I stay the full term or do I go to the NFL early early. Tell me about those two decisions and how you came up with them. What decision for me personally was when I was last involved I kinda was in my younger years? Here's I kinda was Kinda then do school where it goes out with the baby so I got mad at my mom. My mom was a single parent so she was. You know we kinda. We've got my eight eight of us and we kinda grew up in section. Four of them was in high school like an elementary school. So my mom worked Tooth and nail to do what she had to do to get the older four four out of high school so and it got me Kinda got mad because she you know she was doing so much. So I kinda rebelled against that it Kinda got held back on a couple of years and an elementary school and then they'll do but then when I got introduced the football you know my last year I football would have been my junior high school so I had to do all this work. They're trying to get the next level and the only school that was that said if I get all my grades and get everything off minute scholarship. So that was Florida state so for me personally. That wasn't a hard decision for me because the state was interested me from day one so I stuck with them. And then you know NFL making that decision to retire wasn't a hard decision. My Mom told me a long time ago. Whatever it says you make? I'm I'm behind you one hundred percent so once. I made that decision man it was. It wasn't hard for me. I kinda like I knew that I gave everything I had been a game of football and I was ready to look forward to you know life after football I was talking to Mike. Holmgren Homerun When he comes down here in town I've known Mike for a very long time and we your name came up and he just talked glowingly about a about you but he did say something that I I thought was interesting and I want to get your perspective on this? He said about you. His quiet leadership and tremendous skills were an inspiration and it was the quiet leadership that cotton attention. Tell me about what he was talking about. more of a I wasn't a Rod. Rod Type Guy. You know I thought like you know I was when I when I got Introduced to the game of football. I was always that your your game represents you and your people if you if you if you go out and do the right way people gonNa Watch you and that's got how play the game. I when I got into the League. My goal was to watch the older guys. Watch how they practice how to prepare. So I learned that from those guys and I felt like if I'm going to do this. I'm not the guy that's going to get up in front of the team. I talked to him. But you know I try to to relate to everybody and I just I just hang out with my office a line guys. I hung out with the. DVD's I hang out with the offense defense guys. So I just wanted to be cool and everybody let everybody know where team and it takes all of us to to make get compensated. So that's the way I wanted to do. I wanted to. I wanted to Leave is apple so I tried to go out and play the game the way it should be played and and try to plan a very high level and trying to stay consistent so when guys go to watch family meal watch game they can say man. I want to do it just like Whoa Dude. What I'm going to speak up? I don't have to say I just have to go out and do my job. You're on another career tracked after years of dominating the other athletes in the national football league. You're into into photography and you said I want people to take me seriously. This is something I really WanNa do. This is something I really want to craft. I'm putting in the work. Hopefully in the end it will turn out to be something special. How did you get hooked on photography? Opportunity presented itself. You know always had the you know the name brand cameras and stuff going. Don't check family vacations. I took pitches but I never looked at it as go. Being able to be on the sideline so opportunity presented itself and you know a lot of times the players have a hard time trying to figure out what they WANNA do after football in for me personally and I haven't been issue for me because you know like you say I'm Quad Gua- leader so I didn't. I wasn't looking for the cameras. I'm not like that so for me. That was an easy transition for me because I always when I was playing I I I made myself okay. Sit at home and do this and do that then then look for that you know. Sometimes they they. They're so so caught up in what's going on all that they're getting pat on the back that sometimes I think that'd be the hardest transition but you know if you can find something that you can get. You WanNa do that really you know you have. I have to find something that you can train yourself and say I want to learn everything I can't about that. And that gives you that motivation every day when you wake up so for me. It gives me motivation. I want to do understand the things that you have to just not just picking up a camera and taking pitchers in you know for me. I have my hat off to the sounders to Seattle sounders. I forgive him the opportunity to go out and take pictures in the opportunity to to meet other got in other professions. To kinda see. How did they prepare for me and gave me a whole new aspect watching other professors? And I'll get a chance to go to the manners and stuff. Just watch those guys and feel guy prepare and get ready for the game and they're no different different for me and how I prepare rating so I'm hoping that opportunity presents itself but you know I don't speak on it too much because it's something that I really want to get. Yeah no and learn just letting the cameras a lot of work but if the opportunity presents itself I wanna be on the marriage not just by what I did on the football field Walter Alter we have a couple of minutes left but you know photography for something. It's still was fairly easy but when you're talking about motion like you have in sports. How did you develop the eye for photography? I think the hardest part is just not being into the game you know..

football national football league Seattle offensive tackle seahawks ricky watters Walter Alter Shaun Alexander Waller Jones Tony Boselli Jonathan Ogden Muslim Brotherhood Wall Florida Sean League Ville sounders
"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on Pop Culture Cosmos

Pop Culture Cosmos

11:07 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on Pop Culture Cosmos

"When we talk about the Lakers on the Lakers fast-break podcast? And I'll tell you what my friend is a lot of stuff going on a lot of emotions. A lot of things that are that are going on it just it. Yesterday was such such a heavy day for all of us. Just I felt it in my body. Felt that my chest and it was just so hard and I can't think of TJ Johnson for voice from the underground for speaking to me at length that it really helped me I was. We weren't sure we were going to go on. And we both weren't sure we're GONNA be able to speak thought that we're probably GONNA make fools out of ourselves on camera But we got through it and it was actually very therapeutic for all of us with you know. Yesterday was a tough day and you couldn't come on the air and I know you had coach girls and I wanted to know you have to get through the day saw. How did you get through the day yesterday who you know? As far as what things did you do. Who did you talk to you? And where did you go to find some solace in such a sad time like this while I was. It was kind of funny by the time. I I got the news in told my wife about it. We had to get ready to go to my granddaughter. MIA's game and I really didn't even Wanna a go at first. I just just sitting down in front of the computer trying to get the news trying to figure out what happened. I mean at that point in time before I left for the game in uh the the crazy dumb rumors that all four daughters died with him on the plane. were out there and I was trying to grapple with that you know then Rick Fox was an clocks supposed to be on there and you know it's you know I mean get the news right guys doesn't do any good to to the beat somebody else. When you create crazy rumors that just caused more pain people so you know in but then I and then I saw my wife took off with her car to go and and I left me here and I'm sitting there and I'm thinking about the whole thing and I said I just got I just got to go to me as game? I can't miss this game name so I jumped in the car and zoomed off and turn on CNN. You know just it's normally the station. I listened to when I'm in the car while CNN. It's not a single word about politics. Everything's about Kobe Bryant plane crash in so at least I at least I found out that it was only only a Ugh who was on the plane with Gobi. Although to to his two of her teammates were on the plane. You know you think about three thirteen eighteen year old girls who all love basketball and you know that just so tragic you know a pin one of the mothers in one one of the one of the great baseball coaches in southern cal in southern California junior college figs him and his wife where their daughter Just yes so tragic because I get to the game you know and in the Games getting ready to start and I'm watching the game you know and I see my son and you know on. He's got tears in his eyes and One of the girls one of the best players on the team had heard the news and had told my daughter told my granddaughter modern she told Her Dad and you know he grew up as a Kobe Fan. I mean it was just horrible. In that sense they won the game though they played extremely really well and then I added to go off to the second game with other granddaughter and we were GonNa Scout Two teams that we were playing. I got after the arena there in and saw lots of friends that I knew in guys who were referees and coaches in the Cyo and Talk to the other coaches loser. Because he had was there with his girls and we talked about the whole thing coby and his girls. I live in northern California. So there's there's like an island of Laker fans among all of the waiters fans. If he will but it helps it helps just to talk it out just does does help to talk it out except my problem was I couldn't really talk every time I tried to say something about it. My son would say something about it. Might Start to talk and I'd start to cry and I didn't I just you know I know I remember at the end of the game. Hugging both migrate At the end of each game hugged each of my granddaughters in Tears in my eyes just just the whole the whole thing that Colombian In those three girls with their parents were on the way to a game. Just the same as I was with. My you know in the car Dr and you had a car accident just like a helicopter accident back. I'd probably say that your chances of having an accident in the car were greater the chances of having an accident and he'll look after But just that that parallels between it just made me want to hang onto them and not let go of them you know. That was the biggest sense that I got a lot of the a lot of fans on Laker dot net. Very similar. Things you know. Make sure you hug your husband or your wife find a way to work because God knows whether you'll see him again and so you know for me I I I just wasn't I wasn't marginally capable of really talking about it any great extent. You know I really actually appreciate the chance to talk about it with you and I was just. I was just tool mostly overwrought yesterday. I just couldn't stop crying at by started. Crying was just in a in their Irina with you know coaching these girls goes on coby. COBY would've said you know. Let's play absolutely as described in my conversation with Tj down for voice from the underground yesterday. If Kobe were live right now he would probably slap all all of us collectively to say no at snap out of it. You know life goes on. There's a game on Tuesday. Laker fans have got to go ahead and and support their team. But you know at Laker fans are also going to go ahead and support their team by also supporting one of the greatest to ever played the game and You Know L. as we close out in the last fifteen minutes here of our show and again I want to thank everybody for watching. Thank everybody for listening to Laker's fastbreak hope you get a chance to go ahead and listen to more episodes that we've got on there all of our podcast networks. That are out there. If you have any questions please let us know at Laker's fastbreak on twitter. The Lakers fast-break at Yahoo Dot Com. or You just said it. As part of a five star review on Apple podcasts. I want to go ahead and to say you know. What is it about Kobe that that struck you? Most you know what is it about copays career that really just propelled him in your eyes to become one of the best that you've ever seen. I think that it's probably encapsulated with the Momma mentality. That from the time he came into the League in threw up those first two airballs in the playoffs to you know finishing his career with sixty point game is a guy who never quit was never intimidated. Aidid was never afraid. You could block his shot. You could block his dock but that would not in he had the ultimate the ultimate shooters shooters mentality that you never worried about the last shot. The next shot was going in so I think that level of confidence and backed by the fierce determination that he showed when he played the game was the first determination he showed as he prepared for the game. You hear the phrase Koby ask sometimes when players make moves in the court and so forth to me. Yeah the greatest compliment that anybody could give somebody in athletics today. or or an any endeavour today would be to say that there are work ethic and their effort their determination to their craft. Their commitment to their craft was Kobe esque. I think that's what stands out most to me. It's the thing that I use sometimes with my girls when I'm coaching him. That basically you know you don't WanNa quit never quit. It doesn't matter if you missed the last shop that doesn't matter. Don't cry over spilled milk. Just take the next shot. I congratulate them. I want every one of them to take a shot when they got the chance to shoot and Kobe was a guy who totally believed in that. You know One of the things that he would most angry about teammates was when they had an open shot. They didn't take that shot his APP. Just files everything up. You know you have to play with confidence and the only way you learn to do that is to learn to forget. Get what you make a mistake. Learn from it. Yes and don't make the same mistake again but you basically have to have to have some Mama mentality one of the things I wanted to ask you before we head on out and like I said we're in our final twelve minutes or so here on the Lakers fast-break podcasts. Is You know the those memories the most that stick out to you. I mean the games that you think really just defined Kobe and who he was as a player player. I want you to go ahead and describe I mean the easy answer is the eighty one point game and I saw that game first hand. I didn't see it on tape delay. I didn't see it on. You know I have. I've seen it. You know again in future recordings after that but I did see it live as it happened. I was privileged to see it and I saw the bruins right there up in person and but for me probably one of the most memo games was one of his worst games. Actually and that was against the Boston Celtics in game. Seven of the two thousand nights series and I as I was speaking to. TJ Johnson. A voice in the underground. What impressed me most was that he was awful? Shooting the ball for virtually virtually the entire game. He found other ways to help the team win. You know you hear it all the time about Alice Caruso about so many other players. There's Oh he does the little things he does everything else to help. The team win too poor to provide that platform and Kobe did exactly that he rebounded rebounded in double digits. He passed the ball efficiently. He got the you know. got to the open man. He played really hard defense against the Boston. Celtics at that point in time it truly impressed me that day to see that no matter how frustrated coby got with the shooting he never let the other parts of his game lead down down and to me I just thought that was just a tribute to the determination that he has and the wheel that he had in that game where it was truly one of the ugliest games you could probably that'd be see from a basketball standpoint something you probably would never show that as far as teaching offense to apply to any player out there but from defensive standpoint the point especially the defense and the effort of the team defense that Kobe displayed on that day. I think it was just something that it shows that Kobe was you know had more to this game and it had more to his game the just shooting that just going ahead and just filling it into.

