35 Burst results for "Theresa May"

Who Killed Dr. Teresa Sievers?

Sword and Scale

02:48 min | 6 d ago

Who Killed Dr. Teresa Sievers?

"Theresa's seaver sister recalls the weekend of june twenty sixth twenty fifteen. The began celebration of their mother's birthday and abruptly ended as the last weekend the family would ever spend together. We enjoyed the weather the first day. It was beautiful and we swam in the pool and we relaxed in the sun sister's doing yoga. She prepared a beautiful dinner starting to cook for the weekend. And we just enjoy each other's company and had wine and laughed and played a lot of scrabble. 'cause it rained the next day so we just played a lot of scramble. Hanno 'cause much to our delight there was a piano there on my sister. And i played and we hadn't played in years. There was a lot of that these gatherings it was once a tradition to take a family photo together and so all the siblings significant others and grandchildren huddled around each other smiling knowing this family ritual would soon and forever be too painful to recreate as the family. Reunion came to a close that sunday. Evening theresa savers her husband mark and her two daughters drove south to laguardia airport. Which theresa would be dropped off for her flight. Back home to receivers was in fact. Dr theresa verse with a busy practice patients to see first thing monday morning. Mark and their two daughters would stay behind driving back up north to connecticut. Reuniting with theresa's mother and extending their vacation for the next several days theresa returned home just after eleven pm that sunday night and after parking the mini van in the garage placing our luggage near the front. Bumper theresa walked through the laundry room and into the kitchen where she would set her purse on the counter. Undoubtedly feeling that same sense of comfort. We all feel when we're finally back home. After a long day of travel but hardly a moment that past when an extremely loud crashing sound rang out like a gong being hit directly behind earlier that going off the kitchen walls and startling theresa with a terrifying notion that someone else was in her home. She turned around. The large man was already through the laundry room and standing in the kitchen doorway wielding a hammer and striking her in the head with three swift strokes.

Theresa Seaver Hanno Dr Theresa Laguardia Airport Bumper Theresa Mark Connecticut
Congressional Lawmakers Head To Texas, Concerns Of Overcrowding At Facility Holding Migrant Children

Charlie Parker

00:37 sec | 2 weeks ago

Congressional Lawmakers Head To Texas, Concerns Of Overcrowding At Facility Holding Migrant Children

"Group of federal lawmakers are heading to Texas today to see the effects of the immigration surge. This one is being led by Congressman Joaquin Castro has concerns about overcrowding in the holding facilities for kids it's going to take. I want to say weeks, but I think it may be a few months before they're able to stabilize the capacity issue. The latest numbers show that CBP now has about 17,000 unaccompanied Children in custody. Today's group of Congressmen will visit the Theresa Springs office. Refugee resettlement facility at the border press will not be allowed inside, which is now standard under the Biden administration.

Congressman Joaquin Castro Texas Theresa Springs CBP Biden Administration
Biden urges UK and EU to preserve Northern Irish peace amid Brexit row

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:38 min | 2 weeks ago

Biden urges UK and EU to preserve Northern Irish peace amid Brexit row

"Good. Friday agreement of nineteen ninety-eight ended thirty years of conflicts between mostly catholic nationalists fighting for a united ireland and mostly protestant loyalists who want northern ireland to stay part of the united kingdom. But now the accord is in jeopardy. According to david campbell chairman of the loyalist community's council. He's calling for dialogue with the eu and island to change the northern irish protocol. That he believes has breached fundamental principles of the original deal. This follows an announcement from loyalist paramilitary groups that they were temporarily withdrawing support for the peace agreement due to concerns over the brexit deal but it has further repercussions beyond europe to has been mcevoy news a political reporter and monocle twenty four regular and has been covering. The story is here to tell us. Good morning to you. Vinian thanks for joining us at. This is clearly a big problem. Here in britain and for the eu. Why is it resonating across the atlantic. Good morning yet has huge resignation across the atlantic you have a massive irish diaspora in america. One in ten americans consider themselves to be from irish descent. You go to the half american presidents having lineage and the man in the white house now is probably the most closely itunes irish issues. That has been since john f. kennedy and so we've now got the brexit arrangement in place in old nada and there was a reason why the northern irish people voted most strongly than any nation in the united kingdom to remain in the eu. Because it is a self-described post conflict society. Those wounds were still hearing and brexit has opened them up and caused issues and as well as the united kingdom and the eu the us will say played a big role in achieving peace in northern ireland. And it is worried that the westminster government has been to a reckless in its handling of northern ireland and things could start to come upon say loyalists particularly angry. We have to remember over the course of brexit with theresa may. She didn't have a majority off to the two thousand seventeen election. so she's struck this alliance with dp which is the main loyalist party. She gave them all kinds of funding for that backing To get her brexit deal through it contains something cold the irish back stock which they became unhappy with that it would have prevented having border arrangements of they were the ones who encouraged conservative backbenchers to keep looking at so now the situation is that. Despite bar johnson's promises he is betrayed. Loyalist parties in northern ireland in that he has allowed the creation of an irish seaboard between nineteen noland and the rest of the united kingdom. And so it is that that has enraged loyalists because they think that it is a barrier between them and the rest of the u. k. That isolates them and that it leads to more synchronization with the republican violence because north non has stayed in single markets and not go on with the rest of the united kingdom. So of course. We know that the have been major power players struggling currently with the brexit rules and their supporters. What does this mean for northern. Ireland's devolved government. Yeah we have to remember. The nolansville government was actually suspended for three years until january loss. If it had been an independent country it would have been the longest in europe to not have to working governments But what it means now is that we've had them up running for a year and all kinds of problems are coming up. So you know the prime minister. Boris johnson traveled. Auden's elliott this This month he actually didn't meet with chimp Sane the other main partners in that power sharing agreement that has said waves. That says you know. The the westminster copy relied on his effect on governors of. What's going on there. It's only dealing with one of the parties but the loyalists themselves having problems in their ranks. Because of this seaboard you had a administer effectively northern ireland a playing a sort of unilaterally moves late on friday nights a few weeks ago where he sort of blocks the construction of the border checks at poets and the hiring of staff unilaterally and that really set things off because they're just trying to frustrate the creation of this border which brussels assigned up to the uk has signed up to in law and for the first time last week the biden white house made clear that it supports the northern ireland tricycle. And that everyone else. Apart from the loyalist consider this now a settled issue to move on

United Kingdom EU Northern Ireland Loyalist Community's Council United Ireland Westminster Government David Campbell Main Loyalist Party John F Europe White House Atlantic Nolansville Government America Britain Kennedy Theresa Noland Johnson Boris Johnson
In community and out of prisons

Women on the Line

04:38 min | Last month

In community and out of prisons

"In any given year hundreds of kids language behind bars in australia. The minimum age of criminal responsibility is ten in other words of both graded can be arrested and brought before corp camera is the only jurisdiction has taken steps theresa age this week on women on the line raise the age campaigner and solicitor. sophie Explains why locking up. Kids is not only traumatic for the child but exposes them to further And in the second half of the show to win times marissa's Chats bronwyn carlson a professor of indigenous studies at macquarie university. We want to thank maria for giving us permission to play his special international woman's day coverage but first up. Let's look at the campaign to raise their age. Welcome to woman on the line sophie. Thank you very hurt before we look at raise the age campaign. I thought it'd be important to discuss some of the issues that kind of a span the campaign. so let's stop from the top. What factors lead to youth offending proably aware but in australia children as ten year old can be arrested by police and putting the present. So we're talking about extremely young children when we talk about these ideas offending offending anything Maybe an out of home care who Throws them dinner across the room because they get frustrated right through to the things that we might move typically think about like lifting or Some sort of property graffiti something like that. So there's a whole Spectrum of how young people might get caught up in the criminal justice system aboriginal and torres to own the kids of on will likely to be picked up by police arrested put in prison cells than non indigenous kids and the reason that this is a combination of voice over policing so these kids just thing more visible to police and police targeting these these children more often and policies which make lot hotter for these keys high level of poverty and more insecure in unaffordable housing. Things like that got you. And so what happens when children do come into contact with the criminal justice system i had is there. Life generally pan out so again it really depends on who the child is So as i said keep the jiang. ten can come into contact with criminal justice system for that means they might be arrested by police. Taken to a police lockup cell or the night with they might be held that we brought before court and it will be decided what happens to that child Kids that i worked with minimum territory. you know often within sent to sent to juvenile justice detention centers so effectively presents You know where they can be held. If any length of time ed alternative of course his kids particularly to on average charge two kids who come from more privileged background. They might get diverted by police. They might be given a warning that might be taken hunch their parents so a lot hangs on how the police interact with the children. Right the reason. I ask that question was to sort of look at what happens. Like how does prison exists the issue so these kids are going in for minor problems but what does the criminal justice system due to them. Yeah so you almost nothing. Good comes out of the criminal justice system. All the medical evidence tells us that The younger child comes into contact with the criminal justice system. The more likely that they will stay engaged. So that means you know you pay if a kid is eleven years old when they first have contact with police them much more likely to later in life including when adult continue to have that that contact with the criminal justice system and there were lots of reasons to this. But they're all pretty simple when you when you take a kid a child away from their family away from schooling away from all those social structures and support if extremely traumatic for the child. A young person's brain is developing until the about twenty five itchy tilles very young so it disrupts the way brain can can form mature and clerk even basic things like egypt taken out of the formal education system. Says six months very hard for you to reengage with that when you get back. It's very hot. Eatery engage with your friends and your family and third. These kids have a lot of difficulty issuing than normal lives in the community officer being disrupted and very traumatic way by putting these children tension sensitive

