17 Burst results for "Thirteen Centuries"

"thirteen centuries" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

08:09 min | 5 months ago

"thirteen centuries" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"An end. Ep member of parliament from nunavut says goodbye and good riddance to ottawa. Explaining how unwelcomed she was made to feel as an inuit woman in the house of commons. Not a good sign. An edmonton mosque is in shock. After a swastikas discovered spray painted on a wall and the mosque president tells us hate has no place in canada handshake agreement disagreement on everything else. Joe biden and vladimir putin meet and greet but the tete-a-tete appear to have resulted in any changes of heart scorching policy. Doctors in arizona are warning residents to tread carefully because a heatwave has turned the pavement into a searing surface that can inflict serious burns ahead by thirteen centuries researchers in new zealand find evidence that the antarctic waters were explored by indigenous groups long before bearded dudes from europe showed up on the scene and a box on all your houses in the us girl scout. Cookies sales are way down but for one eleven year old sales in the cookies themselves are way up. Thanks to the drones. She's using to deliver them as it happens. Wednesday edition radio. Let's chocolate chips fall where they may underneath. Malak cacak is leaving parliament with something to think about. The mvp mp for nunavut has decided not to run in the next election last night. She delivered her farewell speech to the house of commons and as ms kaku told her followers on twitter. She did not hold back every time. I walk onto house of common grounds. Speak in news chambers. I'm reminded every step of the way. I don't belong here. I have never felt safe or protected in my position. Especially within the house of commons often having pep talks with myself in the elevator or taking a moment in the bathroom stall to maintain my composure. When i walked through these doors not only am. I reminded of the clear colonial house on fire. I am willingly walking into. I'm already in survival mode. That was going and ep. Mp mummy luck. Speaking the house of commons last night we reached ms cacak in ottawa. This speech you gave last night is so powerful and we will post links so that because everyone should hear it. What kind of reaction are you getting from people. I think that people are upset. it's it's been forced. This conversation has been forced the student I think that people that they want to see my name back on the ballot. So it's been nothing but momentum amount of support and and months that i've been seeing anyways and lots of messages from people that i know Just congratulating or same but it's it's what's needed and that's what's going to be missed that amount and level of transparency and accountability. You said in part of the speech. You mentioned that you are reminded every time you walk into the house of commons. You reminded that you don't belong there. What does the experience you have in that building in that institution so i was walking to the house one time and to question period and i saw the security guy in booth and he gave me a nod so i guess i'm a nod and i was like great like i contact with great. I like i'm good. He knows who i am and i. I don't have to worry. So and i usually. I always have my headphones in. Because i'm trying to pump myself up with snotty nose reds kids and get myself mentally prepared to speak in the house of commons and i got the nod from the security in the booth and i pass by the next set of doors and i'm listening to music but i can hear and feel heavy steps and vibration as if somebody's jogging after me and i knew it was happening and that there was a the second security guard. He didn't not at me even though he looked at me. And so i thought okay. That's probably what it is so slowly take out my headphones slowly. Turn make sure that. I'm not moving. Casaus i'm not gonna make a scene i'm not gonna and he's like do you have. Id you need to be like basically screen to be in here. And i was like oh my goodness and he eventually like realized. I think felt a bit silly. But how intimidating is that like to have these big heavy footsteps behind me. And so then i'm thinking so my position helps but it doesn't matter If i don't have the titles and then what then. What do i do and i just am always going into work With that mindset in your speech you want people to understand the issues. You were trying to bring to the house of commons that. They've also been ignored. You talk about this. The lack of affordability in housing the access to clean water the suicide rate among you people were ever able to get anything that you wanted on the agenda. I got to speak from a place of truth and reality. I got to say exactly what needed to be said and how it needed to and for me. That's the a huge accomplishment. Even though it it shouldn't be in the world of politics. I think that's that's something that needs to be discussed more. I would not feel comfortable in any other space except with the new democrat party. I have never felt the need to to tone down or two not k something. And i have never been put in a position where i've been made to muslim myself. And in any way shape or form. And i think if anything i've been able to show that impossible as possible that there's chance for hope where it's purposely put out and i think that regardless of what happens next there has at least been shown that we don't need to hide those truth we don't need to be thankful for less than the bare minimum and that we can find pride in our identity and who we are again and let for moving towards healing. You don't let anyone off the hook in this speech right you. The people who say who are posed to your ideas opposed to what you're trying to to tell the house of commons. That did they are less a problem for you than those who say yes. We understand exactly we. We see exactly what you're saying but we're not going to do anything about it. You've said that that's that's that's the worst of it isn't it to be told all the time as an indigenous person. That's someone that looks like me that they know there's a problem. They know there needs to be more. Done is incredibly frustrating. And what. I've come to realize more and more is that it's it's about power and that there's an major imbalance and what what that is is the gaslight. It's a power trip to be able to have an immense amount of oppression on not a small group of people by any means. I'm talking about tens of thousands of inuit. I'm about hundreds of thousands of digital people who this system doesn't doesn't work for and i have point.

Joe biden Malak cacak arizona new zealand europe twitter ottawa Wednesday vladimir putin last night nunavut two antarctic tens of thousands canada hundreds of thousands second security guard thirteen centuries democrat party muslim
"thirteen centuries" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

08:09 min | 5 months ago

"thirteen centuries" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"An end. Ep member of parliament from nunavut says goodbye and good riddance to ottawa. Explaining how unwelcomed she was made to feel as an inuit woman in the house of commons. Not a good sign and edmonton mosque is in shock. After a swastikas discovered spray painted on a wall and the mosque president tells us hate has no place in canada handshake agreement disagreement on everything else. Joe biden and vladimir putin meet and greet but the tete-a-tete doesn't appear to have resulted in any changes of heart scorching policy. Doctors in arizona are warning residents to tread carefully because a heatwave has turned the pavement into a searing surface that can inflict serious burns ahead by thirteen centuries researchers in new zealand find evidence that the antarctic waters were explored by indigenous groups long before bearded dudes from europe showed up on the scene and a box on all your houses in the us girl scout. Cookies sales are way down but for one eleven year old sales in the cookies themselves are way up. Thanks to the drones. She's using to deliver them as it happens. Wednesday edition radio. Let's chocolate chips fall where they may underneath. Malak cacak is leaving parliament with something to think about. The mvp mp for nunavut has decided not to run in the next election last night. She delivered her farewell speech to the house of commons and as ms kaku told her followers on twitter. She did not hold back every time. I walk onto house of common grounds. Speak in news chambers. I'm reminded every step of the way. I don't belong here. I have never felt safe or protected in my position. Especially within the house of commons often having pep talks with myself in the elevator or taking a moment in the bathroom stall to maintain my composure. When i walked through these doors not only am. I reminded of the clear colonial house on fire. I am willingly walking into. I'm already in survival mode. That was going and ep. Mp mummy luck cacak. Speaking the house of commons last night we reached ms cacak in ottawa. The speech you gave last night is so powerful and we will post links so that because everyone should hear it. What kind of reaction are you getting from people. I think that people are upset. it's it's been forced. This conversation has been forced. The students I think that people that they want to see my name back on the ballot. So it's been nothing but momentum amount of support and and months that i've been seeing anyways and lots of messages from people that i know Just congratulating or same but it's it's what's needed and that's what's going to be missed that amount and level of transparency and accountability. You said in part of the speech. You mentioned that you are reminded every time you walk into the house of commons. You reminded that you don't belong there. What does the experience you have in that building in that institution so i was walking to the house one time and to question period and i saw the security guy in booth and he gave me a nod so i guess i'm a nod and i was like great like i contact with great. I like i'm good. He knows who i am and i. I don't have to worry. So and i usually. I always have my headphones in. Because i'm trying to pump myself up with snotty nose reds kids and get myself mentally prepared to speak in the house of commons and the nod from the security in the booth and i passed by the next set of doors. And i'm listening to music but i can hear and feel heavy steps and vibration as if somebody's jogging after me and i knew it was happening and that there was a the second security guard. He didn't not at me even though he looked at me. And so i thought okay. That's probably what it is so slowly take. Oh my headphones slowly. Turn make sure that. I'm not rinku. Casaus i'm not gonna make a scene i'm not gonna and he's like do you have. Id you need to be like basically screen to be in here. And i was like oh my goodness and he eventually like realized. I think felt a bit silly. But how intimidating is that like to have these big heavy footsteps behind me. And so then i'm thinking so my position helps but it doesn't matter If i don't have the titles and then what then. What do i do and i just am always going into work With that mindset in your speech you want people to understand the issues. You were trying to bring to the house of commons that. They've also been ignored. You talk about this. The lack of affordability in housing the access to clean water the suicide rate among would people were ever able to get anything that you wanted on the agenda. I got to speak from a place of truth and reality. I got to say exactly what needed to be said and how it needed to and for me. That's the a huge accomplishment. Even though it it shouldn't be in the world of politics. I think that's that's something that needs to be discussed more. I would not feel comfortable in any other space except with the new democrat party. I have never felt the need to to tone down or two not k something. And i have never been put in a position where i've been made to muslim myself. And in any way shape or form. And i think if anything i've been able to show that impossible as possible that there's chance for hope where it's purposely put out and i think that regardless of what happens next there has at least been shown that we don't need to hide those truths we don't need to be thankful for less than the bare minimum and that we can find pride in our identity and who we are again and let for. We're moving towards healing. You don't let anyone off the hook in this speech right you. The people who say who are posed to your ideas opposed to what you're trying to to tell the house of commons. That did they are less a problem for you than those who say yes. We understand exactly we. We see exactly what you're saying but we're not going to do anything about it. You've said that that's that's that's the worst of it isn't it to be told all the time as an indigenous person. That's someone that looks like me that they know there's a problem. They know there needs to be more. Done is incredibly frustrating. And what. I've come to realize more and more is that it's it's about power and that there's an major imbalance and what what that is is the late. It's a power trip to be able to have an immense amount of oppression on not a small group of people by any means. I'm talking about tens of thousands of inuit. I'm about hundreds of thousands of digital who this system doesn't doesn't work for and i have point.