Kobe Lakers TJ Johnson Kobe Bryant CNN coby basketball Kobe esque California Laker Rick Fox Boston Boston Celtics athletics Wan baseball
"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on Do The Thing, with Whole30's Melissa Urban

Do The Thing, with Whole30's Melissa Urban

13:00 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on Do The Thing, with Whole30's Melissa Urban

"You're you're welcome okay enough talking. This is a really good one and it's a little bit longer than normal because the info was too good to leave any of it out so without further ado you now onto the episode hi. I'm really excited to talk to you today. I'll Abou- How gut health so I guess officially I will welcome you to do the thing. Dr Michael Rubio. Thank you so much for joining us today for having me all right so before we begin in the podcast I ask every guest. What's your thing? My thing is helping people to understand how their symptoms and this includes even non digestive symptoms could be coming from their gut and then what steps they can take to treat this underlying cause I love that and I also want to let people know that you and I have been really good friends for a really long longtime and you've helped me with some of my gut issues in the past. Though when I wanted to get to the concept of do the thing is like thinking about what's been missing every time you've tried to make a change and with a lot of people I think they feel like they're doing the right things. They're changing their diet. They're eating more vegetables their eating lots of Salads. They're taking can you know probiotics and there's something missing in that equation and I think the information you're gonNA share today might unlock some action steps for them. I think so. uh-huh and in good health seems to be an area where people turn to the Internet and boy do they get confused. High carb low carb low fat gluten-free Eat whole grains Raines oxalate probiotics probiotics. DANCE MICROBIAL CBO it gets messy but if you if you have someone who's as I have for about thirteen eighteen years now doing this every day you figure out after a while what works what doesn't work of course that's heavily informed by what the scientific research shows then. It's not that hard but if you start googling stuff yeah you get pretty confused. Pretty darn quickly. I mean I get confused and I'm someone with access to some of the best doctors. I've I picked your brain over lunch a million times. I have access to some of the latest literature. And you're sending me Your pubmed studies like I get confused with some of the stuff so I can't imagine agean how overwhelming it is for other people. I WANNA start kind of at the beginning now. It seems like everyone is talking about gut health these days. What do they mean when we're talking about gut health? What are we looking for in terms of a healthy gut that is surprisingly a hard question to answer? Now we could say someone has a healthy gut. They have no gut symptoms. I have no reflux have no bloating constipation. Diarrhea or abdominal pain. But even that it doesn't stand the scrutiny of science because we know there are some people and this has been even published in the conventional literature. WHO HAVE FOR EXAMPLE CEAC disease full blown and they will only have neurological symptoms as a manifestation of that so we can't say I have no digestive symptoms for health gut and I was also in that boat of I had a parasitic infection? Had No digestive symptoms only had brain fog insomnia fatigue depression So symptoms aren't a great measure. And then there's this test that test Johnny Lynn for leaky gut or CBO breath testing and these all have a degree of merit but none none of them are perfect and I would argue that. They actually harm the consumers more than help them because they oftentimes paint a picture of things being worse than they are an aren't aren't super clinically informative so rather I would say Regretfully there's not a good one test will tell us this but rather I would say if someone has gone on a whole thirty die and Donna. A huge step forward in terms of getting rid of energetic and inflammatory foods and they're sleeping in their exercising and they're still not well. I would look to making some tweaks to optimize your gut health as the next best intervention. Okay so when you. So when you say optimize your gut health. Are we really talking about the bacteria in your gut and making sure. They're in a healthy not balanced. You don't have too many of the bad guys and not enough of the good guys. Is that an overly simplistic but still kind of accurate way to look at it. Yes I would say it's overly simplistic sick but still generally tends to hold true. There are other things like the immune system that sometimes needs to be dampened But yes one of the things that will see. PS someone improves the health of their gut or even improves the health of their body. Because remember your gut. Bacteria grow in the environment. That is your body so if you abuse your body on healthy soil unhealthy bacteria grow if you treat your body. Well then we'll see healthier bacteria and that's also been shown they they've done some studies taking sedentary interior people tracked or Mike Obama's with serial repeat samples and what you know that period and their gut actually got healthier once they started exercising So yes the bacteria and fungus new play a pivotal role in that not exclusively but definitely part of the Mex- excellent and so how do they get messed up up in the first place you were just talking about the soil. We eat Through our vegetables in the foods that we grow having an impact. You're talking about exercise having an impact. I know stress. This has an impact on our gut bacteria. I feel like more things than you could imagine. Impact our gut. Is that true. This is absolutely true that they've even done studies. He's showing that in families that wash their dishes. With a sponge they have different micro biogas than those that. Use A dishwasher So there's so many things that your microbial That's overwhelming because now it makes me feel like I have to scrutinize every single action. I'd take and by the way is a sponge dishwasher better. Well they've shown lower incidences of allergic diseases in those at wash with sponges. Part of the the theory is that that is because it allows more bacteria to kind of build up. And they're not quite as couldn't hygienic. But we also have to be careful because it may be that more more. Wealthy families are using dishwashers. And they also may have more hygienic practices that accompany Having more economic reach reach if you will so we had to be careful observational studies. I don't want to attribute it all to the sponges but that's definitely an observation in theory. That's out there but that's really interesting because what I from what I understand to having exposure to too many bad bacteria like not washing your hands and shaking hands with a bunch of people in a crowd is problematic automatic but also being to hygenic is problematic you know having that SANITIZER on in every single surface and having everything super squeaky clean never putting a farm-animal is also problematic. Right yeah there. There's a balance to be struck there and it's not an easy balance to strike because the immune system surprise surprise is Israeli complicated but the general observation. There is certainly true that if from the one end in Third World countries grease people often have a hines a parasite infections and there's a high infant mortality death rate and we go all the way to the other hand where people are slathered in antibacterial soaps from the moment that they're born and they have reduced contact with natural environment. I'm Byron it's like soil and animals. Then that's probably going too far in somewhere in the middle is optimal. It's just trying to figure out exactly where that middle is. That's a little bit more challenging and it's really impossible isn't isn't it like. I'M NOT GONNA walk around testing my microbiology and testing my surfaces every single day I feel like if you can get pretty far into the weeds in terms of MIT. Doing the right thing for my gut in this moment and then that can be overwhelming to the point. Where you know you're actually hurting your health versus helping it exactly ackley? And there's an important distinction. We should draw. which is there's these two items? There's clinical gastroenterology meeting someone has for lack of a more scientific term messed up gut. What clinical interventions have been studied are tried and true compared to microbiology academic research which is just uh starting to piece together associations and how all of this works more academic perspective but doesn't really inform what you can do about it and this is really important because people oftentimes get pulled into all this academic nuance that doesn't translate into clinical interventions and so they flounder? Because they're they're doing clinical gastroenterology. which are these simple things that have been shown clinically effective that we can do to help improve one's gut health absolutely? So that's what we're going to focus on for the rest of this episode is the clinically effective things that are proven to help. And I don't know anybody WHO's a bigger expert in that than you are so let's go back to what you you said earlier. which is there are some obvious signs of a messed up gut as you so clinically and scientifically put it a few minutes ago right if you've got diarrhea if you've got bloating if you've got reflux if you've got stomach pain or constipation? Those are obvious signs that something's going on with your digestion but there are other signs is to that maybe have nothing to do with digestion. That could point to the gut. What are some of those? Well there's a number of them Insomnia because because that's one that I suffered with and I'll never forget but that's also been published in the peer reviewed literature depression and anxiety actually fatigue the joint problems skinner options of various sorts. And again this is where we're learning more about the connections. In the academic research the the Gut brain connection the J- The gut skin connection the gut. Join Connection Even thyroid actually. And this is one of the things where I think. There's an absolute epidemic emmerich of natural alternative providers including myself in that camp so this is not a disparagement but who are way too quick to diagnose I know someone with a quote unquote thyroid problem and give them thyroid medication. And it's disturbing. How many of these patients actually have no problem at all with their thyroid Loyd but their fatigue depression their constipation is actually being driven by a problem in the gut? And we've even gone so far as to publish a number of case studies on our website. Documenting Manning this same thing Mary sue spend a year and a half going from thyroid specialist. Thyroid specialist finally ends up in our clinic. We inform them that they're thorough. Diagnosis noses was incorrect. From the start we do some simple stuff that we'll talk about here in a moment and literally in two or three months in some of these cases and years long Bouts of symptoms are resolved and credible. It almost sounds like the guy that got health is like foundational that a lot of these other things in Psalm. Neha is not something I ever ever would have connected with the gut definitely mental health issues. I have definitely skin conditions but all of these different things. These different symptoms that appear to be unconnected did might all be rooted in have a foundation in. What's going on in your gut agreed? And that's why I try to bring people back to the recommendation of start art these pillars of Diet and lifestyle and then reevaluate. And if you're not where you WANNA be then instead of going to heavy metal toxins or mold or fiber conversion or to Saas Jerome. I would I take some time to really focus on trying optimize your gut health because you may see again the insomnia and depression. You thought was from thyroid would actually goes away because it was likely being driven by the gun right it so it's really interesting. I would imagine because your doctor I would imagine if I said to you. How do I WANNA start like my gut health? I would assume that you would say well. Come to me and do a bunch of lab tests and we'll see what's going on with your boop but you have a different approach and I like your approach crouch. What's your approach? Well I. I used to order the testing that everyone would think Dr Order and after years and years as I started saying boy doesn't matter if this test is a little high here or a little low there or that test shows X. or Y.. I ended up doing a lot of the same mm stoff and it turns out that many of the treatments in natural medicine can be administered without meeting test and that many of the tasks that are being used in functional medicine actually have not been scientifically validated. So they're just pretty influential and so you you can actually get pretty far down the road of gut health intervention. You can do on your own without doing any testing and it's really important. Understand Dan this because patients will come in say doc. I'm so sick of this depression of this joint pain of this insomnia. I'll do anything well..