Sophie Explains Bronwyn Carlson Australia Macquarie University Marissa Theresa Corp Sophie Maria Tilles Egypt
3 Alabama professors on leave over insensitive photos

Maggi Tax

00:18 sec | Last month

3 Alabama professors on leave over insensitive photos

"Alex Hogan, three professors of the University of South Alabama, have been placed on leave pending an investigation. After racially insensitive Halloween photos of them surfaced. Finance professor Bob Wood was dressed in a Confederate soldier's uniform, while professors Alex Charlotte did Nance and Theresa. Well, D posed with a

Alex Hogan University Of South Alabama Bob Wood Alex Charlotte Nance Theresa
Seattle City Council candidate was charged with assault, harassment after 2015 confrontation

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:38 sec | Last month

Seattle City Council candidate was charged with assault, harassment after 2015 confrontation

"City Council candidates arrest several years ago has come to light as we hear from Kemal's Bill O'Neill. The Seattle Times reports. Mike McQuaid was charged with harassment in 2015 police report shows McQuaid became upset with some landscape working outside of his Wesley condo. And got into an argument with a man there. That led to McQuaid, threatening the man with a saw and throwing a rock at him, but quite agreed to a deferred prosecution. Gross misdemeanor charges were dismissed in 2018 after he served a year probation. He also spent 24 hours is part of a work crew. Cueto is running for council Position eight, which is currently held by Theresa Mosqueda tells the times what happened frightened him. He says he would have avoided the situation. If he had to do it over again and wishes he could take what happened back.

Bill O'neill Mike Mcquaid Mcquaid Kemal The Seattle Times City Council Theresa Mosqueda Cueto
The History (and Erasure) of Black Brewers

Kottke Ride Home

05:29 min | Last month

The History (and Erasure) of Black Brewers

"Despite the overarching image of whiteness. When it comes to beer there is a vast history of black brewing culture. Which like so many things has been largely erased from the history books and cultural consciousness. James bennett the second dove into this for a recent peace in eater. He acknowledges the huge influences of german and irish culture in america but points out. That's not the only source when it comes to beer quoting eater. The ancestors of african americans. They were fermenters. They were really good at making their own liquor and making their own beers and also making wine from fruit says the culinary historian and writer. Michael w twitty one of our african 'isms in fact was producing all of these things and one of the reasons why we did. That was because it was related to our traditional spirituality libation twitty. Ads is the heart of african spiritual worship. He recounts seeing this firsthand on a trip to takhar village in cameroon. They pull out a big ceramic vessel full of their traditional beer. He says and even though a lot of takhar our muslim this is one of the traditional religious practices that they keep alongside islam. What beer-drinking may be nonexistent on friday. Would he notes. You better believe that at social functions to honor youth. Celebrate a marriage or the deceased in the ground. Alcohol is poured out and passed among the elders and quotes alcohol and in many cases. Beer was and is important. Spiritually and culturally to many different communities in africa throughout the ages as european colonizers began enslaving people and forcing them to work on their stolen land. The knowledge and skill sets of many enslaved black people surrounding bruin were exploited quoting again. The prevailing image of enslaved black person is that of someone laboring in the fields were being ordered around the big house but american slavery built in sustained a pretty much every aspect of this american life and that included beer again the west african societies. From which so many bodies were stolen. Were no stranger to the mechanisms of fermentation. We know that. Enslaved africans and african caribbeans were brewing beer or were cultivating hops or other grains. That would have been used in the brewing process. Says theresa mccullough of the smithsonian's national museum of american history. Black brewing skill was no secret. She adds advertisements for enslaved. People who were skilled. Brewers -absolutely wanted posters that identified fugitives as skilled brewers or otherwise involved in the brewing industry. As american as apple pie. Peter hemmings enslaved at monticello was a master brewer and quote but even if their expertise was being used to produce beer many black individuals who were free at the time. Weren't drinking much of it. Part of it was because temperance. Got rolled into the abolitionist movements. Most abolitionists were anti alcohol. Seen it as a toxic influence and a tool of the oppressor now. That's not to say that all temperance advocates were abolitionists. Far from it but most abolitionist were teetotalers. But there is also a practical angle. Bennett explains black. People were wary of being taken advantage of by white people while drunk and also simply didn't have the money or time for drinking while they were figuring out more important matters like getting an education job and securing semblance of safety in a dangerous climate then in the second half of the nineteenth century beer and cider went from being a smaller mostly at home type of operation to a profitable business largely. Thanks to the influence of german immigrants in america and of course now that it was profitable. Black brewers were shut out and being that beer was now more something to be purchased at an establishment like a saloon versus consumed at home. Black people were also often refused service. Then prohibition hits and when it was repealed with many federal regulations in place breweries were fearful of being shut down so they leaned hard into patriotic. Branding the kind of whitewashed stars and stripes apple pie type of america that is definitively white as been it says. Advertising has more to do with what we buy than most of us care to admit and by his accounts that adds up with the consumer trends that we saw throughout the second half of the twentieth century as white flight brought middle and upper middle class white people to the suburbs where they could host parties at home and had a bit of bigger budget a lot of them swapped beer for cocktails and thinking that they could get them back with a beer that had as high as cocktails beer. Companies tried to sell the white suburbanites on malt liquor but the attempt flopped most likely minutes opposes. Because it's something of an acquired taste so then a pivot happened quoting again. How did malt liquor go from garden. Party aspirated two boys in the hood levels of despair. The exact y. Is a matter of law but jane. Nicole jackson beckham diversity ambassador for the brewers association has a pretty good idea. The story i've been able to get is that there was some kind of persistent market research saying that. Urban audiences make more purchasing decisions based on. Abc and that urban audiences tend to buy for volume. She says the decision was made to market malt liquor not as an upscale product but a specifically urban products and to put it in a large vessel boom the forty and quotes

Takhar Michael W Twitty James Bennett Theresa Mccullough Smithsonian's National Museum Twitty Peter Hemmings America Cameroon Monticello Brewers Apple Africa Bennett Nicole Jackson Brewers Association Jane ABC
The Moon Through the Houses in the Natal Chart

Astrology Bytes with Theresa Reed

04:03 min | Last month

The Moon Through the Houses in the Natal Chart

"Today we are talking about the moon through the houses in the natal chart. The moon symbolizes your emotions needs and how we respond to others and the world around us. I want to remind you there are twelve houses in the natal chart. You can go back to the old episodes to learn about the attributes of each house and wherever the moon sits in your natal chart in one of these houses shows. Were you can get a little emotional. And because the moon is changeable this could also indicate were in. Your life may fluctuate too so. Let's go through them. The first house. The of the first house indicates a personality that expresses feelings outwardly. Your heart is right under sleeve but sometimes you may be too reactionary. The moon in the second house means money is important to you. It comes and goes which can create insight eighty when you have enough cash to the bank. You tend to be more chill the moon. The third house indicates abotions ted. The color your thoughts. You've got a great imagination and might be intuitive and times you need to work hard to keep your feet planted on the ground. The moon and the fourth house is at home. Since this is the natural placement for la luna hope is where your heart is. And you're probably close to your family. You might have accompany home to. You'll need to guard against holding onto the past. If you can't get you can't let go of the old. you can't be present. The moon of the fifth house makes you a hopeless romantic. You want true love and nothing less will do. You're probably fertile. Couldn't many children. Ed would make an excellent parent but watch out that your pursuit for pleasure doesn't cause you to leave a trail of broken hearts behind you. The moon in the six house means work needs to be emotionally satisfying. You may choose a career as a caregiver or in the food industry drama at work could affect your well being and could sometimes be a catalyst for many job changes the moon of the seventh house places emotional emphasis on relationships. You crave security through long-term partnerships. You're highly empathic. But can also become co dependent. The moon in the eighth house heightens intuition. You can feel things. Am people out with these. You also have good instincts were handling money however boundaries could be week or you may struggle to find emotional intimacy hot and cold. Yep the moon in the ninth house creates a desire to see the world or feed your had you love to learn about other cultures and may have a strong moral compass. Bud this placement of the moon could also indicate restlessness or religious hypocrisy. The moon and the tenth house means the public. Loves you and you love them. You want recognition and you probably get it. The negative side of this placement could be someone who does whatever they think. We'll get the most applause. The moon in the eleventh brings a motion relationships with friends. Friends often become members of the family. Or you may have chosen family of buddies that replaces an unhappy birth family. The mood in the eleventh can also make you susceptible to peer pressure and lastly the moon and the twelfth house indicates a deep emotional need for solitude too much time spent with others stranger batteries frequent sabbaticals or therapy helps you restore your sense of emotional balance. You'll need to be careful that your past experiences to not color the present moment. Let go of those old stories

La Luna TED ED BUD
OA466: Opening Arguments Blocked in Australia?!

Opening Arguments

03:05 min | Last month

OA466: Opening Arguments Blocked in Australia?!