Joe biden Malak cacak arizona new zealand europe twitter vladimir putin ottawa Wednesday last night nunavut canada antarctic tens of thousands second security guard hundreds of thousands one eleven year old one time thirteen centuries ms kaku
"thirteen centuries" Discussed on Racing Post

Racing Post

06:41 min | 6 months ago

"thirteen centuries" Discussed on Racing Post

"Dream. Six to one great gideon thirteen to free count. Eight hundred chase. The dollar. ten to one camelot's tails and sixteen ball. We have non masuko h. Betting katie confident about this one. Going point lake actually. I've got some members of this nor through anything. I actually one but my lost a bit because the only media pewter ev'ry slept with that one district what was it. What what were you doing you just betting shop manager Cashing in like a ge manager. This was a student. Did you enjoy it. Yeah it was pretty good at it toy. A few things from our yourself see not say. Did you see someone beating the living daylights. Have a folksy. We haven't quite reached that stage default. Tease aggressively didn't need still relatively time. So-so irate punters up any any speech in history of star. Then yeah it was an awesome old. Everybody finds handicap epsom. A wow took this year should be good. It was an. I still trip down. Memory lane thanking tranquil and greet gideon or guardian sue for running down the hill epsom and petri won't be he's already one here for a mile and half of third loan the horses. He's got up seven punch up into does have a little bit more than maybe some others have be four horses and gap off for the first after the first five and theaters for one more recently improved by sex ninety nine on aug yards so is really strong for patient. You by al kazeem dumpsite quite low stamina. Ten for is definitely going to episode. Absolutely is other actually cuming fuel. Incidentally just to put an actual dot box think is extremely solid. Excellent patient dream for king. Rife is kate selection. Who's david's process. This is the biker. Today king franklin win. Dad wouldn't be surprised. Me one easily and i taught the london. Gold cup was ahead of a race beforehand. And afterwards i thought it was probably a better race and bay bridge wanted impressively by forelands off market. Ninety he went up a stolen to america. One hundred and four at king franklin was second of eighty two on up six. They might think six is a bit mad for a horse that was beaten four lengths and beaten comprehensively but he was four and a quarter atlanta ahead of river alwin who was third and i talked to was plenty of them in behind the lights. Are tom barabbas. Dubai we signs highland rocker. Who were all on expose of potentially decent handicappers virgin group class and kane franken favorites watson the race shoe comparison. I hate when people do that. But if favorites wasn't the race he would have won by florida court. Relents would have gone even further. The bay bridge did and perfect draw. Installed trae groaned idea. Jost your typical improving mark. Johnson trade old i. I'd be really disappointed if this heart speaking reciting two to one is fine really well. It's always a terrific race. The london go cop kills away. Swear buttons back everything that comes out of it so they go with patient dream for kaethe and key king franco for david genesis. Move onto the to thirty five. Now i've ramal. And half furlong the princess elizabeth stakes sponsored by kazoo because very welcome backers of the darby and the ship group three and a mom or is since two favorite roughly speaking to a nonstop posted nonstop statement. Five to one nine zoo. Not seventy one n e cargo eight to one parents press extinct one ball data you can go first and i posted hair bruce m. I take was valid excuses for for her. Run into daily stakes. They went no pace there and it turned into a bit of a sprint on on she kind of she she was very busy in the early stages and then she looked like she might just could commit Just didn't happen but you know it was the first one hundred and four days and as i said she was quite keen on. I think she can take a big jump forward from that road when she will not list racist time than last year. Pharmacy are dinar. Pr hundred eleven. That they would be loved. The time at lop nur flu was tired. And really impressive. And i think absent showed suits running style. I think the goal plenty quick enough air and joint top race in the race along with memora- and the patriots one hundred nays and sam. I think she's a little bit more to offer so posted for me. Thanks steve jake cave. There's all statements no question for her. Probably trek pickles. She she was second and fred dali telco free. She was a big price. The and still price for the guineas. I need to these informal. The lie and the fred darling. One and only because at one for the people to heart. She'll have to sell out. Bob mora is going to give it elite for one and there's other horses in this recent tend to straight on a little bit as well sort of go about fifty stephen get color fred. Dolly is absolutely fighting games. A real chance to still in front. I think maybe even to form out again each time before the dominic yvo thinks he's got more shoe was if she sales if she gets up leading sales behind thing. She's got johnson. Thank you very much case. Let's move onto the three ten diamond stakes also sponsored by kazoo group three again over a mile and half a furlong and we've got some good old favorites heading the betting around about one hundred thirteen century. Drain got maximum. Fulls bill rooker six prince. Iag at thirteen to two juke of hazard i-it's mary's dominant attends escobar. And this is fourteen and the outside is far less so keith. Plenty of exposed types. But he's a wide open betting affair. How.

Bob mora Ninety johnson Five steve jake cave last year kane franken Dolly america One hundred Today Dubai tom barabbas florida court fourteen first five Eight hundred eight hundred thirteen century london
"thirteen centuries" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"thirteen centuries" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Neck stand up I want to do how long smokestack lightning hello yeah the white bands I can Grateful Dead the who the stones like I mean it's a great blues track it again that's a black musician giving us the gift of his music and and and and I I just want to pay respects so how long will smokestack Lightnin fabulous beautiful then because of the role here okay well as we continued to to remember that we owe everything to black culture the blues jazz hip hop funk you name it I've first I was gonna go with Britney Howard who is the voice of Alabama shakes was incredible and I look I almost went with this song thirteen century metal I want people to go listen to that but the song that I want to go with it is my favorite soul duo Sam and Dave now song called I thank you I want to see.

