17 Burst results for "Third Ranger Battalion"

"third ranger battalion" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

02:56 min | Last month

"third ranger battalion" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"Of the iraqi military hundreds of thousands of them in fact are surrendering before they even put up a fight and this is similar to what we experienced in panama. And again i thought to myself. I don't know if it's because of the overwhelming superiority of america's military might like our technology. The folks the troops that we put on the ground there clearly head and shoulders above. Everybody else out there. I don't know that's why they're surrendering or if it's just don't really believe in the cause this little special operations team. That i was in reconnaissance team did come under enemy fire from across the border in iraq while we were doing this show of force mission kuwait and it almost became an international incident in that i had this radio and had to call back to the. Us and basically determine oregon are are we willing to. We're going to do a training mission. Are we going to go across. The border responded this enemy gunfire that we're getting and it was a it was a a tense. There was a tense gunfight in a for just a little bit while we were on that border but wasn't really. It didn't really last very long jeff. We're gonna to pause right there. Come back with much more of your story on veterans chronicles. Our guest this week veterans. Chronicles is jeff. Stricker served our nation as a us army ranger and eventually retired as a us. Army chaplains. now a pastor in georgia. We've been talking about his military experience in panama and desert storm and Jeff you're also part of a crew that's been immortalized in film and as well no now In terms of black hawk down and that was in somalia which started as a humanitarian mission in late. Nineteen ninety-two Turned into something very different in nineteen ninety-three when we're you sent to somalia we were are. My battalion was scheduled to do a large training exercise in texas. This is in the summer of nineteen ninety-three an exercise that we'd been planning for and preparing for for quite some time while were in texas. And i think this is around the late june early july timeframe. Maybe a little bit later than that. We got notified one company from that battalion. My company of rangers bravo company. Third ranger battalion was going to go to the east coast and go joint special operations task force and go train for something but we didn't even know what we were training for. Just stop what you're doing here in texas. Go fly over to the east coast. We'll tell you when we get over there. I knew that somalia was picking up in intensity but quite frankly rangers are prepared to respond anywhere and everywhere in the world at any moment so for me. It could have been any place but it was likely somalia so when we showed up Fort bragg north carolina we..

texas Jeff iraq georgia panama one company somalia jeff Stricker this week Fort bragg north carolina late june early july america hundreds of thousands -three rangers bravo nineteen ninety-three Nineteen ninety-two Third iraqi
"third ranger battalion" Discussed on Cleared Hot