"Legal advice from a podcast. Hello welcome opening arguments. This is episode. Four hundred and sixty six. I'm thomas that's andrew how you doing. I am fantastic thomas. How're you well. I'm so controversial that i've been banned in the whole continent. Yeah actually that is right. The the australian court justices have Yeah decided to restrict access to opening arguments. We're gonna tell you why. I thought it was just me l. Thank god okay. I tribunal with like the laser handcuffs and the like we sentence you to the phantom zone shears relief though if it's just our show and shit right well before we get to it. cheese our hearts go out to the people of texas. Who are. i can't even. I don't even know that we know how bad it is yet fully because it seems like so much is offline that i'm really scared that it's going to be even far worse than we know right now. Yeah i think that's right. We have ton of listeners and friends and you know our very own theresa gomez lots of people who are in texas who are suffering through This this you know every year once in a century ice storm and my joke from last night. But that's i love it so you and i have are looking into ways that. Oa can help one of the things. That ashley put together that. I'm going to include in the show. Notes is a list of resources and links for folks in texas. A again may not have have but yeah but if you have spotty or intermittent access and and you can get that so or you know if your family members who are elsewhere. I'm going to run down them. Really really quickly I be just a shout out. Jose andres who's like i could. He could he just be overlord of he. He has overlord of her. Yeah ed and his restaurants are amazing. i've been to. I think all the ones that i could get to. So yeah andrea and world central kitchen or down in texas Given out free food if you are without heat. There are warming shelters throughout the state. You can call two one one on your phone. If you have a medical device that requires power you can call nine one one and I've got a list of the warming. Centers that'll be in the show notes there are. I'm gonna include a an article. Ashley pulled from the texas tribune which is The ways that i it compiles bunch of different ways in which You can get help during the storm and then there are to live. Docs one is by the texas civil rights project and if you are in or about the houston area. This is alive dock with resources on open restaurants grocery stores gas stations hotels

Australian Court Texas Thomas Theresa Gomez Jose Andres Andrew Ashley Texas Tribune Andrea ED Houston
QFC to close two Seattle stores, blames city's new $4 hazard pay law

News, Traffic and Weather

01:16 min | Last month

QFC to close two Seattle stores, blames city's new $4 hazard pay law

"And bullying. That's what one Labor Union calls QFC decision to close two stores after Seattle required hazard pay for workers during the pandemic. Com O Seu Romero has the story If any, Sanders with KFC says the mandate that certain grocers pay an extra $4 an hour accelerated their decision to close to underperforming stores in Seattle on 15th Avenue on Capitol Hill and 35th Avenue in which would we're doing our best to really provide for our associates and Provide the things they need. So they have been getting appreciation paid and bonuses and rewards of since March. Sara Charon is with the union local 21 representing grocery workers. Kroger's intent seems perfectly clear. They are announcing these closings to try to intimidate any other local communities from passing hazard pay. She testified before the King County Council, which is following Seattle and considering requiring groceries to pay workers extra hazard pay. Sue Romero, come on use gentle council member, Theresa Mosqueda released a statement about the store closures, calling the move disappointing, adding quote Grocery workers have had to cover emergency shifts, pick up extra responsibilities and are five times more likely to contract Cove. It she went on to say these workers should not be pawns in a game of chess.

Seu Romero Seattle QFC Labor Union Sara Charon KFC Sanders Capitol Hill Sue Romero Kroger King County Council Theresa Mosqueda Chess
Mbappe Makes Messi Miserable

ESPN FC

01:22 min | Last month

Mbappe Makes Messi Miserable

"Only one place to start the show and that's in spain wearing finished barcelona one. Psg four he was messy opened the scoring imposs- with a penalty for then it was all about killing them by. He backed a hat trick. King on the goalscoring action as well seeing. Psg in complete control of this tight going into the second leg. In france craig. Bapai's imbaba story. The messy messy story was he was on the fringes but not entirely has fought because the supporting cast as a shadow of its former self inova but the only thing that went their way in terms of lock tonight. Psg was the fog to the dutch referee. Could have sent a theresa gayle from full stop for a second bookable offence. He away with now. That's probably why. Portugal took them over off because he got. He made a reckless challenge. Then he made another one. I'm really not sure. How the referee that the second yellow apart. Psg were immense the defendant when heart should the medfield was excellent particularly variety and and bobby stepped up stepped up onto the big stage. I mean they just took bacelona partner. Basically

PSG Bapai Theresa Gayle Barcelona Spain Inova Craig King France Portugal Bobby Bacelona
Seattle Council approves extra 'hazard pay' for grocery store workers

The Gee and Ursula Show

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

Seattle Council approves extra 'hazard pay' for grocery store workers

"Stores and chains in Seattle will now be required to pay workers $4 more per hour during the pandemic. We talked about this yesterday in the Seattle City Council did vote unanimously to approve the mandatory hazard pay to begin immediately. One study of grocery workers in Boston found that 20% of those workers tested positive despite high use of mass and council member Theresa Mosqueda says grocery employees are essential workers and Their employers are not suffering financially. During this pandemic.

Seattle City Council Seattle Theresa Mosqueda Boston
Theresa May rebukes Boris Johnson as UK welcomes Biden era

Hugh Hewitt

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

Theresa May rebukes Boris Johnson as UK welcomes Biden era

"Prime minister has some scathing criticism for current Prime Minister Boris Johnson. It's not the first time Theresa may has criticized the government's decision to reduce the aid spending target or denounced its threat later dropped to break international law by going back on a treaty. But the former prime minister has chosen the day of Joe Biden's inauguration to issue a sharp rebuke. Theresa May says a new administration in Washington should again allow the UK and us to rally around shared values in a leadership role. But she has a blunt message. Mrs May says the world does not owe Britain a prominent place on the global stage and its actions that matter to BBC's band, right. High

Prime Minister Boris Johnson Theresa Theresa May Joe Biden Government Mrs May Washington UK Britain BBC
How Zoom might stay relevant post-pandemic

OC Talk Radio

05:58 min | 3 months ago

How Zoom might stay relevant post-pandemic

"Back to our listeners. And welcome back to work place perspective. Julie mccoy thank you to recite a happy new year. And thank you for having me back again. Sorry excited. I love that. We've with scientific arthur time. We've had to kick off our new year. I think it's a great way to do it. Twenty twenty one. Can you believe it. thank goodness right. Never so happy to see a year in the rear view mirror ever well. This is a great topic today. We're gonna be talking about lessons from twenty twenty one that we can take forward with us into this new year. What we could use to improve ourselves improve our lines and provide quality of lives and leaving behind everything. That doesn't serve us. So i am so excited to talk about this list. Jump right into it. Well thank you theresa sought. I've done a lot of reflecting on your twenty eight twenty as we leave it in the rear view mirror. Thank goodness but i. I think it's really important for your listeners. To before they russ not normalcy and twenty twenty one whenever that takes place. I think it's really important to reflect upon things that they undoubtedly learned in the what i call the roussel of twenty twenty because it was that or many of us and some of us bar more than others but You know there's a seeing among the coaching community that there's no comfort in the growth zone and no growth in the comfort zone and we've all been terribly uncomfortable to varying degrees where the past year and we now see the light. The end of the tunnel return to our normal are were teens and had dick schedules. And and i think it's really important to tag out or the experience of twenty twenty uncomfortable experience the lessons that we all learned and in a city. Here right now. Sort of your listeners may be dismissing that Because you know it they were mostly more focused on the pain and how to get through it and what was going to happen next year that accompanied all of his nyan certainty of it but invariably we. I am certain that we all learned things. Maybe we learned a new skill for example. I know a lot of people Might i'll take myself as an example. I wasn't really much of a cook. Started this process. Why us man. I ate out a lot. We got to take now snatch And all of a sudden is down than i had. Actually prepare a week's worth of menus. Arkansas and prepare food and i became a much better cook because i had to learn how to do things like substitute ingredients. And before i was just following the recipe rigidly. Because that's all i knew how to do. I had no idea. I'm substitute well. If you can't just run out and store to get one item because that's too dangerous right to your hell. I figure that out. So there's there was real learning around that For me i. I know of other people who had to learn how to be alone. Alana people just really can't stand thought of being alone and on the isolation of this pandemic inspires ties into that You know i would say that as we need this year last year behind us it's important to take a moment to reflect on what we gained on and there were a lot of positives. They came out of twenty twenty on on a broader scale For example the images of the clear skies in los angeles on this beautiful days when there was no pollution the images of the himalayan mountain one which you never see right because it's always obscured and smog the fact that a lot of us learned that our lives were so much more hectic when we were running around in our cars going back and forth to meetings there was so much easier just to sit down at our desk in have a really productive. Absolutely you know. I find that amazing now and that was one of the first things i noticed was how much time i saved by. Not having to and i still get ready. The i get up. I put my hair up close make module around and everything but still. It's so awesome. How much time you save right. And you're saving the environment at time. And you arrive at meetings not so frazzled. Especially in southern california when you're driving in traffic all of the time I you know. I just woke that going forward. Some of us will remember value of hadden's in meetings which they seem very awkward in the beginning and some people tatum so much they just signed off and reviews combat. But were those of us who had to stick it out. There were these we had to accomplish. I think we learned how to work through the awkwardness of winners. It might've speedy and ocean the conduct brisson's talking and once we did that we download it was really productive platform for getting things done and could sit down calmly in our desk with a cup of coffee or glass of water and proceed to our meeting without the rush of. Oh i just got the freeway. I'm laid i gotta find parking place. A russian take an elevator. So i i just hope that some of us will from time to time and undoubtedly in person meetings organic resume as soon as nike And i hope that some of the small may be take her pause in every now and then say you know. This meeting doesn't have to be. We're solidity in the comfort of our own homes or on offices and students via sumer via conference call.