Insomnia Diarrhea reflux bloating Dr Michael Rubio insomnia MIT CBO Donna Johnny Lynn Mike Obama Dr Order Dan Byron Loyd Neha abdominal pain hines
"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on Past Gas

Past Gas

09:38 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on Past Gas

"First motorcycle a Harley Davidson. He liked to ride the bike fast and recklessly jumping off of whatever he could doing. wheelies up and down the streets of Butte Montana. Thirteen eighteen year old can tell their their kid. What's that small boys healy? I I think I'd be mad. I'd be like sick and this is boots somebody. They've never seen shit like this any they don't even have TV. It's amazing really funny thing. That happened real quick when he first came to Hollywood. This will come later He was doing wheelies up and down the street and now like in front of a bar that all these sportscasters went to on like Ventura and they all came out and watch him do wheelies and they're like yeah. That was the first time I I even heard. The word really are knew what a whealy was and he is just amazing yeah. My grandma was a flight attendant and like in the forties and she was like yeah. I didn't know what pizza though. It's like twenty five in Italy. Does she like it when she. Yeah it's great like some pilot was like we're going to be at pizza and her friend. Were like what is on on her helmet. That's crazy. The point is like people back in the olden days like just didn't know nowadays holidays. We're pretty aware of almost every Internet makes it so easy for us. Everything like a Wehrley you say. Well I guess that a big sense you'd also get the police to chase him and he would outrun them every time one time Um you showing off her friends and then he crashed into his neighbor's garage and started a fire But after a couple of years thrashing Harley around by the way not his Harley he stole it thrashing the Harley around his grandma replaced the bike with a triumph. HIS GRANDMA GRANDMA GRANDMA WHO's raising him. That's cool yeah. His Grandma's really nice is GRANDPA is really nice to help them out with like money once in a while but I think one weird thing that was in his documentary was the people have but I always want to say but the people of Butte it was kind of like a west like a Western kind of uncivilized civilized town and so they believed in like not law but like salving. It like settling things like a man. I was kind of thing. Yeah and so. They knew that he was doing this. Like shitty things like stealing a motorcycle and Riding around town noon wheelies. But it wasn't it didn't bother them that much and it was like everyone knew each other and so it's kind of this weird like no one cared that he was the breaking all these laws. I think nobody wants to use his doing. Yeah well I mean stealing motorcycles to well yeah but probably gave it back at some point Okay when he wasn't riding motorcycles young Robert now going by Bob got thrilled throwing rocks at prostitutes and running away when their pimps Hims- chased him cool guy. I mean that's a hard job already and then he's making it harder by throwing rocks people. Yeah problem like most high schoolers. He hated going to school because the guy in the way of him riding his motorcycle he dropped out sophomore year and got a job but the Anaconda mining company operating a drill but that was too boring for him so he was moved to service duty where he got to drive an earth mover around He must have gone pretty bored with that as well because one day at work he did a whealy in his what he did it really really. It has earthmover and drove it straight into a high voltage power line. Severing the wires and cutting off power to the entire of Butte. Just like the town tear. He was fired on the spot. But that was okay with him because anything other than riding a motorcycle with considered unimportant unimportant stuff. Knievel didn't need a boss telling him what to do. He'll learn pretty quickly how to use his natural charm to manipulate people. He started he started offering going to help. Guard local businesses overnight for some money on the side. Bob Acted as a private security guard making sure no one baroque into these stores. But but if shops didn't WANNA pay him he would break into them himself and loot whatever he could. This was just one of the many rackets knievel had going on. He was also known as has a great safecracker card. Cheat and stick up kid means he's stuck up people and he was a kid doesn't mean that he was stuck up now means he sticks him up and he was the opposite of stuck up. This life of crime eventually got him arrested. I'm not surprised while in the clink. There's only like eight people in his damn. Well I mean you said there's thirty thousand people your time but that's a small town. I mean that's bigger than a task era. Though imagining where where I grew up. Sorry my hometown of a task era. I was imagining like a five hundred people town. I grew up My city of shorewood Wisconsin had seventeen thousand people and I feel like I knew most down while in the clink. Bob Shared a cell with another local criminal criminal. William no full awful awful. That's very important that you pronounce it William an awful a cop on night duty Solitu- you and said offhandedly great we got awful awful in evil knievel and the name stuck. I think that's so cool. That's cool awful awful evil knievel. That's like you ever have those relatives where you're like. Oh you're so funny like you should be a writer. They come up with great things on the spot and they're like Oh. No that cop should have written for the office Bob later changed it to e. l. because he didn't want to be perceived as a bad guy but he was a bad guy. Make that clear by the late. Fifties crime wasn't looking like a sustainable career for evil everyone in the small town Newnham. And there's no one left and swindle swindle lose money so he joined the army one thing you should know about. Evil Knievel is that he was athletically. Gifted at Butte High School he was proficient in track and field icehockey and ski jumping now in the Army Evil Excelled on the army team particularly in the poll. Jump when it came time for him to choose a path in the army he chose to become a paratrooper making over thirty successful. Jumps which goes to show evil was a thrill seeker. SNOOT SNOOP Thrill Seeker. Excuse me through and through. After he got out of the army he found himself chasing that adrenaline rush now more than ever he participated in local rodeos motorcycle. They go races and ski jump competitions he even won the northern Rocky Mountain Ski Association Class. A men Ski Jumping Ski Jumping Championship in Nineteen Nineteen fifty-nine Ski Jumping Insane I can only imagine that back Danny was even more insane because they probably didn't have all the safety equipment that they do now. Now braces and stuff. Yeah like good helmets. They pro didn't wear helmets at all or not. I like those ski speed need scheme helmets. That are like cones. Skiers are so sick action figures. Bodey Miller who's the one that was like but I love about Olympic athletes is that you forget their names but every four years like Oh yeah dude freaking Apollo Anton Ohno take a little soul. Patch was so cool at one point. Evil played a semi pro. Hongda is this Guy Right and awesome athlete and miss handsome handsome and cool at motorcycle from Butte. Yeah I think I'm GONNA play like semi professional hockey. Now Eh where do you go from the Northern Rocky Mountain Association. Ski Jump Roping. Yes so he was playing summer pro hockey with the Charlotte. Checkers His teammates said he was a decent athlete but one of the biggest bully and he always had to be the center of attention even if it meant getting in a more fights than the other players when he was nineteen. He's only nineteen point. He moved back to on Tanna and use. Use the money from a local car dealership and his GRANDPA to start a semi professional hockey team of his own called the butte bombers. He was the owner coach and and starting center. So you're just like in Butte and maybe you're like yeah. Played some hockey back in the dam and join his team and then coach is like a nineteen year old kid it and the owner. He's like negotiating a salary with his kid. Ever the.

Bob Shared Butte ski jumping Harley Davidson hockey Butte Montana Butte High School Anaconda mining company healy Ventura Rocky Mountain Ski Association Hollywood Italy Northern Rocky Mountain Associ shorewood Wisconsin Tanna writer Anton Ohno
"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on Past Gas