Cleared Hot

12:45 min | 11 months ago

"third ranger battalion" Discussed on Cleared Hot

"For one. I never thought in a million years that I would do anything like this so the whole thing has been a journey that I have no explanation for whatsoever. So how has your week been? It's been the same life as you can imagine. We're from just a a normal dude. Police officer Jujitsu Guy Thousand followers on instagram. Mostly people that I've known been the military with and now I'm like almost seventy and just getting bombarded by everybody news outlets podcasters like it's it's seriously insane. That eight minutes of speaking. My heart has completely changed my life. How long did it take from when you posted that video until you really noticed that you were on an on ramp? That was probably describe it if you'll like uncontrollable at this point. Yeah it's funny man like I posted it may fifth that night and By the next morning you know it was it a few thousand which for just a normal dude. Like like wow. This is gain traction magnitude of order greater than what you're Asher and a couple of hours later like I said my video. My work called me. And they're like. Hey Greg this things at four hundred thousand views this time to pull the plug. And that's what I was like. Oh wow this is everybody that Santa sharing it and just on facebook alone. It's at like thirteen million views and four hundred thousand shares and not to mention like every other you know it's been ripped and put on Youtube and twitter and I don't even have accounts with those things so yeah it's the digital ecosystem is weird once you hit post whether you own in air quotes that material or not. Your ownership of that is gone. Yeah I think the you know the smoke was coming out of this space shuttle rocket for you on that one and at some point if it left in orbit you had control of. Its money too because my work even said that. Listen there's no pulling your message back. We understand that that is out there in the in the world of the interwebs but just taking it down shows that you're in compliance with with our policy and our request. Just you taking down get down. That's what they said they needed to see from me and I was like you know a liquid. We're talking on the way here. I think one of the things I love about. Podcasting FORMAT IS THAT. We have forty five hours on this. Sd Card. Which I'm going to be honest. Let's not fill up the whole forty five because I'm trying to go to the bathroom we're GONNA have to get some food but it's a long form medium. And what would resonated with me with your video. Was you're talking about the gap in trust between law enforcement and the civilian populists and I think that's huge. I want to spend. I WanNa talk about whatever you want to and I definitely want to talk about that but I think we should start even long before this began and give some people some understanding your context of who you are and how you arrived as the officer in that car. I'm assuming you made it in your patrol car did look like making that video so let's go the way back machine right so. I mean I've I've put some of this stuff out there but we can go through again. I right out of high school. I was like most young men that had no idea what I wanted to fucking do. Where'd you go to high school? Snohomish Washington so it's just north of Seattle. Okay and you know it's funny because people thought. Oh he's he's going into the military must be a patriot. You must love this country and it's like that stuff developed through the process. Initially I hated school. I liked partying and I didn't feel like going to college. So tell you where a typical slash average eighteen year old young man and so and it's funny too. Because I was like okay. If I'M GONNA do this I'm going to do the hardest route that I can take. I WanNa do the hardest thing that I can do for this four year enlistment and I don't even know where I looked into it or heard about as like maybe seal or Army Ranger. That's it I'm GONNA do one of those two things and so it's funny like my whole career got based off of meeting to recruiters such common unless you have lived like if you've gone military route as soon as you said that people are like. Oh I know where he's going with this. Everybody else is like Oh interesting. How does this happen? I went into the navy recruiting office. I it's not a good call and like every other person that walks through their doors says they want to be a navy seal and and then you talk to somebody who had no idea what is sealed is never had no information to give you and he was just a two and he was super pushy. He was like well you know. Let's let's sit you down right now and and have you take this practice as Bab. I WanNa see where you're at and I'm like okay all right so I took that. And then he's like all right. I want to schedule your date for maps and I was like listen. Bro. I'm just trying to figure this out. You know. And then I went right next door to the army recruiter and said I mentioned in being an army ranger in the dude was just chill kick back and I just connected with that dude better. I was like you know. Army guys are cool. I'm going to army and like it could have just as easily went the other way as you were telling this and you said you went right next door. I was thinking back to the name so I was born raised in Santa Cruz. Pretty far to the left and joining the military there is. It's not atypical. But it's probably not the the normal path and I remember going to the navy. Recruiter and right next door was the army recruiter as well. I wonder if there's some strategy there like it's like you know we'll get a cheaper release but also we'll just be right over here when you piss each other off. They can just make this little turn be like. Hey what are you guys have to offer and so I came out whatever you want. So that was in ninety nine went through. I signed up. I didn't get arranger contract. Because they said they were all out like they always say and I was too dumb to fight for it at the time and luckily it worked out for me but I went to boot camp down in Fort Benning airborne school and then when I was at airborne school a guy from judgment came down and said hey who would like to try out and go through the ranger in doc program like. That's what I was waiting for so I raise my hand and right there on the spot they take you on a death run. They're like fall out to the rear of the formation. Right right face and just run you to the dirt. That's is gonNA shock people and it's because I found out later on some guys told me like you know they send the fastest dude for you to pick up the rangers. It's a every guy falls out you know. That's that's your first five minutes in and going into the rip program but yeah it was peacetime army. Still so it was. I went through rip and then went up the Second Ranger Battalion. Out of Fort Lewis Washington and then they send you to ranger school. Once you've been with the regiment for you know a period of time and they realize that you're good dude we WANNA keep you. We want you to promote the Ranger Regiment. You can't promote unless you have ranger tab and so they send you. I went to ranger school in the craziest thing happened. It was my last day ranger school and Are you familiar with how school structured networks? I know that there's three phases I know well I mean I. My understanding is that it's a leadership. Course it's broken down into three phases. It's heavy on physical exertion land. Now one of them is jungle. Right is another one swamp I don't know if there's much of a difference between the swamp in a jungle but yeah so they have they have Darby which is at Fort Benning. That's your first phase and the mountains which is Delana Georgia and then you go down to Eglin Air Force base for your swamp face. Get you swamp down down in Florida so I went through. That was doing pretty well and on the last day and like you said it's leadership course so everything is graded and you get if you pass your patrols. Then you're going to graduate ranger school and I'd passed all my patrols already so I knew I was good and on the last day of Ranger School. You put you you rig up and you put your parachutes on down on Eglin Air Force Base. You jump back into bending turn your Garin and your graduate. That's pretty cool. That's pretty cool. So we were on the tarmac. All rigged up ready to get on the plane to jump and the cadre came out. They're like hey guys. Everyone derailed right now. Come into the auditorium. We gotTA talk about. Something was a month of September Ti. He was you're correct. Yeah Okay Yeah so it nine eleven and fuck you know we were. We've been so isolated from the world for the last sixty two however many days depending on some guys do the extended tour ranger school. There's people who've been at buds for twenty four months. Same same all the instructors like what's Bob I'm like. Isn't that kid a student? Yeah we've got a few of them but Yeah so we knew right there like your first contact with the real world after months is like. Oh we're fucking going to war and you know it and it's exciting because I mean I mean you know how it is. Everyone special ops community. You train you train you train you train and you WanNa go and you WANNA fuck and meet the enemy on the field of battle. That's what we do and a lot of people think that's weird when I say that but it's like what person would want to dedicate years to a certain skill and never get to use it. You have now. Actually I think a lot about this especially in the modern generations where there is an actual real world test. You know the chessboard of your enemy. It's no longer hypothetical it's it's legitimate and you're GONNA get tested and I think about the generations before mind like everybody who put me through buds people. I put up on this pedestal. I'm like Oh my God like I want to be this guy. Never those people never saw a single out of combat because they didn't get chance they didn't throw them the opportunity I'd have to imagine to some level that's frustrating but I also think and talk with younger guys about this when they ask them like. Be Very careful judging yourself in your career based off only your combat experience because up very true that people who put me through training. I still aspire to be like them and like I said they saw no combat. So if you're only metric is all that guy didn't see any combat Mikey Eh. But neither did three generation a team guys either. So let's be very careful well test. It's all luck of the draw. It's all combat. Is I mean how you react and how you perform. Obviously that's based on who you are and your skill set and your connection with your team but where you end up and when it's just luck of the draw you and like in the Ranger Regiment. When I was a private there was you know. The Rangers had seen combat in Panama and Grenada and Somalia but just real brief little pockets of combat here and there same with the seal community. There was In the numbers got smaller. But no some all in there was four seals. When I say smaller I mean like maybe two platoons in Panama and Grenada Which is you know. Thirty some guys down to four that after that that was the combat experience the real world experience that was being passed forward. And it's funny because all those guys that that were deployed to those theaters. Were like Gods walking. You know dude you know what I Sergeant Kennedy saw like. He was in Panama. And it's like I mean not to take anything away from that now but now literally every single person in the ranger regiment has multiple combat deployments. Just a different military optic your shift. I remember I was like nineteen years. Old Checking into seal team five and then one of the guys there had served in Somalia and he was in his using his khakis arguably one of the most atrocious military uniforms don't demand and he had a house like Oh my God. I never seen one you know. I had heard of this. But he was walking across the grinder one day. And I'm like he might as well have been Moses parting just unbelievable and you now you go to you know even the conventional seal team's in it's like Silver Star. I don't know how many BV's you have. Because I don't understand the things you have on. It's unbelievable the different optics. So yeah back to graduate and Ranger School I. I was deployed to the Mid Release. Like less than a month later. Yeah and so Third Ranger Battalion and Second Ranger Battalion. It third all of Third Ranger Battalion Alpha Company Second Ranger Battalion. We're going to invade Afghanistan on October..

Ranger Regiment Ranger School Third Ranger Battalion Alpha C Second Ranger Battalion Army ranger school officer Third Ranger Battalion Panama Rangers Eglin Air Force Base Asher Somalia Greg Fort Benning airborne school Washington facebook Youtube rangers Grenada
"third ranger battalion" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