Julie Mccoy Arthur Time Theresa Russ Himalayan Mountain Dick Alana Arkansas Brisson Los Angeles Hadden Tatum California Nike
EU officials formally sign post-Brexit trade deal with UK

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 3 months ago

EU officials formally sign post-Brexit trade deal with UK

"This is Lou makers have been asked to approve a one thousand two hundred page brexit trade agreement in one day to beat immediacy deadline top European Union official signed the document not long before U. K. prime minister Boris Johnson urged U. K. legislators to back the deal in the heart of this bill is one of the biggest free trade agreements in the world as well as we discussed in this chamber many times Mr speaker a comprehensive Canada style deal worth over six hundred and sixty billion pas son will make his gripes about be given any five hours in parliament to scrutinize the deal that will mean profound changes for Britain's economy and society but it is highly likely to get the backing from the house of Commons what Johnson's concepto party has a large majority former prime minister Theresa may said it's not the deals he had hoped for we have a deal in trade which benefits the E. U.'s button also deal in services which would have benefited the U. K. Karen Thomas London

U. K. Prime Minister Boris Joh LOU European Union MR Parliament Canada House Of Commons Britain Theresa May E. U. Johnson U. K. Karen Thomas London
Iran’s president blames Israel for killing nuclear scientist and vows to respond at the ‘right time’

AM Joy

05:48 min | 4 months ago

Iran’s president blames Israel for killing nuclear scientist and vows to respond at the ‘right time’

"Joe biden could be facing a crisis in iran when he takes office the runs top. Nuclear scientists was killed. Daytime ambush friday. The scientists was considered the architect of iran's secret nuclear program that was halted in two thousand three while. Nbc news has not independently confirmed details surrounding his death. Iran's foreign minister has implicated israel in the attack but israel has not commented on the allegations. Join me now now. You're a hawk former state. Department senior adviser and host of sirius. Xm that global experience treat a policy of the quincy institute for responsibility in statecraft and author of losing it. Enemy and colonel lawrence wilkerson former chief of staff for secretary of state colin powell. So i'd like to start with you. Treat it what exactly is happening right now. What are we hearing. Well the latest is happening. Is that the iranian president. I've come out with a statement. Essentially saying that iran is not going to walk into what he called a trap by israelis to escalate and and create a war because that is in his assessment with the israelis wants But it is not clear if that is the view of other elements inside the country. Some of this debate is starting to be taking place in public in which the argument that is made by the other side is that these assassinations continued to take place precisely because in their view the iranians have not responded harshly enough to previous attacks and the only way of preventing future. Attacks is to respond harshly. This one if that happens however than there is a very significant risk for a major esscalation potentially war which according to ruhani is what the Always looking for curl wilkerson. How unusual would it be for the notes to have not been informed of this. Do you believe that the white house knew that this was going to happen. It would be extremely unusual. Maria theresa I have to believe that was informed Trump's whole effort now seems to be to be foul the recent election. So i don't think he's very attentive to but my peyot at sectors state is and i'll remind your viewers of what's up their defense robert gates Now my chancellor. William and mary that the saudis are willing to fight the iranians for the last dead american. And i would add bb netanyahu too much in yahoo in that. I think that's what we're looking at here. They want as a major outcome. A war as a middle ground outcomes they want a bombing campaign by the us against toronto nuclear facilities and as a minimum amount They want to foreclose any possibility of the new president. Joe biden reentering the joint comprehensive plan of action the nuclear agreement with iran and. It looks like they're well on that road to success to follow up on that. Because i think the what the colonel stating is quite implicates the perhaps the role of the white house in this we know that any who has been a very strong ally of donald trump donald trump has been very clear that he is an ally of israel but also want also was the one that was responsible for pulling us out of the nuclear deal with iran. And the idea that we're hearing possibly is that donald trump perhaps did this. No had israelis did this informing donald trump. But also is this netanyahu's attempt to do something under this current administration that he knows me not able to do with a biden administration will the binding administration has certainly picked up a where. The obama administration left off in terms of wanting to return to diplomacy and use the tools of diplomacy to box in bad actors. If we rewind we know. The iran nuclear deal was less about iran's as a terrorist nation and more about eliminating the ability for iran to get a nuclear weapon. That yahoo was opposed of the saudis. Were closed. But this was a coordinated effort between european countries including russia and the united states with the united states. Pulling out that really opened the door. Before is israel and the saudis to look to other avenues to influence the united states. You also had with trump national security adviser john bolton who was in iran war hawk and so some of that still remains netanyahu just last week was meeting and talking with mohammed bin salman the crown prince of saudi arabia. So they're looking at a ticking time clock of being able to behave in ways in which the international at least the united states will not be speaking up. An opposing their efforts so That's the key thing is how much can they. Box in. A biden's options By engaging the united states under a trump administration or while trump is still commander in chiefs treatise of the. Us has done officially commented on what occurred. What is your take when this idea that. Perhaps the trying to do is box in the president elect wyden. I think that's absolutely correct than i think it's also correct would counter wilkerson said that There was probably some sort of implicit green light from the trump administration for netanyahu. Go forward with this. However it's also important to recognize that. Netanyahu must also have calculated that biden. Probably does not have the political will to inflict impose a cost netanyahu if he does these things to box in biden and i think it is up to the biden administration to prove netanyahu wrong. Because i doubt that netanyahu would have gone down this path unless he felt that it was pretty much cost fee from him not just from trump but also from biden

Iran Quincy Institute For Responsib Lawrence Wilkerson Israel Joe Biden Ruhani Curl Wilkerson Netanyahu Colin Powell Donald Trump Donald Trump White House Donald Trump United States Biden Administration Maria Theresa NBC Obama Administration Robert Gates Yahoo
Seattle City Council voting to cut Seattle Police Budget

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:59 sec | 4 months ago

Seattle City Council voting to cut Seattle Police Budget

"Seattle City Council is expected to hold a full vote on next year's budget. One of the biggest budget fights involves funding for the Seattle Police Department. Many council members and activists want to cut the budget for SPD in half. This set off weeks of sometimes violent protests over the summer. Last week, the City Council's budget committee voted down a hiring freeze for SPD Como's Frank Lindsay, reporting a long line of protesters and cars honk honk their their horns horns last last night night outside outside the the home home of of Seattle Seattle City City Council Council member member Theresa Theresa Mosqueda. Mosqueda. Police Police say the protests began around 10 o'clock near 30th Avenue, southwest and South West Nevada Street in west Seattle. People in a line of cars began honking horns and chanting through loudspeakers. The protesters stopped in front of most get his home and many got out of the cars. Mosqueda then reportedly came out to speak with them. She chairs the city council's budget committee and has previously proposed to package of changes. It would reduce the Seattle Police Department budget by nearly 20%. Although some activists want 50%

Seattle Police Department Mosqueda Frank Lindsay Seattle City Council City City Council Council Seattle Theresa Theresa Mosqueda City Council
Boris Johnson says Britain needs its own Green New Deal

