35 Burst results for "Theresa May"

Mexico Records The Highest Number Of Health Care Worker Deaths From COVID-19

Marketplace

03:45 min | 16 hrs ago

Mexico Records The Highest Number Of Health Care Worker Deaths From COVID-19

"Taken a heavy toll on health care workers around the world. Amnesty International reports that Mexico has recorded the highest number of health care worker deaths from the Corona virus. 1400. NPR's carry con reports on how that country came to lead the world in this grim statistic. It's a regular scene in the courtyard of the sea Glowing, you know, medical complex in Mexico City. Dozens of the public hospital staff break into applause to encourage patients struggling with covert and honor. Those who died and there are many. Mexico now ranks fourth in the world and deaths from the virus and of the nearly 700,000 infected. One in seven has worked at a hospital or clinic. Like an angel Gutierrez, a pediatric nurse, the sick element, you know, hospital. He first felt covert symptoms back in July, I I felt really bad. My whole body heard I had a terrible headache. And then I infected my wife and two girls, he says. As his two weeks of paid sick leave was running out. He was tested a second time again Positive, but five days later, he was ordered back on the job. I guess we can still infect others at that point, says Gutierrez. But he says by then his symptoms weren't that bad. Two months later, though, he still have a cough. There are many reasons why so many health professionals in Mexico are getting sick and dying. Lack of quality protective equipment long work weeks that extend exposure to high viral loads, and Mexico quickly hired tens of thousands of professionals to boost staffing. Critics say they haven't gotten proper training. Sofia Ramirez of the nonprofit Mexicans against Corruption says in the early days of the pandemic, healthcare workers were dying at rates five times higher than in the US If we don't take care of her health personnel, I'm not sure how they're going to take care of Oliver. The numbers have improved somewhat in recent weeks. But health care workers still account for nearly 16% of all infections in the country. This month, Dr Theresa at the end, head of the Pan American Health organization made an urgent plea. Countries must ensure that have workers can do their job safely. Carlos Eduardo Perez Palma, a radiologist couldn't agree more He says he spends at least $1500 on protection equipment for himself. Goggles, masks face shield every three months. He works at two of the biggest public hospitals in Mexico City. Paris also leads a group of health care workers fighting for workplace protections. Thor, it is like to call us heroes. But in practice, they sure don't eat of the heroes. Mexican authorities insist their covert protocols are up to international standards, and they dispute that the country ranks first in the world for covert deaths among health care workers. In a briefing, the government's lead epidemiologist Jose Luis Alla, Mia, said it's unfair to make this claim because, he asserted Not all countries report deaths among medical staff and fed among men whose government eat five years. Salome is a data show healthcare workers actually don't get a sick or dyas frequently from Cove. It has the general population. But his data may be misleading because of Mexico's low rate of testing. Mexicans are generally tested on Lee after their hospitalized with serious symptoms, but healthcare workers are supposed to get tested as soon as they feel sick. Mexico's Health Ministry declined to respond to NPR's questions and interview requests. Doctor

Mexico Mexico City Angel Gutierrez NPR Amnesty International Pan American Health Cough Health Ministry Carlos Eduardo Perez Palma Jose Luis Alla Paris Sofia Ramirez Dr Theresa Thor United States LEE Salome Oliver MIA
First rental scooters hit Seattle streets

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:36 sec | 2 d ago

First rental scooters hit Seattle streets

"Hundreds of new e scooters are hitting the streets of Seattle Today. Lime is bringing 500 green scooters is part of a one year pilot program. Supporters of the idea say those scooters offer a clean mobility option to reduce congestion on the roads. But Dr Fred Rivera at Harbor View Medical Center, is concerned about head injuries. And he says the scooters are not safe. They really feel like these devices are as a rental is really a bad idea, You know, Serious head injury can be a life changing event. Theresa's You lt's done research that's finds helmets prevent head injuries on bicycles by 85%. But fewer than 10% of

Dr Fred Rivera Harbor View Medical Center Seattle Theresa
Internet Archive Book Scanning with Davide Semenzin

Software Engineering Daily

15:08 min | 3 d ago

Internet Archive Book Scanning with Davide Semenzin

"Welcome to the show. Thank you. You're on the Internet Archive. What does the Internet archive do. That's a great question. Deterrent archive is the world's largest digital library, and whereas most people may know of us because of the way back machine, which is this really rather needs tool that allows you to go back in time and kind of see what web pages used to look like. We really are fully-fledged online is the library and that we have different types of media types. We hold texts and television and audio images, movies, all sorts of things and yeah, the introduce archive you can think of as this huge repository of Internet. When did you start working there? I started here in two thousand sixteen. So. We've been yeah for years. And what do you work on their today? Well, I work on the books. That's mostly what I would I have always been on. I'm spending the bits inside of this. So usually when we think about our media types, we think of in terms of bits and bits out how we procured them, and how we distribute them. My specialty is working on the book bits in saw in order to build up our collection of almost four million books we have Candan, and my job is to sort of keep running the whole pipeline that allows us to do that. So over the last four years, we've my team, I built it. And now we achieved over our objective of being able to digitize million books per year which we're doing, and it's pretty interesting challenge so far. So you work on book digitisation and I WanNa talk about that. But first, let's talk more about the Internet archive at a high level. He told me about what is being stored across the Internet archive and who pays for it, and how do people use it just share a little bit more about the Internet Archive. Yeah. That's a great question. So I'm going to start from a WHO pays for it because I think that's the result of depth and that question Internet Archive. If you think about it as a repository, it's just essentially a bunch of hard drives spinning connected to the Internet. Somebody's GONNA. Pay For both danger and connection and hard drives and the electricity and all of that largely you can think. Of of our revenues in treated front weight. So we're a nonprofit and we don't really run for profit businesses. We don't benefit in any way of the data that comes on on our servers. We do benefit from your donations and so by and large, we are a community funded effort, and so if you type slash donate, we actually just added integration with apple pay so people will not help us. That'd be great. So we receive a fair amount of money that we we need to run from patrons, Cintas like people who supported us. On the side, we do have some some small some businesses. So we have our archive it. Our arm where essentially contract alto were machine capabilities and we we are maintaining a very large amount of curated website collections. In fact, we I, think we have about seven hundred can ization that are that are partnering with us to create these collections and if you tens of billions euros that have been collected for for our partners, and so they pay us to do the service and we do it for them and same is true for books. digitisation. So as we have built up to large infrastructure that is required to do this kind of tasks, we have to an extent, the ability to contract out to third parties, and so we do get some some revenue streams that way not anything particularly substantial in terms of like our ability to to sustain ourselves. But you know every little bit helps and then obviously throughout the twenty twenty, five years of our existence, our founder Brewster Kahle has. Chipped in here in Deir a significant amount, I guess over the years to to keep us running. So we have donations we have a little bit of our non for profit business, and then we have brewster who is there so This is in terms of who pays for it, but the question would be I guess who benefits from it. Right and that's a very, very large segment of the Internet. We're not the biggest website on the Internet. They think we are. We're ranking about two hundred and something the Alexa rank. But since we've been around for a long time, the users that that lovers the Lavas like I, every day I am in contact with people who tell me their story about how they use the Internet archive for their specific need always always amazed by the depth and breadth of. The of the use cases user spring to us. So it it spans from teachers to researchers, journalists to lawyers Theresa very, very large diversity also in terms of the country's from the backgrounds from from when users from. So it's kind of hard to to to paint them with the same brush but in general I want to say they are people who have some degree of laugh for knowledge and you may know our our motto, our slogan our mission is Universal Access to all knowledge, and so I guess people who have an interest in that eventually land on on our website. Okay. Well, let's talk about book digitisation as a particular project that is under the auspices of the Internet Archive. What is book digitisation? So, books digitisation is the effort of transforming physical books into digital artifacts. So that's the definition can take it forms. You know if you are if you have a scanner in your home and your scanning document in a way, that's obviously that's digitisation if you take pictures of the book. That's a book book digitization. So the definition that needs to be applied to the use case at hand, there have been other efforts at large scale of books. This decision famously Google had one but dare. Different From Ours, for instance, where they did distractive digitisation so they would pull the spines from books and and turn dot process into a sort of sensitive. Kind of problem we do non destructive book dissertation and I think non-destructive bit. It's just a little bit as important in the Beth nation as the fact that we're these books digitizing them so that we can keep them so that we don't destroy them. So the process by which we turn books into bits and then returned books to wherever they came from or wherever they need to go. So Why would I want to digitize a book and how many books get digitized each day just tell me more about the volume that's going through this. I'm very happy to answer this. So the reason why you would want to digitize book there's multiple. So think about for instance, the first thing that comes to mind is obviously preservation if famous birtherism is that accessibility drives preservation so if you don't have something. It's almost like it doesn't exist especially in this age of information, we do have immediate access to all of all of these resources and so if we if you actually think about this, if you have to go to the library to to procure a certain book chances are you won't, and if the if the record of that book actually doesn't exist, you may never get to it and were. This is a problem is for all of this huge amount of books that were printed in the twentieth century for which there is really no digital equivalent books nowadays that are published like currently obviously, they have a book artifacts. That stuff is not to get lost. and. That stuff is searchable and it's reachable but we have. Tens of millions of books that are unaccounted for and as time progresses getting lost, and if we if somebody doesn't save them, they will be lost forever and that's that would be a pity and huge loss of human effort and so but first of all, I think important to scope the problem I think the D estimates that there is about one hundred, million books out there. Give or take unique unique books and. Scanning them we're, probably not gonNA scan all all one hundred of them first of all because. You would be able to source and that's my fire the hardest thing. So we tried to scope down the problem and trying to figure out. Okay. How can we do this in a way that is useful for people so first of all, I think we had to come up with a list of books that we wanted to get into we knew. Books that are important and we need to can these first so that? We'll. We'll get. We'll get into to people and this will be evidently immediately useful and a good place for us to start was freaky Pedia, which is collected. A long list of SPN's the where commonly cited in Wikipedia compiled the list came out to a few hundred, thousand books, and so whenever we we come upon one of those sourcing process, we make sure that we get. We can talk about the senator sourcing, Proxima, little bit later but in general, we do have a little bit of a concept of priority or at least we did this was the first million million and a half. And then the problem was that we started running out of books you would be surprised how hard it is to source books by by the half a million you know and if you if you do it by your smaller scale, it doesn't really make sense to to us in terms of maintaining our our economic scale. So the whole system works only if you scan at huge volume and time and but huge volume, we're talking about a million bucks a year, which is about three thousand books day some things some days we'll do thirty, five somedays. We'll do twenty five on a seven days week averages houses about. Between Twenty to twenty, twenty, five, thousand books. Every book is about three hundred pages so that. COMES OUT PRETTY NEAT about million million pages per day five to seven million pages per week and you know that's not a huge amount of data in total. I wouldn't be surprised I. think like last time I checked it was about between ten and fifteen terabytes of data week. So we're not talking about huge amounts but it's not a small amount eater and we can talk about the challenges of Piping data over the Internet in a reliable way later but it's a significant volume and this operation is running you know twenty, four seven. And so. In terms of why even do this? So I called for the first part, which is obviously people want to get to the books. There is a second benefit in having digitize books, and that it's a wholly new format, it allows you to interact with the body of knowledge in a way that you never have before if you have. A physical book artifact, it has some very desirable properties, for instance, very low random access time and doesn't depend on the battery. It's very, very hard to censor, and these are not properties of digital artifact but this is the active factor searchable, and in fact that we have like it's pretty amazing next search engine where you can instantly search all forty million text items that we have. So that's a million books plus all of the patents papers I'll all sorts of stuff and you can search that instantly that was just not possible with the previous format. So I don't think this is dwell ISM in any way I think books. Digital format and books their physical format will continue to coexist. They just help each other out, and in fact, if we are able to digitize them in the first place is because of the properties of. Physical artifacts that they don't just disappear. If we find one, we can scan it. Well. Those are great summary of what you do and I can tell how excited you are about it. Let's talk a little bit more about the high level, and then we'll get into the engineering. So can you describe the steps of digitisation in more detail if I have a book how am I digitized it? Yeah. So, the books that position pipeline is predecing people and it's like in a way if you're an engineer I think is kind of what to expect so I D-. A physical sorting. Step where your book is ingested into the system. It's given ID and it's it's placed in a container. So we know that the the exists. So to speak the second step is it gets to a scanner. The scanner picks it up within the in the machine loads up the data necessary whereby The books method data we can. We're going to have to talk about that. I, guess it's pretty interesting facet of it all and then proceeded to actually scan it, which means they turned the pages page by page and they take pictures of the pages, and once this process done they click upload and the book vanishes into the ether and so at this point, we have a fork the digital artifact goes into our servers divisible artifacts either goes back to the person who gave it to us in the first place or it goes into our warehouse. and. This largely depends on what kind of book it is. So obviously, the recent larger conversation to be had about copyright and like what books is it is it okay to scan and under what guys it is but suppose we are just you know scanning Yearbook Jeff and you you just wrote the book and you want to have it digitized to risk no claim on it just wanted back at the end. So after we're done scanning it, we're handing it back to you with slip inside which will tell you the Internet archive identifier and the. Or is just the name of the item on the Internet Archive. Everything is an item and you're just going go to type slash details, slash your identifier and a few hours. Later, you will find her book. Wile you wait the second part of the pipeline is GONNA kick off. So That's the digital server side stuff and it's divided essentially three phases. We have a first phase which it's a preprocessing stage where we get a look this images that came raw from the camera we'll look at them crop firm we discovered them and we just make sure that everything is is ready to go. There was a second phase of Manual Review Sa- currently all books that we upload have to be checked by a human for correctness, and so this is a step were. Reviewer just goes through the images in shorts that everything is fine and then when this is done, they kick off the third stage of the pipeline, which is A. Is the real processing stage where we take all of these files and compiled them in such a way that they are suitable for consumption by our web front end what we call book reader and from their wheel derive. We call them to rotate formats such as PDF, Abi e POB and either a text file. So CR it all happens at at this stage. This is kind of like the bird I view of the of the books that decision pipeline.