Past Gas

09:38 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on Past Gas

"First motorcycle a Harley Davidson. He liked to ride the bike fast and recklessly jumping off of whatever he could doing. wheelies up and down the streets of Butte Montana. Thirteen eighteen year old can tell their their kid. What's that small boys healy? I I think I'd be mad. I'd be like sick and this is boots somebody. They've never seen shit like this any they don't even have TV. It's amazing really funny thing. That happened real quick when he first came to Hollywood. This will come later He was doing wheelies up and down the street and now like in front of a bar that all these sportscasters went to on like Ventura and they all came out and watch him do wheelies and they're like yeah. That was the first time I I even heard. The word really are knew what a whealy was and he is just amazing yeah. My grandma was a flight attendant and like in the forties and she was like yeah. I didn't know what pizza though. It's like twenty five in Italy. Does she like it when she. Yeah it's great like some pilot was like we're going to be at pizza and her friend. Were like what is on on her helmet. That's crazy. The point is like people back in the olden days like just didn't know nowadays holidays. We're pretty aware of almost every Internet makes it so easy for us. Everything like a Wehrley you say. Well I guess that a big sense you'd also get the police to chase him and he would outrun them every time one time Um you showing off her friends and then he crashed into his neighbor's garage and started a fire But after a couple of years thrashing Harley around by the way not his Harley he stole it thrashing the Harley around his grandma replaced the bike with a triumph. HIS GRANDMA GRANDMA GRANDMA WHO's raising him. That's cool yeah. His Grandma's really nice is GRANDPA is really nice to help them out with like money once in a while but I think one weird thing that was in his documentary was the people have but I always want to say but the people of Butte it was kind of like a west like a Western kind of uncivilized civilized town and so they believed in like not law but like salving. It like settling things like a man. I was kind of thing. Yeah and so. They knew that he was doing this. Like shitty things like stealing a motorcycle and Riding around town noon wheelies. But it wasn't it didn't bother them that much and it was like everyone knew each other and so it's kind of this weird like no one cared that he was the breaking all these laws. I think nobody wants to use his doing. Yeah well I mean stealing motorcycles to well yeah but probably gave it back at some point Okay when he wasn't riding motorcycles young Robert now going by Bob got thrilled throwing rocks at prostitutes and running away when their pimps Hims- chased him cool guy. I mean that's a hard job already and then he's making it harder by throwing rocks people. Yeah problem like most high schoolers. He hated going to school because the guy in the way of him riding his motorcycle he dropped out sophomore year and got a job but the Anaconda mining company operating a drill but that was too boring for him so he was moved to service duty where he got to drive an earth mover around He must have gone pretty bored with that as well because one day at work he did a whealy in his what he did it really really. It has earthmover and drove it straight into a high voltage power line. Severing the wires and cutting off power to the entire of Butte. Just like the town tear. He was fired on the spot. But that was okay with him because anything other than riding a motorcycle with considered unimportant unimportant stuff. Knievel didn't need a boss telling him what to do. He'll learn pretty quickly how to use his natural charm to manipulate people. He started he started offering going to help. Guard local businesses overnight for some money on the side. Bob Acted as a private security guard making sure no one baroque into these stores. But but if shops didn't WANNA pay him he would break into them himself and loot whatever he could. This was just one of the many rackets knievel had going on. He was also known as has a great safecracker card. Cheat and stick up kid means he's stuck up people and he was a kid doesn't mean that he was stuck up now means he sticks him up and he was the opposite of stuck up. This life of crime eventually got him arrested. I'm not surprised while in the clink. There's only like eight people in his damn. Well I mean you said there's thirty thousand people your time but that's a small town. I mean that's bigger than a task era. Though imagining where where I grew up. Sorry my hometown of a task era. I was imagining like a five hundred people town. I grew up My city of shorewood Wisconsin had seventeen thousand people and I feel like I knew most down while in the clink. Bob Shared a cell with another local criminal criminal. William no full awful awful. That's very important that you pronounce it William an awful a cop on night duty Solitu- you and said offhandedly great we got awful awful in evil knievel and the name stuck. I think that's so cool. That's cool awful awful evil knievel. That's like you ever have those relatives where you're like. Oh you're so funny like you should be a writer. They come up with great things on the spot and they're like Oh. No that cop should have written for the office Bob later changed it to e. l. because he didn't want to be perceived as a bad guy but he was a bad guy. Make that clear by the late. Fifties crime wasn't looking like a sustainable career for evil everyone in the small town Newnham. And there's no one left and swindle swindle lose money so he joined the army one thing you should know about. Evil Knievel is that he was athletically. Gifted at Butte High School he was proficient in track and field icehockey and ski jumping now in the Army Evil Excelled on the army team particularly in the poll. Jump when it came time for him to choose a path in the army he chose to become a paratrooper making over thirty successful. Jumps which goes to show evil was a thrill seeker. SNOOT SNOOP Thrill Seeker. Excuse me through and through. After he got out of the army he found himself chasing that adrenaline rush now more than ever he participated in local rodeos motorcycle. They go races and ski jump competitions he even won the northern Rocky Mountain Ski Association Class. A men Ski Jumping Ski Jumping Championship in Nineteen Nineteen fifty-nine Ski Jumping Insane I can only imagine that back Danny was even more insane because they probably didn't have all the safety equipment that they do now. Now braces and stuff. Yeah like good helmets. They pro didn't wear helmets at all or not. I like those ski speed need scheme helmets. That are like cones. Skiers are so sick action figures. Bodey Miller who's the one that was like but I love about Olympic athletes is that you forget their names but every four years like Oh yeah dude freaking Apollo Anton Ohno take a little soul. Patch was so cool at one point. Evil played a semi pro. Hongda is this Guy Right and awesome athlete and miss handsome handsome and cool at motorcycle from Butte. Yeah I think I'm GONNA play like semi professional hockey. Now Eh where do you go from the Northern Rocky Mountain Association. Ski Jump Roping. Yes so he was playing summer pro hockey with the Charlotte. Checkers His teammates said he was a decent athlete but one of the biggest bully and he always had to be the center of attention even if it meant getting in a more fights than the other players when he was nineteen. He's only nineteen point. He moved back to on Tanna and use. Use the money from a local car dealership and his GRANDPA to start a semi professional hockey team of his own called the butte bombers. He was the owner coach and and starting center. So you're just like in Butte and maybe you're like yeah. Played some hockey back in the dam and join his team and then coach is like a nineteen year old kid it and the owner. He's like negotiating a salary with his kid. Ever the.

Bob Shared Butte ski jumping Harley Davidson hockey Butte Montana Butte High School Anaconda mining company healy Ventura Rocky Mountain Ski Association Hollywood Italy Northern Rocky Mountain Associ shorewood Wisconsin Tanna writer Anton Ohno
"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

13:36 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

"Percent of the value. I can probably add as a function in. My experience is thirteen years in the field building actual companies so basically seen most mistakes before Mo- partially probably committed them all and so if I can help a founder avoid them that's great and then of occasionally seeing you know a conceptual framework for resolving very sharp trade offs that it can be useful to a very talented founder and that's all function on my thirteen eighteen years of experience Really running things. I mean. Push back on me. If you don't agree with this but I think it's really important to understand what your unique skills are and it seems like you've done a ton of self reflection of really understand this so I'm wondering if there's anything that you've done to understand what you are best at great question because one of the most important things I read had growing up sexually either junior senior and junior prize maybe software. Your High School Oxley was his books. Being of sports by Pat Riley Called the winner within and in the book he quotes of all things. Jerry Garcia. The grateful dead. Saying you don't want to be the best what you do. You want to be the only one who does what you do. And that's that that definition of how to how to define yourself that like instruction of how to define yourself to be unique I'm really resonated with me and so I've spent a lot of time over my life's yard read this many many years ago for decades ago and I've always wanted to figure out how to define myself. Not just being the best but being unique and so I always thought to be able to communicate that with clarity and so that that leads to a fair amount of reflection similarly venture capitals very competitive industry I compete with a lot. aww talented people in the US incredibly efficient market actually and so you to be successful than efficient market you need to figure out what your comparative the data judges and you need your magnify it if you want to have disproportion success so I spent a lot of time trying to figure out both for me in far our fund how do we have a comparative advantage. vis-a-vis a lot of other talented folks. Do you have a clear concise breakdown of what your comparative advantages. Well Well Yeah No. It's changed a little bit Over over time in in different roles arguably for example. The last x years of my life is executive I think one of the things that well maybe it. Maybe I'll give you a global one. That's probably fair to state Across twenty years. Which is what I've been able to do very well as pair with very opinionated strong willed visionary founders and be there complement and that's a fairly difficult skill or fairly rare skill actually In there's reasons why on as I mentioned all these people from Peter to reach a Max Jock to vinod to Peter are all very different with different strengths and different needs and being able to be a compliment to them in a way that they appreciate it. It is a unique skill and I of often thought about doing it again. And you know finding another one of those people because actually the is really challenging and very ornamental works So that that's one that's probably inconsistent but let's say as an example Last what's four or five years in my executive career. I was able to blend what what might be called design thinking with impure pure call analysis in a quite interesting way so the way I would describe this is even is a business person Most of the designers I worked with would really appreciate my feedback and being able to work with first rate designers as a quantitative empirical thinker with the Business Marketing Mindset Was Pretty a rare. Actually it was a it was a significant compliment when a designer would come up to me and ask for feedback and especially say you're the only business personnel like sir. Try to be able to marry those two things and that not that common. So let's talk about the marriage of that then so I'm thinking about just your overall idea generation process you when you hear about a business your vetting it through. What is that look like for you? Then the marriage of those two. I don't actually do a lot of top down thinking of of Interesting ideas that would be great businesses. I'd say that occur. That happens for me once every four or five years. It's very slow pace. I have friends and colleagues his who seemed to have good ideas Every week or every month or every year. That's not me. I'm a better filter of other people's ideas than I am a generator of my own So a lot of what I do is I listened to ideas and riffs on them or critique them and help other people refine them by my critiques or by my wrists versus like generating them yet. I I should reword that I met more about those risks and I'm wondering are you going out on your own rethinking. Those ideas through seeking pushback even harder or is it just kind of right there in the moment you're thinking through it's usually. It's usually pretty spontaneously pretty quickly. I had an immediate reaction very fast to a lot of ideas and that may start a very deep in long prolonged dialogue about the merits or demerits. Seven idea you know over. Over twenty years you develop like simple distillation jr that are short short hand Principles so for example. I tend tend to like vertically integrated companies. I don't tend to like components. I you you develop these Ceuta biasi pseudo principles based APOL- law A lot of very detailed and specific thinking that you start uses an immediate filter and then you engage from the immediate. Get solter so let's stick with finding that undiscovered talent and I know one of your goals is to monopolize that and and how close are you to that. Unfortunately I am very very far away have yet to come up with the perfect answer and how to become a monopolist on undiscovered talent One day hopefully maybe once I finally finally achieve it. Maybe then I'll quit. I'm one of the important. Things is taken that talent and being able to structure that culture around it. So what are your first principles around designing a culture. Well the first principles to that or if you're going to attract people with extremely high potential. The first thing you you have to do is let them thrive which is giving them degrees of freedom should do both what they can do very well until to some extent concomitantly allow them make mistakes if you try to constrain very talented people. You're only going to create a mirror of yourself with your same same strengths and weaknesses. You have to let people do stuff that you disagree with or because you can't really tell how good they are if they're just replicating what you would have them do justice first thing second thing is you need to let them. You need to give them enough visiting giving enough rope. That they can prove what they're awesome and get close enough to failing that they've they feel the consequences but with enough of a sort of a safety valve that if there's there's catastrophic potential specially for company an operating company that you have enough time and Attention to inner intercept dot. So so that. That alone is a major challenge. Second I think you need a process for where nobody's perfect. Where whoever whoever they said people you can learn and that can be through Moses or can be through top down instruction but he basically wanted to be ultimate enter people And there are different ways to do that. But you want people to increase the their proficiency improve their craft and you want to create a process and culture where that's possible encouraged to for example one of the most important lessons I've learned when I was a law clerk so right out of law school When I was twenty five years old was The judge I clerked for sat down and and she basically explained that my job in our jobs that you cook co clerks was to not allow her to make a mistake and that is something something I that lesson is something. I demand and instruct all the table. Come to work for me. Is your number one job is. Don't let me allow don't ever let you make a mistake and I don't care what you have to do to stop me for making a mistake and shoe versus you'll meet a lot of people life that will complain and whine you know. Oh my boss. Did this decided that or me. And I sorta transform that in invert dot and say it's always your obligation to convince whoever you report Portugal that they're wrong and most talented people that I've ever worked with take. This instruction very seriously in a very good at forty out to me would have to make a mistake. I love that framework. I loved the pushback. I want to dive back for a second in just giving that overall freedom to make mistakes and any memories where you had someone you worked with really gave you that leeway to make those mistakes and learn didn't maybe not actually the people I worked for a very opinionated. Very strong views Maybe yeah I'm not sure I'm not sure I like that much of a license but that's okay I give other people licensed by more exactly so you. So you mentioned that moment when you you were clerking any other defining moments in your career. I know when you pivoted joined pay pal any other things that really just come to mind for you. I mean one of the most important moments of my career. There was when my first week at payback. Actually believe it or not. The Saturday afternoon of the first week Peter and I went for a jog around the Stanford campus and we have this prolonged longed elaborate conversation about how to discover on the importance of an discovering undiscovered talent. He basically had this point and observation that you can scale start up competing for the same talent that all the large comments wanted at the time. It'd be somewhere like Yahoo Microsoft. AOL All believe it or not e Bay on you had to be able to find people that they didn't know how how to process because otherwise they would just outbid you compensation etc and show. I didn't understand understood the logic of that in it was certainly the power behind the pay. Powell recruiting machine. But I didn't understand how I didn't how to accomplish it so it took me the multiple years of trial and error theory out how to skeletal Albany by only hiring people that were undiscovered Sue sube but then the the benefit or the value and the importance of it was really touch me November of two thousand and it's been the driving force in my career so clearly a very indispensable conversation who'd win a race. You're Peter Back then. He's a much better runner than me. I probably could outrun them. Now but He he he he. He is much much more provisions runner than I ever was so sticking with discovering undiscovered talent. What are some unmeasurable things that you believe? We just provide the best benefit in got sure mushroom totally following the question Are there the unique traits that someone might do that. You can't measure but you just think provides tremendous benefit. Yeah I mean certainly things like whether you describe it Paul. Graham has his great essay called relentlessly resourceful Title and I think it sort of gives away the conclusion then whether you describe it as being relentlessly resourceful or tenacious or grit. They're somewhat similar concepts. I think relentlessly resourceful is the probably the most apt description. But they're fairly similar traits. I I still believe in the benefits of intelligence than I Q. I think you do need to see things other. People don't see you have to do things other people won't do which is the relentlessness but being able to see things in solutions and ideas other people don't see is partially function of q and then third probably something to the altus scale yourself which is around being a magnet for talent to even be altus missile. There people sell vision to other people. That's compelling because you really can't change the world at least start ups by yourself what do you do. You discover. Discover one of these people and they're working on the wrong thing well that's rare truthfully Partially because they're better filters of their own time they value their own time. Systematically you know As well as I would. So they'll they'll know they're working on the wrong thing more than I will. In any ways asymmetric information I may highlight highlight. Ask for them. Or may give them some clarification about like The value of their time but they really already know that in their heart and they just made many sort of reinforcement reinforcement. I mean that's a lot of a lot of my role in. Many ways is very similar to a psychologist in some ways of giving people feedback by asking questions and at the end of the questioning. Kinda gets to the right conclusion Or submit I think on my role as being haunted House Mirror. Like cartoonish merits or this or exaggerates. The strengths and we this is really just play back..