FT Politics

08:07 min | 5 months ago

Boris Johnson says Britain needs its own Green New Deal

"Boris johnson has always been keen to burn it his green credentials and put tackling climate. Change at the front of his government's. Agenda is done so again this week setting out a long-awaited plan to make the uk a world leader in green technology as with most government announcements. However that will plenty of spending commitments already made being re announced but the most auden criticism came from the tories who said it goes against. The party's new electoral base and could cost them votes but business secretary. Alex chama rejected this notion. This is about leveling up across our country. We're talking about twelve billion pounds and he has around. Four billion pounds of this is new money. Other money is money that's been pledged previously on deed lost budget in in in march Book very importantly This billion pounds will help to bring in three times as much in terms of private sector money and supporting create two hundred and fifty thousand jobs but the have been some critics of this plan arguing that it really doesn't go far enough. The shuttle business sexually. Ed milliband made this point. There is an urgency. That isn't enough ambition. That isn't a real plan. He's got to do better in all of our interests that he does better. We will keep pushing the government on ambition on jobs on appropriate plan to rise to the scale of the climate emergency. We face chimp. Let's begin with this. Ten point plan of boys. Johnson set out in article in the financial times. In fact what did you make of it and how much of it was new money and new policy okay so this was a very long awaited announcement. They were meant to originally Back in the summer and it slipped because of pressures on number ten prime minister announced twelve billion pounds states investment program when you went through the numbers at ten about three billion pounds this new at included five hundred million hydrogen one billion pounds insulation three hundred million pounds for nuclear industry. I think what was interesting even if the money was pretty small. Change when you compare it said of the countries like franz chemmy refute these comparisons jeremy kuban late manifesto prince lansing which lici tuten sums of hundreds of billions of pounds of buried money. Guns was agreement. Deo i think it's still a political moment because as always this tension between people saying let's go green other Saying it will damage economy People in cost known areas concerned type. Slutty jim republic who worry about paying extra tax also green initiatives ambrose johnson especially saying worry we can. Tiny's these things together. We make sure. Green economic growth happens in some of the left behind redwood areas and talking about place humble months for over northeast. police o'clock. It's wonderful to have you on the podcast. What were your thoughts. When you saw this announcement here because johnson has talked a lot about green policy arisons locked summer but it fuses if that rhetoric has increase as jim said that is new money on some new policies to go with it to there is a but by i know about this was a. It's brilliant. Hear a british conservative prime minister coming up with a plan like this. Because although we've had david cameron promising the government ever and then we had theresa may actually legislating for a net zero twenty fifty which was very pioneering for a country the size of britain at the time. The thing is. We really haven't seen a prime minister set out in a speech or in a plan like this thing as visionary really and it is a great vision. Unfortunately it's really not matched by detailed plans and considering that a large chunk of it is dependent on trying to mobilize private investor capital. I'm just concerned that it's really not going to make. Investors are not going to invest unless they see the detailed policy until they know what the shape of any sort of regulatory framework has got to look like really not going to get people plowing in at the rate needed to fulfill this and when it comes to actually meeting that net zero goal twenty fifty. It's really not on track to do that. Unfortunately the classic example about chocolate changing which is provided uncertainty from best is if you look at one of the atoms. Boris johnson announcement which was carbon capture storage. Which is basically succour Boats on you bury it. The browns the tools boom cameron government promised been impounds towards that twenty fifteen a group of plug on that money or johnston's done this year's he promised eight hundred pounds in the spring budget yet. Another challenge main pounds this week. Hey presto Where we were five years ago with basically almost leg progress on cca. Yeah that's exactly. It had this sort of crisis. Feel about it really. Is you know god. We've got to do something on climate. Okay what do we do on electric cars. Oh i know will bring the target ford. That's actually relatively easy to do. It's important but unless it's matched by holocene setting out how people are going to be able to buy more electric cars and how the rollout of the charging infrastructure is going to work. You know it's really difficult to see how it works. I expected a guest to say something a little more meditative parts of this plan on you when it comes to the targets for making sure that new homes not built with natural gas boilers in them. For example you know that's really quite important. And of course at target itself has been brought forward slightly from twenty five to twenty twenty three at same these support for hydrogen also important but again. You look at what germany's doing in its recovery plan. It's got around. Forty forty billion set aside for electric cars renewable energy and so forth and france around thirty billion euros set aside nine billion of that is for hydrogen renewables alone so compared to that. The u k plan does look a little small were jim. This is one thing critics of picked up on the plan. Even who is labour's shadow. Business secretary has said it doesn't remotely meet the scale of what is needed. I think greenpeace charity have said similar things to all those criticisms fad. You because when it comes to government spending you can always make the case you should be spending more doing more radical things and as please note. This is a conservative government. This is not natural territory. Full them yet. But i think the first point to make our show on the business sexually set on the radio. This is a down payment but that will be more. Fiscal events is quite possible than the spending review. The we see next week that could be more money for example nuclear. They could say they're gonna stop negotiation sizewell c Pass station which would of course involve more money. And i think as well now. He's talking about how these provides whole sums compared to labor government beginning right now the thing to remember Tackle climate change isn't just about state. Money is also about regulation so of course the bundle twenty fifty borrowing in new pets from these laws as an example of wet government does not have to spend the money it can regulate and things happen and so many of these decisions of stems from theresa. May's decision donning moments of her administration commit twenty-fifty net zero target. Only kind of off the thought. She the mohanchris coop suasion joyfulness. She bandied about it even now known. Would think theresa may is great green ahead and yet she took this decision from which all sorts of future decisions have the stem. But i think to remember names of bishops is very seats. Promotional world where Christie is coming from fossil fuels. Were kind of on talking for. I think you have to remember that. The british energy system like any other system But also transport system unfairly household energy or freeways needs to be decarbonised. And i remember whether we're on track to do that. Speed that needs to

Alex Chama Ed Milliband Boris Johnson Franz Chemmy Jeremy Kuban Prince Lansing Lici Tuten Slutty Jim Ambrose Johnson Cameron Government Financial Times Theresa David Cameron
"theresa may" Discussed on FT Politics

FT Politics

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on FT Politics

"I think he's better off just sticking his guns at this stage and Josiah's look the other candidates. So this really is well as boys about four very serious ones. You have fought campaign team because I do think by the way, the myth that we refer to one of the candidates by their first name just shows. How huge figure they are you have to enormous public figure before your referred to in that way. And that's the scale of the advance, she has absolutely George. Let's look at some of the other main candidates who are likely to come the next prime minister, I would probably reckon uh, though. It's a type thing to say that the main competition for boys comes from Dominic Robb, the former Brexit secretary who's a slightly more hard line Brexit her than Boras. He's probably more likely to push for a no deal banks. It if the begs, Adeel, MRs may negotiated can't be fixed in some way, and he appeals to conservatives who really want to get a clean break with the. EU but I do wonder how he will go down with the country outside. The conservative party is not really known outside of Westminster at all and does come across as a bit of a code fish to some people. He certainly doesn't have any of the charisma of Boris Johnson, as you say is not very well known. And if you're a conservative MP sitting at a marginal seat in the middle of the majority of five thousand and you wonder who's gonna help you hold onto that majority. Don't think the obvious answer is be dominant Robin to instructive Lee, there was a survey, I think by labor list of the Tory, prime minister, the labor party would fear. Most ambitious Johnson was off. The scale is the person that the labor party forty five percent exotic in the others were nowhere to. I think that tells you a lot about the calculation that Torian will be making and the thing, Mr. rob. But is that he's actually not a total hardline breaks because he did vote for Theresa May's, you're on the third reading he said he wouldn't vote it if it come back for fourth, and so that hard core group of conservative MP's, which is thirty.

prime minister conservative party Boras Boris Johnson Torian Josiah Mr. rob Dominic Robb George EU secretary Robin Theresa May Lee forty five percent
"theresa may" Discussed on FT Politics

FT Politics

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on FT Politics

"FD politics, a Wiki discussion on what's happening in Westminster from the financial times. I'm Sebastian pain in this week's episode. You can imagine what going to be discussing the resignation of Theresa May, we'll also being into who is coming next as the next prime minister of Britain. I'm delighted to be joined by our political editor, George Parker, columnist, Robert shrimps and deputy opinion. Miranda green, thank you for joining. And if you find yourself liking, this episode of F T politics than don't forget to subscribe through all the usual channels to see every Saturday morning. Well, we often say be dramatic week in Westminster on this podcast, but this week for the has talked them all recording this on Friday. Just a couple of hours after Theresa May came out of Downing Street to announce that on the seventh of June. She will be residing crucially. She stepping down as leader of the conservative party, not as prime minister. But we know the by the end of July, we'll have a new person in Downing Street and new. Person to take on the Brexit, mantle George pocket. Let's begin beginning of what was a pretty hectic week in Westminster Monday was quite quite, but on Tuesday to ease make live at what was her final big act as prime minister, which was to deliver a somewhat mischievous speech on breaks, which went down, while the Bodley and after a lot of efforts finally sealed her fate. Yes. This was the bold new and improved Brexit for that. She intended to put the house of Commons. Very much Laslo the dice to try and get her bricks deal through it had some stuff in there about the customs union which was intended to win support from some labor impedes, but most controversial all dangled the possibility of a second e referendum in front of labor and peace..

Theresa May prime minister Westminster Robert shrimps Miranda green George pocket George Parker Brexit political editor Britain
"theresa may" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Really is what matters all of the EU states, they do set their own energy policy, but the targets for how much they have to reduce their carbon emissions by that is all set at the level so under the Paris agreement countries have to commit to reduce emissions by a certain amount. And that decision, the EU makes collectively, and so in part because the EU has been very successful at integrating, its economy and integrating, its energy sector. The power grids are integrated these really aren't decisions that individual countries can make the by themselves and the EU is collectively the third largest emitter of. Carbon emissions in the world after the US and China will what happens in Europe. Really moving needle globally either way in terms of getting where the world needs to be in response to this crisis. Yeah, I think the EU is a major player in international climate negotiation. It plays a big role. It's also historically. Been one of the more ambitious players in global climate negotiations. So it has pushed other countries to move forward, and it has been one of the big funders of other countries and partnering with other countries. So when the EU is being ambitious climate policy that really pushes global policy forward. And if the EU steps back, especially with the US having stepped back, you know, that also has ramifications on the global level. So I think the difference between a very aggressive EU and an e you that isn't as aggressive as something that you really would feel at the global level. So what matters in the u parliament matters to the world reported ritual halts? Berlin will leave there. Thanks very much. Thank you might go as we say goodbye today. It seems appropriate to end by saying goodbye to British Prime Minister Theresa may her political legacy will be debated for years to come and her musical legacy. The world's. Andrea crossing has some thoughts for Theresa May one of her most memorable political moments was set to music it all started last year when she was on an official visit to South Africa. She did an impromptu dance with kids there. Her signature move was something between a middle school, prom shuffle and the robot and it launched a thousand memes may made it clear. She was in on the joke when she took the stage at the twenty eight teen conservative party convention. She smiled vitally and danced awkwardly as the crowd cheered her on Theresa May will be remembered for her unique dance style. But what about the music written about her? I went looking for songs inspired by her time as prime minister, there was this, one by captain, Scott. We the conservative build bet. She. And then there were some remixes made of her political statements like this. Unheedful a strong. Unstable unstable with a strong stable government is still a struggle. One thing became clear as I started hunting for music, about Theresa May. When it comes to British politicians women seem to inspire more songs, and to be clear. These are not love songs just do a Google search for songs about Margaret Thatcher. At the. Don. Down Margaret by the English beat or this one by John McCullough. That's we done. That Tanya says start. Will done. Yes, we. That Sonia Graham says fat almost anything in Billy bragg's back catalogue. But look for songs about John Major, Tony Blair, or David Cameron and well there's just not much. It could be that it's harder to find lyrics that rhyme with Cameron, or it could be something else. Whatever the reason for it as Theresa May leave office, she'll be followed by the long shadow of a failed Brexit. But no matter what comes next..