Britney Howard Alabama Sam Dave
"thirteen centuries" Discussed on Legally Bland

Legally Bland

14:17 min | 1 year ago

"thirteen centuries" Discussed on Legally Bland

"Oh Boy Am I. I started off thinking. Wash our human rights. Because like you I wanted to go very broad and then narrow in on what I actually picked so I find this interesting close in. The face of a book called maclear. It's an international human rights law book and it's as human rights mean different things to different people from the woman on the street to the U. N. High Commissioner for Human Rights from the local human rights activists to the government official. Each of us has a different conception of the origin purpose and function of human rights. So a good head space to get into before considering anything else. Human Rights I think is something along. The lines of the first rule is there are no rules because I love human rights. It's it's as Alana mentioned earlier. I I've studied it a bit more and I really love it put. It frustrates me beyond belief. So this is a reoccurring theme one of the first pitfalls of thinking about in human rights in an international context is there's this agreement that prevails thought the framework on basic conception. We have of what human rights are are fundamentally subject to Western bias so we think are essential human rights. This comes back to like the moral of the story for the first couple episodes where we kept surmising. The lowest fake doesn't really mean anything so it's been aggie dot like the imposition of human rights is a neo colonialism venture of sorts And these actually ageements from public international law scholars that the Western influence on human rights is so large dotted foxy impossible to imagine what it would be like with this Western influence which is just it's headbutting. Bush so just yet remember. There are no rules. They're they're really they don't find it. It's just a hideout no but it's it comes back to like it comes back to as humans. We try him put labels on things. That are really just things that like. We feel like we feel human rights. We like we feel inherently some of the time. What should be a human right? But it's very hard to explain to them. Undertake weigh the sources really not as straightforward as we try and label. It as another issue can be. We try to legally justify what we have moral justifications for which is tricky so right can be seen in two basic ways you can see them as the universal natural phenomenon that are that are innate to human beings so if by virtue of being a person you have human rights or it can be viewed as this contractual protection afforded to you by your government so not really universal on practically. That's an easier way to think about us. I I like the idea of natural rights that you know. We're just people and people have rights. Yeah I think I told my explanation. Lean towards anyway realistically. It's easier to think in a practical science dot. The government is affording you these protections which is an idea so the origins of human rights. I think it's an interesting. I suppose question because there is no starting point and Arjun humanoids albeit in a slightly different guides can be traced as far back as ancient Babylon aren seventeen hundred BC which is a long time ago. Some scholars wrongly slash the magnetic AirAsia. Which is a thirteen century. Document just stopped the King of England having absolute power over his nobles objects dot sometimes light is like the beginning of human rights in a modern ISH context. There is a lot in the sixteenth and seventeenth century. Bache scholar is believing rights. We're just a social contract with you. And your government and natural rights really became prevalent as a result of the American revolution and Subsequent Declaration of Independence. So ever knows you know those famous words. We hold these treats to resolve evident that all men are created equal that they are indeed with certain unalienable rights that among these are life liberty and the pursuit of happiness. The people that wrote these owned other people like it. Just fix the hypocrisy. It's just ludicrous. Like hypocrisy war like everyone has rights. We know sorry. We have rights. Everyone might have rights. That's kind of the gist. It's so from that point. In time there were more people can like more people. Existed who didn't have rights than heart rates like women did not have many rights that many rights. That's got to be over fifty percents. Also I remember thinking about. This child made like why? That's really embarrassing. That they wrote that was take people rights. I can't believe they didn't realize what an error they were making themselves. And we still quote it like. That's like if Hitler had said something about like peace and we were like where that was a good quote though on you. Just what? He preached boy. Was it a good quote? I know exactly like this is very aspirational. Unlike it for what it is when you think about the context no so human rights in the modern era really gets going. I suppose with the UN Cheshire which was established in one thousand nine forty five which is in the wake of the atrocities of World War. Two but an important thing about the UN Charito to keep in mind is the human rights was never the main focus. The main focus was to prevent road war. Three if you will and a good question I think is the. Un was not created to take Mankayane to heaven but to save humanity from hell which is a coup the former United Nations secretary general commerce gold. That's good it's good boy. I want the poster. I don't think we're even being saved from Alabama. Oh No it doesn't the third circle of Hell Somewhere. I don't know you mentioned the Universal Declaration of Human Rights which was adopted in nineteen forty eight and it had thirty areas calls with you know again the quote unquote the basic human rights. The high profile ones right to life freedom from torture freedom of expression and there is a big divide theoretically within rights and the international contacts between so-called positive and negative rights which doesn't mean one's good and one's barrage like what is good and one said is bad and so positive rights is higher the government can interact with people to enhance their enjoyment of their freedom and negative rights is basically. You're the government limiting their interference. So he can be left alone to enjoy your freedom like privacy for his aesthetically cool so there's the International Covenant on Economic Social and Cultural Rights. Which is the more positive side of rights? So it's the right to the rector social security the right to education the right to health so this kind of right to Geshe things from the government and then there's the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights which is the negative rights. So be left alone. The right to life the right to liberty freedom of expression right of peaceful assembly so that was really good like that was Seabra. Good no wonder you're an an expert. I'm not an expert so the Irish constitution will narrow it back day in from. That was a very broad general introduction to the gist of human rights in a micro sense. So we'll bring it back to the Irish Constitution. So if you've been listening to this podcast for any amount of time you know we love the constitution. It's what we're a boast. So the Irish Constitution or Boehner Clarion was ratified in nineteen thirty. Seven eight describes the fundamental rights of every Irish citizen. I mentioned the constitution is also part of a wider human rights framework in Ireland. So there's other legal and human rights commitments made by Ireland so the treaties under the United Nations. Which have mentioned some of them the European Convention of Human Rights on the ECJ or act which brings those rights into the Irish context on the charter fundamental rights of the European Union. So articles forty. Two forty four provide the fundamental rights of our citizens so as Alana mentioned fundamental rights are not obsolete which they can be limited or restricted by the octaves for certain reasons like common good public order and every constitutional. Right has the same status and value. If there's a conflict between the constitutional rights all the circumstances are wade opt to decide which conceal right is more important in that particular case so I feel those last. Two points are very important to emphasize because I perceive a common misunderstanding to be like having a rice is obsolete Like no further just discussion required end of story. Good night good luck. I have my rice go away. So the Covenant on Economic Social and Cultural Rights is generally associated with more like eastern countries so when Western countries like when people say I have a right to education? My brain just wanted to go do you think so which is kind of terrible so on enumerated rights have been mentioned before. Alana back in episode two and also earlier in this episode so basically not every fundamental rights that you possess is set in the constitution explicitly. You've Sony personal rates that are just not specifically stated and these rights can be derived or employed by the constitution. So these include privacy bodily integrity on freedom from torture inhumane or degrading treatment. So the case I pick a for a while I was worried. I'd gone away off brief and the human rights but this is a rights case. It's just sometimes I think when people talk about human rights they perceive it to be these massive injustices like on an atrocity scale which it can be but a lot of time feel human rights can be very almost mundane every day things if that makes sense so the case I chose was nickel and on boarding tola nine hundred sixty six one four so the applicant in this case can ever say Leonidas Nikola was separate national. Living in London he'd been in a relationship with Kathleen Donnelly Irishwoman woman and they lived together in London when their daughter was born there. February nine hundred sixty at the time. Stanley was upset that the child was illegitimate and operate. Continue living with Mr Nikolai on his wife but she also would only marry Niccolo if he became a member of the Catholic Church because he was a member of the Greek Orthodox church where she's yeah. I can't read the Times that makes sense you. I mean this case really does focus on the rights of the married father. But at the time it's really pertinent to remember. For All this context I focus on Nikolas writes Bush like Kathleen. Donnelly obviously a terrible time. As well the nineteen sixties in Ireland absolutely just controlled by the Catholic Church so women having children of wedlock of you will was just absolutely scandalous. And they retreated so horribly criminally stigmatized Bush. Just keep that in mind. I do focus on Nikola. But that's not saying that she got off. Scot free in any sense of course so the Mother Kathleen Donald Returns to Ireland. She goes to the Office of the Catholic Production Rescue Society of Ireland and was admitted with her baby to Saint Patrick's home. Which was you know whether there's more and baby homes which is just a whole other fish we could discuss so she requested that the child be placed for adoption on. She then left the home and went to live with her parents on the ABC. Into this case Niccolo went and visited. The home of the mother's parents Orland and was very apprehensive. That arrangements were being made to have his child adopted and in nineteen sixty one. The child adoption was finalized bought. Mr Nicholas was only informed of this when Miss John Lee Returned London. Nineteen sixty three. He objected the adoption. Which had been arranged with Ed is consent? It was you that he had no right to contest the adoption order or even be heard by onboard. Tola just the adoption board so the governing major station in this case was the adoption act. Nineteen fifty two. It was the first legislation Ireland covering adoption before nineteen fifty two. It was just a free for all adoption. There is if there's something though low legislation no real. Anything went terrible when the adoption act was being was being drafted. The hierarchy of the Catholic Church was given an unusual degree of control. You know even by the prevailing standards at the time so every line of the bill was sent to the Catholic Archbishop of Dublin by Dev. Really well Dave Dave wanted. Obviously the Catholic Church had a huge influence over everything devils particularly religious Yuccas. What he sent every single line of the adoption act. The BISHOP PROVED LEGISLATION..