Mentors for Military Podcast

10:54 min | 1 year ago

"third ranger battalion" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

"For military. Might glad we were able to carve out some time and put some on the calendar here. Well thank you for having me. It's a it's an honor. I I love I love this show and I. I love who you've had on and I am ambled to be included in this. I know that you spent some time in Ranger Regiment. Correct dead. Yeah so now. You're an officer so did you go into. Ocs Route ROTC West Point. What was it I was an ROTC guy out of the University of Rhode Island okay But from the time I was a cadet I knew I wanted to be in the Rangers. I My first assignment was at the eighty second airborne division and I I As soon as I had the requisite time to to put my back in for the regiment I did and at the time I had a brigade. Commander who was not necessarily pro ranger And so he said no And then another guy came in guy named Horst Carl worst who the day he took command called me into his office. Said here you WanNa the regiment and I said I Sir. He signed up on my paperwork and You know Luckily General McChrystal at a time was our. Ceo and I 'cause I was a senior first lieutenant. And he said Okay and I I went to Third Ranger Battalion in Nineteen ninety-seven and they had to like kick me out of there. You know screaming To go to the advanced course over the infantry hopkins occur of course in fact I got a letter from my branch guides that either. Go now or you gotta get out of the military. Yeah that's kind of the. I guess the bad thing about going to regimen is an officers and enlisted guy. We'll even back in the day. People would spend on average about three years and regiment and get out. Actually I think the time frame at that time frame for enlisted was probably about two years you know and then leave but there's guys now that's been there. Ten Twelve fifteen years blows my mind and in this because they get part of this whole tribe their regiment. They get very comfortable with that environment. They know the people on their left. And right you know. They feel comfortable with that that you know culture and everything that's there and they don't. WanNa leave but yet officers. Unfortunately it's you know it's pretty much just an assignment you can move onto the next one. Well the good news is You know I was able to come back again so I spent about twenty four months out as a captain and then right back in and was there from late. Two thousand one to two thousand five so ironclad again or at the reg. No I went. I started at the regimental headquarters. Okay I was a regimental air officer for a little while. And then I commanded Charlie Company in one seven five. No okay so one of these things that you asked to go to one seven five or was it. You were here that that's where I was selected At the time it was Kershaw was the commander. He ended up actually relinquishing demand to a rich Clarke Who was another phenomenal leader? So I was really really lucky and I was excited to go to first guy in Maine I I truly enjoyed my time. And once five yeah. It's really cool. That you've got a chance to actually had experienced several different of the battalions as well as regimental headquarters to see the differences there but then also spending time in the conventional army. What did you kind of take away or bring to the conventional army from that so I think the first time I went back after. My lieutenant time It was it. Was You know we started? I was actually Put into when we were setting up the strikers the the brand new unit and so kind of bring that mentality guy named Nicholson was the battalion commander and there were two of us. A guy named Pat Work and I who who were both from Third Ranger Battalion. He picked US both in. We commanded next to each other And they wanted to create the striker thing that they had the mentality of a ranger battalion on wheels. And you know I think think it was a it was a natural fit so I got to kind of continue to bring kind of that ranger mentality that that ranger philosophy are along with Abram charter into this brand new unit was just starting off. That's fascinating actually. I didn't even know anything about that. you know. There's always been this bit of a rip between you know those Guys Eleven Mike Levin Bravo's and you know the whole mechanized and everything in some cases guys didn't volunteer for mechanized. They came in eleven accident getting picked up for that. You know it was a as a bit of one of those things in the military but you know in your case. There was a discussion a true discussion about all right. There's going to be a need here. We can't always be light infantry we've got to be able to to shoot maneuvering communicate you know? So what's the fastest way that we can get there and speed to the assault? Is the big thing you know. It's the whole reason. Why the M One? Abrams started changing the whole. You Know War Book and everything about how we're going to fight the battle because the speed of a JP four jet engine in the back of that thing rewrote history. Yeah and so it was fun to be on kind of the ground floor of of this this new idea that I mean and they put the right leadership I mean I. I had great leaders above me an incredible NCO's and you know until Nine eleven all we did was trained. We didn't pull any duty so I was in a shoot house probably as much as I had been in the Ranger Regiment So it was really. It was great and we had this new platform and I again. I'd agree commander. Who said hey go figure out how to use this having been a ranger platoon leader? Go figure out how to use this in a ranger like fight and it was awesome. Do you think that it had something to do with the Black Hawk down incident? The fact of you know the Tenth Mountain Division coming in in helping a in that situation some stuff in vehicles or or do you think it had nothing to do with it at all. I know that had anything to do with that. I think that we saw in the military. There was this there was a a very heavy mentality. That was certainly Projected at a near peer enemy and then we had these small units that were focused on irregular warfare or a symmetric or the asymmetric threat. And you know I give Shinseki A lot of a lot of credit because I think he saw that the asymmetric threat was going to happen and we needed to have some sort of a hybrid force that could handle the asymmetric threat and he picked the platform. That was spectacular. And he you know but we got to keep that light fighting mentality and we weren't. We weren't tethered to our vehicles. The vehicles were quite honestly. They would be in support by fire. They were big machine guns that we could. We could put somewhere right. And sometimes we could roll up and we wouldn't be you know Exposed for as long so I think it was. I think it was a a nod kind of irregular warfare that we we ended up seeing so they don't think you know I think Shinseki gets a lot of a lot of grief for the black beret. But what? He doesn't get a lot of credit for not only having little pet project that all cheap staff have but he got it done in his tenure and it was thinking about the future fight. It wasn't just like little pet project that he'd always wanted to do since he was lieutenant. It was hey I think this is the kind of fight we're going to be fighting and you know. B B F C B. Two was there and I just don't think he gets a lot of credit for that and he should because I think it was It was a turning point in how we thought about war. Yeah you know you and I both know that. Every leader Chief of staff especially in a lot of those positions up there in putting their marker their stamp someway within the military is the reason why we have changed uniforms. Forty two times I think and so we used to joke. You know that every time a new leader comes into place in New Journal Officer. Their spouse decides that they want to change something about the uniform. I don't know if that's true or not but it certainly felt that way as you had to go out and buy new uniforms. Every time you turned around I think I went through a couple. Yeah couple of months. I know there was a lot of beef about the black beret going out into the conventional military but I personally think that it makes a uniform sharp. I know it's not a great headgear in terms of blocking the sun and those types of things but you know it. It allowed the military in a different way. I think to join together. Once they started learning how to wear it I think it took a period of time. There are a lot of people didn't know how to quite where the the beret the we probably should be warm but you know Now I think that it's not worn is often as it once was in that period of time frame and so it seems to be more of the norm. You know it's it's kind of fits group which everything and change in the military happens that way well and I think you know. I think it really depended on how you looked at it. You know at the end of the day even coming from the regiment. I was like it's a hat. Let's not get crazy And at the at the striker's we actually did a process where guys earned their beret. Just like Rangers earned their beret. We they went through kind of a ranger stakes. Kind of event for forty eight hours to earn their Beret When I when I was a battalion commander basic training. They earned their beret. I said you don't issue to collect all their berets up. When they get from their issue on day one you'll hand it to him at rates passage because it should be an urn piece because that was the issue is is earned not given and I if you gave it to them. Yeah you're right but you WANNA make it feel as special as it is and you don't have to take you don't have to take the pride away if you just make it something that they feel that they've accomplished together. It was it something when you came in the military that your parents or forefathers or somebody in the align had gone into were you the first kind of go into the military so I had A. I had a grandfather that was in World War One but he passed when I was probably like five or six So for me based. I didn't have the best childhood and There was a I was estranged from my dad for a long time and After graduating high school I got.

Third Ranger Battalion Commander Rangers officer Ranger Regiment commander Abrams Shinseki Ocs Route ROTC West Point University of Rhode Island General McChrystal US Tenth Mountain Division battalion Charlie Company Ceo Maine Mike Levin Bravo assault Horst Carl
"third ranger battalion" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