Internet Archive Twenty Twenty Brewster Kahle Cintas Internet Google Alexa Candan Apple Theresa Manual Review Sa Senator Wikipedia Founder Engineer
Members of Gov. Tom Wolf's cabinet helped hand out boxes of surplus food in South Philadelphia

KYW 24 Hour News

01:06 min | 6 d ago

Members of Gov. Tom Wolf's cabinet helped hand out boxes of surplus food in South Philadelphia

"Governor. Wolves cabinet help with September as hunger action Month after a visit to the largest food bank in the Philadelphia reaching Kyi, W's Paul Kurtz has more on the loading dock here until abundances South Philly hub, State Agriculture Secretary Russell Reading and Human Services Secretary Theresa Miller joined the staff and handing out boxes of surplus food to people who operate food banks throughout the region. It was a symbolic show of support for those agencies that have been strained to the limit. Reading says demand for food has doubled its been pretty steady of 500,000 people a week and a year ago. That was 250 Phil Abundance. CEO Laurie Jones says they're now preparing for another surge and all guess some of the unemployment benefits of the supplemental benefits ended. So we started seeing that need go back up again. And so what we're doing here, Phil Abundance We think food banks were doing across the region across the country are really preparing to meet this need at this heightened level for the long haul. The Wolf Administration says charitable donations are not enough to meet that need. It's calling for a 15% increase in funding for the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program in South Philadelphia. I'm Paul Kurtz, K

Phil Abundance Paul Kurtz Philadelphia Secretary Ceo Laurie Jones Russell Reading Theresa Miller Wolves Wolf Administration
The Seattle City Council Is Stuck in Budget Limbo

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:49 sec | Last week

The Seattle City Council Is Stuck in Budget Limbo

"It's not yet clear of Thie City Council of Seattle will override Mayor Jenny Durkin's budget veto, but co Mohs Ryan Harris says it sounds like some are ready. Budget Committee chair Theresa Mosqueda was among those council members who chose to address the veto at their first council briefing since Dirk and issued it Mosqueda says they're collaborating with the community to take the uncomfortable step of making fundamental changes to public safety. We will do this in a transparent way with that includes public engagement and accountability. Having you take my ball and go home approach or my way or the highway is not collaboration. Council president Lorena Gonzalez was more diplomatic, saying her office is trying to find agreement with the mayor. They just haven't found it yet. The council passed the budget with enough votes to override a veto. It will likely take up the veto. September 21st Ryan Harris Camo News.

Thie City Council Ryan Harris Budget Committee Theresa Mosqueda Jenny Durkin Lorena Gonzalez Seattle Dirk President Trump
UK's Brexit plans would 'break international law,' minister admits

Not Too Shabby

00:56 sec | Last week

UK's Brexit plans would 'break international law,' minister admits

"The British minister has conceded their plans to amend the Brexit withdrawal agreement would break international law. Brandon Lewis said legislation to be introduced on Wednesday would go against the treaty agreed with the U in a specific and limited way. Criticism also came from the former prime minister, Theresa May, who warned the government it was in danger of losing the trust of other countries. Rob Watson is in Westminster. She's not alone. All sorts of other British politicians and politicians from outside of the country is saying what on Earth is the U. K doing thinking of breaking international law, even the most minor way or threatening to do it? Because what does the U k stand for in the world? If nothing from the upholding of domestic law and international law, I should say that the counter arguments all of that from the Brexiteers camp is to say, Well, if the doesn't want to play nicely with us. Well, maybe we should just tear up the withdrawal agreement altogether.

Theresa May Prime Minister Brandon Lewis Rob Watson Brexiteers Camp Westminster
Lockdown in Honolulu

Travel with Rick Steves

05:06 min | Last week

Lockdown in Honolulu

"Don Wallace is on the line from Honolulu. He tells US authorities they're put in a new set of restrictions because of a recent surge in Cova cases on Oahu justice they were hoping they could start reopening. It's crucial tourism industry. Don's a contributing editor at Honolulu magazine and he's updated us on Hawaii tourism in the past and done you're you're out there about twenty five, hundred miles away from anywhere else in the middle of the Pacific. Hawaii depends so much on tourism and I would imagine it's been quite a stressful time with the coronavirus continuing to spread. What's it like in Hawaii right now. Well the whiny started out as soon as thirty thousand tourists stopped coming way did very well on the virus were the lowest in the nation for states. Now we've had a spike starting at the fourth of July and August it began to get up to two hundred cases a day. I know that doesn't sound like much but. you don't have that many hospital facilities. That, we had to do a banning perks, beaches hiking trails and gatherings over ten So is the response and the impact of the corona virus different from different islands. who gets most of it in fact, it's almost miniscule on now big island, the ninety MILICI, those islands, the people can pretty much go cleese they. You wear masks you're allowed to fly into a walk who without according to you. But people who can't find their without of quarantine. What about people in the tourism industry? Are they impatient or they realizing that haste makes waste when it comes to getting over the so they can start making money again. It's a very interesting case people very concerned. There's no voice irresponsibly pushing for white opener light opening deal like Texas, did for instance. And I think that's because the workers sixty seventy percent of the are. No a minimum wage workers they don't have good health plans. They carry the burden of this, and the other part is the Theresa Stop Coming. Can Americans from the mainland fly into Hawaiian vacation if they want to yeah, you can come We get about three thousand a day. And I think the hitch there is you do a fourteen day quarantine and you check into your hotel and you can't leave your hotel room. The impact on tourism would be you're probably wondering around the beaches thinking this is like it was back in the old days. You're very much in nineteen threes, Hawaii. Waikiki is a ghost town. That's not entirely a bad thing We think tasteful Hawaii empty beaches, very clean water clean here you feel like being caress be hanging out with the beach boys. Old School Beach Boys. And if you do go out to dinner, for instance, you may have the restaurant to yourself just one or two people. Magic. So That's interesting. I mean, of course the you've lost the revenue, but you've regained your beaches as far as the locals go there was something in the news and I think you wrote about it about gun toting extremists who are wearing Hawaii shirts. It doesn't seem like the Aloha spirit to me what's Really thought it. Up in the news, there's one of these Gun Group extremists start showing up at the black lives, matter protests and other places. Instead of what they weren't Loescher it's Kinda create a sort of scary dissidence. Then people here reacted really strongly. Ensured is about Aloha Aloha is welcoming. It's inclusive. And it's actually something. I wrote an article about how Hawaiian shirts fight extremism. Hungary magazines. It's a love story about two sisters from Portland. Hawaii's eighteen twenty. Married South Asian immigrants helped create yellow her shirt industry. It's a beautiful beautiful story and it's that Louis Spirit that sort of loved that easygoing nece that caring for others. What a what a dissonance by these? What do they call? Boo Goo Boo Voice Blue Boys. Okay. Well I hope you have to handle and then we can read about that in your article and then very quickly what's open now if you are in Hawaii, museums, clubs, restaurants what's The dishes and Him after limited reopening had to close again. We hooked to get them back up in a couple of weeks neither good their little outdoor cafes and restaurants they've shifted to putting cafe tables out on the sidewalks and even the streets in some cases. So Madonna. Of Lua. And you know, thankfully, why is a very outdoor culture? So eating outdoors is. No big concession. So that lends itself to social distancing done. It's so great to have you on. We'll talk again soon I hope everything goes well with Hawaii and tourism, and your work there done Wallace's a contributing editor at Honolulu magazine. He's written the French house about buying a fixer upper on the island and Brittany and he's written articles about what's going on. In Hawaii these days

Hawaii Don Wallace Honolulu Magazine Contributing Editor Aloha Aloha Honolulu United States Old School Beach Boys Cova Oahu Hungary Portland Waikiki Texas Louis Spirit Brittany
Child abuse reports are down during the pandemic.

KYW 24 Hour News

01:07 min | 2 weeks ago

Child abuse reports are down during the pandemic.

"There's another warning that calls to report child abuse or down by a lot. Kyi. Nobody suburban bureau chief Jim Millward reports. Health officials want people to look out for signs. It's been repeated since the pandemic first hit the region without Children in front of teachers, coaches or other caregivers who were required by law to report suspected abuse. Those reports are way down We all have a responsibility to protect Children from child abuse. And neglect. Pennsylvania Department of Human Services Secretary Theresa Miller says they've seen a 40 to 50% decline and caused the child lance and schools closed down in the spring. Even this summer with summer camps and library story times cancelled. We've seen a 10 to 12% decrease in child line reports compared to these same months last year, she says. You don't have to be a mandated reporter to make an anonymous report with the child line. And, she says, with many schools starting the upcoming school year online instead of the classroom, everyone needs to be aware. Signs of abuse, she says, include numerous unexplained injuries or bruises, poor impulse control, demonstrating abusive behavior or talk, flinching or avoiding being touched or fear. Of a caregiver or parent at the suburban bureau. Jim Mel work, Okay, Whatever you news radio

Jim Millward Bureau Chief Jim Mel Pennsylvania Department Of Hum Theresa Miller Reporter Secretary
C.D.C. Suggests Some Child-Care Centers Can Reopen Safely

KYW 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 3 weeks ago

C.D.C. Suggests Some Child-Care Centers Can Reopen Safely

"Are doing all they can to help his many childcare centers keep the doors open. That's Ravinia Department of Human Services Secretary Theresa Miller says they worked with Penn State Harrisburg. Look at the effects. The Corona virus has had on childcare centers and to help recommend how to distribute the third round of cares Act funding childcare. Both the industry and its work force has long been under appreciated for its foundational rule. And the development of Children and has a critical piece of our economies infrastructure. The state's already directed more than $100 Million of Cares Act funding the childcare centers, But the study says it could take twice that. Miller says pre pandemic there around 7000 childcare centers in Pennsylvania as of late July, more than 200 of those providers have indicated an intention. Permanently closed their doors. And she says another 1000 could close if they don't get help, not only with what they lost while they were forced to close but also with limited enrolment and higher protective equipment and cleaning costs. At the suburban

Theresa Miller Ravinia Department Of Human Se Harrisburg Secretary Pennsylvania
Seattle Media Companies Appeal Police Protest Subpoena

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:57 sec | Last month

Seattle Media Companies Appeal Police Protest Subpoena

"Five local media companies, including common who's taking their complaint about a police subpoena to the state Supreme Court is here from comas. Corwin had the news outlets are appealing to the state's highest court to prevent enforcement of a Seattle police subpoena. Last month, a King County judge ordered the Seattle Times Co. Moh news and three other TV stations to provide police with unpublished images and video from a May 30th. Black lives matter Protest. Police hope those images will help them identify suspects who burned a Seattle police car and stole police guns. The news outlets are appealing the lower court ruling. Seattle City Council member Theresa Mosqueda recently spoke out against the subpoena. I could get his abhorrence that our city continues to push for members of the press to hand over video and photos of people participating in their First Amendment rights, The Seattle Times reports. The news outlets are asking the Supreme Court to block the Subpoena until the appeal is resolved.