EU Theresa May Andrea crossing prime minister US Margaret Thatcher Europe David Cameron Billy bragg Berlin John Major Sonia Graham Google Paris Tanya China John McCullough Don
"theresa may" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm Marco werman surprising. No on Theresa May, is out as UK prime minister, I will shortly leave the job that it is being the owner of my life to hold her downfall with Brexit, but her departure doesn't make Britain, leaving the European Union any easier. We'll hear what comes next and President Trump visits Japan this weekend that country that helps shape Trump's views on trade decades ago you can trace so much his rhetoric back to the nineteen eighties that I think he hasn't actually updated it that much, plus gay rights advocates, celebrate and Taiwan and Brazil today, but not so much in Kenya will explain today here on the world. I'm Marco werman you're with the world. It is official now, British Prime Minister Theresa may announce that she will step down in two weeks. Time on June. Seventh that'll be just days after President Trump goes on a state visit to the UK. Here's may earlier today. I will shortly leave the job that it is being the owner of my life to hold the second female prime minister, but certainly not the last I do so with no ill-will, but with enormous and enduring gratitude to have had the opportunity to serve the country. I love may said she had done her best to deliver Brexit. But in the end, it was her failure to get the votes needed that brought her premiership to an end. The world's Orla Barry is in London. Hey, orla. Hey, marco. How're you doing? Okay. What's been reaction in London to the announcement by the prime minister well in some ways. Depends on what people are saying in private and what they're saying in public, they're two very different things, despite where you stand on three Somme most people, I think will be so what moved when they hear her on the verge of tears. There is she announced the cheese stepping down, but it has been a day that has been some time, coming if she were to look at Twitter, she will see some of those who were her gracious torn in her side at wishing her well, and paying tribute all saying, very dignified things about unpacking, her first story kill service to the country at the same time. It's these very people are responsible for the fact that she's stepping down. So what about Theresa May's legacy, like how she likely to be viewed in hindsight in a year, or five years, the could be quite a difference actually between a year and five years at the moment when you look at three as legacy you can't help but divide it from Brexit, and that's her greatest difficulty, because the mess that we're in with regards to Brexit is ultimately tied. Two three Somme. So when she came into office, for example, and she made this speech about bringing about braces and about not having a general election 'til at least twenty twenty and now triggering article fifty which would bring about Brexit until this clear negotiation Brexit deal was in place. She failed in all three counts. We had general election. And this is where she lost lot of the support from her fellow MP's, and also triggered article fifty when they didn't have kind of cleared idea. What Brexit was going to look like. So at this point, you know, she very closely tarnished, by Brexit that said, if you were to look down the road at the next person who will take on her premiership, depending, and how they deal with Brexit people might look back a little more kindly on three Semait. Talk has already moved onto who will be may successor who is likely to be the next British Prime minister, the front runner is Boris Johnson? Former mayor of London, former foreign secretary. Known for his mop of blond hair..

Theresa May Brexit prime minister President Trump Prime minister Marco werman London UK Orla Barry European Union Kenya Boris Johnson Twitter President Britain Japan Taiwan Brazil
"theresa may" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Resume as finally called time on her premiership the main reason was in the end it was a bridge too far. She tried for a fourth time to bring Brexit deal back offering this time the opportunity for lawmakers to vote for the possibility of a second referendum, which would counsel Brexit altogether, and that for her conservative party, which is full of Euro-sceptics proved really something that was too much to stomach. And so in, in suing rebellion took hold and her hand was forced. What she dealt an impossible hand, though, is it almost impossible at this point in time to get any sort of Brexit withdrawal deal through parliament. It's not impossible, but I think she made various errors earlier on an apprenticeship, which made a task law Hodder. She said out a road to, to, to Brexit without really fully realizing the trade offs that, that required and that meant ultimately proved impossible for her to deliver it. And the big problem, she had is she as an individual became very closely indicated with the deal that she proposed. And so as a result, many people in the end voted against the deal because they didn't want her. And I think that is why in the end she's had to go. Who will replace her? Are there any leading candidates? There are several leading candidates, the favourite at the moment is the former foreign secretary Boris Johnson, who is well known to eurosceptics was a big cheerleader for leaving the EU during the two thousand sixteen referendum mister Johnson advocates, but a hard Brexit. He advocates an abrupt departure from the EU, which many in the conservative party would like to see. However mister Johnson if he does get elected to power will face many of the same challenges Theresa May faced and it's not entirely clear as to how he will deal with those the pound has been dropping in recent weeks, amid fears by traders that he will in fact lead the UK out of the EU with no deal. Come the end of October. Something that many people predict because economic pandemonium in the UK, however it's unclear and these leadership races for the conservative party are deeply unpredictable and often the favourite falls by the. Wayside. So we will have to see how do you think Theresa May will be remembered will she be deemed, a failure are, thank you very much, depends, is how the Brexit process ends up. I think if the practice process is calamitous and causes huge economic pain and proves unpopular in the long term, the maybe her efforts to try and find a compromise solution will be respected. However, if it is successfully delivered by successor, then she will have seen as a leader who wasted several years, the UK public's time trying to deliver a project for which they voted. So I think it very much depends on what happens next. You can find all the latest developments on who will succeed, MRs may at WSJ dot com. You might know ADP is the biggest name in payroll. But that's just the beginning because ADP is transforming the way great work gets done with HR talent time benefits and payroll informed by data and designed for people, that's ADP always designing for people. On to markets US markets closed lower yesterday. With the Dow slipping two hundred forty eight points on renewed trade concerns. One area that's worth paying attention to though is fixed income, the yield on the benchmark ten year note hits lowest level since October twenty seventeen yesterday. When bond yields drop it means a bond prices are rising that suggests increased demand from investors are market columnist Nate Tappin explains. Why fixed income has become more appealing to reasons. One is that there's a lot of us equities, which are exposed to, to China in various ways. Particularly in the tech sector US semiconductor firms sell tons of chips to China, and their revenues will certainly take a hit if they can't sell those things to alway for example, and then the other reason is that this could in over the long run. If it continues mean law. For growth in both places and so bond yields are dropping both because people are fleeing kind of risky assets like equities, which are our growth plays, and then also they're, they're looking at, at lower growth, potentially in the US in the future,.

mister Johnson ADP Theresa May EU UK Brexit US China WSJ secretary Nate Tappin eurosceptics ten year
"theresa may" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

06:19 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"Just before you start listening to this podcast reminded that we have a specialist subscription her, he can get twelve issues of the spectator for twelve pounds as one of the twenty pound Amazon voucher, Goto spectator, coda UK Ford slash voucher. If you'd like to get this offer. Unwelcome to coffee house shows the spectators daily politics podcast, I'm Cindy, and I'm joined by James foresight, and Katie booze since may match the nine hundred twenty two committee today. Is this the end for him James? So as we expected her commitment to bring the second reading of the Bill at beginning of June has been enough. What the statement agree between her and the chairman lunch, when secrity Kosovar in Brady says, is that she will bring the second reunion green Bill then and then off the bat. He and her will sit down to agree on a timetable for the tour de contest because whatever happens with that second reading things are meeting, if it is defeated, which is, what is the expectation in Westminster, then she is out of options and the Tory party would need a need, if second reading, pauses, then, remember that trees, my has said that she will go soon as he's about to say it's fruit. I statement seems to be implying that kind always the prices are going could run concurrently with the prices of legisation going through. I think the danger of Theresa May is that one second reinvest Bill comes is, what one loyalist and p was saying is, is it people vote down, second reading to, to bring a resolution his crisis and hastened her departure from office? I've in they're, they're trying to avoid that list dot having a challenge. And I think the other issue here is. At the end the more withdrew agreement loss by fifty eight votes. Why should it now at the beginning of June, when, and if anything the situation has got worse? I think three's manage just hoping that something turns up between now and then but I've even seen mccoubrey is going to be disappointed Katie. She's expertly kicked the can down the road, a little bit longer when the raptors come back in a couple of weeks time issue, going to face a even bigger defeat them, fifty eight St. think, I think it remains in the app, basically have bad, this defeat is going to be I think there is probably today. What percentage you have put a one percent chance that things go right for Theresa May at the hope and number ten is the Brexit party actually make massive gains defy even high expectations are ready and, and really have such big wins, particularly in labor areas that labor MP's then feels the need to get this free. But I think when it comes to the Tory numbers, there will be fewer toy. Stories than the last time voting for this deal. I think they have breakfast is who basically on the third vote for push push themselves over the line Dominic Robb Boris Johnson to positive, and I think a lot of them are struggle to do that. Because they look at the Brexit party and they read from that, that they were right all along, and they need to be more Brexit easy. Yeah. And you shouldn't have compromised tried to go for a softer Brexit. The voters don't like the deal. So the idea of passing the deal isn't going to solve the conservatives programs. I think there's still some Brexit is he would definitely vote for the deal and it's current form because they think that once you're at out that is an improvement to now. But it depends what changes are made to this deal. And the fact is obligated to see some former customs arrangement. Are we gonna see amendments added, and I think that's the issue? So I can't really see it moving. And I think also have been government there figures. He are actually skeptical of y Theresa May has decided to hold. The vote so seen. And it's clearly because as we've seen today, it's tied to her position by doing this. She has gone off a bit more time. And she has a small chance to pats have a happier legacy away being remembered if she manages to pass her deal. But if you took to raise my out of the equation, I think you just looked at in terms of trying to pass the draw agreement. I think people think this is the opportune time to James if she's defeated again in June. What's the mechanism of getting her out? Even if it is politically infeasible, I still say, on would the rules and have to be changed. And if so, does not come with baggage that we've talked about on this podcast before are the probably realistic expectation is that Ralph within have the rules change on her to raise my one, one of the nine people who voted against the rule changes his most adamant against the rule change said to me, if second reading goes down you couldn't hold that toyed back. And I think that wrong within her waiting for them to change the rules and how I think about points, you brought he would see the raw also this means. The voluntary party on the fifteenth. It's known binding but to have the association, chairman vote new confidence in you as the leader again. It would be very, very messy ending on just one the weather she at that point, even to resume might accept, but the game is, is up, I wonder as well wherever there is some attempt to try and get second reading through bar doing something different. I think that we will see a lot of chatter in the weeks leading up to this vote about, do you try and change something about the back stop just in the domestic legislation. And see if that makes the Bill more palatable and almost challenge the e you'd say, no, you haven't ratified it I because of in a have to try something because I'm always this thing is going down to pretty much certain defeat. But isn't that like, passing the moat house compromise orange and engaged EU and saying, we want this year any, you would say, well, that's? That you don't pulse. That what you do is you take this language alternative arrangements in the political declaration. You put it into UK Lule now. You obviously Ryan that you would not be the EU would be well would be technically within it's ROY says, I haven't restful at this thing. So when, when Russia fire and it, it, it's a done thing. But I think the hope would be you put some pressure on. And then if you did it in a way that was a little bit social, rather than just we're taking