Mentors for Military Podcast

13:34 min | 1 year ago

"third ranger battalion" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

"The mentors for military podcast this is going to be interesting topic for all of us because I don't think our listeners really we've ever talked on this topic at all around Mil Sim and simulation and the whole bit right and I know it's big in the community I know that there are a lot of people who listen to this show who are actually in that because you know if I go to their instagram pages you see it a lot you know is either even those in foreign countries I've seen a lot of their pages where they're doing a lot of simulation stuff so let's let's dive a little bit back into how you guys met and your background and all of that okay sure I so I met Paul because some guys who were Paul subordinates when he was in Third Ranger Battalion I worked at my company and they basically had a reunion at one of my game a couple of years ago and they're herald squad leaders coming in and I was like okay and then and Paul came out and played in the game with these dudes and loaned me his his quad so I do what we call white so operations which basically we just arrange safety range for the exercise or whatever and that's what I meant Paul and it was rainy and we basically just hung out on a money hill near Weird campsite and Roll Virginia for two days and watched a bunch of people play war with each other and you know mostly did the work of like Okay this guy sprained his ankle we're really fat so it will drive a quantum better because it's like these there's people trying to have this this kind of infantry FDIC experienced who could just be anybody it could be you know somebody who's dangerously overweight with a lot of health conditions who I mean we had somebody who is Lebron Palsy attempted once thankfully his mom hung out in the parking lot because he didn't make it Belykh thirty minutes into it you know well we I thought wasn't for him in the parking lot but he didn't pay his money so you gotta let them try right yeah there was a family member there that was like hey if he dies trying We won't sue US so we were like sure okay I mean I'm GONNA cousin with Cerebral Palsy like I've tried to make him do sports he doesn't like it but it's he didn't die you know so so I'm assuming that you have them sign waivers anyway right from a legal standpoint as waiver but that doesn't mean you're not getting sued that's true everybody can sue today's Society Yeah we into do that anyway right yeah well I mean everybody's just trying to think about litigation I don't think that necessarily means that people are gonNA sue maybe as much as people think I mean that's a separate topic I really wanted to talk about like small business ownership of just general advice I could talk about that as well especially in the highlight ability kind of event business but that's how we met Paul this Guy Unknown Jim Hansen and this Guy Know Pat Bagan and this guy no Philip Tilly who were all in third battalion was this mortars warder's battalion mortar so I was in Second Ranger Battalion I was in C- Company in the night I was in the line there and then I finished in a card Gustaf section which is kind of a weapon section as so I feel like I feel like I forget and sometimes I was in third bat mortars from like two thousand eight to two thousand fourteen because I know all these dudes in this group and like right I went to a family reunion with Paul just this last summer at his house it was really fun I was plus one I've been Patrick Bacon plus one of the family new years party in Key West and I just like Jim Hansen and I just like constantly sleeping on each other's couches so oddly enough like I don't know these guys we're in different ranger battalions years apart and that's how I know them that's that's a lot to do with just a community though right Paul I think it's it's partly to do with the community you know the Vermin Platoon from her battalion we all uh-huh had to stick together because we were we were the outcast and the underdog but so I think that speaks more to to Josh and it does to the community to be honest that's one of the things I know that this that that event that I went to reluctantly I might add because I always thought you know it's a bunch of nerds playing BBC's by what I saw was quite different and and Josh is a polarizing figure I think people are attracted to his charisma they're attracted to the quality of the events that he gives or that he puts on and he has a really great cadre of very knowledgeable people from special operations and conventional side so these people that are trying to impressions and immersions into that sort of world for a weekend they really get the real deal and you know Josh all of his cadre from what I've learned are very close to Josh and he takes very good care of them and they work very hard for him and I thought this is pretty neat you know as I'm going through the event and then I got to know some of the players that were non military and I realized these guys are helping each other with their schoolwork outside of the events they're helping each other do pt for the events and prepped their kids so that they look right and if you walk through looks like you know you walk through one of these Games you walk into a patrol base and it looks right I mean definitely looks wrong if you've been in the military at that moment when you walk into a patrol base millsap event where as a former military member you're like wait this is pretty good like these guys are doing all the things for the most part you know they've got their facial hair and their sideburns and and you know some flair on their kid to individualize their experience but it's impressive and I think that's that's because Josh I think he's the driving force behind that and that's probably why he's stayed in contact with With the mortars and become sort of artificial third baton Auburn I appreciate that proud to be an unofficial vermin member what got you into this in the first place Josh I mean how did you start this whole thing after you came out of the military you're well let's go even though it starts before that okay so let's start off the very beginning is something he started doing this all crevice don't mind background with them a common question I get a lot from not just other veterans but everybody is like how you make something that you're so passionate about as a career right yeah and so in this little background will explain to you hire never made any money doing this forever because they've been doing it since I was six years old so if you break it down lost money in the long run I started playing war when I was six years old I got obsessed with the American revolution all the kids in the neighborhood to wear the correct uniform terms and we had battles like you know we reenacted when I was six my mom took me to a reenactment when I was seven and I got adopted by this Guberina actors because like normally kids only do that when their parents do it and they have to super about bringing people water buckets on the battlefield and shed and I knew what I was like I was like twelve they're gonNa let me have a gun I get to have a musket yeah oh boy did happen because my parents weren't GonNa let me have a gun they listen to NPR so like you know it's not happening I was PR. I knew they were GonNa let me have one and that's how I started and I've been reenactor most of my life except for probably my last couple years of high school and like when I was in the military and when I got out of the military I continue to reenact still do it today as the site you know as a hobby but when I got out of the military some guy primarily makes his living in sales but did this I did this thing called Macondo school it was like Vietnam era themed Mini Ranger School Event and he marketed in the paintball community initially but by the time it I had met him he was doing it in Aerosol because air soft basically is replaced paintball one paintball was in the late nineties early two thousands you know air soft has surpassed is that mccord grown with the economy at large so maybe you can help I don't want to stop you too much here but I mean explain the difference there because for guys like me yeah yeah sure the main difference as between Boehner assault is like a gaming tool or training tool you can use those words interchangeably and I do by prefer not to say training because it invites a lot of weird shit with it I want to be doing entertainment I don't necessarily want to able to Mexico and do games I travel across America and do games I don't want anyone to think I'm training this is purely for entertainment that said there's always valuing games gene so the differences paintball of most people know paintball right it runs on a high pressure or a co two air system typically guns look more like markers they feed from the top there's competitive standardized style of play it's basically like a sport it set up to be a sport you are marked with paint because the assumption is you're going to cheat because it's a sport you know the assumption is you will not call your heads I mean maybe you back me on this ball I was trained not to call my hits with Sims in the military okay so anyway so that's for me the difference between a paintball gun and an aerosol gun is paintball is sporting equipment and air assault gun is a toy for gaming that at least that's what I tell customs officials but I mean it's also true it's true like that's my intent you know and that's what they are choice so people like air soft guns primarily because a lot of them can be powered very reliably on an electric battery that will last you for twenty plus hours potentially they are one to one replicas of real firearms with similar functions you can use high pressure air gas to get even more realistic function you can replicate everything muscles all the way up to like medium machine guns and things like that they have a longer range they don't cause as much of a mass there's less pain associated with it it's way cheaper to do and those are the main differences between the two okay and so when I got out of range regimen two thousand five you know paint or was just starting to get very popular in the Pacific northwest which is where I lived I was in second battalion which is near Fort Lewis sorry at Fort Lewis which is now joint base Lewis mcchord or something near Tacoma Washington and a I got out there was this guy that lived up there in in Bellevue name's John Robots and he's worked primarily in auto sales auto sales training most of his life but you know he has a side Gig ran this thing called the condo school which was you know basically a little bit of a miniature ranger school kind of targeted to air saw that was the Vietnam reenacting game and I got involved with that and I worked for him and then another guy and various aerosol businesses for years mostly doing historical events that were super hardcore because I didn't feel comfortable wearing modern kit and like playing these games if that makes sense I love playing these games like wars an awesome fucking game as a reality mixed but as game love it every time and that's how I got into it and basically I work for these other people for a long time when I got out of the military initially intended to return military I went to college for four years on Raunchy scholarship somehow managed to get kicked out of the college in the last three weeks because of poor grades like I need to do Gosh GonNa say Yeah Yeah I just I just got drunk and had sex with girls that were younger than me like the whole time and then at the end like they pick my branch and shit and everybody was like everybody so our God yeah so thanks for that Gi bill that was cool that really helped me decompress from deployments ranger regiment my divorce and eating out of the military all at age twenty four you know what I mean is this cool I had this safety net for four years everything was just still paid for so I didn't have to figure it out and after that I briefly worked in federal law enforcement because I didn't know what the fuck could do with myself and I had to make money and I realized that made me super miserable because just hated everybody I work with was ninety percent people that like so I have a mixed opinion of veterans in the outside world like unless you served with somebody or you know somebody like you gotta treat veterans the same way you would anybody else because I know I've worked with some people were phenomenal like Jim Hansen Lake Pat Bagan you know what I mean who who introduced me to guys like all the like I've met some guys don't weren't so great that have worked for me that have not been helpful that have been mad ask me later actively animists tried to hurt my business literally that and saying Gee right and that's all in the ranger community so yeah created equal that's for sure oh we talk about how much we eat our own all the time so.