Supreme Court Seattle The Seattle Times Corwin MOH King County Theresa Mosqueda City Council
Seattle Police Chief Resigns as Council Pursues Ambitious Plan to Cut Budget

First Light

00:43 sec | Last month

Seattle Police Chief Resigns as Council Pursues Ambitious Plan to Cut Budget

"The Seattle police budget's been cut and police chief Carmen Best retires right after the 7 to 1 City Council vote on this year's revised budget, including the cuts as well as calls to eliminate the almost navigation team. And a civilian eyes. The 9 11 system chief Best made the announcement her retirement effective September 2nd. The cuts require the layoffs of more than 100 officers, but it only cuts the budget. By about 10% not the 50%. Community activist wanted. Council Budget Chair Theresa Mosqueda says they have more work to do invest in community. Both the mayor in the downtown Seattle Association urge the council to reconsider some of the cuts with the worried about the effect losing the navigation team will have on parks and

Seattle City Council Carmen Best Theresa Mosqueda
Seattle adopts spending plan for new payroll tax on big business

Seattle's Morning News with Dave Ross

02:19 min | 2 months ago

Seattle adopts spending plan for new payroll tax on big business

"So how to jump start the Seattle economy. One idea is the tax on big businesses. The City Council has now approved spending from the new business tax, even though it has been collected yet, and the emergency fund to help the city get through the current crisis. And Kyra's Chris Sullivan has been looking into this screwed up. This tax goes into effect next year, and so what they're doing is there's a spending $86 million in emergency funds right now, in the hopes that when they start collecting that big business tax next year, they will pay it back. The money this year will go towards some covert relief. $67 million coming from an emergency fund. 19 million From the rainy day fund. As you know this business taxes a payroll tax charging businesses that have over $7 million in payroll on their highest earners. The more you make, the more that you get taxed, starting at $150,000 then moving on up in salary. It's expected to raise more than $200 million a year. Councilmember Theresa Mosqueda authored the plan. This is pushed back against status for politics in in the middle of a deadly global pandemic, with the highest rates of unemployment and business closures ever. We are doing something that has been proven to invest in our most vulnerable to spur local economic activity and create a more resilient and equitable economy. The so called jumpstart Seattle plan will spend over 60% of the tax revenues once they start collecting them next year on affordable housing and homelessness. This is what it looks like to lift up the voices of those shut out by establishment politics of the past, who listened to what community needs who find ways to get to? Yes. This is what happens when we have folks in office who don't accept the way things have always then who aren't going to just give lip service void of action. Mayor Durkin and her economic staff asked the council to hold off on approving the spending until it had a better idea of what the budget hole is going to be facing in 2021. They're expected to get some more economic data next month. Mayor called this plan risky, considering that a lawsuit over the business tax could be coming and depleting the emergency funds. In this way. We'll leave the city with virtually nothing in the bank next year, the mayor letting this tax become law as you know, without signature because the council has a veto proof majority Yesterday this authorization for the spending was approved unanimously by the City Council.

City Council Seattle Mayor Durkin Councilmember Theresa Mosqueda Chris Sullivan
Handyman program helps seniors save energy

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 2 months ago

Handyman program helps seniors save energy

"Many elderly people want to live independently, but that can be difficult if they become unable to do or afford basic home maintenance, these are individuals who deserve to be able to age in the community that really they helped build Theresa Collins CEO Senior Services Plus. The Illinois nonprofit has a handyman program that offers subsidize home repairs to seniors, and when workers visit a home, they also help clients take advantage of energy efficiency programs that are offered by the Utility Amarin Illinois. For example clients may receive more efficient showerheads led lights or smart thermostats. Collins, says the benefits go beyond lower utility bills. A lot of times when you think of energy efficiency, you're thinking dollars, but it's really so much more than that. For example one client, struggling to shave safely in his poorly lit bathroom, so a worker installed new lights that were bright and efficient. It made such an impact not just in the fact that he was able to keep his personal care up, but that it made an impact in his pride, so collins says improving energy efficiency can improve people's lives.

Theresa Collins Utility Amarin Illinois Illinois CEO
Tanya Zuckerbrot: The F-Factor Diet

The Here for Her Podcast

05:32 min | 2 months ago

Tanya Zuckerbrot: The F-Factor Diet

"Okay, so let's talk about a factor for people that are listening. Who may have never heard of this before? What is give us a little post? It note introduction short so f factor. The company is a health and wellness brand that was based on the factor diet, which was a book I wrote back in two, thousand six, and the factor diet is a disruptive liberating ineffective approach to weight loss and. Your health and it's based on the premise of fiber. Eat carbs day one, but unlike traditional carbs fiber as zero grams of CARBS, though it's found in carb's. I'll get into that a little bit five reds up metabolism feeling full, so that's the beauty of f factor is that you're eating carbs from day one, but you're able to lose weight without compromising your lifestyle, so it's a very lifestyle brand. Where your dining out from day one you're enjoying carves from day one. You're enjoying cocktails from day one and we even talked about the role that exercise should play, and that is probably. Probably one of the most liberating pillars of factor because we teach people that it's not how long you're working out. It's actually what you're doing, and we teach people how to probably work out. Let's look a greater return, so it's just very liberating approach, but if it wasn't producing results, it would all be smoke and mirrors, and probably had a business after a year, and the company's been around for twenty years and only growing. So Amazing? Okay, so I WANNA, go back a little because you are a registered Dietitian and I love your story. Can you share? How you found such a passionate nutritional wellness, and how you developed a factor, sure so I've always loved food and I think that. Really reveals itself when you see me doing all. My AG TV's an all the cooking videos because. At the core of F factor is my desire to. Deliver yummy food at still allows people to look and feel their best the space of weight loss I think. has you believing that it's like healthy food is tasteless food and. Through that taste, good is always fattening and F- factors. Theory is that if you give people yummy food that's healthy. That produces certain results. This can become a lifestyle so because I've always loved food and cooking I. think that's where F factors popularity drives from because people see like the passion, and when I say that always love food, I optical going to become a chef rather than a registered dietitian cooking, my whole life, not professionally, but more through passion like when I was five years old six years old from Julia. Child's like you know cookbooks. And when I was applying for my master's degree, I knew I want to be in the wellness space by thought. I really wanted a healthy gourmet shop that was gonna be my career path. The I was choosing between new universities, food and nutrition program. That was the masters, course there or the Culinary Institute of America. and. because. I had attended the University of Michigan Undergrad. I really wanted to be back like in an urban setting because. University of Michigan is in Ann. Arbor, which is like a small town, but compared to your that is and the culinary. Institute of America is like an upstate New, York, so I was like no I want to be in the big city, but I miss understood the curriculum like the food and nutrition studies may be studying food and I get to Nyu on the first day and I get handed a list of prerequisites. And the classes included. Inorganic Chemistry Organic Chemistry Biochemistry Anatomy Physiology I'm like. Wait I'm here for the courses on apple like. Pretty Mad. Because twenty years ago, the idea becoming a nutritionist. Commonplace like yeah, you became a doctor lawyer, but what? What was a registered Dietitian, so I had no idea that my interest in nutrition was really tracking me to be more pre MED. And because I was ready to Nyu and my parents had paid my tuition also I got stick this out. There was no backyard at this point so I put my head down and I got through the science classes and to my surprise I love them I'd never taken science courses before. I was a psych major Undergrad so the science to me was new. I learned that I really appreciated the science that. Explains the value of food and food in the form of nutrition, and then you really learn that nutrition is a discipline of medicine, and in order to become a registered dieticians be board certified. You have to complete a residency. And I did mine near University Hospital where your rotations include oncology audio vascular rotations gastroenterology. You're even in the ICU so you are working as part of the medical team. Prescribing is to enhance patient care to either manage a clinical condition, or hopefully in some cases, reverse it or at least decrease the amount of medication to patients taking so my background is super clinical and when I went into. Into private practice weight loss was not even on my radar like frankly after doing two feeds in the ICU, weight loss felt beneath my skill set. I'm not minimizing it, and certainly that's where I've landed, but at the time I really wanted a clinical private practice i. have this mother Theresa Complex I wanNA. Make the world a better place. People healthy and I thought I could do it. The reversing disease states through nutrition,

NYU Private Practice Chemistry Organic Chemistry Bi University Of Michigan Undergr University Of Michigan Culinary Institute Of America. F Julia Apple University Hospital Theresa Complex Arbor Institute Of America ANN York
BlackLine and LOOMIA

Zero to IPO

04:43 min | 3 months ago

BlackLine and LOOMIA

"You, for the kind introduction and I was so excited to speak with theresa and Fatty Day, because evolve have big. Businesses and I find that sells is something that can be really hard to hire for and really hard to learn. A lot of my background is on the product side so. We can make prototypes. We can get things out there. We can handle inbound, but when it comes to having a really strong smell strategy including hiring a sales voice. Something! That's been been tricky over time, so I wanted to have this conversation to get as much advice as possible about how you went about finding your sales hires what you looked for any challenges you had along the way. I love it awesome. This is my favorite kind of conversation so many ideas Matt. Let me ask you a question, so maybe can you describe it in like a minute so that we can maybe give you also some specific advice in your case, so how many? How many customers you have today, what is the enterprise sales cycle? Look like how long did it take? What's the average customer take? Do you have any sales reps like? Can you paint a little bit of the picture? Because maybe then we could actually give you some specific like actionable things out of this. So our team is very small and we're four people and we just brought on. To people went to help kind of conscious and sales. I'm in another person to help execute in sales, but there's not somebody who's full. We wanted to kind of test and see. What we liked to get a handle of this situation, we have about six customers or so are we generally sell to large businesses, and especially, because the product that we make is very hardware focused. It was really around the beginning of last year we were able to get to market in a meaningful way when we were able to have samples were like this. Versus like imagine what you could get. Rich is a really different process to last year. We say on a few fortune one thousand companies. This year we're hoping to bring out a few more, but as he mentioned as. Her and I do most of the sales calls, and at some point for these really high attached cells processes. It really doesn't scalp very well, so I think that in the past we felt a little burnt by certain sales hires, and so we're trying to think okay. How do we re strategize everything about this differently? In order to be able to hire better, and because I think for the company to grab, we definitely have to have to have someone. Well. Let's turn to our expert Therese, Tucker. What's your advice to Mattie? Mattie I like you don't come from a sales background. And I definitely made plenty of mistakes in the early days and I have to tell you that the first really capable sales leader that I hired made the difference between the company succeeding and failing okay, but before I found him I definitely went through a number of. Different attempts at trying to find the right people, and it's difficult, because people that are in sales can talk a good game right just about all of them, and that may or may not translate in terms of. Performance now with that you have to think about the kind of sales culture that you want I did not want a sales culture like some of the other software companies that I've worked at you know there are certain software companies that have reputations for people, basically just brawlers. They grabbed the prospect, and they throw them on the ground and stomp on them until they get a deal I've had a few of those okay again. That's not something that necessarily comes through in an interview, because everybody's on their best behavior in an interview, so you're GONNA WANNA. Look for proven success. You're going to want to look for culture alignment in terms of the culture that you're setting for your company. For your early sales. People I would suggest that you do options. A really good salesperson can work anywhere I mean they really, can't they? They've got all the options in the world right I mean in. Actual you know they can go anywhere. And so why would they come to a small company that may or may not succeed in a new market. So, what is the carrot to get somebody WHO's really good? And, typically that would be stock options that gives them tremendous upside.