U. N. High Commissioner for Hu European Convention of Human R International Covenant on Econ the Times Alana Catholic Church UN Ireland government Kathleen Donnelly Irishwoman Bush London Niccolo Seabra official Bache
"thirteen centuries" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen centuries" Discussed on 790 KABC

"One in Indiana that would be one thing you tried and you lost by twenty points let's talk about brutal because judge goes back long goes the intersectional well whenever you are embarrassing the Democratic Party go the intersectional well he's also kinda harassing Cory Booker has a black woman well as a black man and now you get people who did what as a gay man in Mike pence's Indiana needs a little it is this is people just favorite little riff that makes no sense because Mike pence thing give two craps about people judge he does not care about people judge he was always very nice to be able to judge Mike pence's Indiana what we act like this is like thirteen century Saudi Arabia or something like what what what are you talking about or at the modern day Saudi Arabia but what do you what are you saying that might that indeed there no be people in Indiana is that the implication that under Mike pence gave people like mayor people were taken out and put in the stocks the soles of their feet with hot coals what are you talking about it's nonsense at first well that's nonsense on his face but then any quote which I was like you know what now you know what just just now yeah you can talk about you one eighty percent of the vote I like ten thousand votes and let me let me explain to me about elections buddy you ran statewide for state treasurer you never talk about this people judge ran statewide for state treasurer in two thousand one and I you know you did you get your **** kicked it was just to see you you got to you got murdered by Richard Murdoch sixty three to thirty five or something you got beaten it wasn't it wasn't twenty one seven by twenty five points factcheck falls he's the by twenty five and just has not come back to that because the fact is that well he's a very talented young politician he is not one statewide he's never held high office is the mayor of a small town in Indiana was very fluent in very verbally cogent and good for him I called the charges tax is a telling one will get you a little bit more from the debate in just one second first I need to take.

Indiana Democratic Party Cory Booker Mike pence Saudi Arabia treasurer Richard Murdoch
"thirteen centuries" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen centuries" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"One in Indiana that would be one thing you tried and you lost by twenty points let's talk about brutal because judge goes back to loan goes the intersectional well whenever you are embarrassing the Democratic Party go the intersectional well he's also Connolly harassing Cory Booker has a black woman well as a black man and now you get people who did what as a gay man in Mike pence's Indiana maid's tale it is this is people yet just favorite little riff that makes no sense because Mike pence thing give two craps about people judge he does not care about people to judge he was always very nice to be able to judge Mike pence's Indiana what we act like this is like thirteen century Saudi Arabia or something like what what what are you talking about the modern day Saudi Arabia but what do you what are you saying that might that in the they're not be people in Indiana is that the implication that under Mike pence gave people like mayor people were taken out and put in the stocks the soles of their feet with hot coals what are you talking about it's nonsense first of all that's nonsense on his face but then any closure is like you know what now you know what just just now yeah you can talk about you one eighty percent of the vote I have like ten thousand votes in let me let me explain to me about actions buddy you ran statewide for state treasurer you never talk about this people get you ran statewide for state treasurer and he doesn't want it and they you know you did you get your **** kicked it was just to see you yet that you got murdered by Richard Murdoch sixty three to thirty five or something you got beaten it wasn't it wasn't twenty one can be by twenty five points back check balls he's the by twenty five and the judge has not come back to that because the fact is that well he's a very talented young politician he's not one statewide he's never held high office is the mayor of a small town in Indiana was very fluent in very verbally cogent and good for him but culture is Jack is a telling one will get you a little bit more from the debate in just one second first I need to take.

Indiana Democratic Party Connolly Cory Booker Mike pence Saudi Arabia treasurer Richard Murdoch Jack
"thirteen centuries" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen centuries" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"At how you my experience center and it was before the break and I was going to let it go because we got bigger fish to fry here but you know I don't think we had a bigger fish to fry than picking a president of the United States we should have someone heading up this ticket that is actually one and been able to show that they can gather the support that you talked about Rupp moderate Republicans and independents as well as a fired up democratic based and not just done it once I've done it three times if you just go by vote totals maybe because on my city seems small the you want to talk about the capacity to win try putting together a coalition to bring you back to office with eighty percent of the vote as a gay dude in Mike pence's Indiana one in Indiana that would be one thing you tried and you lost by twenty points let's talk about brutal because judge goes back to only goes the intersectional well whenever you are embarrassing the Democratic Party go the intersectional well he's also Connolly harassing Cory Booker has a black woman well as a black man and now you get people which is what as a gay man in Mike pence's Indiana maid's tale it is this is Bridget just favorite little riff that makes no sense because Mike pence then give two craps about people judge he does not care of people to judge he was always very nice to be able to judge Mike pence's Indiana what we act like this is like thirteen century Saudi Arabia or something like what what what are you talking about the modern exaggerated but what do you what are you saying that might that indeed there no be people in Indiana is that the implication that under Mike pence gave people like mayor people were taken out and beaten put in the stocks the soles of their feet with hot coals what are you talking about it's nonsense first of all that's nonsense on his face but then maybe call the cars like you know what now you know what just just now yeah you can talk about you one eighty percent of the vote I like ten thousand votes let me let me explain to me about elections buddy you ran statewide for state treasurer you never talk about this people judge ran statewide for state treasurer in two thousand eleven and I you know you did you get your **** kicked it was just to see that you got murdered by Richard Murdoch sixty three to thirty five or something you have beaten it wasn't it wasn't twenty one can be by twenty five points factcheck falls he's the by twenty five and it has not come back to that because the fact is that well he's a very talented young politician he is not one state why he's never held high office is the mayor of a small town in Indiana was very fluent in very verbally cogent and good for him but cultures attack is a telling one will get you a little bit more from the debate in just one second first I need to take.

"thirteen centuries" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen centuries" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"For that yeah I don't even know what it is so we have you know its history so I you have to know like British history which I know you don't said not spoiling the thing for you or anybody else doesn't now let my minor was in modern European history that is shocked and the eight it wasn't through this late it was more it was earlier thirteen century she was the one that you're European has our teen century where the crusades all about anyway Intel is but Henry the fourth and the peasant revolt of thirteen eighty one I didn't I didn't go past the fifties though yeah in my Holly thank you so have fun at Janice and dinner we have a fun a chance and dinner theater is sloppily out here right yeah yes okay where the fireside lounge people are enjoying cocktails or jurors and of course all this witty banter we'll be right back all right you're my talk traffic is brought to you by allied formally known as American refugee committee starting in mountain thirty five W. southbound across from highway tend to county road I near little Canada thirty five the northbound across from Maryland Avenue to Wheelock parkway in golden valley highway no one hundred north bound across from highway fifty five to run golden valley road your new Brighton installed vehicle blocking a lane thirty five W. north bound right around can you repeat to you and also in a tiny another still vehicle blocking a lane this time highway one hundred northbound from highway sixty two to Benton Avenue at a light we do the doable in the face of the world seemingly impossible problems a light dives right in what can be done a small actions can lead to big impact and talk to one person to one I.

Intel Henry Holly Janice Canada Brighton thirty five W thirteen century
"thirteen centuries" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen centuries" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Two years after isis was driven out of Mosel street inside the mosque where al Baghdadi declared an Islamic state the slowly coming back to life between the damage shuttered shops there's a bakery a hardware store even a shop selling song birds got by Daddy Alan of eleven again due to him out so he'd a local amount was in the nearby at home during the day that Baghdad he roared up with dozens of bodyguards and strode to the pulpit by Daddy told worshippers he was the latest successor to an Islamic ruler known as of about Kerr thirteen centuries ago cut off caller ID on my Missy now what this should be quoted Abu Bakir speech when the Muslims chose him as their leader and he said you've chosen me as your caller but we did it ISIS in the U. S. backed battle to drive the moat destroyed this part of Mosul it killed thousands of people most families here have members killed either by ISIS during the battle over the city many are skeptical that he's dead and actually some of the people gathered around this tea shop I think the Iraqi who pronounced himself over Baqerabad Daddy supposedly from the city of Samara was a U. S. invention of faith that number if you were from Samarra like they say we would know his tribe says one of the imams friends who doesn't want to give his name they say the family al Baghdadi was said to have come from owns a restaurant and everyone knows their son wasn't an ISIS later so Micah so yeah I don't I don't we don't know ask America asked Donald Trump secede he says it's theater produced by America and Israel our solid sits nearby on the sidewalk the five year old son multimillion holds a plastic toy rifle almost as big as he is his father was a police officer.