Peter Back executive founder Pat Riley Jerry Garcia Mo Oxley US House Mirror Portugal Yahoo law clerk altus Powell AOL Graham Albany Paul e Bay
"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

13:40 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"Everybody welcome back to the show as you heard in the introduction. I am very very pleased. Pleased to have Jim Lindenberg on the show today. I so it's very interesting. Jim is a person that I've only met once before at an event at Cardinal Stritch where it was it was an event for the TV. Show that that Jim has been on The project kitchen it's called. I believe that's the name and It was so it was great for me. I got introduced to Jim and I didn't know him but he's the guy that I have and maybe you have you. You heard a ton about over the years and always been like what is that who you know who is that guy. And when am I ever GonNa have the chance to meet him and my friend DOCO is inskeep. Brought his name up just before I met him so I was like. Wow this is really I dunno divine intervention or whatever but So I reached out estrogen agenda if he'd consider being on the show and We had you know we had we had. We had a A little bit of challenge putting schedules together. But I'm so glad that you've finally agreed to be on the show and I'm very pleased to have you so. Welcome thank you very much. I'm glad to be here too. Yeah I started everyone on my shows the same way and that's with a a simple question. Jim How did happen for you. Well it's a long story How did it happen for me but I was actually working. At a wiring cable company locally here and really enjoyed it learned a lot and the founders of the company were great guys and really took me under their wing and taught me a lot about the wire and cable industry. Unfortunately after about thirteen years I was overlooked look for promotion and it really crushed me. I had built myself up. Took a lot of education We did everything I could to make my resume. Great to possibly be in top management vice president and hopefully president someday of this company The company decided to go outside and bring someone in and hired someone from the outside after houser. Thirteen years so I was younger at the time. I wasn't going to be negative employees and I thought you know I need to look and see what else is out out there A lot of my fellow employees and my vendors and customers you know had brought up about have you ever thought about uh-huh may not be your own business and I didn't think that because of the fact that I had no money and it's hard to open up a business when you have no money money but there was a vendor. That for years was after me to open up my own electrical wire and cable distributorship. Yep and I always said no no. I'm not interested but when I got overlooked for this promotion I thought maybe I should talk to them and they were out of Ohio and they had a lot of money and there was two guys and they each put up a quarter of a million dollars to start the company any and the company that started off for me it was called World Class Wire and cable side with two employees. It was very scary the first year as most people know who start businesses. You're worried about how do you pay the bill or about cash flow In those days there was a fax machine. You just prayed that in order would come over to facts and you were hoping it wasn't going to be a bill so that first year to you know it was tough it was tough but Trying to make a long story. Short had good employees and a good team and and we worked hard but we had fun too and the company grew every year and Turned out to be a very successful business and in the business that you were in where you got overlooked. How did you get started in that business? In what roles did you did you Play while you were there. While originally I went to school and Dan got my college degree from Whitewater and Started off in accounting so I had a little bit of a financial background but then I finished with management so I I knew a little bit about a lot of things in business Took a job as a buyer at laddish and cutting and and unfortunately after one year I was laid off but they hired me to be in purchasing and they did a great job training they had me work in each department. It and I learned an awful lot about business. Just one year Atlantis. And then from there I went to a company called sales recruiters and they placed me with this other wire company and I started off in purchasing there and after a year. They said we think you're a salesperson and my father was always a salesperson so I thought yeah I'll give that a try so they put me on inside sales and outside sales. AOL's and then I moved to Greenville South Carolina and opened up a branch furthest company and I traveled all the United States selling wire all the United States. It's and that gave me experience to be pretty good at wire and cable distribution and First of all just to give people 'cause I I don't know if everybody knows what wire and cable I mean people generically. What wiring cable is but what what exactly where he's reselling sure Good question Electrical wire and cable electronic wire and cable anything that has electricity running through it. I'm selling it and I'm selling it to manufacturers. That are making a product companies such as gener- AC Allen Bradley and g medical and Harley Davidson When you think about it electrical wire and cable can pretty much gone to any product? Look around any room and there's wire connected to yeah just here with our podcast all kinds of wire and so when you when you get passed over. What did what was the conversation? Like between the owners and you how did they. How did they explain that to you? Well at the time They felt that I was a little young and that I needed more experience and and I thought after work in thirteen years that I was pretty well qualified and like I say I went and got a lot of experience and education education to round myself off and give myself a good background so I thought I was ready And for whatever reason you know they. It wasn't my time and I was involved with athletics a lot in high school and college and I coach a lot of youth sports. So so I wasn't going to be a negative person and I asked many times you know. Can I get this promotion. How do I get this promotion and I could just sense that the time wasn't there and You don't maybe I should move on so my path to get promotions to possibly be a vice. President was a little quicker than their path. And I wasn't going to wait okay and you From an education standpoint. I noticed that Oh you got your master your MBA from cardinal stritch. was that part of the part of the action steps. You were taking to position yourself for that next role or yes Yeah I did a lot of things. You know Wisconsin Bell Telemarketing Class. Ms Oh Lee Electricity in. Oh just whatever you could do whether it was networking joining all the different chamber of Commerce's The coaching you know volunteering church things you do just to get more of a background and be more well rounded individual okay and and these two fellows that helped back you when you started. You said that they'd been talking to you for a while. Where does it just because they liked you was? Were they having an issue with the company and they thought you could you know. Give them another opportunity. I'm curious if they're you know what because it's it's a big big too large amount of support for someone that they were working with at a company if they were happy with especially if there were happy with the company. Yeah you would like to think that somehow you stood out right as a successful salesperson and and at that time national sales manager I I am out and about. I'm traveling already United States. I'm calling on a lot of the top customers. I'm meeting with the top vendors You're out and about so it was it's kind of easy to be noticed I believe that having a huge network is helps you be very successful in life life and business and by being out and about meeting all kinds of people and going to a lot of events I built up a pretty strong network and I still do to a stain. Continue that and let let me back up for just a little bit before I go forward when you were a kid Or maybe a teenager or maybe even when you were in college what what. What were you thinking that Your Life Path was going to be? The reason I ask is because I I didn't know what my life path was going to be. I ended up in an industry and with a company that completely foreign to me as a kid I never would have thought of it and you mentioned in your dad was in sales so I just thought well you know. Find out what you were thinking what you were thinking them. Yeah Well my big goal was I wanted wanted to play for the Green Bay packers but I was too slow and not big enough for that so that was going to happen but You know I have pretty simple goals get married. have of kids and be able to pay your rent And just live and survive so I never had gigantic dreams besides being a green bay packer acker Never thought I'd be a successful business person My parents were very hard workers and they introduced me to good core values throughout my life and they were hard workers so I kinda followed in their path and You know worked as many jobs as I could through high school and college and even after College And just try to make money so that you can pay your bills. What are some of the things that you did when you were a kid for work? I worked at McDonalds which was a great background. I started my own painting company. Funny me and a couple of friends. We'd go around pain apartments and houses I collected Money for nonprofits. It's you know every year. Yeah I cut grass at high schools Every year you have kind of a different job to work your way through you know high school and College College I tended bar. I bounced A little bit of everything however you can make a buck and when you went to Whitewater you you played football all there right. So that's like the top of that's one of the top division three programs in the country. It is now. Yeah so that's that's pretty spectacular right. That I don't know did that feel good or was that was that a goal of a new here goal was to be packer so was did you go to boil water for for football or did you knowing that you wanted to say study accounting I really went for the education in that they were a strong business school so I wasn't exactly sure you know what I wanted to end up in B but I was pretty good. Math and financials So I thought all start off as an accountant and as I got into I switched general management but I just knew they were great business school. And that's why I chose Whitewater Okay and so let me move back it to where you decided to leave so you had asked you about what the discussion was about. You being passed over How did you they had? Did you end it with the company. How what was that? Conversation like Well it was very very hard for me because after working there thirteen eighteen years. I thought I would stay there my whole life and I wanted to stay there. The whole life But like I said at times. Maybe you know people See it differently and so it was very very hard so I resigned and you know gave them my two week notice and At the time I was thinking of starting my consulting company which I did and small business consulting Lindy enterprises and it still exists to this day and I thought that's what I was going to do and.