Mil Sim four years six years ninety percent thirty minutes three weeks two days
"third ranger battalion" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"third ranger battalion" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"Fighting the enemy, but the same time they're kicking you guys out of the military, because it was a friendly, fire incident and no one sees the contradiction here. Yeah. One the worst thing about that. Like it was it was really hard for, I mean, for obvious reasons as shooter in that incident like you, you know, your heart in your mind vacillates between, you know, this is unfair to, you know, I deserve worse. You know what I mean? So, and I'm not I'm the last person that is in a position to kind of pass judgment on my own my own actions. But the one of the biggest injustices was of the guys that were releasing the resume time was our was are PL who vehemently disputed, and fought with the chain of command against splitting tune. And so. There's there's. Reverberations of this. I think in what happened in Asia where split out splitting up the team. Yeah. Yeah. So there was a lot of into that, obviously. I mean, it was just it was a horrible incident for so many reasons it was horrible for the family. I mean Pat, but then effectively losing in twice in a way in terms of being told one narrative, and then being told another. And then all the distrust that created. And then just the. Yeah, just the just the broken that created within the unit as as. We know this. But we know that, you know, bad stories or dark story, they don't get better with age and they don't get better with deception. You just make it worse for everybody. And so that, yeah, it was it was a very difficult to swallow for lots of reasons and not the least of which was, you know, was gone. And, and you were, you know me as part of that infant, you know, you were part of, you know, part of that, and, you know, it's not it's not fair to say that, you know, I caused his death Ryan responsible for it. You know, I was one person that was taking actions within the broader a much broader dysfunctional contacts at the same time. You know, you pull the trigger. Right. And you have responsibility. And so, you know, I spent the better part of, you know, twelve years, trying to sort that out in my heart and mind. In terms of, you know, owning what I needed to own you know as a as a soldier as ranger. Man. But at the same time, not making myself the center of the story, if that makes sense because I think sometimes we can own part of a part of tragedy that really just makes us more important than we are. You know, it's just like, really bad important to be the one who caused all of this, or no. At the same time you have responsive. I had though I you know, it's funny. I mean it's not funny, but it's, it's interesting to hear you say this, because I like I went through so many of the same things where like I totally blamed myself for everything. And it was really funny in the sense that when I was writing my book, I went and I, I asked teammates of mine who were their supervisors. I had at the time. Like, hey, can you take a look at what I wrote here like and like just for fact checking really? Yeah. And they came back to me, and I think to a man each of them was like it wasn't even your fault Jack like. Are you blaming you? I feel like it's my fault. And I took responsibility for it in at the time I took responsibility for in my book. I did as well. I mean, it was interesting that, you know, a lot of the guys, I worked with are like, dude. Like you're putting a little bit too much on yourself here. Interesting. But anyway, if you want, I will walk you through the what happened to me. That winter of two thousand and four so. Winner of, oh, four five, and I can't remember the exact date. Unfortunately, maybe if I go digging through some paperwork, I can try to figure that out. But it was that winter, we got the word I was down in Salerno, fob, Salerno Afghanistan, which is in. Kaos gavin's. I was a sniper attached to Charlie company. Third ranger battalion beyond that it was the first appointment with our new record teams..

Third ranger battalion Salerno Salerno Afghanistan Asia Charlie company Pat gavin Ryan Jack twelve years
"third ranger battalion" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"third ranger battalion" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"Monumental effort. That's happening in Columbus, Ohio. And before we get into all of that, the national Veterans Memorial and museum. Can we talk a little bit about your career for a few minutes looney? Yeah. Let's do that. Yeah. So give us kind of the rundown because if I don't I don't know we only have an hour long program, and I can't run down all the awards. Well, you know, if there's ever an award credit goes to the young soldiers and officers that often carry all of us under shoulders, and we get the credit. So there are a lot of people that that carried me on their shoulders over the years. Graduated graduated from Senator Dole in Charleston, South Carolina in nineteen seventy nine. In which commissioned. That's an infantry Lieutenant and. So over the course of my career, I served in every type of infantry unit winter for Riley Kansas near you with the big red one mechanized one, right? And then and then I went up to Alaska, and I was parachute. Infantry Arctic paratroopers with north of the Arctic circle. Sharing that the goodness. And the hardship. Paratroopers at forty below zero for a number of years and then down to the ranger battalions part of our special operation forces where I commanded. I probably company second ranger battalion. And then moved after a couple of years. To ninety three division which was a motorized and recognize the precursor to watch strikers are today. And then which college here at Fort Leavenworth Kansas returned to the ranger regiment at Fort Benning, where once again, which would just the most amazing, bright energetic, and and patriotic soldiers. During that time, deployed to Mogadishu Somalia. We've all seen Black Hawk Down the second force forward. I like to always say so we arrived on the fourth of October joined our colleagues over there. But Nevertheless, I was there, and then and then I was selected to command Parachute Battalion at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The second battalion five oh four. And then selected to command the second another ranger battalion. Another battalion third ranger battalion the same one that went to Mogadishu and then crossed over into the training command where we had all the officers and airborne school captains. And she does of infantry. And I know she s for my dad officer candidate school where you can be a private someday. And then an officer very proud of that part of our military service, then give everyone a chance to be the best. They can. And then through no fault of my own was selected to general officer. You know, we just found that if you keep taking care of people they'll take care of business and today, I find that as success again. Western to parachute division, eighty second airborne division, deployed for a little while to Iraq. And then over the next couple of years, deployed about three years to Iraq. And then became the three star general in Iraq. For all the fighting and training and helped shut down from ninety nine basis to ten basis. And and then also. Then ran all the army bases around the world, purist installation management. Command many general essentially seventy five cities we ran.