Mattie Rich Matt Theresa Therese Tucker
Women In Prison

Mentally Yours

04:25 min | 3 months ago

Women In Prison

"Today chatting to classrooms. He's the managing editor of the magazine, a new magazine that publishes poetry and articles by women in prison today. We're going to be chatting to her. About what life is like for women in Britain's prisons. How them into health is affected by being in prisons, and what life is like at the moment during the covert epidemic. So my interest is like mice, people, you know they're all mental health. Issues in my family have an aunt. WHO's diagnosed bipolar, so we sort of grew up with that. And then. I went to school with Ended up just in a lot of trouble with the criminal justice system and when she was released from. Last time she asked. If I would help and get involved with the which when I look at it I was just delighted to. Because it's really important, it's it's not just for women in prison for women who've got any contact with the criminal justice system, so they could be women on in the community all they could be The partners of men they could be NGOs or other people involved in the criminal justice system went lawyers. Judges actually subscribed to twos. Quite it's quite a broad abroad with limited reach. This is kind of broad question, but what is it is particularly about women how to how women specifically affected by being in the prison system coming out of the issues that they face specifically so I think when you look at. The. Number of women who all incarcerated who we send to present. You have mental health issues vomited vaguely report, but he are half ago and Init- initial justice admits that over eighty percent of women have mental health issues on those mental health issues not treated in women's Prisons Stats men's prisons. They're much lower and then women things. I and depression is compounded, because only one percent of children actually stay in the family home. If mother is sent to prison, I mean that's an alarming statistic, and we need to think about being Zion, if not knowing what's happening to your child in your home and everything. In a while you're in prison where it's remind is usually you know nine times out of ten, a mother, or assist O or upon who can pick up the pieces in the Gulf to the children, but for women very often. They don't have those networks especially when it comes to child care. And women have also leads upon leads of trauma an emotional abuse. Again enormous report that was commissioned by Theresa May. He says that over fifty percent of women. have been the victims of abuse. Emotional or sexual or domestic abuse? In their lives, and of course, imprisoning them white disc, compacting that trauma and adding Les- Upon it, and what about the mental? They received. We'll maybe don't receive. When are actually in prison will? What's really frightening? Is that judges put women in prison thinking that they will get mental health support because you know, there are these massive I mean really enormous mental health contracts over six hundred million pounds. A year is spent on health and mental health. They called the justice health contracts, so these are given to provide his including. National Health Service, foundation trust and private providers like. A and Really. Women just cannot access them they. For example at Drake Hotel which is the prison? In the Midlands is meant to be a fulltime psychologists in the time psychiatrist, I'm case paid to provide that service, but actually that has not been a full time. Psychiatrists death of a two years. They've just not been able to fill the role. And they'll get in training. US is or nasty to on. Day contracts who don't have any commitment to being in that position and that she looking off the the patient doodle is just it's just a job, so we are really concerned about mental health and women's specific health services like menopause connect like. A. Logical problems PAP, Smit's things like that and just not being done for him in prison

National Health Service Managing Editor United States Smit Britain Theresa May Gulf Zion Drake Hotel O
Biden wins Maryland primary

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 3 months ago

Biden wins Maryland primary

"More election results coming in from the Maryland primary and there are already returns in a very closely watched congressional race WTOP's Mitchell Miller joins us live Maryland is one of seven states Joe Biden has won this primary night and he's now less than one hundred and fifty delegates away from clinching the democratic presidential nomination incoming congressional candidates in Maryland all appear to be holding their own though the numbers are still relatively light and could a controversial congressman in Iowa be in trouble Republican Steve king who's been accused of various races statements over the years trails Republican challenger Randy Feenstra with about half of the vote counted now he's trailing forty three percent to thirty six percent also two Senate races are now set in Iowa Democrat Theresa greenfield will take on Republican senator Joni Ernst and in Montana former governor and Democrat Steve bullock will face Republican senator Steve Daines

Wtop Mitchell Miller Maryland Joe Biden Congressman Iowa Steve King Theresa Greenfield Senator Joni Ernst Senator Steve Daines Randy Feenstra Senate Montana Steve Bullock
Theresa Greenfield wins Democratic Senate primary in Iowa

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 3 months ago

Theresa Greenfield wins Democratic Senate primary in Iowa

"Race in Iowa Theresa greenfield has just won the democratic nomination she'll face Republican congresswoman Joni Ernst there are also reports early on now from CNN that Steve king an Iowa the long time Republican may be in trouble in that race meanwhile in Montana closely watched race in the Senate former Montana governor Steve bullock has won the democratic nomination to face incumbent Republican senator

Theresa Greenfield Joni Ernst CNN Iowa Montana Steve Bullock Senator Steve King Senate
"theresa may" Discussed on FT Politics

FT Politics

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"theresa may" Discussed on FT Politics

"I think he's better off just sticking his guns at this stage and Josiah's look the other candidates. So this really is well as boys about four very serious ones. You have fought campaign team because I do think by the way, the myth that we refer to one of the candidates by their first name just shows. How huge figure they are you have to enormous public figure before your referred to in that way. And that's the scale of the advance, she has absolutely George. Let's look at some of the other main candidates who are likely to come the next prime minister, I would probably reckon uh, though. It's a type thing to say that the main competition for boys comes from Dominic Robb, the former Brexit secretary who's a slightly more hard line Brexit her than Boras. He's probably more likely to push for a no deal banks. It if the begs, Adeel, MRs may negotiated can't be fixed in some way, and he appeals to conservatives who really want to get a clean break with the. EU but I do wonder how he will go down with the country outside. The conservative party is not really known outside of Westminster at all and does come across as a bit of a code fish to some people. He certainly doesn't have any of the charisma of Boris Johnson, as you say is not very well known. And if you're a conservative MP sitting at a marginal seat in the middle of the majority of five thousand and you wonder who's gonna help you hold onto that majority. Don't think the obvious answer is be dominant Robin to instructive Lee, there was a survey, I think by labor list of the Tory, prime minister, the labor party would fear. Most ambitious Johnson was off. The scale is the person that the labor party forty five percent exotic in the others were nowhere to. I think that tells you a lot about the calculation that Torian will be making and the thing, Mr. rob. But is that he's actually not a total hardline breaks because he did vote for Theresa May's, you're on the third reading he said he wouldn't vote it if it come back for fourth, and so that hard core group of conservative MP's, which is thirty.

prime minister conservative party Boras Boris Johnson Torian Josiah Mr. rob Dominic Robb George EU secretary Robin Theresa May Lee forty five percent
"theresa may" Discussed on FT Politics

FT Politics

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"theresa may" Discussed on FT Politics

"FD politics, a Wiki discussion on what's happening in Westminster from the financial times. I'm Sebastian pain in this week's episode. You can imagine what going to be discussing the resignation of Theresa May, we'll also being into who is coming next as the next prime minister of Britain. I'm delighted to be joined by our political editor, George Parker, columnist, Robert shrimps and deputy opinion. Miranda green, thank you for joining. And if you find yourself liking, this episode of F T politics than don't forget to subscribe through all the usual channels to see every Saturday morning. Well, we often say be dramatic week in Westminster on this podcast, but this week for the has talked them all recording this on Friday. Just a couple of hours after Theresa May came out of Downing Street to announce that on the seventh of June. She will be residing crucially. She stepping down as leader of the conservative party, not as prime minister. But we know the by the end of July, we'll have a new person in Downing Street and new. Person to take on the Brexit, mantle George pocket. Let's begin beginning of what was a pretty hectic week in Westminster Monday was quite quite, but on Tuesday to ease make live at what was her final big act as prime minister, which was to deliver a somewhat mischievous speech on breaks, which went down, while the Bodley and after a lot of efforts finally sealed her fate. Yes. This was the bold new and improved Brexit for that. She intended to put the house of Commons. Very much Laslo the dice to try and get her bricks deal through it had some stuff in there about the customs union which was intended to win support from some labor impedes, but most controversial all dangled the possibility of a second e referendum in front of labor and peace..

Theresa May prime minister Westminster Robert shrimps Miranda green George pocket George Parker Brexit political editor Britain
"theresa may" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"theresa may" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Really is what matters all of the EU states, they do set their own energy policy, but the targets for how much they have to reduce their carbon emissions by that is all set at the level so under the Paris agreement countries have to commit to reduce emissions by a certain amount. And that decision, the EU makes collectively, and so in part because the EU has been very successful at integrating, its economy and integrating, its energy sector. The power grids are integrated these really aren't decisions that individual countries can make the by themselves and the EU is collectively the third largest emitter of. Carbon emissions in the world after the US and China will what happens in Europe. Really moving needle globally either way in terms of getting where the world needs to be in response to this crisis. Yeah, I think the EU is a major player in international climate negotiation. It plays a big role. It's also historically. Been one of the more ambitious players in global climate negotiations. So it has pushed other countries to move forward, and it has been one of the big funders of other countries and partnering with other countries. So when the EU is being ambitious climate policy that really pushes global policy forward. And if the EU steps back, especially with the US having stepped back, you know, that also has ramifications on the global level. So I think the difference between a very aggressive EU and an e you that isn't as aggressive as something that you really would feel at the global level. So what matters in the u parliament matters to the world reported ritual halts? Berlin will leave there. Thanks very much. Thank you might go as we say goodbye today. It seems appropriate to end by saying goodbye to British Prime Minister Theresa may her political legacy will be debated for years to come and her musical legacy. The world's. Andrea crossing has some thoughts for Theresa May one of her most memorable political moments was set to music it all started last year when she was on an official visit to South Africa. She did an impromptu dance with kids there. Her signature move was something between a middle school, prom shuffle and the robot and it launched a thousand memes may made it clear. She was in on the joke when she took the stage at the twenty eight teen conservative party convention. She smiled vitally and danced awkwardly as the crowd cheered her on Theresa May will be remembered for her unique dance style. But what about the music written about her? I went looking for songs inspired by her time as prime minister, there was this, one by captain, Scott. We the conservative build bet. She. And then there were some remixes made of her political statements like this. Unheedful a strong. Unstable unstable with a strong stable government is still a struggle. One thing became clear as I started hunting for music, about Theresa May. When it comes to British politicians women seem to inspire more songs, and to be clear. These are not love songs just do a Google search for songs about Margaret Thatcher. At the. Don. Down Margaret by the English beat or this one by John McCullough. That's we done. That Tanya says start. Will done. Yes, we. That Sonia Graham says fat almost anything in Billy bragg's back catalogue. But look for songs about John Major, Tony Blair, or David Cameron and well there's just not much. It could be that it's harder to find lyrics that rhyme with Cameron, or it could be something else. Whatever the reason for it as Theresa May leave office, she'll be followed by the long shadow of a failed Brexit. But no matter what comes next..

EU Theresa May Andrea crossing prime minister US Margaret Thatcher Europe David Cameron Billy bragg Berlin John Major Sonia Graham Google Paris Tanya China John McCullough Don
"theresa may" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"theresa may" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm Marco werman surprising. No on Theresa May, is out as UK prime minister, I will shortly leave the job that it is being the owner of my life to hold her downfall with Brexit, but her departure doesn't make Britain, leaving the European Union any easier. We'll hear what comes next and President Trump visits Japan this weekend that country that helps shape Trump's views on trade decades ago you can trace so much his rhetoric back to the nineteen eighties that I think he hasn't actually updated it that much, plus gay rights advocates, celebrate and Taiwan and Brazil today, but not so much in Kenya will explain today here on the world. I'm Marco werman you're with the world. It is official now, British Prime Minister Theresa may announce that she will step down in two weeks. Time on June. Seventh that'll be just days after President Trump goes on a state visit to the UK. Here's may earlier today. I will shortly leave the job that it is being the owner of my life to hold the second female prime minister, but certainly not the last I do so with no ill-will, but with enormous and enduring gratitude to have had the opportunity to serve the country. I love may said she had done her best to deliver Brexit. But in the end, it was her failure to get the votes needed that brought her premiership to an end. The world's Orla Barry is in London. Hey, orla. Hey, marco. How're you doing? Okay. What's been reaction in London to the announcement by the prime minister well in some ways. Depends on what people are saying in private and what they're saying in public, they're two very different things, despite where you stand on three Somme most people, I think will be so what moved when they hear her on the verge of tears. There is she announced the cheese stepping down, but it has been a day that has been some time, coming if she were to look at Twitter, she will see some of those who were her gracious torn in her side at wishing her well, and paying tribute all saying, very dignified things about unpacking, her first story kill service to the country at the same time. It's these very people are responsible for the fact that she's stepping down. So what about Theresa May's legacy, like how she likely to be viewed in hindsight in a year, or five years, the could be quite a difference actually between a year and five years at the moment when you look at three as legacy you can't help but divide it from Brexit, and that's her greatest difficulty, because the mess that we're in with regards to Brexit is ultimately tied. Two three Somme. So when she came into office, for example, and she made this speech about bringing about braces and about not having a general election 'til at least twenty twenty and now triggering article fifty which would bring about Brexit until this clear negotiation Brexit deal was in place. She failed in all three counts. We had general election. And this is where she lost lot of the support from her fellow MP's, and also triggered article fifty when they didn't have kind of cleared idea. What Brexit was going to look like. So at this point, you know, she very closely tarnished, by Brexit that said, if you were to look down the road at the next person who will take on her premiership, depending, and how they deal with Brexit people might look back a little more kindly on three Semait. Talk has already moved onto who will be may successor who is likely to be the next British Prime minister, the front runner is Boris Johnson? Former mayor of London, former foreign secretary. Known for his mop of blond hair..