Jim Lindenberg United States Whitewater president Cardinal Stritch Ohio football Green Bay McDonalds vice president College College Wisconsin packer accountant Lindy enterprises cardinal stritch. national sales manager Dan Allen Bradley
"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on Inspirado Projecto

Inspirado Projecto

05:12 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on Inspirado Projecto

"A chip over Snake River every time. Let's say if we were to define the idea of being on stage is just a pure pleasure in just being on the stage rather rather than the the laugh because a lot of times. There's an emphasis put on the laugh. If we don't get those laughs it got really bad it would take the cut. Oh can I smoke coffee. Thank you but if we take off at emphasis then it's even easier to to to create what we're creating. Do you feel that. Yeah I mean the less pressure. I have the more relaxed and I'll do better. Some about is like I'll I just fucking doing but there's also if you're too casual you can fuck up and could forget lines can be me too casual on stage. So there's there's always a tight rope in terms of all right. I want it tight but not too tight and loose. You know the head space centers. In Sunday's It was before and I was like really uncomfortable. I'm not sure how this is going to go. I haven't done this thirteen eighteen years. No one here knows me foreign crowd but it's not you know there's a lot going on in my head and it's you know you and I have had this discussion. That turns Bobby Deerfield is not me. You know what I mean. I tried to play it like that's my friend. reclined I'm as manager. You know what I mean and do you try to keep that separation because I feel like that plays into it. And that's important to the out of the character and zero respect. Bobby I really. It's kind of fucking nuts because I realize yes. There's sounds like schizophrenics I do it but not really. It's it's just like the way and actors carrying over his character. You always hear the stories of actors who are very protective over their work. In their art burst. They're stickler about it. So I was like I made this deal with myself before I was going on and I was like just be Ukraine. Just be like you're the stage manager guy for Bobby. Just be cool and just have the gear setup act like a Rhody so I said all the gear up and all that I love it. Yeah Yeah and the deal I made with. I'm going to walk out and then I'm going to put the hat and glasses on those glasses on. I'm talking about you know that's how do you feel that it gives you more freedom to just be completely focused in what he his mind was. It got really intense really fast and and I knew like art. I don't know if I can hold on for too long so I put the glasses on like right before I got on stage and still uh-huh cool and I'm not a decker. No I'm not I'm we're sharp okay. But I'm somewhere else cribbage. You're safe now. Let's cardiac yet I have not yet. It's still puts into my coffee taken over that. Yeah absolutely I mean Ukraine and with that one has been drive. Is that Roman there. It's delicious uh-huh my God. Is there any of them have left this issue is the drake from a little announced. Impose Exergen Duggan viramune. I got on stage and I'd fuck in somewhere else. Thank you. It wasn't me that was Craig you could've total. I mean seriously you do an audible of that you know you just have a night of sending the foam around record the audio record that year we can do that easier. Yeah yeah absolutely booming eggers. I need to work this story under a little bit. Let's find right. It's perfect one dragon. Dragging the character. I yeah just imagine like this. This guy he's dragging the dragons do not know what my because he never think about those jobs when it comes to like fantasy stuff like the people who have like someone just killed a dragon. Someone's gotTa take some dose on Wall Bradley Bradley Edward Second Alabel Money. That's all I got in Germany. We will talk more even more later about other things. Feed.

Bobby Deerfield Ukraine Bobby Craig Bradley Bradley Edward Snake River Bobby I Exergen Duggan cribbage Germany
"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

09:21 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"I prefer pope. Nobody okay I have a complaint about your name of names are supposed to be at M. BIG UATION as opposed to creating more ambiguity. So I'M GONNA stick with Pope. Nobody that I know exactly who I'm talking by Subvert Subvert Nomenclature apparently in Illinois they have come up with the grand idea of creating what we called confinement cells in prison. You know the whole Segregation so they decided. This'll be a good idea for it. Well solid days in segregation and it is a Kind of surreal experience. I perfer D. M. T. by a long shot. Yeah not much fun and oftentimes they will only give you say of religious book to read. I true true through which is one of the reasons. I became a pope. Because it occurred to me that as a church I'd be able to put in Copies of Atlas Atlas shrugged and the fountainhead. And have my members able to say. Oh well I wanNA religious book bring the Atlas Shrugged Something Man Economy and state so here from PROPUBLICA. The spaces have gentle names James. The reflection room the cool down room the calming room the quiet room but shut inside them in public schools across the state of Illinois children as young as five wail for their parents streaming anger and beg to be he led out. I'd like to just remind everybody why confinement exists. Now you know custody care and control. This is is all part of the prison system. But it came from quaker's in the late nineteenth century attempting to come up with if something that was more humane than the old dungeon system. That sort of was used up to that point and failed abysmally abysmally they really did. I mean spectacularly. The idea will quakers thereabouts sitting in silence and listening to God so they thought honey I wonder if we just locked people in rooms and demanded absolute silence from them whether they would get better under the answer. No no no what it did is drive them insane. In many cases that was abandoned but but modified not just by the quakers that point everybody liked it. Oh this is great. Let's lock people in little rooms. Not that much different than a dungeon but the the whole quietness introspection aspect. That's the quaker thing so I never noticed a lot of quietness or introspection. I remember a lot of people screaming a lot of people fighting. You know you know I mean. Look when you're dealing with prisoners you're dealing with people who are Presumably not doing very well in society. So you need some kind of system to deal with an idea it. I think that if we got rid of the drug war we'd probably have about twenty percent of the people in prison that we do today I would. I would tend to agree both. Because you know there's people are inert directly because of the drug war four and then you have the people who are in there because the drug were made them poor or because the drug war deprived them of a father Whole variety hi it? Yeah that I it would take a little time for to reach that eighty percent number. But it's it's some conjecture give me a decade and in the drug war now. Not Not saying there won't be some ramifications societally but we're talking about prison here so there you go going on with this about school school or you know as I like to call it middle class welfare babysitting day prison. I say that because it's middle class welfare because the middle class people have not yet figured out the middle class people like me. Most of whom have not figured out the bourgeoisie. I guess that's what we are. I don't know the only infringe have not figured out that. It is a terrible idea to turn your kids over to the government. I mean a terrible belie dea. He will yeah if you send your children to Caesar to be educated. Don't be surprised when they return as Romans indeed and they do over and over again now I get that we're all robbed and the former property tax to pay for these things but I mean eighteen. Eighty five percent of the kids in the country. Go to government school and well there you have. I mean the the government school had the kids for more than one hundred years. Now anything that we've got an America you can blame on that at. Yeah I mean. Yeah if you've got an issue with the millennials Zuma's guess who raised them the government. They had him for thirteen eighteen years. Well time they rose to them went to college to even though there weren't enough post college jobs for most of them and that's the doing doing the school system too so Illinois has the straight idea of locking kids in quiet rooms. I'M GONNA go on with the story from PROPUBLICA Republica. The students most of them with disabilities. Scratch the windows or tear at the padded walls. They throw their bodies against locked doors. They wet their pants. Some children's spend hours inside these rooms missing class time now for kid these hours I remember giving timeouts else to my son. He hasn't had one in years but I the rule was that I heard is one minute of time out for the age of the child and so I I think he was six the last time he got one and the reason he got it is because he was showing off his new bicycle to the men who were laying saying metal roofing on top of a shed. We have so if the metal roofing let's go it cleaves them in half like a guillotine right. He had been warned two times to get out of there and he really wanted to show off this bicycle and he felt like that was the best position to do it right there in the cleaning zone and so you know off we had to go for a little Time out to you know. Think about what was going on but punishments. They're relatively easy. Ed When you've got a kid who's normal not also easy. When the kid has disabilities these autistic kids can be very difficult to deal with however this is probably a bad that idea? It's certainly doesn't play well in the press as you will soon see because I'm going to go ahead and finish the story and I would have to say that a lot of these kids kids in the schools. I mean they're not going to grow up and get jobs. That's not going to happen with now. There are autistic. Kids who will grow up and get shunned get jobs. Don't don't get me wrong. It's a lung spectrum but a lot of them are not going to grow up and and and get jobs and in that case corralling them into these schools is just cruel right. I mean it's not a system that works. No I mean I get that there's a mandate for the public schools to take every kid that's a problem but another point we are look at. Is that that public school students. I don't say graduates because they don't all make it but public school students are far over represented in the prison system in the United States. meaning that if you send your kid to a private school or if you home school your kid or boarding school or whatever the other options are your kid is much less likely to end up in prison so we could I mean this is just a correlation not causation situation. But we could presume. The government school is not very good with this data. We can presume that the government schools not very good at keeping kids out of prison. Well do end ended up in prison at least prepared them for their future right now. Illinois is going one step further and showing them. What confinement cells are like? They're missing class time. I am and through it all adults stay outside the door writing down everything that happens so there in these little padded cells sells and people are peering in at them. What's the suicide rate for these adults? That's what I want to know. How many of them can't take eight five five? Four five zero three three seven three three balance of nature's fruit and veggie capsules contain one hundred percent vine ripened fruits and vegetables. Tested did pure with no pesticides fillers or additives of any kind and are the most effective whole food supplements.

Illinois M. T. James America Zuma Caesar United States.
"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on Wednesdays at Nine