Theresa May James foresight chairman Katie booze Brexit party Tory party UK EU Amazon Cindy Dominic Robb Boris Johnson Bill Brady Westminster raptors UK Lule mccoubrey Russia Ryan
"theresa may" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

14:42 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on The Daily

"From the New York Times. I'm Michael Barbaro. This today. Today after months of trying and failing to put forward a deal for how the UK could leave the European Union. Theresa May had one final thing too often. Herself. It's Monday, April first. Thank you for calling the London office of the New York Times. Hello. Oh, hello. How are you Ellen? I'm great. I'm so sorry that we've had technical difficulties this morning, not to worry wouldn't be the daily if we didn't have to technical difficulty. Okay. So here we go on tell me when you're ready ready. Okay. Ellen berry is a times correspondent inland. So last Wednesday in the middle of the day. Theresa May called her party members to committee room for teen which is a sort of big committee room somewhere in the bowels of Westminster palace. It was quite unclear what this was about. There was loads of speculation that she would perhaps fire her chief negotiator for Brexit who is widely despised by right wingers in her party. The world covers trained on the British parliament waiting for a Brexit breakthrough for money, the workings of this house appear increasingly mystifying, but after months of Brexit paralysis could things be starting to move so five o'clock conservative lawmakers began crowding into this room, and it was by all accounts stifling and completely packed the minister for international development, couldn't even get in there and was watching through the keyhole. And it is traditional in these gatherings. When the prime minister comes in people bang on the tables with their hands. It's kind of like a tribal drumbeats. And so then the room went silent door closed the room when silent and what was said in. There was said only to each other, but meetings like this leak -ly saves and the clothes meeting with conservative MP's. Theresa May said she's prepared to make the ultimate move crackly the outside world came to know that the thing that she was prepared to offer in exchange for their votes was herself. She concluded by offering everyone in the room to backer deal to allow for a smooth and orderly Brexit, she basically said I'll make you a deal if you vote for this. If you vote for the withdrawal agreement and get it through then I will step down as prime minister Brexit from my head, basically. Ellen. How did all of this happen? How did Theresa May end up being at the center of Rexon say the funny thing is that Brexit was never Theresa May's issue. She kind of kept her head down. But she was remain or she voted to stay inside the European Union. And really just stayed out of the whole public debate over Brexit to great extent, and it was really somewhat by accident that she became prime minister. So he with coverage is back in Downing Street a happy man after surprise election victory against most predictions. His parties won a slim outright majority started with David Cameron who is basically hoping to stop a hemorrhage of MP's from switching sides and going to you Kip, which was the Brexit party. We will give the British people a referendum with a very simple in or out choice. And he made a. Gamble to stay in the European Union on these new terms or to come out altogether. It is time for the British people to have this. A it is time for us to settle this question about Britain and Europe, it was essentially to kind of a swathe the hard right of his party. He thought he could essentially throw them above on and get them onside. And he did so expecting that the country would vote to remain and it just came as a kind of staggering surprise on June twenty third of twenty sixteen when the results came out, and it was fifty two to forty eight percent for leaving the European Union. The British people have voted to leave the European Union and the will must be respected and because David Cameron had been squarely opposed to leaving the European Union. He then announced that he was going to step down as prime minister rather than lead the country through the process of. Of leaving the country requires fresh leadership to take it in this direction. I will do everything I can is prime minister to steady the ship over the coming weeks and months, but I do not think it would be right for me to try to be the captain that STIs our country to its next destination. So why does Theresa May end up taking his place if she had been a remainder if she'd been opposed to Brexit, so Theresa May end up taking his place because the men who were the obvious front runners to be his successor's kind of took each other out in the political fist fight that followed. And I suppose she was appealing in a sense that she was quite different from all of those top Tory men. There's a phrase they use bail college which is the tranquil assurance of effortless. Superiority some people would say sometimes life is his daughter isn't can have its ups and downs. Theresa May as nothing like that. I mean, not on any level. But I feel hugely privileged actually in the the childhood that I had she was the daughter of a small town vicar and the granddaughter of two lady's, maids, and the great granddaughter of a Butler, so she came from a family with a really long sense of public service and duty notice thing you ever did openness me. Will suppose. Gosh, jim. No. I'm quite sure must. Nobody's nobody's ever perfect. All the I mean, I have to confess when me and my friends sort of used to run through the fields of wheat farmers went to pleased about that. So she seemed like one of the grownups in the room at the time someone who could potentially bring the country back together after an incredibly difficult and divisive referendum campaign. So the men who create Brexit, essentially, self immolate, and the party turns to Theresa May. Yes, she cast herself as someone who is trying to do the least damage I mean instead of projecting enthusiasm about the mission of Brexit. She tended to express a sense of duty that she had taken on the job. She was going to finish the job. We all living through an important moment in our country's history following the referendum. We face a time of great national change. And I know because we Great Britain that we will rise to the challenge, but it didn't take long for her to start making serious blunders around Brexit because it turned out that she's one of the worst retail politicians that Britain has ever seen. I know that the public sector has had to carry a heavy burden the private sector has played its part too. But with government businesses and the public set to working together we have bounce back. She is wooden. She is unable to speak off script. She cannot generate warmth. She seems sort of congenitally unable to generate warm. Brexit means Brexit. We're going to make successful. She went out on the stump in repeated kind of robotic robotics bricks. It means Brexit set of phrases that she had been briefed on because bricks. It means Brexit, and she earned the nickname the may Bhatt because she was seemingly unable to come up with different answers. Even when the same question was asked her repeatedly. Well, the reason reasonably be saying Brexit means Brexit is precisely because it does to be this is what history looks like the official letter formally starting the process of Britain. Leaving the European Union is delivered says she made a series of very significant blunders that year one of them. Maybe the most important one is that she triggered article fifty the article fifty process is now underway and in accordance with the wishes of the British people. The United Kingdom is leaving the European Union which started the clock ticking towards an end date an exit date. Of March twenty nine this is on historic moment from which can be no turning back Britain is leaving the European Union. We all going to make our own decisions, and our laws as soon as she started that the EU had an enormous advantage in the negotiation. This is a decisive step which enables us to move on. And finalize the deal in the days ahead. These decisions were not taken lightly. But I believe it is decision that is firmly in the national interest. I mean, she also as a general matter she played her cards, incredibly close to her vast throughout the negotiation. So the country really didn't know where she was going with this process until late last year when she shared her withdrawal agreement with the country when you strip away the detail the choice before us is clear this deal which delivers on the vote of the referendum which brings about control of money laws and orders ends free movement. Protect jobs security and our union all leave with not ill. No, Brexit, all and it went over like a lead balloon, and why was that? Wow. She laid out a series of red lines that were in fact, very hard Brexit, red lines. No, one knew up until that point that she was planning to. Exit customs union and the single market because we will no longer be members of the single market. We will not be required. Contribute huge sums to the EU budget the days of Britain, making vast contributions to the European Union. Every year will end in. Why is that automatically a blunder? Well, they had no solution for what would turn out to be the fatal problem without plan, which is Britain is not an island. There is a land border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, and you cannot just walk away from the customs union without creating some kind of a border, and of course, that open border between Northern Ireland and the Republic had been the subject of a thirty year armed struggle and a hard-fought peace agreement so to gloss over it was sort of not looking at the problem, which was going to block this thing at the end, the choices before us difficult, particularly in relation to the northern. Island backstop. But the way she squared the circle with the Irish porter is to create something called the backstop. And with the backstop means is that the entire of the UK would remain in the customs union until such time that there is a solution to the border problem which could easily be never, and this is why she lost her exit tears because they said, well, this is just a way for us to stay in the European Union subject to their regulations indefinitely because there is no provision for the United Kingdom leaving the backstop unilaterally. So they style themselves as being stuck at the mercy of Europe indefinitely. Well, that's the first time. I understood the backstop. Thank you. The fact is that HUD, veal isn't really a deal because what it actually does is postpone everything settle anything. It actually guarantees more uncertainty, which is terrible business. And it's not even Brexit. It is not. Brexit toll and they're pretending that it is. So what she begins to do is try to persuade the country to compromise. But it is extremely late in the game. And she hasn't laid the groundwork for a compromise much of her energy went to keeping the hardliners on side. And as soon as she published her withdrawal agreement she lost him. Theresa May still believes this battle to be one. In Brussels, a growing number of British MP's, don't the view of Europe is of a nation, increasing the roads with self, and how does may respond to all these condemnations and men who were essentially beating her up. I mean, this is such an irritating. Maddening group of people that I don't know a lot of Britain's during this period, their heart kind of went out to her because any normal person would just throw their hands up and walk away from this nightmare of job. But she just wake up in the morning and dust. Herself off and set aside her personal feelings and say, I believe with every fiber of my being that. The course I set out is the right one for our country and all our people again. And again from the very beginning. I have known what I wanted to deliver for the British people to honor the vote in the referendum. I have committed to delivering Brexit to the British people the British people just wanted to get on with it. They are looking to the conservative party to deliver to deliver a Brexit that works for the whole UK. And that's what I'm gonna do. I'm gonna do my job of getting the best deal for Britain. I'm going to my job of getting a deal that is in the national interest. She stuck with it. And she stuck with it. And she seemed unwilling to give up and I'm going to see this through. Yes. Until last week.