"thirteen centuries" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

13:59 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen centuries" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Open the Hugh months, but they can get a free chapter of improbable planet had reasons dot org slash Ross. Where we talk about all the amazing fine tuning that's necessary to get this period of extreme climate stability, and how it is human activity could threaten that. So if I'm hearing you correctly, then you you do subscribe to answer genyk global warming. Yeah. There's no doubt that the planet has warmed up over the past seventy years. I mean, the temperature measurements all over the world, gut confirmed that I think we're debate is taking places who or what's responsible for that morning. And I think there's overwhelming evidence that it's the greenhouse gases that have been pumped in the atmosphere is not just carbon dioxide nitrous oxides greenhouse gas, methane greenhouse Gagic chlorofluorocarbons, and so all of them are contributing to warming the planet, but unlike a water climatologist, I do believe you're things we can do to rectify the situation that don't require draconian economic sacrifices. I think that's what's causing the political debate. Because one side is saying this is a problem that we have to rectify by whatever means necessary, even means crippling our economy, but the. Other side is saying well, if you try to do that people are going to cheat or nations are going to cheat. It's not gonna work, and I actually agree with both sides. We need solutions that are actually going to enhance the world economy. Well, the same time stabilizing the climate, and there are many solutions that will do exactly that. And I wrote about three of them in improbable planet. Can you just give us one example briefly? Well, one example would be to restore the whale populations to what they were three hundred years ago. There was a group of Australian researchers that made the point that baleen whales and sperm whales play a critical role in fertilizing the fighter plane in the oceans, and yes, they do breathe. Oh, carbon dioxide, and then that sense contribute to global warming. But for every tonne of carbon dioxide, they breathe into the atmosphere. Their fertilize -ation of the zone removes four times as many Hannah's the fighter plane, and that are the number one. Life form that pulls carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. Moreover that same study basically shows that we restore the whale populations. We're going to increase the fish stocks in the oceans, which means we're going to have more fish that we can harvest and use that to sustain our economy. So everybody wins if he bring the whales back to where they were another example would be to replant, the Sahara Gobi desert s- human activity is made the Sahara desert about ten times bigger than what the time of the Roman empire, and we can reverse that. And then the Sahara desert actually, become a food source. We could plan grain there. That was pulled greenhouse gases of the atmosphere. It would be a big source of income for people living in that part of Africa. That's just two examples. Fascinating. I've never heard anyone talk about Wales as being an answer to to global warming. About the I mean, you need more than Wales, obviously. But they would be a contributor significant contributor. If if this whole universe was created for us by God, it would seem likely then that he would have created also certain built in checks and balances just to make sure or to help ensure the success of humankind. So I'm wondering, for example about like a source of energy. I think that that things like zero point energy are are we are we on the cusp of harnessing things like that. Or are we going to continue continue on for the foreseeable future using fossil fuels? Well, I mean, the big alternative fossil fuels as we can develop controlled fusion, physicists have been working on that for good sixty years. And we still don't yet have fusion reactor. I mean, we do reactors, but we have to put more energy than we get out. But there's some hope that within the next few decades of we could be there, and that would provide us with an enormous amount of energy that would require fossil fuels. We could replace the fossil fuels completely. If we the find some way to develop controlled Uson. And what about zero point? Or is that a lot of much ado about nothing we hear all the all the time about zero point energy that that's just bad physics. I mean, I tell people don't invest in anything that violates the laws of physics. You will lose money. That's the reason why the patent office won't give you a patent. If you're trying to build a perpetual motion machine. Physics. Hyper dimensions, theoretical physicist. I I've sort of lost track of what the latest number is. I seem to recall the number twelve being bandied about twelve hyper dimensions aside from the three or four that you know, we now have does the bible hint at the existence of hyper dimensions. Well, it hints in that the new creation the creation at rebels place this one after evil is a radical by God. Has completely different dimensions won't be linked with light and time anymore, and you're right to make particle physics work. We need a six tiny space dimensions to company three big ones. And so that sense, we already know that there's more than just four space time dimensions back the predominant. Cosmic model is one where you've got nine dimensions of space expanding the cosmic creation event, but when gravity separates from the three forces of physics when universes extremely young six of the nine dimension, stop expanding and these six dimensions are incredibly tiny. Having the cross section is twenty orders of magnitude smaller than the diameter electron. So that's why we don't notice him, but the are critical, and what are to have gravity and quantum mechanics, and general coexist. Is there something in the bible about the heavens being scrolled, which which kind of suggests a hyper dimension? Well, there are places three places the bible talks about how the end of the universe will be God, wrapping it up like a scroll in the whole universe. Disappearing into a fiery heat, and that's consistent with a number of what are called at pyro big bang models. Which is the idea that this universe is a ten dimensional slash sheet. And indeed universe does measure to be geometrically flat. And beyond where we can see that flat sheet might fold in on itself and become like, a you where you'd have one part of the sheet above the bottom part of the sheet. And if those the separation of those two sheets is about a millimeter. Then there's a possibility that space-time fluctuation that top sheet to make contact with one in the bottom sheet. And if that were to happen, the whole universe would disappear into a singularity. It'd be like all the space time dimensions disappearing into an infinite volume and university deed would disappear in a fiery heat one of several models be consistent with a literal interpretation of three checks, but I should have that there are bible scholars who think those three texts or metaphorical rather than literal. So I mean, it's only three sentences that you can go by. Why did God choose to use nature in the laws of physics to to create? He I mean, he he transcends the laws of physics. He transcends time and space. He just snapped his fingers or spoke mankind in the universe into existence. Why go through this, you know, thirteen point eight billion years and sort of laying the groundwork for life to all naturally, why not just do it in the blink of an eye? He can do anything. He could do anything. But he's got multiple purposes for why he created the universe. I mean, that's what I write about. And why the universe is the way it is saying you go down the wrong path. All you look at as one of God's purposes for creating universe that. If you look at the multiple purposes that explains why the universe must be as big as it is as old. As it is with the laws of physics Senate has with the space time dimensions that it has all the individual components. We see the universe and explains too. Why you have to have three point eight billion years of life history on the earth because God wants to redeem not just a few human beings, but billions of human beings, and that requires extraordinary fine tuning and was that Keltec at the international skeptics society conference that I debated the, hey, Theus physicist, Victor stinger, and he said, well could he have different fine tuning for different kind of life and said, what's certainly the case? In fact, we know that case of biblical perspective Gog traded and entirely different realm for the angels with different laws of physics in different. Dimensions. But guess what? Their realm this fine. Tune just like our realm is fine tuned. And these other dimensions is this where you believe the biblical concept of heaven is to be found in one of these other dimensions. Well, not the space time dimensions of the universe. Because the bible tells us that wants evil has been Radic aided the universe will fulfill this purpose God will speak it hood of existence and replace it with a brand new realm, the new creation for redeem human beings. But it tells us that heaven hell survived that event, which means heaven and hell or not part of the space time dimensions of our universe. We're gonna open up the phone lines at the bottom of the hour. Take questions and comments one final question as we head into the break. And that is you you mentioned the laws of physics. I and death and resurrection doesn't the resurrection aspect an immortality of the soul doesn't that break? The laws of physics. Well, I believe that the spirit of a human being can exist independent of his universe. And the laws of physics doesn't words. The bible tells us that we have a physical component. And we have been non physical component physical component is subject to the laws of physics. The non physical component for. This light is restrained inside the body of each one of us, and that sense is constrained, but when we die we exit this FaceTime realm and enter a completely different. Dimensional realm. And so in from a Christian perspective, we have what's called a dual nature of human beings that were not only physical, but also solar and a spiritual and the case of the resurrection. That's got the creator himself raising his own body bodily from the dead. And since he created space time matter and energy in the laws of physics walking on water, transforming water into wine or raising bodily from the dead is certainly within his power and capability. Do you believe that the shroud contains evidence of a resurrection event that that that image on the shroud was created by radiation from a resurrection event? I think it's still debatable. What's happening with the shroud? And I don't think that debates going to be settled until a second carbon fourteen date has made the shroud as they first date. They came back with thirteenth century AD which raised suspicion because thirteenth century when there is a lot of fraudulent Christian artifacts being sold that century was one where they sold sixteen tons of lumber from the cross of Jesus, and I don't think cross wait. No, indeed. However, the only took four square inches of they were to take say twelve or fifteen square inches. And I would just tell people in the shroud pick pieces of the shroud that you want and give him to say the Jet Propulsion Laboratory any other Hella Bora, Tori and get an accurate carbon fourteen date. The problem is it's thirteen century. That's close to the edge where carbon fourteen is no longer reliable. But if it's two thousand years old, you will get a reliable date. So this is an easy thing to settle we need a second carbon fourteen date. It's also been suggested that the original carbon dating was performed on pieces.