Theresa May Brexit prime minister President Trump Prime minister Marco werman London UK Orla Barry European Union Kenya Boris Johnson Twitter President Britain Japan Taiwan Brazil
"theresa may" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"theresa may" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Resume as finally called time on her premiership the main reason was in the end it was a bridge too far. She tried for a fourth time to bring Brexit deal back offering this time the opportunity for lawmakers to vote for the possibility of a second referendum, which would counsel Brexit altogether, and that for her conservative party, which is full of Euro-sceptics proved really something that was too much to stomach. And so in, in suing rebellion took hold and her hand was forced. What she dealt an impossible hand, though, is it almost impossible at this point in time to get any sort of Brexit withdrawal deal through parliament. It's not impossible, but I think she made various errors earlier on an apprenticeship, which made a task law Hodder. She said out a road to, to, to Brexit without really fully realizing the trade offs that, that required and that meant ultimately proved impossible for her to deliver it. And the big problem, she had is she as an individual became very closely indicated with the deal that she proposed. And so as a result, many people in the end voted against the deal because they didn't want her. And I think that is why in the end she's had to go. Who will replace her? Are there any leading candidates? There are several leading candidates, the favourite at the moment is the former foreign secretary Boris Johnson, who is well known to eurosceptics was a big cheerleader for leaving the EU during the two thousand sixteen referendum mister Johnson advocates, but a hard Brexit. He advocates an abrupt departure from the EU, which many in the conservative party would like to see. However mister Johnson if he does get elected to power will face many of the same challenges Theresa May faced and it's not entirely clear as to how he will deal with those the pound has been dropping in recent weeks, amid fears by traders that he will in fact lead the UK out of the EU with no deal. Come the end of October. Something that many people predict because economic pandemonium in the UK, however it's unclear and these leadership races for the conservative party are deeply unpredictable and often the favourite falls by the. Wayside. So we will have to see how do you think Theresa May will be remembered will she be deemed, a failure are, thank you very much, depends, is how the Brexit process ends up. I think if the practice process is calamitous and causes huge economic pain and proves unpopular in the long term, the maybe her efforts to try and find a compromise solution will be respected. However, if it is successfully delivered by successor, then she will have seen as a leader who wasted several years, the UK public's time trying to deliver a project for which they voted. So I think it very much depends on what happens next. You can find all the latest developments on who will succeed, MRs may at WSJ dot com. You might know ADP is the biggest name in payroll. But that's just the beginning because ADP is transforming the way great work gets done with HR talent time benefits and payroll informed by data and designed for people, that's ADP always designing for people. On to markets US markets closed lower yesterday. With the Dow slipping two hundred forty eight points on renewed trade concerns. One area that's worth paying attention to though is fixed income, the yield on the benchmark ten year note hits lowest level since October twenty seventeen yesterday. When bond yields drop it means a bond prices are rising that suggests increased demand from investors are market columnist Nate Tappin explains. Why fixed income has become more appealing to reasons. One is that there's a lot of us equities, which are exposed to, to China in various ways. Particularly in the tech sector US semiconductor firms sell tons of chips to China, and their revenues will certainly take a hit if they can't sell those things to alway for example, and then the other reason is that this could in over the long run. If it continues mean law. For growth in both places and so bond yields are dropping both because people are fleeing kind of risky assets like equities, which are our growth plays, and then also they're, they're looking at, at lower growth, potentially in the US in the future,.

mister Johnson ADP Theresa May EU UK Brexit US China WSJ secretary Nate Tappin eurosceptics ten year
"theresa may" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"Just before you start listening to this podcast reminded that we have a specialist subscription her, he can get twelve issues of the spectator for twelve pounds as one of the twenty pound Amazon voucher, Goto spectator, coda UK Ford slash voucher. If you'd like to get this offer. Unwelcome to coffee house shows the spectators daily politics podcast, I'm Cindy, and I'm joined by James foresight, and Katie booze since may match the nine hundred twenty two committee today. Is this the end for him James? So as we expected her commitment to bring the second reading of the Bill at beginning of June has been enough. What the statement agree between her and the chairman lunch, when secrity Kosovar in Brady says, is that she will bring the second reunion green Bill then and then off the bat. He and her will sit down to agree on a timetable for the tour de contest because whatever happens with that second reading things are meeting, if it is defeated, which is, what is the expectation in Westminster, then she is out of options and the Tory party would need a need, if second reading, pauses, then, remember that trees, my has said that she will go soon as he's about to say it's fruit. I statement seems to be implying that kind always the prices are going could run concurrently with the prices of legisation going through. I think the danger of Theresa May is that one second reinvest Bill comes is, what one loyalist and p was saying is, is it people vote down, second reading to, to bring a resolution his crisis and hastened her departure from office? I've in they're, they're trying to avoid that list dot having a challenge. And I think the other issue here is. At the end the more withdrew agreement loss by fifty eight votes. Why should it now at the beginning of June, when, and if anything the situation has got worse? I think three's manage just hoping that something turns up between now and then but I've even seen mccoubrey is going to be disappointed Katie. She's expertly kicked the can down the road, a little bit longer when the raptors come back in a couple of weeks time issue, going to face a even bigger defeat them, fifty eight St. think, I think it remains in the app, basically have bad, this defeat is going to be I think there is probably today. What percentage you have put a one percent chance that things go right for Theresa May at the hope and number ten is the Brexit party actually make massive gains defy even high expectations are ready and, and really have such big wins, particularly in labor areas that labor MP's then feels the need to get this free. But I think when it comes to the Tory numbers, there will be fewer toy. Stories than the last time voting for this deal. I think they have breakfast is who basically on the third vote for push push themselves over the line Dominic Robb Boris Johnson to positive, and I think a lot of them are struggle to do that. Because they look at the Brexit party and they read from that, that they were right all along, and they need to be more Brexit easy. Yeah. And you shouldn't have compromised tried to go for a softer Brexit. The voters don't like the deal. So the idea of passing the deal isn't going to solve the conservatives programs. I think there's still some Brexit is he would definitely vote for the deal and it's current form because they think that once you're at out that is an improvement to now. But it depends what changes are made to this deal. And the fact is obligated to see some former customs arrangement. Are we gonna see amendments added, and I think that's the issue? So I can't really see it moving. And I think also have been government there figures. He are actually skeptical of y Theresa May has decided to hold. The vote so seen. And it's clearly because as we've seen today, it's tied to her position by doing this. She has gone off a bit more time. And she has a small chance to pats have a happier legacy away being remembered if she manages to pass her deal. But if you took to raise my out of the equation, I think you just looked at in terms of trying to pass the draw agreement. I think people think this is the opportune time to James if she's defeated again in June. What's the mechanism of getting her out? Even if it is politically infeasible, I still say, on would the rules and have to be changed. And if so, does not come with baggage that we've talked about on this podcast before are the probably realistic expectation is that Ralph within have the rules change on her to raise my one, one of the nine people who voted against the rule changes his most adamant against the rule change said to me, if second reading goes down you couldn't hold that toyed back. And I think that wrong within her waiting for them to change the rules and how I think about points, you brought he would see the raw also this means. The voluntary party on the fifteenth. It's known binding but to have the association, chairman vote new confidence in you as the leader again. It would be very, very messy ending on just one the weather she at that point, even to resume might accept, but the game is, is up, I wonder as well wherever there is some attempt to try and get second reading through bar doing something different. I think that we will see a lot of chatter in the weeks leading up to this vote about, do you try and change something about the back stop just in the domestic legislation. And see if that makes the Bill more palatable and almost challenge the e you'd say, no, you haven't ratified it I because of in a have to try something because I'm always this thing is going down to pretty much certain defeat. But isn't that like, passing the moat house compromise orange and engaged EU and saying, we want this year any, you would say, well, that's? That you don't pulse. That what you do is you take this language alternative arrangements in the political declaration. You put it into UK Lule now. You obviously Ryan that you would not be the EU would be well would be technically within it's ROY says, I haven't restful at this thing. So when, when Russia fire and it, it, it's a done thing. But I think the hope would be you put some pressure on. And then if you did it in a way that was a little bit social, rather than just we're taking

Theresa May James foresight chairman Katie booze Brexit party Tory party UK EU Amazon Cindy Dominic Robb Boris Johnson Bill Brady Westminster raptors UK Lule mccoubrey Russia Ryan
"theresa may" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