national Veterans Memorial and second ranger battalion command Parachute Battalion ranger battalion officer Iraq ranger regiment Fort Leavenworth Kansas Mogadishu Columbus Senator Dole Riley Kansas Ohio Fort Benning Somalia Alaska Fort Bragg South Carolina army
"third ranger battalion" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"third ranger battalion" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"And so I met the I was having coffee with ru in the Philippines, and I met Dale just this year. So and then we started talk and find out that Dale was in Mogadishu the same time. I was yeah. He he must have been on the same plane, even as Joe with George hand because I believe it was a squadron that came in after the battle of the Black Sea as reinforcements like, my my company is in third ranger battalion way after the event, but Bravo company three seven five gotten to that firefight in manga dish you and then my company off a company came in afterwards to to reinforce and help out. But I I don't think they saw any action. But that's. Thanks so much for doing this today. I mean, this has been like a super enlightening interview me because like you said, I think a lot of us have heard I either through the grapevine through our friends, and so forth are from the wider public is aware of thirteen hours and all of that. But like you said, I mean, there's not much knowledge about what this work is Asian really is or where it came from. Or all these these colorful incidents that they've been involved in over the decades. So you've sold me I'm super stoked to read this book now. Excellent. Yes. Yes. Having me. So the the final plug for the book here. I'm sure a lot of you guys are gonna wanna pick it up guardian life in the crosshairs of the CIA is war on terror, it it is a little bit until comes out at comes out may seventh, but it is up for preorder on Amazon dot com. And as I know you've probably set in here. I know Brandon said many times that you know, pre-ordered really matter. So, you know, pre. Order it and may seventh you know, it it'll approach sooner than you think. And I think this is going to open up some white a lot of stuff that people don't know about is. He said, you know, and I think especially anyone who's read thirteen hours gonna wanna read this book now. Absolutely. It's it's it's a good origin story. And I'm giving I'm doing the sneak peeks into the book every two weeks on the guardian Facebook page. Okay. Don lincoln. Where can people find that? If people wanna check on Lincoln, just go to my my Lynton page under Thomas Cora and guardian is if you just put guardian on Facebook. It should come up. It's a it's a separate webpage. Okay. And in the book is also out on Barnes and noble, cool. So I'm down both. We'll have you back on as we get closer to the release date. If that works for you and wing, thank go in a little bit more in depth with it, maybe can read the book, and then and then do a part to. Yes. That'd be awesome. And it's we'll do it for sure. So I'm going to wrap up the show with Jack Thomas, but it's gonna tell you I'll have this up tomorrow night..

Dale Facebook Don lincoln George hand Brandon Mogadishu Philippines Bravo company Black Sea Jack Thomas third ranger battalion CIA Amazon Thomas Cora Joe Barnes thirteen hours two weeks
"third ranger battalion" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"third ranger battalion" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"So lately, I've been I will say obsessing about certain military news, and it is not just that the president went to France and didn't participate in a ceremony honoring World War One veterans. But it is the deployment of over five thousand in President Trump promises fifteen thousand troops near the US border. As a means to combat a caravan that seems to be let us say greatly exaggerated. In fact, I've been quasi infuriated about this. Because there are all sorts of military undertakings that you could debate the wisdom of, but this seems to me to be beyond debate. So what I like to do is. I have a few sources a few outlets where military voices talk about what they think. One. Is. I go to duffel blog, which is kind of more of a funny Facebook site, I subscribe to a site called task and purpose, which I think is really good. And I listened to a podcast called soft rep. Now part of the news rep family, and it was started by Jack Murphy who served as a sniper team leader in the third ranger battalion in Xenia weapons sergeant on a military freefall team in the fifth. You know, how it goes with these military credentials, but he's certainly a warrior, and now he's a journalist and think you win Jackie got what an advanced degree Columbia after serving bachelor's degree actual degree. Okay. Not that advanced. We don't want. We don't wanna brag too much. But I wanted to talk to someone who talks about military issues and with military people all the time about some of the recent developments concerning our military. Jack Murphy is here. Thanks for coming in thanks for having. So let's talk about the quote, unquote, Boorda deployment before the troops got involved. When this was an issue. What were you saying what we're people who are interacting with you on your various outlets saying about the caravan? I mean, I could only speak unofficially. I mean, just casual anecdotes lodger vacations. But I mean, some people pretty free. Out by it. I think there were a lot of people who are concerned about illegal immigration, and they saw the caravan as sort of sort of the confirmation of the worst nightmare for people who are on the right is invasion of people from the southern hemisphere. I think it's mostly a horse pony show, ponies and balloons. I it's a political gesture there's this ramping up this escalation in the more this this sort of fears about a migrant caravan and invasion of our soil amped up the more pressure. There is it's really a cynical way. I think the play up the issue of illegal immigration we've been kicking the can down the road on that for decades. You know, some of these things should have been resolved back during the Clinton administration at least and every subsequent president has kind of kicked the can. And at the end of the day. I mean, we can see now the congress of gone to the Democrats and Republicans have the. Senate. I mean, Donald Trump's wall is clearly not going to happen at this point that's over. So we're just kind of beating this drum for a political distraction and the playing such a small number of troops. They what is it five thousand fifty six hundred. I mean, they can't possibly secure border. That's that long. Can they do just militaristically? They could shore up some key areas from what we're told. That's not even happening. There can't make arrests in right? They don't have arrested thority kind of pointless, right? Yeah. And we're told at least that there's purely going to be in support positions. So they're going to be driving the trucks moving the pallets of water bottles and things like this. So it's even more pointless than that. If we were to do anything would be to mobilize and train more immigration officers. Right. That would be a more pause -able long-term solution. Does it upset you? Does it infuriate? You have. You just said politics or politics, and I don't get upset with them. No matter what they did. I mean, I know this sounds quite jaded of me. I do except that it's politics as usual to some extent. I mean, we've been fighting a war for seventeen freaking years. We've been in Afghanistan, sending people back and forth back and forth. Guys coming home in body bags for what what is the strategic purpose? What's the endgame? And there's none. So. Yeah. I mean, my faith in government is a little tarnished. Okay..