Sahara desert physicist bible Wales Africa Hugh Jet Propulsion Laboratory Sahara Gobi Ross Uson Hannah Radic Hella Bora Keltec Tori Victor stinger
"thirteen centuries" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

14:37 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen centuries" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"McDougall. His website is linked up at coast to coast AM dot com. John so many things to talk with you about. But I want to pick your brain again about your book the starched solution. I mean, this is contrary to what so many other dietitians say tell us about this. I mean, you say, you know, eat potatoes rice pasta, and you'll be fine. Go ahead. Well, I think the opportunity up there. It's a very simple thing that people can prove themselves, whether they're religious followers, whether they're epidemiologists saw geographers historians. It doesn't make any difference. If you look back over human history. What you find is that all large successful populations of people have a pain the ball because they're Keller's starch. Well, we're talking about here. Offi successful. Like, for example, the. The aspects Mayans were noticed. The people of corn corn for thirteen centuries. They fought battles they competing athletic events. They reproduce children for thirteen hundred years on a diet based on corn. You look at the Incas. There's a population that lived up potatoes, except when they were at the battle. Then they took key wa because it was like, Jerry, let me take a look at the Asians, even in our memory. George ninety percent of the diet of an Asian typically, we think of as rice, that's right? And we could go off online. There's an undeniable historical epidemiological fact that no one can get around. And that is that all large successful populations of people throughout all of their fiber. History have paid the bulk of their Keller's from starch. So why all of a sudden have we become carnivores? You know, why have what we all of a sudden BI? Become omnivores that can eat any basically anything, you know there. There is a diet. That's best suits people cod trade what a lot of people associated with me. And my name that doesn't necessarily have to be vegan diet is a matter of fact, I go to great effort to tell people that I'm not of the what I do is. I tell people that they should have paid the bulk of their Keller's starch how much well typically issued before nineteen eighty ninety percent of their diet with white rice ninety percent of the food. Now, you got white rice terrible terrible, excuse me. White rice it okay for the Japanese during World War Two. And in Vietnam. The rice eaters. Made a notable challenge to power didn't they so, you know, you can't stand back and deny all of history all geography all of religious teachers, and basically all the sides and go and say that we are supposed to have died of breed butter cheese, or how how does science go against what you say in Intel people, you know, if you're pre diabetic stay away from rice, and pastas and all the stuff totally contrary to what you're saying. Why do they do this? Well, it's also contrary to what the three search says the basic research was done before the nineteen eighties. When we had researchers such a guy named Percival hymns worth did the basic studies on the effect of food on blood sugar or his project. Yaw Shirley Sweeney. Nineteen twenty seven publicist result. On his medical students where he took healthy medical students. Any fed a diet that was very high in fat, and they became all the became diabetic. And then he fed a diet. It was like eighty ninety percent sugar and all remained non diabetic so him worth. He published. I mean, this is the father diabetes, he publishes work in the British medical journal as best and finest article in nineteen forty the debate should have been over. Then in nineteen forty went. He made his publication hymns worth did. But you know, for most of the reasons all them, the economical somehow the truth has been lost. I'll have to say George since nineteen eighty which allow things happen. Then we had CNN news worldwide. News, disseminates information and travel excetera. A lot of things happened in nineteen eighty but in nineteen eighty the the food industry. I figured out that they had to fight hard to maintain their position. And this is based largely upon what happened in nineteen sixty four which is when Luther Terry the surgeon general the United States surgeons house report on smoking and health. He basically Luther Terry single handedly put tobacco industry out of business in the US. We went from us smokey population of half the people to wear a few of the clinic percent of the people in the US now smoke now the food industry. They saw this happen to big alcohol and to big tobacco. And they said to never gonna let this happen to them. So what they started doing in the nineteen eighties. Starting buying the research. They bought the researchers, and they bought them with contracts stipulated that they wouldn't be allowed to publish the data and less the funding company approved of the results. I mean, that's how they started out. They sent their lobbyists. They sent their money. They did everything they could to not end up like big tobacco at sad to say, George. They have one today they shouldn't have won because nineteen seventy seven the dietary goals who put up by George McGovern, which again was the Waterloo for the food industry. There was the time when everything should have changed like did with big tobacco. But it did not know it did not. In fact, they were smart enough, the food industry course, they're far bigger than back were all industries. They were smart enough. And they realized the threat was so serious that they had to put every possible effort behind keeping the product selling even to the point of lying to the public which brings us to the topic that I hope excited you in terms of having me again on guest, which I very much appreciate and that's the subject of Johnson and Johnson. Beat sued over baby powder. That you were the whistle blower. How did that happen? Well, let me tell you I established the importance many listeners may have left. This piece of news go by so many horrible things happening in the world today. This is just a minor one. It may put Johnson Johnson company out of business of the projections are as high as forty seven billion dollars. I lost it just consider last year. Twenty two women filed a lawsuit which resulted in a four point bay dollar award. A twenty two women who sue Johnson's Johnson last year got twenty two billion dollars or four point seven billion dollars the lawsuit. Well, call I suppose this it was a rather innocent thing, I was just finishing residency training in Hawaii was at the John burns school of medicine. And there were a lot of newspaper articles be published at that time about the aspects. In the school room walls, and how the workers shipyard workers during World War Two were exposed to specis and all the sickness, Bob. The lung cancers called net deal most, you'll variant cancers, stomach cancers, etc. They were terribly learned about this. So what I did as an innocent young doctor is I wrote a letter to the editor of the Honolulu advertiser star bulletin, and I said, why are you so upset about the school room walls and shipyard workers when every day in the state of Hawaii people are eating a million pounds tons. I have no idea what the correct figure is of aspects every day on their telco rice. Now, George I waited for a month for that letter to the drill here and in never appeared. So I called the associate editor, and I said, where's my toil? He said what we what upset? People. Nesta's which we believe is true, by the way. So anyways, I got off the phone. I call George Chaplin who happened to be the editor for advertisers, star-bulletin time and short started having the simple conversation. Finally got around to me asking him a very important question are you on newspaper. What is your job is it to defend businesses or to defend the people will white and George Chaplin, Mr. chaplain? He agreed that they weren't fulfilling their paper in other words, telling both sides of the story. So what they did next George is. They got the rice industry side of the story. And this is what always done. Yeah. You get somebody tries to tell the truth, even he's a maverick. Even if he doesn't agree with establishment what they do is the dairy industry or meat industry or car industry, tobacco or whatever. They get their spin doctors working again again upon them. Yep. Really? They just have all the resources they have. The money. All we have is truth in success. So what they did is they published an article I ask your producers to put that that are up. It was in the nineteen seventy eight I have a copy not saved by the from the fire. Dr Jack I had to get it from the advertiser. And they say, well, they still had the archives. So I asked produces to put that article up where there's a debate over aspects being Intel code rice, and they brought in the rights company telling you know, basic saying, I was a liar. I was uninformed and etc. You know, the usual contra attack. So I was act Mr. chaplain. And I said you don't even though your newspaper you try to be fair. You haven't told the truth? He says well you prove that there's s bestest in the rice in Hawaii. See what they do is to make white rice. You have to take the Colonel off. So you it from broad rice into white rice and that lease at Balmoral to vermin which eat up the white rice, so to protect the rice from deterioration from moles, etc. What they do is it with glucose and tell. Folk. So what people don't realize Johnson's out. The lawsuit is brought out. And in fact, most of the attorneys that have been on the defensive side pointed out that you cannot mind tell without mining ESTES and baby powder is Telcom powder. So the way it works is this is the mineral is actually they'd be better off, by the way with cornstarch wouldn't they well probably glucose, the both chemically both of the same one some more for which is called tell the other is the fibers form, which is called specis. You cannot mind help without mining s. Bessis matter of fact, they estimate man of fibers particles in every tiny bit of rice consumed now the hope anyway. I had to prepare. I was starving resident making twelve thousand dollars a year. And I had to prove that there was s best to the in the Tel authorize in Hawaii. So I hired by higher because there couldn't afford them. But they were willing to volunteer their services three independent laboratories they went to various stores in Hawaii and bought rice in every single sample. They found aspects in huge Omar guard. Now, they printed that and that's the second article. I sent to your producers if they knew socials wanna put it up on your website, which is by the way, next website, put up your website. So they could see these articles that were written. But the bottom line. This is whole thing George this within a year. You could no longer by tell coated rice. Remember, this is forty one years ago was this all over the country just Hawaii that they're selling the stuff. Nope. This is the end line of the story within a year. The you could no longer by tell coated rice in Hawaii, California or Puerto Rico. They never were hell coated rice disappeared from the marketplace in nineteen eighty one year after I wrote the articles now it's says in the lawsuits against awesome Johnson. Does they've known for forty years about the presence of aspects Intel. It's always there. It's never not. They've known about that for forty years. And they've lied about it. They've covered it up. That's the danger. And now they're paying a price. You say the stock market, which is most interesting. What's going on says that the losses to Donna Johnson could be as high forty seven billion dollars almost as much as the cost? I survived the wildfires in to whoever their insurance company is gonna probably go out of business too. Well. Well, the thing is is industry will do anything. And again, we're gonna have something this is not a conspiracy just business. And what you wanna do is is you wanna make your product as favorables possible to the consumer. Of course, even if involved wine high in the facts and the death of thousands of people from. Ovarian cancer stomach cancer and diseases associated known to be caused by SPF. And I see these methods Lioma commercials for law firms all over the place these days..