14:42 min | 1 year ago

"theresa may" Discussed on The Daily

"From the New York Times. I'm Michael Barbaro. This today. Today after months of trying and failing to put forward a deal for how the UK could leave the European Union. Theresa May had one final thing too often. Herself. It's Monday, April first. Thank you for calling the London office of the New York Times. Hello. Oh, hello. How are you Ellen? I'm great. I'm so sorry that we've had technical difficulties this morning, not to worry wouldn't be the daily if we didn't have to technical difficulty. Okay. So here we go on tell me when you're ready ready. Okay. Ellen berry is a times correspondent inland. So last Wednesday in the middle of the day. Theresa May called her party members to committee room for teen which is a sort of big committee room somewhere in the bowels of Westminster palace. It was quite unclear what this was about. There was loads of speculation that she would perhaps fire her chief negotiator for Brexit who is widely despised by right wingers in her party. The world covers trained on the British parliament waiting for a Brexit breakthrough for money, the workings of this house appear increasingly mystifying, but after months of Brexit paralysis could things be starting to move so five o'clock conservative lawmakers began crowding into this room, and it was by all accounts stifling and completely packed the minister for international development, couldn't even get in there and was watching through the keyhole. And it is traditional in these gatherings. When the prime minister comes in people bang on the tables with their hands. It's kind of like a tribal drumbeats. And so then the room went silent door closed the room when silent and what was said in. There was said only to each other, but meetings like this leak -ly saves and the clothes meeting with conservative MP's. Theresa May said she's prepared to make the ultimate move crackly the outside world came to know that the thing that she was prepared to offer in exchange for their votes was herself. She concluded by offering everyone in the room to backer deal to allow for a smooth and orderly Brexit, she basically said I'll make you a deal if you vote for this. If you vote for the withdrawal agreement and get it through then I will step down as prime minister Brexit from my head, basically. Ellen. How did all of this happen? How did Theresa May end up being at the center of Rexon say the funny thing is that Brexit was never Theresa May's issue. She kind of kept her head down. But she was remain or she voted to stay inside the European Union. And really just stayed out of the whole public debate over Brexit to great extent, and it was really somewhat by accident that she became prime minister. So he with coverage is back in Downing Street a happy man after surprise election victory against most predictions. His parties won a slim outright majority started with David Cameron who is basically hoping to stop a hemorrhage of MP's from switching sides and going to you Kip, which was the Brexit party. We will give the British people a referendum with a very simple in or out choice. And he made a. Gamble to stay in the European Union on these new terms or to come out altogether. It is time for the British people to have this. A it is time for us to settle this question about Britain and Europe, it was essentially to kind of a swathe the hard right of his party. He thought he could essentially throw them above on and get them onside. And he did so expecting that the country would vote to remain and it just came as a kind of staggering surprise on June twenty third of twenty sixteen when the results came out, and it was fifty two to forty eight percent for leaving the European Union. The British people have voted to leave the European Union and the will must be respected and because David Cameron had been squarely opposed to leaving the European Union. He then announced that he was going to step down as prime minister rather than lead the country through the process of. Of leaving the country requires fresh leadership to take it in this direction. I will do everything I can is prime minister to steady the ship over the coming weeks and months, but I do not think it would be right for me to try to be the captain that STIs our country to its next destination. So why does Theresa May end up taking his place if she had been a remainder if she'd been opposed to Brexit, so Theresa May end up taking his place because the men who were the obvious front runners to be his successor's kind of took each other out in the political fist fight that followed. And I suppose she was appealing in a sense that she was quite different from all of those top Tory men. There's a phrase they use bail college which is the tranquil assurance of effortless. Superiority some people would say sometimes life is his daughter isn't can have its ups and downs. Theresa May as nothing like that. I mean, not on any level. But I feel hugely privileged actually in the the childhood that I had she was the daughter of a small town vicar and the granddaughter of two lady's, maids, and the great granddaughter of a Butler, so she came from a family with a really long sense of public service and duty notice thing you ever did openness me. Will suppose. Gosh, jim. No. I'm quite sure must. Nobody's nobody's ever perfect. All the I mean, I have to confess when me and my friends sort of used to run through the fields of wheat farmers went to pleased about that. So she seemed like one of the grownups in the room at the time someone who could potentially bring the country back together after an incredibly difficult and divisive referendum campaign. So the men who create Brexit, essentially, self immolate, and the party turns to Theresa May. Yes, she cast herself as someone who is trying to do the least damage I mean instead of projecting enthusiasm about the mission of Brexit. She tended to express a sense of duty that she had taken on the job. She was going to finish the job. We all living through an important moment in our country's history following the referendum. We face a time of great national change. And I know because we Great Britain that we will rise to the challenge, but it didn't take long for her to start making serious blunders around Brexit because it turned out that she's one of the worst retail politicians that Britain has ever seen. I know that the public sector has had to carry a heavy burden the private sector has played its part too. But with government businesses and the public set to working together we have bounce back. She is wooden. She is unable to speak off script. She cannot generate warmth. She seems sort of congenitally unable to generate warm. Brexit means Brexit. We're going to make successful. She went out on the stump in repeated kind of robotic robotics bricks. It means Brexit set of phrases that she had been briefed on because bricks. It means Brexit, and she earned the nickname the may Bhatt because she was seemingly unable to come up with different answers. Even when the same question was asked her repeatedly. Well, the reason reasonably be saying Brexit means Brexit is precisely because it does to be this is what history looks like the official letter formally starting the process of Britain. Leaving the European Union is delivered says she made a series of very significant blunders that year one of them. Maybe the most important one is that she triggered article fifty the article fifty process is now underway and in accordance with the wishes of the British people. The United Kingdom is leaving the European Union which started the clock ticking towards an end date an exit date. Of March twenty nine this is on historic moment from which can be no turning back Britain is leaving the European Union. We all going to make our own decisions, and our laws as soon as she started that the EU had an enormous advantage in the negotiation. This is a decisive step which enables us to move on. And finalize the deal in the days ahead. These decisions were not taken lightly. But I believe it is decision that is firmly in the national interest. I mean, she also as a general matter she played her cards, incredibly close to her vast throughout the negotiation. So the country really didn't know where she was going with this process until late last year when she shared her withdrawal agreement with the country when you strip away the detail the choice before us is clear this deal which delivers on the vote of the referendum which brings about control of money laws and orders ends free movement. Protect jobs security and our union all leave with not ill. No, Brexit, all and it went over like a lead balloon, and why was that? Wow. She laid out a series of red lines that were in fact, very hard Brexit, red lines. No, one knew up until that point that she was planning to. Exit customs union and the single market because we will no longer be members of the single market. We will not be required. Contribute huge sums to the EU budget the days of Britain, making vast contributions to the European Union. Every year will end in. Why is that automatically a blunder? Well, they had no solution for what would turn out to be the fatal problem without plan, which is Britain is not an island. There is a land border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, and you cannot just walk away from the customs union without creating some kind of a border, and of course, that open border between Northern Ireland and the Republic had been the subject of a thirty year armed struggle and a hard-fought peace agreement so to gloss over it was sort of not looking at the problem, which was going to block this thing at the end, the choices before us difficult, particularly in relation to the northern. Island backstop. But the way she squared the circle with the Irish porter is to create something called the backstop. And with the backstop means is that the entire of the UK would remain in the customs union until such time that there is a solution to the border problem which could easily be never, and this is why she lost her exit tears because they said, well, this is just a way for us to stay in the European Union subject to their regulations indefinitely because there is no provision for the United Kingdom leaving the backstop unilaterally. So they style themselves as being stuck at the mercy of Europe indefinitely. Well, that's the first time. I understood the backstop. Thank you. The fact is that HUD, veal isn't really a deal because what it actually does is postpone everything settle anything. It actually guarantees more uncertainty, which is terrible business. And it's not even Brexit. It is not. Brexit toll and they're pretending that it is. So what she begins to do is try to persuade the country to compromise. But it is extremely late in the game. And she hasn't laid the groundwork for a compromise much of her energy went to keeping the hardliners on side. And as soon as she published her withdrawal agreement she lost him. Theresa May still believes this battle to be one. In Brussels, a growing number of British MP's, don't the view of Europe is of a nation, increasing the roads with self, and how does may respond to all these condemnations and men who were essentially beating her up. I mean, this is such an irritating. Maddening group of people that I don't know a lot of Britain's during this period, their heart kind of went out to her because any normal person would just throw their hands up and walk away from this nightmare of job. But she just wake up in the morning and dust. Herself off and set aside her personal feelings and say, I believe with every fiber of my being that. The course I set out is the right one for our country and all our people again. And again from the very beginning. I have known what I wanted to deliver for the British people to honor the vote in the referendum. I have committed to delivering Brexit to the British people the British people just wanted to get on with it. They are looking to the conservative party to deliver to deliver a Brexit that works for the whole UK. And that's what I'm gonna do. I'm gonna do my job of getting the best deal for Britain. I'm going to my job of getting a deal that is in the national interest. She stuck with it. And she stuck with it. And she seemed unwilling to give up and I'm going to see this through. Yes. Until last week.

Theresa May European Union Brexit Britain prime minister United Kingdom Ellen berry Europe New York Times David Cameron Brexit party London Michael Barbaro Westminster palace MP Republic of Ireland Brussels
"theresa may" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Talking Politics

"As leader of the conservative party. The number all cast in favor of having competence into reason. I was two hundred and against one hundred seventeen under the rule says out in the constitution of the conservative party. No further can take place for at least. Is just going nine o'clock, and that was the result. So what we said today was strictly true. I guess Theresa May one Helen has returned to bed. But I just texted her to find out something intelligent that. I could say I'm actually going to read out text Helen techs in full sentences. I should say that this is what she says need something to change the EU and more than she did. But that can be no allusions there. Now that she can't as things stand. Get withdrawal agreement through. So Alan view about which I have say there were more people voting yesterday. I thought it would possibly be less than one hundred is that she strengthened in one respect Theresa May. She has more leverage because if the ultimate fifth everyone involved in these negotiations is not real deal is now more realistic. If this would draw agreement Congo through it reminds me in a way of something that it's the opposite to which is Jeremy Cubans confidence vote. He lost his decisively. The large majority of his parliamentary party voted against him. And he was strengthened by losing it because it made clear that he was not beholden to them. His real power was with the membership. She has won hers, and she's been weakened by it because those hundred seventeen people on not going to make it possible for her to get a deal through. And if she says win is win, and I wanna majority. They can say fine. But that number of people voting against you. We stand by our guns too. So the one thing that hasn't happened. This evening is the only thing that's gonna make this mess. Clear which is there are too many different options in play all at the same time too, many different possibilities, and too many different interests prepared to Diana ditch for the thing that they believe in. And this is only going to be resolved. And at some point we'll have to be resolved as the options fool away, one by one eventually leading a pair of options that people have to choose between and seemed at least possible tonight that one of the options would fall away, which was that Theresa May would be strengthened and several leadership challenge with dissipate. She can't be challenged for another year. But she has been weakened by this. It doesn't feel that auction is going away doesn't feel like people who feel the only way to resolve this is to replace as leader will now be persuaded that they were wrong so options still in play one by one they will have to fool away. Eventually they will have to be. A binary choice something that is possible. Is that as the deadline looms, given that parliament now knows that it can revoke article fifty without asking permission. The final choice might end up being no deal or revoke article fifty something that would have seen incredible. But at some point all the options have to fall away to and then they'll be one. Who knows what might happen over the next month? We will not leave you in the lurch. If it really kicks off I will drag Helen from wherever overseas, and we're gonna talk about it. But until then we're going to do what we did over the summer, which was put out twice a week some guides with some really interesting people to things that we often talk about or you mentioned in passing, but we never really got into in detail and try and describe the background and talk about the white implications. We got lots of fascinating people and topics coming up, Martin Reese on existential risk detail on democracy. Helen's took him at Bretton Woods, Diane. Coyle. When economic well-being. We're going to start with Gary gerstle on the American constitution re hope that you enjoy these give you some listening, which isn't the usual stuff over Christmas. And then we will be back in the new year to pick up where we left off. Until then have a lovely Christmas. My name is David Runciman and weeping took impulsive.

Theresa May Helen conservative party David Runciman Diana ditch Gary gerstle Congo EU Jeremy Cubans Alan Martin Reese Bretton Woods Diane
"theresa may" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Talking Politics

"But nonetheless Corbin does not act like a man who is seriously engaged with the substance of delivering Brexit, and Theresa May stuns out because that is what she looks like he's trying to do. What does it say about Brexit? If the one person who engages seriously with it on its own merits as an issue is the person whose job. Will in the end sooner or later be lost. Because of that does that mean is in a sense the. Doable problem. It's the thing that that is breaking something in British politics. I think that's a pretty interesting question. I think that we have to go though to the circumstances of what happened when the referendum result came out. And that was immediately precipitated the end of the previous government because of Cameron's resignation, then almost nearly immediately precipitated a crisis of confidence in corbin's leadership. So both parties at the top the top of the case and the back benches and around in parliament in the other case responded by acts of internal party management, essentially now that men that building any kind of coalition amount political consensus about what was going to happen next in terms of the substance of Brexit was incredibly difficult because what both parties decided to do in response to what happened then you've got the difficulty of the general election that not only produce the minority. Government. But it produced a minority government produces supply and confidence agreement with the one party that was in the most vexed position in regard to the outcome of Brexit negotiations because of the question of the the Irish border, you couldn't come up with a worst domestic political figuration. I mean, if you wanted to say how bad could possibly be in terms of a domestic political configuration to realize the vote of the referendum. We'll be what we've gone that was going to be one of my questions because looking back at what was the point of which we go on this path leads to whatever's going to happen today. The generation does seem up sedately central to this because we recall this Wednesday morning. I think I have a slight structural bias in that I tend to just read Daniel Finkelstein skull him in the times it comes out on Wednesday. It's very interesting usually so today's one makes a very important point to think about the difficulty here from any minority government which could conceivably win a substantive vote on the big issue of the day. But is going to really struggle to pass the legis. Flation the repeated amendments another piece of legislation to get this into law because it's all very well for Tyler one vote where members of the opposition party support the government, but to expect them to do we have two week after week is going to be hard for whoever is prime minister. And that's a fundamental difference. With the situation that trees may thought she would have two things would have been true say she'd wanna majority of forty they wouldn't have been a leadership challenge because with the majority forty she could always seen off. And Secondly, she could if she could get through the one off vote, pasta education. Neither she nor any success with hers is gonna find it easy to do the actual parliamentary legwork to get this into law. Even if they can get through a meaningful vote. I cannot see how there will be a parliamentary majority for what ever seeming for the moment that basic Notre will be AO g approved conservative leader, not parliamentary. Thirty for Theresa May cannot keep the move a main supporting conservative impedes on sites. How earth this births Johnson going to do the same? They're simply onto Nuff Democratic Unionists in order to the parliamentary with mcaddo the other essential question that arises whatever happens to resume, whoever winds up, his prime minister, never mind. The legislation is the meaningful vote at some point Ponant has got to agree. What this means, and we like historical comparisons, the one that came to mind with me and this relates to the timing is black getting the vote through the Commons on the Iraq war. There are some comparisons. Here. It was I think we forget relatively speaking. How precarious that was his government could have fallen..