Wednesdays at Nine

08:47 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on Wednesdays at Nine

"Shouted to Andy Phipps. aloke seeing them shutouts handicaps among big old boy. See that guy and a couple in about five weeks huby here. We're GONNA fucking fuck the more you ever hear. Tom Said we hear that did not. Oh High Bar yeah. I love that scene so much. That's the only thing I love hallmark. Thomas Watch right fucking so good. Yeah yea you guys have any movie recommendations watched over this week or something. What do we got well? We watched the staircase me Tom. And cody the light is the lighthouse. The staircases the guy's crazy I was you. Lighthouse the lighthouse. Yeah it looks good to Willem Defoe and Robert Robert Pattinson from AH black and white film it takes place in the late. Eighteen hundreds at a lighthouse us on an island in New England. Yeah and it's a really old lower lighthouse keeper and a young kind of maintenance helper upper easily traveler vagrant needed a fresh dot okay and it was good. It was really good. It's funny I ended up watching another movie by the same director called the witch. ooh right afterward which was also. I mean just in the theme of Holiness Halloween here and everything I like it came out in two thousand fifteen. It was really good Netflix. Yeah Okay Otis on Netflix Netflix. On the witch you know. What's crazy crazy is? I fucking rented it on Amazon Prime and then he is on Netflix and I watched on Amazon prime. And then I was like I WanNa Watch the witch again. As I'm scrolling through Netflix it comes up as recommending. You Mother Idiots. I was like it was here the whole time. They got good notice. Search like all four war of your movie streaming plaster email. You just created a NAP boy. He just created an APP. That you're right. Maybe rich the socks because so how can you. How do you owe me and then it takes you to your APP right? Well we we gotTA stop that raise. Exactly Yeah well thanks for joining welcome to episode fifty four. I was GonNa ask you the Guy who did the witch also do who hereditary no. That's just the same production company. Yeah Predator eight twenty four production company. No no sorry. The hereditary. Terry Well Terry was our astor midsummer. Yeah and then this other Guy Robert eggers did which and Lighthouse uh-huh and that was really scary. Pick they have cool shake scary house. No no that was Oscar okay. I'M SCARED ME I. I thought it was going to be scary movie. But it's not the lighthouse yeah hereditary was was very scary. Have you guys watched the joker yet. Yeah no me. Neither I thought you guys should see it. It's good recommendations from one to four. What do you recommend our eight four? All right we got good reveals three point. Seven stars out of four was just our own review system. It's just one out of three one out of three. It's a seven and we're always over time so you never know the twitter account we ray dogs. Yeah and it's always like like This dog is fourteen hundred ten. It's like this is a dog is like says something about the dog guy. Water Doc is just like the dog could just be like sitting outside of building a New Yorker like. This dog is also a doorman. We talk about twelve hundred ten. So they're always so regenerating the dog the dog in the photo would boop boop and thus we're giving him a thirteen out of ten. Yeah I like the fact that it's it's always it's always over ten. Yeah just like why. They're so good remained voice. And it's like it's like kind of thirteen eighteen year talking precise right. It's like wow. I totally agree. That's thirteen right. That's good molly loves that. Yeah that's Super Fund or shutter. We write dogs New Book 'cause it's not we rape dogs because that's a totally different account. Follow rate with T- ooh Qatar. Weird turn so dark we rape dogs. That's wonder why they gaetano thirteen hundred. We don't this is ray with careful what you say out of ten Jewish for Holy Shit. You guys are sick and the headman hate when that stuff happens. That's all I know. I've only known one thing in my life is a. You guys are smug sick so so I can pooper her per boo Halloween. I know you love it into work a costume contest. Today it was great it was pineapple express with two other. Co Workers. Did you is wearing something we did not. We didn't yeah. Yeah Yeah who won the two people dressed up as has the twin sisters from the shining. Was it good. Yeah the costumes were spot on. They had like all this fake blood on them and shit which is awesome. I'll show you a picture school. who were the three characters and Pineapple Express Dale Denton Myself Saul silver? which was James Franco? Oh which somebody from another graphic designer played the person on your right on here. Yeah Yeah that was the James Franco. Yes and then the other one was Tom Cruise. That was copywriter. Guy's super funny. He read Danny McBride with a neck. Brace yeah exactly. Oh yeah when he goes through has trying to get my mother the focus scholarship. Yeah and you were one. He's dealing with Rogan's character. You've been served. I made across joint joint. I got I got you. You were crossing that join Doug. I can't stand. It was a real joint. Now that would have been even is just paper pretty good. It's tight I'll make you on a real one though L.. Make sorry I keep the dragon with a cross joint Saturday night. Let's to to wild things. He's right Saturday night. I already got compromising on a night. He doesn't come out much. nope not to watch fights. Add a crib at somebody's like residents residents. He wants to be able to you know if he needs to put his feet up. He's able to do so if he wants to. A little bit more ice cubes in his drinking and get up and do it himself. There's no venue going to use the bathroom. He knows exactly where it is. He knows where his car is if he needs to run onto his car and grab something able to do so. That's what the what with the dragons all about so. I'm going to be the first one at your house on Saturday. You'll be there at four thirty. I'll be there at six so come whenever I'm working till five. I want all right great man. I'll see you when you get out of the shower. I'll be downstairs and I'll be there like it'd be naked it and we don't have to worry if we need anything to eat. We can go across the street or we can go to sexy toys. Whatever you want? We'll bring over some steaks and stuff perfect all right great so I'll see he this weekend and we'll see all of you next week for episode Fifty Five Wednesdays between in good night..

Netflix Tom Cruise Guy Robert eggers Amazon rape James Franco Andy Phipps. cody Willem Defoe Thomas Robert Robert Pattinson Terry twitter New England director Danny McBride Qatar Oscar
"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

11:27 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen eighteen years" Discussed on My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

"And I'm here with featured guests. Dennis and Katie. O'Brien Denison Katie. Are you ready to rock alertly. Okay all right well let me introduce you to the audience. You have a bit of heroic story here. Denison Katie decided to create chain of wealth. After a tough conversation about Katie's debt. She had over two hundred thousand dollars of debt that included a student loan mortgage car loan and negative equity. And let me tell tell you you're not alone or you weren't alone as I can see a lot of that going on in America after hunkering down and re prioritizing what is important in life they have managed Enersen pay off all their debt in less than two years all while getting married and paying for their wedding in cash. Katie and Dennis take a minute going further tidbits about your life. Yes thank you so much for having us like you said we just got married about a month and a half ago I we got married in South Africa. Because that is where Devos's family is a beautiful location. Yeah when we talk without a hitch absolutely beautiful so I kept expecting something to go wrong but wintle perfectly. We were very very blessed. The weather was perfect. We saw some really cool animals and yeah wait till fairly well. Yeah fantastic fantastic well. Congratulations mom I promise. I'm going to get married when I grow up. She's GonNa she's GonNa go. Hey I heard that my number one listener. Well now it's time to share your worst investment ever and since no one goes into their worst investment investment thinking it will be take a moment and tell us a bit about the circumstances leading up to it and then tell us your story yes sir. We're going to highlight one of Katie's debts. Let's that's she paid off but to give you an idea as to where it all started. So Katie moved into my pop up to DC. We originally admitted Tampa. We'd been dating backwards and forwards and I had to move for work. We kind of agreed that she would come and join me. At the time she says. So she's had a menchie schoolteacher. Ah Trade and she quit her job obviously coming up and she didn't want to take a job because she was worried you know. What if this doesn't work out? I need a backup plan if money to jump except I need to get up there. Quick I mean look at this guy was so. She didn't take up a job she when she moved. Stop and look at the time. But you move into DC without any income and things were grateful a couple of months and all of a sudden you know the Bulls started coming in and Katie was always scared to check the Mail on sketch. She had anxiety of a check in the mail and she never used to lock it win. is say. Well let me ask male with downstairs will Rachi. Let's go grab that's and one day like after this like tension and not that we don't even check them out a skit. So what are you worried about. It's just the male. Yes and that's when it all started so I didn't want to check the mail because because I knew what laid waiting for me in the mailbox and it was like a stack of bills like this and I was right and and after a long night we told everything up and it came to a staggering. Two hundred thousand dollars worth of debt and I thought I was going to be sick. I had no job. I didn't know what to do is pure panic so a lot like you said in the intro it was student loan a mortgage and then a car loan in negative equity. I'm going to focus only on the negative equity part because it is the most regretful. threatful one that I have you because you have to go to school so you take out a loan you buy a home you take out a mortgage. Those are all understandable thing. The negative equity on the other. Our hand is like such a moment in my life or now I just look back I think like what in the world reside thinking so it back in March two thousand fifteen to notice them fourteen somewhere around there. I was dating this boy and he was really convincing. He needed a new car for some reason or another and he had bad credit and he convinced me after many conversations that if I were to co-sign a loan for him that that would lower his interest rate and then we'll be able to save money to do all kinds of other things with the money so at the time. I'm driving a two two thousand two Toyota Corolla with a dent in the side. Okay the check engine. Light is on the you know sue sue. Every time I went to get gas I would have to pop up in the hood. Check the oil. I always had an extra thing of oil in the back of my car. Just think inside a poor more in I I am not like a car person and had never had a car payment before this so finally I go and I geico to the car dealership. He picks out their car and he tells me that he has all this negative equity and and at the time I can use my context clues I know. Negative equity is not great but it was super sure what negative equity even was was at this point and I am twenty five twenty six and now I've got my own apartment. I graduated from college. I have a job like I know everything so I I do the terrible thing. I don't even tell my mom that doing it until after it's done so I co signed for the car and it was not even like a really really nice cars. Well it was nice farther like Haiyan Day it wasn't like a Mercedes or BMW or anything high ends like that. So that was march. And I'm sure as you can probably imagine that relationship quickly hit like a hill and there's just like a straight plummet down and that the friendship relationship was over and he goes well. Thanks for the car that you're going to keep making payments onyx under your name. I'm not paying for it and I thought was. Can you even do that. Yes exactly out all she can after more than one night of tears and my mom trying to help me my brother trying to help me the only away. Well first let me let me back up a little bit when I come signed. He said this'll be no problem to you. I promise I will make every single payments comments and then we are no longer friends and now my credit is attached to the so the first month he made the payment second month. He didn't make the payment and I called every single day. He never made the payment so I didn't know what else to do along with some other stuff that was going on. I went to a lawyer and I said I don't know what to do. I need him to take this car and pay for it or I need him to give back to me so I can deal with this so I'm sure you can imagine like the dog he was. I came home one night. I was living with my mom at the time. I came home one night and and in front of her. How they're six the car and he said it cures go ahead and take it no problem you know basically saying thank you for paying all of my negative equity off on it and we're talking not a little bit of negative equity twenty thousand dollars and Sand Lake then said I a teacher? Twenty thousand dollars is a lot of money for me and so now. I'm panicked next because I don't really know what to do. And I started the process of trying to get his name off the title naturally. He's super hard to work with. He won't even even do that. And I don't know what possessed me but we went to a car dealership my mother and one day because she told me that if I make all the payments on the car and in three years the cars almost paid off he can still come in the middle of the night and take the car away from me. Yeah and that is really now that I have the car back and I can make the payments and my card is not going to be affected. That was my next big fear that he was going to take car in the middle of the night. So I went to a car dealership in Tampa where I was living at the time. And when and I and told the guy what had happened nothing makes you feel more like a bozo then a situation and like this and I remember they i. I thought I was going to be able to go in and pick out a cheaper car. Get his name off of it and Bing Bang boom like we're done John and life can move on. I was wrong just like your head is shaking. I was wrong so then we're looking at all these. He's like fifty and sixty thousand dollar cars. I had never had a car payment. My car is at the time like twelve thirteen eighteen years old so I just like we have to have something cheaper. I can't afford the and the guy told me he said the can't do anything and cheaper because you have so much negative equity you need alone. They'll be able to cover the cost of the car. Just to add to that saw the dealerships are allowed to do that and the reason they weren't giving her a learn with because she had no collateral so it was high risk for them to give her a cheap car. And say we'll just giving you twenty thousand dollars. I'm hoping that you pay it back back. So they say well. If it's not a problem we'll to sell your more expensive assets said that way if you default we have more claim so from the caused the ship I totally get it and I understand why but it's a tough position to be in talking to the salesmen. I didn't didn't even go and look at cars. I know a lot of people go and buy a car. They walked the law and they test drive and they do this and that and everything. I did not do that. There's there's a car sitting right on the showroom floor since I had to get a super expensive car. There's no point in looking at the cheaper cars that can't get so. I bought this blue. Honda cars sewer right off the showroom floor with like thirty five miles on it and I hated it. I didn't even sit in it before I bought. How did I just signed the paperwork and I remember sitting in the dealership with my mom and it was like a beautiful? Saturday is by this time unlike late September but when all this had kinda come to surface and I had moved out and all the car stuff had been you know thrown.