George Donna Johnson Hawaii Intel Keller rice US Johnson Johnson Luther Terry George Chaplin George McGovern John McDougall. sue Johnson diabetes CNN British medical journal John burns school of medicine
"thirteen centuries" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen centuries" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"I'm just amazed. Aren't you? The more because of what happened yesterday studying the history of that cathedral. The architecture. I'm just flabbergasted. In so many ways at how they built. Cathedral like that back in the year eleven sixty until what you're thirteen forty five. Took almost amazed by that think about that. Takes almost two hundred years to build. So so people who are. Think about that people who were around when Notre dam was beginning was going under construction was beginning to be built. They never came close to seen built to seeing finished. Isn't that something it took two hundred years to build? Now. This is the year twenty nineteen right now. So that's like analogous to starting work on a building in the year eighteen nineteen and you're just finishing this year. Okay. That's like amazing. That's like seriously who who. The people who are building the that the darn thing. You don't get to see the fruits of your labor. Your dead. Your kids are dead. Your grandkids are dead. I think I'm right on this. Your great grandkids are dead before that cathedral was finished. You magin that? Beginning building in the year eighteen nineteen and it's just finished this year. That's how long it took to build. Notre dom. And I'm just a mazed without our machinery without our technology. Without everything we have today to build these mammoth skyscrapers. These million storey buildings. It's incredible. That that they were able to build. A cathedral building like they did. Back in the twelve and thirteen centuries. It's quite a feat. I would. I would encourage if you've got some time on your hands. Read up on how they built Notre down. The process is fascinating. What they did how they had to improvise over the years. How long it took how difficult it was. That whole subject of. How they built these great big grand, churches, cathedrals and monuments and everything else back in those days. It's really fascinating. How industrious people were back then without any of the advances. We have today and yet they were able to. To build a beautiful beautiful beautiful huge building. If you've got some time on your hands. Check it out. I think you'd be blown away the process of how they built that cathedral is absolutely fascinating. Eight five five six four to fifty six hundred eight five five six four to fifty six hundred. I am Joe Walsh. Don't you dare go anywhere? I.

Notre dam Notre Joe Walsh two hundred years thirteen centuries
"thirteen centuries" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

09:21 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen centuries" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"If you do tweet, by the way, please follow me on Twitter at walshsfreedom. It looks like a day after and I know we spent a good deal of our show last night on Notre Dom. But it looks like a day after the cathedral is going to be saved and the cathedral is going to be rebuilt. And the stained glass windows survived. And many of most of the relics and the statues and the artwork survived. The roof is gone. Much of the interior has been destroyed. But it could have been so much worse. And it will be rebuilt. This. Almost eight hundred fifty year old cathedral will be rebuilt. Now on that score. My only hope is that it is rebuilt as they built it eight hundred fifty years ago. My my hope my only hope is that they build they rebuild the cathedral. So that it looks like the cathedral that it was they rebuild the cathedral like people used to build like they used to build cathedrals back in the day. These can I get just personal beef off my chest. I'm I'm kind of an old fashioned part. I may I'm an old practicing Roman Catholic, I like, old fashioned churches. I like the old fashioned high Latin mass, I I have begrudgingly gone long over the course of my lifetime with my Catholic church. Reforming with. The reforming of the mass. And I have not accepted all of the changes. And I will not accept all of the changes. I'm just old fashioned, man. I think you know, the the body of Christ not to get too far down the rabbit hole here though, the body of Christ. I can't touch that goes right into my mouth. I don't believe in taking it in my hands. And then giving it to myself there are so many ways that the mass the Catholic mass has changed over the years that I don't like. But that's okay. I go to mass in masses. What it is for me? But I like the beautiful beautiful old churches. I like the big beautiful old cathedrals. A man I can't stand these megachurches today. Non-catholic? So you typically don't see the big humongous obnoxious megachurches in the Catholic. Faith, but I know in like many of the event Jellicoe churches, many of these big, you know, these big new modern megachurches, they're like. They're like, malls, giant malls. Man, don't rebuild. Notre Dom to look like anything like that. And I know plenty of year yelling at me right now. Because you probably go to church every week, and in one of those big modern mall like church buildings will God bless you. I'm glad you do. And I hope you get a lot out of it. I I like feeling like I'm walking into a church back in the year. Thirteen ninety two. I like walking into an old church. I got a Catholic church in my neighborhood, the one closest to me here. In suburban Chicago, just a little too modern looking for me. I feel like I'm walking into a spaceship low bit. And this is a Catholic church, and you usually don't get that in the Catholic faith. But it is I got an old old old, old fashioned Catholic church. Fifteen twenty minutes down the street that I like to go to and when I walk into that church. It feels to me like I'm walking back into the fourteenth century. I like that. So again, who am I? And who cares? What I have to say. But I really do hope that when they rebuild Notre down that they rebuild. Notre dom. As it. As its always looked. And I think they will. I'm thinking they will. I'm just amazed. Aren't you? The more because of what happened yesterday studying the history of that cathedral. The architecture. I'm just flabbergasted. In so many ways at how they built. Cathedral like that back in the year eleven sixty until what the your thirteen forty five took almost amazed by that think about that. Takes almost two hundred years to build. So so people who are. Think about that people who were around when Notre dam was beginning was going under construction was beginning to be built they they never came close to seen it built to seen. It finished. Isn't that something it took two hundred years to build? Now. This is the year twenty nineteen right now. So that's like analogous to starting work on a building in the year eighteen nineteen and you're just finishing this year. Okay. That's like amazing. That's like seriously who who. And the people who are building the the darn thing. You don't get to see the fruits of your labor. Your dead. Your kids are dead. Your grandkids are dead. I think I'm right on this. Your great grandkids are dead before that cathedral was finished. You magin that? Beginning a building in the year eighteen nineteen and it's just finished this year. That's how long it took to build. Notre dom. I I'm just amazed without our machinery without our technology. Without everything we have today to build these mammoth skyscrapers. These million storey buildings. It's incredible. That that they were able to build. A cathedral building like they did. Back in the twelve and thirteen centuries. It's quite a feat. I would. I would encourage if you've got some time on your hands. Read up on how they built Notre down. The process is fascinating. What they did how they had to improvise over the years. How long it took a difficult. It was. That whole subject of. How they built these great big grand churches cathedrals in my new mints and everything else back in those days. It's really fascinating. How industrious people were back then without any of the advances. We have today and yet they were able to. To build a beautiful beautiful beautiful huge building. If you've got some time in on your hands. Check it out. I think you'd be blown away the process of how they built that cathedral is absolutely fascinating. Eight five five six four to fifty six hundred eight five five six four to fifty six hundred. I am Joe Walsh. Don't you dare go anywhere? I got a.

Notre fashioned Catholic church Notre dam Twitter Jellicoe Joe Walsh Chicago two hundred years eight hundred fifty years eight hundred fifty year Fifteen twenty minutes thirteen centuries
"thirteen centuries" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