government Brexit Theresa May Corbin prime minister Daniel Finkelstein Iraq Cameron Ponant Tyler Johnson two week
"theresa may" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Without a majority tool and rather than at that stage say I think this means need to go for softer Brexit. She decided to do a deal with the DP, which is kind of unions Unionist Party in Northern Ireland quite hard line, quite traditional and very very very against anything that smacks over sort of different regime in Northern Ireland. What are they like as a group? Very sort of patriotic very British. They would say. Angry all the time. I would say from their interventions in the Commons, but we have the right to speak for the people of northern part of. And there is another one that you mentioned Labor's from bench. I mean, they couldn't theory say Theresa May in theory. They could labor has this sort of complex position. Which is they have six tests. They're going to hold trees may to almost impossible tests to me, I have to say so at the moment, we're expecting them to vote we fully expecting them to vote against the deal. Although Jimmy Kuban did hold out a little sort of olive branch. Will let me also reach out to the prime minister reach out to everybody said to trees may look if you move closer to a customs union, if you assure us that you'll uphold workers rights, and environmental standards and other things we might even throw weight behind your deal. But if you can't go shit that deal, then you need to make way for a party that can and will. What you're basically saying is that even Theresa May gets her deal with Brussels and that lots of sticky at the moment, she's got an almost impossible task in parliament. I mean, the groups that you've set out they all seem to have completely contradictory red lines. What happens if she doesn't get it three? Well, the answer is that nobody knows we would be in uncharted territory by the number of options. Labor says it would try and force a general election. It would do that by tabling a motion of no confidence in the government. Although to resume could well win that even if even if she hasn't got support for her deal. There are plenty of MP's who would try and bring about a second referendum. They would try and force the government to go back to the public before any deal takes place to his may says if parliament doesn't back her deal the O'neil turn a tube is a no deal. So we crush out with n without any free trade agreement or anything in place MP's. In particular, labor leadership say, they won't let that happen. They'll try and put down motions in parliament or amend bits of legislation to make that impossible for the government to do or tentatively. The government could end up having to extend the deadline, which they would need approval from the other EU Member States for if it's in a position where it com get all of this done in time. Something could happen is that Theresa May be challenged for the conservative leadership her own party decided wants to put someone in charge of this process. Low time would be short to do that before the Brexit deadline at the end of March you've done sixty seconds on backstop. Gimme sixty seconds on who could be the next Tory leader. Any number of candidates such Javid? The home secretary probably looks most likely he's playing very canny game. Boris Johnson is an out of the race. David Davis, quite fancies himself as a short term caretaker leader to get bricks over the line. And then there are sort of quieter candidates, Damian Hinds, the education secretary and various backbenches, even Tom too. It's incredibly difficult to say sounds like a load of blokes have there's a lot of them. Yeah. Yeah. And just tell me is there a way through this for her. We'll look at still not impossible that she manages to strike that deal. She bullies and cajoles enough MP's over the line in parliament to get it through or perhaps that she fails the first time, and then she comes back with something slightly different. And you know, maybe the markets are crushing and peas feel the stakes higher. And finally, they give their backing, but it's certainly not going to be easy. Thank you so much. Thank you. Keep up with all our coverage on Brexit. In brussels..

Theresa May Labor Northern Ireland Brussels Unionist Party Jimmy Kuban Tom MP Boris Johnson Damian Hinds Brexit secretary David Davis prime minister EU sixty seconds
"theresa may" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"Welcome to coffee shops, political Einar Pentagon. And I'm stage ROY by phase Nelson and James Saif to phrase the DP of accused may of breaking promises on the border. They about to cause more problems for made you think while they're certainly threatening to the IRAs. Valetta that's reason than was supposed to be reassuring them saying the EU onto split Northern Ireland. The I'm going to let it happen. But they read into a small print of that. But that's exactly what she intended to do. Now, there are two very different questions about the video threes May's about to get but she would rather not answer not directly one is going to make any separate demand of Northern Ireland veneers and the rest of the UK. In other words, is it going to have a means of lee-ing some kind of claim Northern Ireland is she about to agree it? I'm the second is how difficult it will be booby ticket out of her deal. Now, the DP handed to them they'll go this. Of course. The clues named unionists this laser like focus anything, which might weaken the Northern Ireland from the rest of the UK. And the reason may well have said it's funny that Madejski Downing Street. She was saying my very passionate unionist do think she's been on a bit of a learning curve as to what's eating is means to those who are genuinely passionate about it. And how something that might not cause a practical problem will be a deal Ricky for the DP everything is how likely the artifact against her. Now, you might think well with the DP caused that much trouble. Surely, they knew about Jeremy Corbyn in the IRA, surely they would not do anything to hasten Corbin going into number ten, but the thing was to the UP is if they are seen by people who elect them to allow any kind of delusion of the union, and they won't be elected again. So their jobs, depend on safeguarding lists. And I for one take them at their word. In the problem. Threes may is hurt him. Reassurance. Doesn't actually address. What worries the DP reasonably says all will not allow this to happen? That's not what worries the DP DP ward. If is Northern Irish backstop is underneath the UK backstop in the treaty. It might end up being triggered not today. Not tomorrow, but five ten years down the line when Theresa May is no longer prime minister, she called bowling hands of her successes. And so what do you worry about is? If it is that what you might get is a situation where the parliamentary particular different, but DP don't have a don't hold the balance of power parliament and a future prime minister, my are either left wing reasons to stay eight or writing reasons economic competitive, perhaps their corporate and they want to United Ireland. Yeah. Okay. Right. Waigel deeds for the UK Great Britain and ends up with Northern Irish backstop. Being triggered by the EU. So be it. That's what worries the DP. And this is what went so wrong when the DP onc- Michelle body, which is the dining sweetheart on a good job of reassuring DP about what would happen today. Tomorrow next eighteen months body events that what would happen to over ten twenty thirty years as the UK and the EU diverse, and it's very telling when only about good deal. She does a good deal for her, grandchildren. Because that is the kind of timeframe DP thinking and Theresa May's pretty expert political survival waving anyone expected to still be prime minister. When owning fosters grandchildren are coming of age. And so these promises from Theresa May are only promises that point that ain't into success of that reason the DP don't find them that reassuring story making headlines this morning as the as demanded fishing rights in British water is going to be another headache for me. I've been in attendance that would have been headed against desk moment because this is. Fishing fishing's, a small part of economy in in the political? This is a to- Tamika..

Northern Ireland Theresa May UK prime minister EU Einar Pentagon Corbin Jeremy Corbyn Nelson James Saif Tamika Ricky United Ireland Michelle body Britain ten twenty thirty years eighteen months five ten years
"theresa may" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"You may think that having a weekly leader is better than getting someone who might from that point of view, less easy to put pressure on, but there are no real reserves of loyalty that I can detect within the conservative party to those still a desire to get to deal. With Brexit, but there's an absolute determination not to let her fight another general election. So she is going to be replaced at some point. And if she has one bad full, I think that point people might say, well, as nine point in carrying on with Theresa, May she just being propped up by these officials and she hasn't got it and she leading us to petition on that point of the Tory party will is very difficult question they will. They will think, well, we've thought to be ruthless. They have. They ought traditionally ruthless party. They'll throw our Gordon. Have someone else on that thought, Andrew, I, if the conservative party would to rediscover that the taste for regicide in in the near future, who do you see as the subject of the next chapter of any expanded edition of Jim sins? Prime ministers who who is the likeliest next occupant of number ten. This is a very difficult question because it hasn't been the likely or expected person since Anthony. Eden, succeeded win. Entrenched at nine fifty five. So it might be whoever manages accessory to be not Boris Johnson off the downfall Margaret, that show it was John Major who was very good at not being Michael Hesseltine. So on that your herself who had the courage to go for the leadership in seventy five. She got it by not being Edward Heath. So this strange sort of negative quality that comes into play. I've written a biography of Boris Johnson. I didn't think he can be ruled out because he's one of the very few senior politicians on either side of the house of Commons of whom people who've actually heard nor the many people have very, very angry with him and disgusted with him. He's still probably has greater gifts as an election near which one thing. One of the criteria that the Tory party will be thinking of and most of his rivals, and it's very, very difficult while you're in power when you're out of power, you can bring in someone like Cameron all, blah, who's never held ministerial office. But while you're impact, I think it would be incredibly old to pluck some gifted. Person from the backbenches on saying his new prime minister of someone who hasn't even been in the cabinet Terry, I do like where possible to try and close the discussions on on vaguely update, not even even if you have to drift into the rooms of the hypothetical to do it, which is, which is what I'm about to invite you to do. If we gave Theresa May as much credit as one compulsively give her full good intentions. And if we removed from her intrigue the not inconsiderable burden of Brexit, what would she want to be able to do as prime minister? How would she like to change a country. It's interesting looking back at what she said when she arrived in Downing Street, she was talking about things like fighting against burning injustice, which was seen a pretty good phrase, but does he say was a come by Brexit? And she did want to talk more about the criminal Justice system and more about social mobility. I think the trouble though with Paul, her record as home secretary, is that some of the things that she did in that ferry long tenure on our will say, coming apart onto her prime ministership I'm, for instance, she brought in what she called a hostile environment towards immigration. One of the fatty constant things about her has been trying to restrict immigration to a certain extent..

Brexit Boris Johnson prime minister Theresa May Edward Heath Margaret Gordon Eden Anthony Andrew John Major Cameron Jim Michael Hesseltine Paul secretary Terry
"theresa may" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"The first question we need to ask is what is merit. And what we find in politics is that men's merit in politics is often just taken for granted while women constantly have to prove that they deserve a place at the table. But now that we Todd quotas in many countries for many years, we can actually look at and compare quota women and non-quota women and men. And what we find is that actually they tend to be as qualified if not more qualified and their male counterparts, but also that if you ask politicians voters, many of them can't tell you who's a quote, a women and who's not a quota women. So you don't see that kind of token affect or stigmatization that you see elsewhere. And in fact that so for example, colleagues in Sweden have done a very interesting study that shows that what happened when you put quotas in for women was that you got rid of mediocre men. So what happened is that the most highly qualified men and the most highly qualified women were selected. So actually the quotas have a positive impact on merit rather than a detrimental. One RV particular times in a country's history which possibly more prepared. For women seeking to make it in politics, and I may not always be the best of times. This is the gloss cliff as opposed to the glossy feeling theory. The idea that men possibly a little bit more inclined to step aside and let women clean it up when things have gone to heck in a hand cut. Yes. Certainly. There's evidence that women are more likely to get the chance to lead parties or lead governments in times of crisis. So times where you've lost power, you've lost favor with voters. You've had a corruption scandal. So they tend to come in when the jobs at the top are not very desirable, and they tend to come in and be left cleanup someone's mess. And it's exactly because other rivals are more likely to step aside because they want to wait for opportunities down the line or they might be weak candidates in the women candidates might be more experienced. So again, kind of in some ways, opens up opportunities, but also the evidence seems to suggest that women are more likely to then be thrown out of those posts. Quicker than men if they fail. And we see that not only politics, but in things like business and so on. So it's a kind of poison chalice in some ways. How big a handy Cup still for female politicians at any level is the. I mean, it's all the difference in the way the media responds to writes about a female politicians as opposed to male ones. The different aspects of the background, their appearance that get concentrated on are we getting anywhere near a media ceasing to treat women in politics as as some sort of peculiar novelty in that respect. I think we still do see a lot of gendered media coverage, particularly because with women leaders because political leadership is very masculine is and particularly as we move towards kinda more presidential is individualized election campaigns. And what you see for a women leaders is this double bind of having to live up to the kind of masculine. Assumptions and expectations of leadership, but also kind of manage their femininity. So the coverage of Theresa May's shoes and her outfits and things like that. You know these kinds of things. You certainly saw also with Hillary Clinton, and I think those kinds of tensions. But also I think the other issue is that we've seen with the rise of social media and new media, the kind of abuse, violent threats faced by female politicians and particularly women of color. Diane Abbott, for example, as a frequent target for sexist racialist abuse. So there's a new kind of arena for political women that may deter them from seeking office to bring back to the subject of today's program to raise a may..