Donald Trump Jack Murphy president Facebook France US Senate third ranger battalion Afghanistan Clinton administration team leader Columbia Jackie
"third ranger battalion" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"third ranger battalion" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"So because part of the philosophy. You hit with your fist and you break a finger. You can't pull the trigger. So it's very geared to anxious. Asian martial arts definitely killing maiming. So the famous to to fight like an ape, so Gary, Chuck Sanderson. China's I think we're kind of tied tied to the hip for awhile and there other people as well. But they got out of the military at one point in time. I went to. Nicaragua to be some Osas bodyguards and work for him. And this is all alleged because I wasn't there. But no people that were Gary, and you they were doing a lot of operations killing a lot of people. And I guess they have that they were warned that they should get out of the country and. Chuck Sanders and Mike China's got on a plane a day before. O'neil endowment that plane got up in here. Just over the Nicaraguan the by the nicotine, I wind exploded. So they were killed that was the end of that. And I guess China's them left not John's to a left within the next day or two. So. Nobody knows. I don't think that this day why that plane ever exploded or how they knew that they should get out of the country. But to point it sounds like a setup I dunno Dale if he's told you anymore. That's about a lot of her. Writing that. But his wife was cut up and killed on her head was put on a mailbox while he was in country, Jerry. Yeah. Yeah. Gary, so Gary O'Neil like people are listening to this who don't know. He has an autobiography out. Also, I believe it's called American warrior. I read it when it first came out. I mean, suffice to say Gary's lead interest in live. I mean alert in Vietnam all kinds of interesting. Yeah. Allegedly drop out of school stole someone's ID entity army. Yeah. Vietnam fifteen. Yeah. He was underage. And are. Yeah. Yeah. He got kicked out his first his first stint in the military because they discovered was underage thing. He came back in I guess when he was eighteen. For the draft order apparently. So he went into first time you went any winters cousins Berlin, typically who was all got discovered got the boot already combat what we did all kinds of budget five. Five through him out again. And then it said you never will join the military. Danny's watch beat his mom on the. Draft board. I guess he made talk. Some paperwork and get back in. So, you know. Guide is dedicated his whole life to the military how to our country and. Right. Cool, dude. It to every now and then but. Getting older, but he's still a bad ass. Man. Tell you that last time I heard heard a guy it was in Fort Bragg was working strip bars. Bouncer at the. I think you Jimmy pull he pulled some guy out. About all. But all I was head. Yeah. That was that was the first night so say they had to let him go. But come started some crappy slaps gonna face pulls his eyeball out. Gary Neal's one of those guys he knows like all these like esoteric forms of martial arts. Like like you were saying like ripping and tearing and like weird stuff that most people. I don't I don't think I've ever heard of. And by the way, I looked up the book that Jack was furniture, which you're correct it's American warrior, the true story of a legendary ranger came out in in originally came out in twenty thirty. I've is that sounds about right. Okay. So much later on in life, and it's written with David Fisher. So you could check he's also a inducted into the ranger hall of fame along with another past guest. What's magic? Mike Mullen that must have been before my time log, oh, we should have him back on sometime. I I there's things I remember and things I don't remember. I can remember finding the word, you know. It's episode four hundred since appropriate say, I remember every single person interview on here. I really do. So like. Wearing a ballot. So it has to be before my really early on. There's no one though that I interview even if they're not the most memorable guests that someone's like, did you ever interview, Sean? So it always I dunno Marlins memorable. He served in all three ranger battalions regimental headquarters and was an ROI at ranger school. Yes. Maximum..

Gary Gary O'Neil China Gary Neal Chuck Sanderson Mike Mullen Vietnam ranger school Sean Nicaragua David Fisher nicotine Chuck Sanders Dale Fort Bragg Berlin Osas Jimmy Jerry Mike China
"third ranger battalion" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"third ranger battalion" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"He's New York Times, bestselling author, everything he puts out and you know it'll get dwarfed in wishes to be honest and comparison to Mike Vining. Yeah, I, I think that's what people come to this podcast for his to hear those voices. Yeah, but it's good to have a mixed because there's always new people discovering the podcast. So I think that if we have those familiar voices on that. Great as absolutely, and it's it's good to and fun to next up for the audience as well for no, there are people who like go through and listen to us every single week. So you know, we want to throw different types of content and different people with different experiences at them. You know, we've had Tom king, you know, the former CIA officer turned comic book, writer writes, Batman, comics. I mean, it's fun to mix it up once in a while. Yeah, if you go way back in the archives, we've had like diamond Dallas page on. Yeah. I mean, you've had some Rockstars on Mark slaughter, Jason row. Yeah, we fillipponi we did with that was cool, but Mark emailed the after that interview. He was really happy with how turned out, and he was like, hey, would come on anytime if you guys need me. And I hear that a lot from guests sometimes for some guys, to be honest, one interview is enough, maybe two interviews. He's a guy I could actually see regularly having on. I really enjoyed that interview and he's done a lot of different things that have. I've really never been written before outside of his book. Yeah, absolutely. We can have him on as a guest again or many times not. I agree. So getting into this first article here, this is not from the news, but it's just something that caught your attention. Yeah, le- fallacy. Task force lead marine and army grunts should train like Rangers from Quantico Virginia. The director of the Pentagon's close combat. We task taskforce wants to make sure infantry squads approach training like the seventy. Fifth ranger regiment too often marines and army and infantrymen are tapped to serve as borrowed military. Manpower details such as guard duty to support base level operations task force director. Joe la- Tolly said Wednesday, at the modern day, marina expo your Wednesday. So you were connecting this a little bit with our interview with Dr Leonard Wong? Yeah. This article written by Matthew Cox, who I cross paths with met him years ago. He wrote this article. Really good people should go check it out. But what it is saying is that the US military's infantry both marine infantry and army infantry. They get treated by the services as like unemployed, labour like, okay, if you're not actively getting shot at by the Taliban, then you are basically just manpower standing by to stand by and we can utilize for post beautification, run around picking up pine cones on post or handing out towels in the gym or whatever stupid thing. The base commander feels news to be done that day and what this, what this study is showing. What they're talking about here is that to improve, we in the competency of the infantry, we need to stop treating them like this, and we need to start training marine and army conventional infantry the way the seventy. Fifth ranger regiment trains. And I was in third ranger battalion. We've..

Jason row Mark slaughter army conventional infantry Fifth ranger regiment Mike Vining New York Times Rangers Matthew Cox director ranger regiment Taliban third ranger battalion Dr Leonard Wong Joe la- Tolly Tom king Dallas US CIA commander Virginia
"third ranger battalion" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

Zero Blog Thirty

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"third ranger battalion" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

"Turn around it yeah it was a lot like no i i don't so you're going through and you used to you've done three deployments right i did one with my first unit and then five with one sixty five with one sixty jesus christ so give us some of the highlights of some of your best best days because we always talk about like highspeed give me a story that's like you would go if you could go back and relive it and do it all over again starting from the beginning where would you go as much as you can yeah yeah right within the realm of object has always so so i guess one of the one of the more memorable times i mean there's a lot of missions that that we took art in that we're taking small arms fire a lot but it was my first deployment where i received my cab which stands for combat action badge and i you know i was new i was fresh i just got done with a b m cue which is basic mission qualification course which was a pre requisite before i was even even able to deploy with the unit and that was where i got to learn the ins and outs of lying so i get down range i'm i'm fresh new guy on like super excited about you know this clean shit yeah exactly so it was either the first or the second mission that we went on and left the the wire and we were supporting third ranger battalion at the time and i was i was on the left gun crew position which is where they stick did the newer guide normally while there's still a lot of responsibilities at that position it's easier for the flight engineer which is always at right gun to kind of coach the guy left gun was kind of like you're playing right field and softball.