10:06 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen centuries" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"The day today. We're talking about the tragedy of Notre Dom yesterday. Very hard to believe that this really happened. John. We were just talking about the Dreyfuss affair the antisemitism. And it's. And it's a strange thing because I was making the points. I always want to frame things that when you force religion on people typically, it backfires, they end up going through the motions and not really owning themselves, and the government kind of takes responsibility. And so then you get a kind of a dead religion coupled with the backlash or the rebellion that manifest itself as anti clerical ISM or as aggressive secularism. And in France, you really clearly have that you have a kind of secularism in France going all the way back obviously to the French revolution, which is very ugly. I would say in many cases demonic a real hatred of God. And the things of God. And to me the situation with Notre Dom. I think this is going to affect the French people in in most ways, I would say for the good. I think they may begin to think. They're probably already thinking more deeply about you know, what is the heart of France. And what is Christianity and France because they've lost something that they so tremendously took for granted. And those released my initial thoughts. I think they might start to realize that what's truly great about France as his truly great of any country that has ever been Christian its greatest period was always when it was pervaded and suffused with supernatural faith. And the reason why a state religion tends to be dead religion, compare religion to America, right? If the love affair between God, and the soul. Well, how great forced marriages where someone kidnapped and Mary without their consent. That usually doesn't work is angry at me. I gotta say. Chill. She'll get over it. She's gonna learn to love me. Okay. You're you're you're quite right, John. And I think that this is part of the tragedy of western Europe. Is that you have look not just western Europe. You have this in Greece. You have this in Italy. A lot of Europe was Christian in a way that was so closely allied to the state that when the Christianity needed to be real Christianity failed. I mean, the story of bond Hoffer stories the classic story that German Lutheranism was not sufficient to withstand the satanic evil of Hitler. There was just dead religion. And the few Christians that were really robust in their faith weren't able to rally the church in Germany to stand against the evil. And you have a lot of that. And then the the backlash, and that's what you're talking about. You know, in one thousand nine five is that ironically, whatever authority the church had which might have been quite good. Is it self lost all of Florida? Become suspect, and you fall into the trap that we've fallen into now in America after Watergate in his sixties that any thority whether the church or the state or any goodness is somehow the aspersion is cast upon it of hypocrisy or well. Anyway, that that's my general take capture the passion and conviction of faith that led ordinary people to volunteer. Their time in the twelve and thirteen centuries. These were peasants and craftsmen who didn't have tons of free time, they weren't bubbling over with material wealth, but they devoted themselves day after day week after week our after our volunteering to build Notre dumb, and it took two hundred years of people volunteering their time people donating of sometimes the kings, donating the church did have some wealth of its own. But it was most. Spontaneous people, you know, the way when someone is shot in say ghetto neighborhood, and you see a little memorial and people put flower plaques. Well, this was the equivalent it was crowd sourcing a cathedral, and that's why one part of the cathedral flight, it's lightly different architectural style than the other. Because when they were making the newer one, they use the newer style. So it's not perfectly match each organic almost like a tree that grew over two hundred years, and it grew out of authentic faith love for God. Love for beauty now in in the secular west, and I won't just single out friends. We we women church like that is destroyed you hear people say what you could never build that. Again. We don't have the crafts. We don't have the technique. In fact, we do if you go up to Morningside heights, you'll see the building gothic cathedral, slowly the cathedral, Saint John the divine techniques still exist what we don't have the techniques of. Faith and love, and and hope and self sacrifice and shoop shoop focus on the supernatural a sense that God is really there. Really is this invisible world of grace and redemption which worth using our earthly lives to to connect with and to build up our relationship with we think it's not really worth the sacrifice. You know? It might be true might not be true was not really worth making that big bet on it. You know, I think I'll do this other thing that's more comfortable. I I've noticed something can this is at least in Catholic churches, Protestant churches. The more comfortable the seats, the uglier cheaper and stupider the the the altar and the factuality are, whereas if you have an old church with exquisite windows, and marble altar it often be hard bench and something hard to kneel on. But what you get to the new churches built in the sixties the stuff that's meant to honor God in the sanctuary. Looks like a portal nombre talented seven year old art class in about ten minutes. And it's cheap materials like cells and polyester and it's simple in its crude. But my gosh, they're like thrones cushions so comfortable. We value our butts beyond our souls and God. Wow. You're just you're very lapidary. Talker. John what you said about writing this article, which people can read at the stream stream dot org, folks dot org, and the title is are we to primitive to rebuild? Notre dom. Use it writing the article was like live tweeting from your mother's funeral and other lapidary phrase. So I have to say John that you know, we're touching on some very important things. That's why I wanted to have you on today because this is not just about. Oh, some terrible thing happened, you know, it's powerfully symbolic deeply symbolic when I think about you know. Suzanne yesterday said something like it's almost as if Saint Patrick's cathedral where to go away. And then we both realize oh my gosh. That doesn't begin to begin to begin to compare to Notre Don, which is eight hundred years, we have absolutely nothing in the United States of America that can touch this. It's just it's just a staggering thing. Now, I heard someplace yesterday on the news that when when Victor Hugo wrote has famous novel bunch Beck of Notre Dom. I was at the turn of the century was at following the Dreyfuss affair. I can't even remember how that was before. Oh, I'm sorry. So it's way before that. But but in a way, I guess what I heard on the news was that it brought new attention to Notre Dom that somehow had already I guess because of the the secularism of French aloof revolution, the general climate hydra believe that two hundred years ago in France. And you know, talk Ville touches on this. You have the kind of secularism that we haven't seen in America until like the nineteen sixties realistically. Can I put it in perspective for you? Please. How quickly things can go insane. As we watch American politics should should keep people up at night seventeen eighty nine when they decided to reform the French monarchy because it had gone broke largely by supporting the American revolution. By the way. When Louis the sixteenth decided to reform the French monarchy he had already abolished laws against product. Jews already liberalized a lot of things and gotten rid of some of the worst aspects of the French monarchy, but he he needed to reform it, so he summoned the estates general, and that that was like some of the common people some of the nobles and the bishop's would all meet in this in this estates. General was like a parliament. Well, it started in seventeen eighty nine with a religious procession with all the bishops of France carrying the Eucharist in a beautiful gold monstrance, and Gregorian chant and very solemn beautiful procession full of hope for the reform of France within four years. They were gunning down preseason nuns as traitors and trying to wipe out the whole population of the province of day because they clung to the Catholic faith and they wanted to restore the monarchy, and they didn't want to fight in the revolutions wars. Here's they went from a religious procession to an anti Christian violent persecution. Things can go that haywire that fast comfortable. Well when we come back. We'll continue the conversation with John's mirror,.

France Saint John America Europe Dreyfuss Notre Greece Morningside heights Italy Germany gothic cathedral Victor Hugo Florida Mary Louis United States Saint Patrick Watergate Ville
"thirteen centuries" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen centuries" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Ten thirty. Then I heart radio station. Sixty seven degrees, mostly cloudy. Very windy right now in Boston at two thirty great to have you with us on this marathon Monday. Good afternoon, MTV gal. Here's what's happening. We'll catch the marathon. In just a moment here on WBZ Boston. But first an enormous fire breaks out in Paris than Notre Dame cathedral. Here's an update from CBS CBS news special report as the sun sets on what had been a beautiful day in Paris. The city of lights is being eliminated by flames shooting from the roof of the iconic ethereal of Notre Dom SS, Elaine Cobb is in Paris. She reports that fire seemingly began on the roof where scaffolding and been set off the cold really rapidly the flame, tune developed into a massive blaze. The wooden structure all what has helped is go down so quickly and the staple spire has just come up. There's thirteen century. Would in there. Well because he has been under renovation. So a lot of a lot of materials and a lot of equipment in the church. Well, then looking in live pictures one can see the exposed in burning interior rafters of the Notre Dame cathedral is fire continues to burn out of control in that twelfth century building. CBS news special reports, I'm Bill Rakoff Tina, keep it tuned here. WBZ radio in Boston for continuing coverage of this developing story out of Paris more than thirty thousand runners from one hundred eighteen countries are converging here. In Boston today for the one hundred twenty third running of the Boston marathon WBZ's Chris foam is out the finish line. There was another banner day on boylston street with the Rainsy's falling just in time to allow worm class b to throw the crowds, which once again showed up in voluminous and appreciative fashion Daniel Roman..

Boston Notre Dame cathedral Paris CBS Bill Rakoff Tina Elaine Cobb MTV Daniel Roman Sixty seven degrees thirteen century
"thirteen centuries" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen centuries" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I about. More say some more of how what is doing with Judaism the rise in mystical curiosity openness to this. Or what do you mean? Well, let's dentist. There are three kinds of Kabila at least maybe a couple more too. But one kind of coupla is called by LA Massari, and it is ethical Kubwa for some reason and no scholar. My knowledge has really done the work on this. But after the appearance of the Zohar twelve thirteen century, virtually every manual of ethical discipline written within Judaism was written by a practicing Kaba list. That that to me is an extraordinary statement, especially since miss this get such bad press, and these all their energised, you know, you can't trust them to good things, or it's purely spiritual of, you know, right as opposed up Scotty, Florida. Yeah. No. I mean, I think when you think about it makes perfect sense. I mean, you don't have an experienced that his unitive in which you feel yourself dissolved into the divine all and emerged from that wanting to rip somebody off. Your immediate this Eire's to show them how to get there with you. And and so forth. The second kind of coupla is called coupla seat, or what in a Jewish histories called practical coupla. If Christa has an experience of the divine. She now presumably in some dim sense also has an insight into the inner workings of creation and everything functions together. And it might be tempting for her not you just making this up. Of course, might be tempting for to use this new knowledge as a way of well, maybe figuring out which stock to buy right which stock to sell or how real estate is going to go maybe to help TIMMY who sick in hospital get better as magic MRs matching. Yeah. And and that's why there's a whole lot of people who think that's all coupla is superstition and hocus pocus and the third kind of a coupla, which is mainly what show them talks about in which most students of Kabulov of of these times like myself is called a coupla e you need or theoretical Coppola. And. And that's pretty much. What we've been talking about Kabul is a way to do. Judaism. It's Judaism on steroids. You you can't do another religion and do Kabul at the same time. 'cause Cobbola only makes sense as a system for making sense out of heightened sense out of classical judy's..

Christa Kabul LA Massari Eire Kabila Florida Kubwa Cobbola TIMMY judy Coppola twelve thirteen century