Hillary Clinton Diane Abbott Theresa May Sweden
"theresa may" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"Is there a may ISM if she said she was on the side of the justify managing 's, she is from a much as gilded background than David Cameron. Father was a with a country club German, and they went to a well off. His father was a regimental sergeant major, and both her grandmothers were ladies Mays. So she's from a much humbler background than than Cameron. And I think she spent about the previous two years being patronised really by Tories, particularly Tori men who rather underestimated her, and obviously that to her was extremely task. Once she got in she, she had a sort of firing squad and got rid of all the prominent Cameroon's all the people who who taunts she had been putting up with while actually a highly competent and successful secretary Terry. If we had to guess who her political heroes would have been growing up, is there any sense that she fashioned herself after any other politicians where the. The British or not. It's interesting because reading profiles of Theresa May. She is reported to have said to people even at very early days in in Oxford, where she was a student politician that she wanted to be prime minister. There's not that greater sense. I don't think of being particularly driven by ideology. I mean, one of the names that is mentioned when people talk about her political heroes is Joseph Chamberlain who was mayor of Birmingham. He was he was more about, you know, municipal politics and about society as a whole, rather than grand ideological systems. I don't think Theresa May as somebody who's particularly argued or debated whole world view. I think as Andrew said she is somebody who grew up, you know, with the church with a strong sense of duty with a strong sense of a ferry small-scale traditional conservatism, but that's not necessarily very inspiring pitch. It's very difficult to to sell in a big way, but I think she's sort of progressed gradually through politics. Probably the most controversial thing that she said before she was prime minister was the famous nasty party speech that was in two thousand and two. She was the chair of the conservative party under Iain, Duncan Smith's leadership, and she arrived at conservative party conference, and she told them people think of us as the nasty party. And that came as as a real shock to a lot of people that that that was how they were perceived. One of the things that Theresa May did try to do in that role and others is actually to get more women MP's in parliament and to increase the sort of the representation of of women within the conservative party. So there are some constants that have been there all along. She just hasn't always been the best person at at selling them during. This was of course what happened last year, having arrived in office because her predecessor misjudged the calling of a popular vote. He then did the same herself in cold a general. Election in attempt to establish her own mandate. Now, everybody, I'm sure herself included assume that this was a an obviously done deal. Everyone looked the opposition labor party who were then as now a a rancorous in chaotic, rabble and assumed she would be someone to victory. And yet she did not. She just fell over the line as it were most that a forgivable mistake. I mean it it. It has been used since then as a criticism of her political judgment, but wouldn't anybody in the position. She thought she was in at least have done the same. I can totally understand the reasons why you would have done that in a way it was a very unto resume like decision to make. You know, she famously went off on her walking Holiday Inn in north Wales and came back with the idea that she was going to call a general election for someone who has always been cool shis who has always wanted to be in control of the way. Things happen suddenly doing this seemed quite out of character. Looking at the opinion polls. She should have been right. What then went wrong was partly the manifesto. It was partly the campaign. She had policies which they put into the manifesto, for example, the plans to do with how to deal with social care, which became known as the dementia tax. In the debate. They had plans that seemed to really alienate in many of the conservatives cool vote..

prime minister conservative party Mays David Cameron Joseph Chamberlain Cameroon Tori Birmingham Terry Wales Andrew secretary Oxford Iain Duncan Smith two years
"theresa may" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"There is probably never an easy time to become prime minister of the United Kingdom. However, not since the end of World War Two has anybody moved into number ten Downing Street in more peculiar circumstances than its current occupant. The premiership of Theresa May was brought about by and will be defined by Brexit, which lest we forget she campaigned against unless may really has completely changed her mind about the wisdom of leaving the European Union since she voted to stay in it and urged her fellow citizens to do. Likewise. She is in the deeply weird position of devoting most of her time and energy to the pursuit of a policy. She believes ill advised in the second episode of our summer series profiling four global leaders with unusual amounts on their plate. We'll look at how many is handling this predicament, how much longer she can reconcile these contradictions, and whether she's only being allowed to stay in the job because nobody else presently wants it. We'll also consider maize place in history. As the United Kingdom's. Second female prime minister. This is the foreign desk. You got to go into negotiation with an idea of what you want, but then also, inevitably, there will have to be given take throughout this process. She's not somebody who not truly forms alliances or political friendships. So I think she's very good at looking at detail. I think she's probably less good at seeing the overarching goal and being flexible in the pursuit of she has made some high profile female appointments early on. But recently you've seen more men be promoted. And part of that, I think is given the kind of tension she faces in her own party and potential challenges to leadership. You've got a case of keep your friends close in your enemies closer, and it's meant that women haven't necessarily won out in the cabinet if she has one bad full. I think that point people might say, well, I point in carrying on with Theresa. May she just being propped up by these officials and at that point of the Tory party will fare well, we thought to be ruthless. They are traditionally with this party. They'll throw overboard. He have someone else. Hello and welcome to the foreign desk. I'm Andrew Muller. My guests today are the journalist, Terry, Stephanie, an Andrew Jackson. Terry is the author of the political novel conflicts of interest. Andrew is contributing editor to conservative home. His book gemstones prime ministers was released early this year. Both have, of course covered the ongoing circus of British politics longer than either make it a recall, but welcome both. Nevertheless, we are here today to discuss the presence and possible future however long it may last of the current prime minister of the United Kingdom Theresa May Andro. I wanted to go back to the start of her premiership in in somewhat bizarre circumstances. A couple of summers ago remind us, and I guess in particular, are international listeners how she ended up in number ten in the first place? Well, because David Cameron called a referendum on British membership of the European Union and the confident belief that he would win it. He lost and the following morning, he announced that he would be standing down. So a leadership contest. Resulted the sudden death tradition in British politics, which he'd sought to limit by having a fixed term parliaments act to be reintroduced by holding this referendum losing it. So if you went now, the obvious thing then was for the Victoria side to provide the prime minister, probably Boris Johnson who was their strongest almost conspicuous campaigner, but Burs Johnson's colleague, Michael gov stabbed him in the back and suddenly rather mysteriously Theresa May seem the only grownup left in the fight. She'd being home secretary since two thousand and ten. She was refreshing change from David Cameron and suddenly the Tory party United around her because the people who had campaigned for Brexit her destroyed each other. Andrew, as we've discussed this, she's kind of an accidental prime minister. She wasn't elected to the job in the first place, and she was only very narrowly elected if you could call it that when she did decide to attempt to seek her own mandate, that being the case, do we actually understand or have we had a chance to. Stand, what drives her?.

prime minister Theresa May David Cameron United Kingdom Theresa Andrew European Union Theresa May Andro Andrew Muller Brexit Boris Johnson Terry secretary contributing editor Victoria Andrew Jackson Michael gov Stephanie
"theresa may" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"We mentioned on the podcast before because Jason thought, because you just had a baby that should be Brandon Lewis, the party chairman for the Tory. So neither would vote in these crunch votes. Brandon is did. There was quite love outrage. Taking the on Twitter and Jillian Smith, the chief whip and Brandon. News for quick to say, sorry to this wasn't honest mistake the times today claiming that it wasn't so nice. Actually, she ends Memphis trying to encourage other MP's on pairing arrangements to do similar thing because they were so worried about this vote. You've had Andrea leads him today, is that she was one of the MP's ONA Perry arrangement, and she received no such instructions, but I think we'd just go to see weather story goes because the times of the grants to think this is the case. Hence, when they ran with it, I think is very bad optics for the government. And lib Dem's went to make as much political capital out this possible. So they're trying to get an edge question on it and trying to get and Smith to give a statement in the highest. It's just quite wrath or chief whip today. I've personally suspect that Janine Smith is safe for this reason which is what you would need to force him out essentially would be for one of these MP's in a pairing arrangement to come forward and say, the chief whip told me to break the Pat on. I mean, anyone who's going to do that because it would be such a brutal act to your own colleague. And Secondly, if you took down the chief whip in such a fashion, you would find that the whips office would dedicate the rest of our life to making your life difficult. So when you base it, he asked for slip to head off to your daughter's wedding or whatever you resolve is crucial government legislation. You can't leave the building. So I think you know if he's not particularly high minded honorable reasons. But for this reason, I think I find it very hone to believe an MP will be prepared to come forward and publicly stay on the record. I was told to break a pairing arrangement show, and Theresa May is not the only one bringing out her diplomatic, a game today, new brakes, it's extra Dominic. Robb will be meeting Michelle Baena. In Brussels, James, what can we expect from that meeting those women's dome it wrong, trying to say on going to be more involved in these negotiations, van David Davis was one of Davis's, great complaints. Was he being Kakata of a loop on this? I think we wait to see where we get. There's no joint press conference Barney, but we wait to see what we get any hint from that. All what Bonier thinks of jackets plan. The word is that the commission on hugely skeptical but are trying to say, made that to opiates katie's love stay in the punt call Asia and also because they wanna find the trees may is forward. They they still regard her as the best person for them to negotiate with and they want more, but it's going to built in the UK which ruling on checkers would do. I wasn't as interesting because we will see a very different dynamic. I think between dome rob Amodio, Bonnie David, a very proud of the idea that he was kind of charming Boston the he could get on with these guys, all very smooth. I don't. Rob will seek a different kind of relationship with Michelle von perhaps more confrontational, perhaps more direct. Yeah, and we are going to get MS charbonnet conference on Friday, but it'd be answering questions from Jan this. So I think depending on how that goes, might James says, has skeptical that should revved up the engines from some exciting Sunday front pages of angry, Brexit, Erin, MP's, love it, and James labor, having troubles, too. That's an extraordinary from page from the Jewish chronicle this morning. What does it say? It takes on the Margaret Hodge comments about Jeremy Kuban legend. Here's a kind of anti Seema in a racist because of this refusals looking broadly accepted definition of antisemitism in the labour party's rules. I think this is quite extrordinary because the Jewish clinical doesn't normally do from pages like this, and it is a fact that this is happening..

MP Brandon Lewis Janine Smith James labor van David Davis Andrea Michelle Baena rob Amodio Bonier Jillian Smith Twitter Jewish chronicle chairman Jason Theresa May Margaret Hodge Seema whips Memphis Barney
"theresa may" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"It's been a tough you days to resume, but as no rest for the wicked and today, the prime minister flies to Northern Ireland Katie. What does she do in them? So Theresa May is trying to continue setting her check as banned by all the problems that has had all the backlash. It has received including Boris Johnson's resignation speech yesterday where he basically said it was Brexit and name only and pointed to the point where this bet wrong when to resume agreed that things on the Irish border. So Theresa May's response to this is to fly to Northern Ireland and took up why is good business and also respects the problems surrounding the Irish border and how office eviction. So that's her plan anyway. Meanwhile, there's still much anger in the Tory backbenches. I think there was a little sign of. Some peace house being restored last night at the meeting of the nine hundred twenty committee of backbenches when Theresa May address them because she had won consecutive pay, say the, I did send a letter to the chat at this committee cooling for competence to need by that. She retracted it, but I think we now have for the Davies today, and that's in that he has actually filed zone that too. So I think we'll probably still very neutral what one that is attracted. One letters going. One of the interesting trees has gone to know Nashville because when Downing Street tries to defend the checkers plan, the no-one hours is is front and center in their reasoning. Their basic argument is look at what we signed up from the nausea, Northern Irish border in December. And from that that creates an imperative, those absolutely no friction at the border. And then once you get to that position, that's where you end up having to have a common rulebook where you have to cover very complicated politicized customs arrangement. 'cause you can't just have two totally separate customs territories. As many bricks. Tears would like the UK on one hundred eighty you on the other. So I think it is an interesting question as to whether to resumes pitch today, ends up exacerbating toward divisions or ends up explaining why she's dumb what she's done. I think what you'll hear loss of is people say one after she promised not to use cameras or the Irish border because you could actually. Have some friction at the border. And if you had cameras, you could use technology to alleviate it. Once you say that you will not use those, then what's at musical solutions become basically redundant or impossible to execute, say James D think this will work this trip. I think it will explain what she's done, what she's done. But as I said in the Pokorny, the pulse of the problem is that lots of levers will say, well, why did he's on the piece of paper in December when that will be their emotional response to a do think though this, that she will be relieved in a weird way because the longest forty-eight hours of hopping better for her, I think she could have expected. First of all, she won not vote on the customs union which the whips office fort was lost. Then Jerry Kuban didn't impact any damage on her PM cues. Boris Jones in his resignation speech attack the checkers deal, nor her personally, I Katie says the media institute night, I think is. Lowered some of the temperature in the Tory policy. And I think other form of relief is that no one's quite noticed. The more negative noises that are beginning to come out of Brussels. I've won this round rig nines is when it becomes clear that Brussels once a once a loss of changes to check his plan, nearly all of which BreX tears will dislike, right Katie will she makes us a nationwide rate Trump? Is she going to other places too? Well, I've been pushing essence ever my icon for Theresa May ten bar on a nation of our influential..

Theresa May Boris Johnson Katie Davies prime minister Northern Ireland Brussels Ireland Nashville nausea Brexit UK Boris Jones James D Jerry Kuban Pokorny forty-eight hours one hours ten bar