engineer softball
"third ranger battalion" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"third ranger battalion" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"Yeah who knows all right well with that we get over to luke bryan who's kind of newer at the site we've never had on the show before but his lived a very interesting life in terms of where he's lived across the globe and former army ranger so let's get them on joining us on the show for the first time as i said luke ryan former third ranger battalion team leader served four deployments and afghantistan and as i was kind of saying the intro you've lived a pretty interesting wife dude the son of foreign aid workers you'll have been pakistan for nine years and tyler land for five years and then later got a degree in english literature so there's a lot of cool stuff to cover yeah yeah yeah i grew up i grew up overseas we moved to box on when i was three so i don't really remember moving over there my earliest memories are up in the like the town where my parents were learning to do more that when i went there so yeah yeah we moved there it was like it was i don't know there's a cool experience i like you know it was cool to be able to grow up in different places like that and i feel like it's giving me a unique perspective on a lot of things living in pox don was hard on my mom i think because you know it's a it's a hard place to for for women to live in general i don't have any sisters but just me and my me and my brother.

team leader army luke ryan third ranger battalion pakistan five years nine years
"third ranger battalion" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"third ranger battalion" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"Yeah there's a lot of sick fucks out there i mean between that and showing us from women crashing green berets funerals there's so many sick people out there there is i had a woman contacting me for a while because there was some some guy was pretending to be an army ranger and this is one of the classic scams what they'll do is they'll suck these women in and they'll tell them i can't leave the army until i pay a fine or so i can't retire until i pay a fine or something like that so then they'll get the woman like send them five thousand dollars or something like that you don't have to pay a fine to retire from the army completely ridiculous but this this one person that's one case was using pictures of my former command sergeant major in third ranger battalion pretending that he was this person and this person is still very much alive thankfully who could guy he the scammer had taken pictures of this ranger sergeant major and was using it to scam women visum sick people out there yeah pretty shit and then before we get to luke the other unfortunate news we have to mention british and american soldiers killed in syria were on mission to capture isis member pentagon says or they said aycell number is which by the way isn't it weird how they always try to say eyesore when the the rest of the world refers to it as ice it's technically dodge or the islamic state but i mean it's because i saw was put on the foreign terrorist organization list so it's there for legal reasons.

syria pentagon five thousand dollars
"third ranger battalion" Discussed on Life, Money and Hope with Chris Brown

Life, Money and Hope with Chris Brown

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"third ranger battalion" Discussed on Life, Money and Hope with Chris Brown

"Five seven three two eight three or you can email me at chris brown on air as stewardship dot com that's chris brown on air as stewardship dot com and of course you can reach out on social media as well chris brown on air on facebook twitter and instagram and after we chat for a while i will share with you what the bible has to say about how we should avoid unnecessary stress and how to process the necessary stress and then is when we have the honour of speaking with kenny thomas and 1993 he was deployed to mogadishu somalia with a third ranger battalion and then on the third of october he and his fellow rangers endured an eight teen our firefight that eventually became the book and the movie that we all know called black hawk down ah there's anyone who can talk to us about navigating stress and pressure it is kenny they were outnumbered ten to one the bullets flying everywhere i could not imagine that kind of stress so we have a full so that's planned today and my hope is that after our time together that you are further further equipped and empowered to win in life and in money that's your encouraged and that ultimately you were injected with a fresh sense of hope that is our goal a god we love you and we worship you and would that heart of worship we are asking that you would speak to us in a clear way today that she would get all in our space were seeking your voice.

chris brown twitter kenny thomas somalia rangers facebook instagram mogadishu
"third ranger battalion" Discussed on Life, Money and Hope with Chris Brown

Life, Money and Hope with Chris Brown

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"third ranger battalion" Discussed on Life, Money and Hope with Chris Brown

"This was supposed to be his day off but as a sergeant in the third ranger battalion at the us army rangers and deployed overseas kenny was used to last minute changes their new orders came in quickly assist delta force by securing the perimeter of a building where a wellknown somali warlord was hiding out was somalians starving and needy emergency rations that this warlord was known for attacking the united nations food shipments and killing american troops after forty missions in the city of mogadishu he thought this should be relatively quick thirty minutes to breach and extradite the warlord was special forces handling the actual breach of the building his ranger battalion were tasked with fast roping down from black hawk helicopters to create a perimeter around the building just as they expected the rate took thirty minutes and the prisoners were loaded onto trucks as helicopters began to fly why are way kenny in the men in his squadron waited for the ride back to base suddenly they heard black hawk jets there's a blackhawk going down and that's when they knew this was not going to turn out like they expected they knew they had to get to the crash site to rescue their man as they began to rush toward the side bullets began flying all around them when a squad leader was wounded kenny was put in charge hour after hour they fought in the narrow streets kenny recalled there was a lot of gunfire when people start getting hurt and shot it's very real but it's not your friend it's someone you counted on and then you've got to do something to fill the gap and the bad guys keep coming and you can't call a time out.

third ranger battalion us kenny mogadishu united nations thirty minutes
"third ranger battalion" Discussed on Mike Drop

Mike Drop

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"third ranger battalion" Discussed on Mike Drop

"A woke up thinking about what my platoon sergeant had told me prior to are going over to iraq we were in a humvee with me in the back and him in the front seat he turned and said you know what our what's up sergeant after you kill a man there is no other feeling like it mark my words you won't want to do any hunting again the excitement of that will be gone you won't find any joy and either once you kill a man you can't replace that feeling ladies and gentlemen it is my distinct honour and pleasure to have the guest for the second podcast that we have today he was a third ranger battalion soldier for five years he did multiple deployments to both iraq and afghanistan he is the deadliest sniper and battalion history credited with thirty three kills in one deployment is the first black sniper in third battalion history he created hard shoot a shooting school in training center he's consultant and been in on multiple tv shows and movies including the hit reality show american grit on fox and advised on the movie the wall with john seena he currently has his first book option for a major motion picture and i would like to welcome sexual chocolate nick the rieper irving to the podcast welcome ammann's go on all.

consultant john seena ammann iraq ranger battalion afghanistan battalion irving five years
"third ranger battalion" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

1150 AM KKNW

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"third ranger battalion" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

"Pretoria's uh th there's there's always worn battalion that's always going to be okay there's always one luke kennard uh uh picking your words carefully a i went someplace that i should never have by they're just trying to get a better idea of the role that they play and what it's about because they were a law a lot of units in the more than the army is known this this i can see a lot of units of the army the at a ready on specific units are at raised were there supposed to be wills up with all combat loads and everything within twelve twenty four thirty six hours ranger regiment in their batons read them are the same way um but just a little less time to get up in the air um and flyover from wherever there at two word conflict uh may be or is about to inspire or a sense air transport um the the seventy fifth their basically just the overall umbrella of the three ranger battalion say ecorse there used to be back in world war two backend fifties there reduce be a lot more battalions long 'cause i read about fifth sixth and seventh yeah um the the the he the the one of the reasons why they they shrunk it down and on and and i'm gonna say this is my.

Pretoria luke kennard world war army twelve twenty four thirty six seventy fifth