The Suitcase Murder

True Crime Brewery

13:45 min | 3 years ago

The Suitcase Murder

"Welcome to hurry. I'm Jill and I'm Dick the bill and Melanie McGuire were an attractive couple in their thirties. They had two young sons to successful careers and they just disclosed and a five hundred thousand dollar home when bill disappeared. Melanie told their friends that they had fought on the night when they closed on their new home bill bill had physically attacked her and walked out telling her he was done with her buildings seem like the type of guy who would hit his wife and lead his children behind but Melanie insisted that he had hit her and walked out on his family. She even went to court and took out a restraining order against bill as the days passed did no one heard from bill. Melanie appeared to be moving on with her life without him but bills family and friends were worried bill had been a gambler may get pissed off the wrong people then a bizarre story got everyone's attention. I A Kenneth Cole suitcase was found in Virginia Beach and it contained aimed a pair of bloodless male human legs that had been severed at the knees one week later Virginia Beach Police recovered a second suitcase that was part of the same in Kenneth Cole set it held a five pound weight black trash bags and more human remains this time it was a man's head in torso but here this man was and when he had been killed were still unknown then the third last suitcase was recovered within two weeks it contains the man's hips and thighs. Virginia Beach Police launched an extensive investigation to identify the victim and identified him as Bill McGuire join us at the quiet in today for a very haunting case that became known as the suitcase murder well respected fertility nurse Melanie he McGuire was accused of her husband's murder and dismemberment and she faced life in prison. Although her attorney would argue her innocence a complex unraveling reveling of the facts would reveal a twisted murder plot which grew from infidelity greed and hate New Jersey case means new New Jersey near yeah figured I'm assuming she killed him in New Jersey. That's the belief yes. She didn't dump his body parts in New Jersey. I don't think now aw but the killing was done so I picked a beer called head high which is brewed by Kane Brewing Company in Ocean New Jersey Far Southern Jersey assist the shore head high is an American. It A in at six point six percent alcohol by volume pretty nice beer hazy orange colour. You're a whitehead some pretty lace aroma of citrus and pine. We have a citrus taste upfront grapefruit and tangerine primarily then some pine nine overlaps and Caramel Mo- nicely hop beer good bitterness the nice beer more vo west coast. IPA TRY IT. That sounds Cilicia. I love that kind of beer. This is your Beer Jill. Yes okay. Let's open that up right away. All right lead the way why down to the quiet end in you can begin our story. Bill McGuire was born in nineteen sixty four in river edge. New Jersey the two older sisters his father worked as a pressman for the New York. Times and his mother stayed home with kids. A billy was the baby of the family family. He got a lot of attention. Here's a cute but very rambunctious kid now when he was four years old his parents divorced bill's mother had to take a job to support the children so she worked the night shift wild bill's oldest sister. Cindy babysat her siblings the Mon- Work Six nights a week so Sunday began to feel like she was a second mother to Bill Leeann. I think bill really looked at her that way even as an adult or you're she had a very maternal influence on his life and when bill was twelve his sister. Cindy moved out and married a guy named bill. Gosh he was an older man who was a pharmacist first and then bills other sister. Nancy moved out as well. Their parents had divorced and remarried a few times so it was very unstable. Environment Sir remarried controller yes back and forth while and Nancy would later accused their father of sexually abusing her too so there's a lot going on in the home sounds work so bill went to Catholic school and he was a decent B. Student. He was quite outgoing and a lot of friends when he was just fifteen ran ran away from home and went to live with Cindy and her husband and he did live with them for a while but eventually left after not following all of her household rules because Cindy was strict then after that he went to his sister Nancy but she didn't have room for him so for awhile bill lived with his high school coach and then he lived with the family of one of his best friends so this is kind of a hard scrabble life he had in his teens assurances. Just been a Roman around yeah. Yeah doesn't have any stability really not much now and we're not really sure what was going on in the home that he felt like he had to run away but it was probably tumultuous between the parents. I mean just the fact that they were together the not together then together the not together. I mean that's that's in stable ripple enough her unstable enough by itself. Yes absolutely so bill was living with his friend. Lenny and his parents and Lenny's twelve year old sister Marcie Darcy got a really big crush on bill so after graduating in nineteen eighty two bill joined the navy thought it would give him some direction in life leaving both his high school girlfriend behind and young Marcy. He broke two hearts when he left the navy bill made friends with a guy named Joe Rice Ace. He was another recruit who was three years older at first. Joe Thought that bill was kind of obnoxious because he was always showing off and telling jokes but then the two men eventually became close friends and bill was very well dressed and bought himself a Camaro which he shouldn't have been able to afford he would admit to Joe that he was opening up checking accounts in fake names and writing bad checks in order to finance the lifestyle that he wanted to live Marino. I got certain needs in my life. I'm just gonNA write checks. I think that's the way he looked at it and remember this is a guy who didn't have much guidance right and he he was really taken with having things that he had had growing up so not to make excuses because it really wasn't a good thing to do of course of course yeah but now that's what he did so in nineteen eighty five. I guess he's been in the service for about three years at this point bill's girlfriend from back home. Lisa flew down in Norfolk to Sam on a weekend. Leave a few months later bill visit Lisa in Vernon New Jersey but their relationship came to an end over well he was in New Jersey Bill. Marcy asked her out on a date and then he and Marcie gradually became a couple and kept in touch with pitcher yes so after Joe Rice married his girlfriend he told bill about how much more money would be making his naval marriage benefits his income nearly doubled after near his girlfriend and then it wasn't too long after that when bill decided to ask Marcie Mary him so a lot of people thought bill just did that to make more money. Let's the impression absolutely his buddies. Tahoe are almost doubled my income so bill's Franken. That's brewing right. We'll marcy was younger though she just graduated from high school but she was very very taken with bill and she accepted did his proposal and she moved down to Virginia to live with bill and to go to College Marsin Bill secretly married in a civil ceremony and then they moved into into a one bedroom apartment together nineteen ninety bill left the navy after earning his associate's degree from tidewater Community College Bill Dylan Marcy Move to Edison New Jersey and he started attending rutgers university where he was going to study pharmacology bill and Marcy moved into an apartment and both took jobs in local restaurants to pay the bills but bill is unhappy then he wanted to split up nineteen ninety two he left. Marcy surprised her. I guess pretty much broker heart 'cause the next two years. She tried to win him back but bill never looked back at Marcy. Who's WHO's dating new women again almost right away after the break-up yeah he had already really checked out of the marriage and then in the summer of nineteen ninety four for a friend of bills introduced him to Melanie slate. The two were attracted to each other and they seem to have a lot in common. They seem to really make a good match. Watch so a little bit about Melanie. Melanie Lynn slate was born in nineteen seventy two in Ridgewood New Jersey. Her father left her mother. When Melanie Melanie was still a baby and then he died a few years later from cancer. Melanie's mother Linda moved back into her appearance on with her daughter and Melanie's Janis Aunts and grandmother helped to raise her her mother. Linda can you to her secretarial job in Manhattan and that's where she began having an affair with her boss Michael Caporetto and that would last for years and Years Melanie grew up beside Michael Cap narrows son Michael Junior and and when Captain Aero finally left his wife he and his son moved in with Linda Melanie but it certainly wasn't the ideal childhood. Her doesn't sound black. Does it now so the kids would go along with Lyndon Michael when they went to Atlantic City Michael Junior and Melanie. You were usually left alone in hotel. Rooms are pretty lengthy times while appearance gambled Michael Senior was such a high stakes gambler learn they were often given comte hotel suites in room service for the children. SA- gambling really can be a serious addiction. WHOA course I've never never really known anyone that has it by Sir with sound of surprise well after I read about this I looked into some other issues with that and children and there is a problem in Atlantic City and Las Vegas of people just Kinda dumping their kids and running off to gamble for days at a time were very often read stories about the type of thing apparent has come the gamble and just dump the kids somewhere. You're gives them a few dollars. Say go under around how fine the gamble one. I think forget about their kids. They get so involved in it because there have been instances was reading about where children have been molested or even kidnapped napped. You know little girls using the restroom in a casino by themselves ECORSE. That's not why s- some horrible things have happened because of this so the only thing I can think is it must be a very strong addiction like drugs for people to leave their kids like that sure immune. A lot of these people are normally holly good parents but this is how Michael and Melanie grew up with a lot of that now even though their parents had some money and they were comps suites they were still abandoned on their own so they became very self sufficient these kids. I guess that's the good part about it. Melanie was really an excellent student and issue reached her teens. She was a beautiful girl. She had long wavy brown hair and a petite figure. She became very self confident and was very flirtatious with the boys at school. Some of the other girls disliked her but melanie had an outward kind. Mr Mr Personality too and she often took weaker girls under her weighing in offered advice on advice and support now. She is an attractive woman you you compare it to an actress. who was that well at Harry? I just mentioned that she looked like what's her name. Marielle and Muster Antonio Veterinary Curry something master Antonio Okay so an actress from like the eighties here yeah yes so she's a good looking woman and she had a lot of freedom when she she was a teenager so that could be a bad combination all this free of within attractive teenage girl she last virginity on a trip to Mexico when she was just thirteen eighteen years old because she and Michael Junior were going out to nightclubs and bars they were just on their own on these vacations so she hooked up with with a Lerman lost her virginity at a young age and then Melanie also began to gamble and she became promiscuous. She slept with older teens when young men who buttered gifts and took her out to fancy restaurants. She was almost like an escort in her teens with some of these older guys and she was his proud of it. She bragged about having affairs with two of her married high schoolteachers as well something to brag about. Isn't it on your teenage girl. You don't the better chance right.

Bill Bill Melanie Melanie Bill Dylan Marcy Move Bill Mcguire New Jersey Bill Leeann Melanie Mcguire Melanie Lynn Slate Melanie He Mcguire Joe Rice Murder Lyndon Michael Virginia Beach Michael Junior Atlantic City Virginia Beach Police Kenneth Cole Cindy Ocean New Jersey Jill