Theresa May European Union Brexit Britain prime minister United Kingdom Ellen berry Europe New York Times David Cameron Brexit party London Michael Barbaro Westminster palace MP Republic of Ireland Brussels
"theresa may" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Talking Politics

"As leader of the conservative party. The number all cast in favor of having competence into reason. I was two hundred and against one hundred seventeen under the rule says out in the constitution of the conservative party. No further can take place for at least. Is just going nine o'clock, and that was the result. So what we said today was strictly true. I guess Theresa May one Helen has returned to bed. But I just texted her to find out something intelligent that. I could say I'm actually going to read out text Helen techs in full sentences. I should say that this is what she says need something to change the EU and more than she did. But that can be no allusions there. Now that she can't as things stand. Get withdrawal agreement through. So Alan view about which I have say there were more people voting yesterday. I thought it would possibly be less than one hundred is that she strengthened in one respect Theresa May. She has more leverage because if the ultimate fifth everyone involved in these negotiations is not real deal is now more realistic. If this would draw agreement Congo through it reminds me in a way of something that it's the opposite to which is Jeremy Cubans confidence vote. He lost his decisively. The large majority of his parliamentary party voted against him. And he was strengthened by losing it because it made clear that he was not beholden to them. His real power was with the membership. She has won hers, and she's been weakened by it because those hundred seventeen people on not going to make it possible for her to get a deal through. And if she says win is win, and I wanna majority. They can say fine. But that number of people voting against you. We stand by our guns too. So the one thing that hasn't happened. This evening is the only thing that's gonna make this mess. Clear which is there are too many different options in play all at the same time too, many different possibilities, and too many different interests prepared to Diana ditch for the thing that they believe in. And this is only going to be resolved. And at some point we'll have to be resolved as the options fool away, one by one eventually leading a pair of options that people have to choose between and seemed at least possible tonight that one of the options would fall away, which was that Theresa May would be strengthened and several leadership challenge with dissipate. She can't be challenged for another year. But she has been weakened by this. It doesn't feel that auction is going away doesn't feel like people who feel the only way to resolve this is to replace as leader will now be persuaded that they were wrong so options still in play one by one they will have to fool away. Eventually they will have to be. A binary choice something that is possible. Is that as the deadline looms, given that parliament now knows that it can revoke article fifty without asking permission. The final choice might end up being no deal or revoke article fifty something that would have seen incredible. But at some point all the options have to fall away to and then they'll be one. Who knows what might happen over the next month? We will not leave you in the lurch. If it really kicks off I will drag Helen from wherever overseas, and we're gonna talk about it. But until then we're going to do what we did over the summer, which was put out twice a week some guides with some really interesting people to things that we often talk about or you mentioned in passing, but we never really got into in detail and try and describe the background and talk about the white implications. We got lots of fascinating people and topics coming up, Martin Reese on existential risk detail on democracy. Helen's took him at Bretton Woods, Diane. Coyle. When economic well-being. We're going to start with Gary gerstle on the American constitution re hope that you enjoy these give you some listening, which isn't the usual stuff over Christmas. And then we will be back in the new year to pick up where we left off. Until then have a lovely Christmas. My name is David Runciman and weeping took impulsive.

Theresa May Helen conservative party David Runciman Diana ditch Gary gerstle Congo EU Jeremy Cubans Alan Martin Reese Bretton Woods Diane
"theresa may" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Talking Politics

"But nonetheless Corbin does not act like a man who is seriously engaged with the substance of delivering Brexit, and Theresa May stuns out because that is what she looks like he's trying to do. What does it say about Brexit? If the one person who engages seriously with it on its own merits as an issue is the person whose job. Will in the end sooner or later be lost. Because of that does that mean is in a sense the. Doable problem. It's the thing that that is breaking something in British politics. I think that's a pretty interesting question. I think that we have to go though to the circumstances of what happened when the referendum result came out. And that was immediately precipitated the end of the previous government because of Cameron's resignation, then almost nearly immediately precipitated a crisis of confidence in corbin's leadership. So both parties at the top the top of the case and the back benches and around in parliament in the other case responded by acts of internal party management, essentially now that men that building any kind of coalition amount political consensus about what was going to happen next in terms of the substance of Brexit was incredibly difficult because what both parties decided to do in response to what happened then you've got the difficulty of the general election that not only produce the minority. Government. But it produced a minority government produces supply and confidence agreement with the one party that was in the most vexed position in regard to the outcome of Brexit negotiations because of the question of the the Irish border, you couldn't come up with a worst domestic political figuration. I mean, if you wanted to say how bad could possibly be in terms of a domestic political configuration to realize the vote of the referendum. We'll be what we've gone that was going to be one of my questions because looking back at what was the point of which we go on this path leads to whatever's going to happen today. The generation does seem up sedately central to this because we recall this Wednesday morning. I think I have a slight structural bias in that I tend to just read Daniel Finkelstein skull him in the times it comes out on Wednesday. It's very interesting usually so today's one makes a very important point to think about the difficulty here from any minority government which could conceivably win a substantive vote on the big issue of the day. But is going to really struggle to pass the legis. Flation the repeated amendments another piece of legislation to get this into law because it's all very well for Tyler one vote where members of the opposition party support the government, but to expect them to do we have two week after week is going to be hard for whoever is prime minister. And that's a fundamental difference. With the situation that trees may thought she would have two things would have been true say she'd wanna majority of forty they wouldn't have been a leadership challenge because with the majority forty she could always seen off. And Secondly, she could if she could get through the one off vote, pasta education. Neither she nor any success with hers is gonna find it easy to do the actual parliamentary legwork to get this into law. Even if they can get through a meaningful vote. I cannot see how there will be a parliamentary majority for what ever seeming for the moment that basic Notre will be AO g approved conservative leader, not parliamentary. Thirty for Theresa May cannot keep the move a main supporting conservative impedes on sites. How earth this births Johnson going to do the same? They're simply onto Nuff Democratic Unionists in order to the parliamentary with mcaddo the other essential question that arises whatever happens to resume, whoever winds up, his prime minister, never mind. The legislation is the meaningful vote at some point Ponant has got to agree. What this means, and we like historical comparisons, the one that came to mind with me and this relates to the timing is black getting the vote through the Commons on the Iraq war. There are some comparisons. Here. It was I think we forget relatively speaking. How precarious that was his government could have fallen..

government Brexit Theresa May Corbin prime minister Daniel Finkelstein Iraq Cameron Ponant Tyler Johnson two week
"theresa may" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Without a majority tool and rather than at that stage say I think this means need to go for softer Brexit. She decided to do a deal with the DP, which is kind of unions Unionist Party in Northern Ireland quite hard line, quite traditional and very very very against anything that smacks over sort of different regime in Northern Ireland. What are they like as a group? Very sort of patriotic very British. They would say. Angry all the time. I would say from their interventions in the Commons, but we have the right to speak for the people of northern part of. And there is another one that you mentioned Labor's from bench. I mean, they couldn't theory say Theresa May in theory. They could labor has this sort of complex position. Which is they have six tests. They're going to hold trees may to almost impossible tests to me, I have to say so at the moment, we're expecting them to vote we fully expecting them to vote against the deal. Although Jimmy Kuban did hold out a little sort of olive branch. Will let me also reach out to the prime minister reach out to everybody said to trees may look if you move closer to a customs union, if you assure us that you'll uphold workers rights, and environmental standards and other things we might even throw weight behind your deal. But if you can't go shit that deal, then you need to make way for a party that can and will. What you're basically saying is that even Theresa May gets her deal with Brussels and that lots of sticky at the moment, she's got an almost impossible task in parliament. I mean, the groups that you've set out they all seem to have completely contradictory red lines. What happens if she doesn't get it three? Well, the answer is that nobody knows we would be in uncharted territory by the number of options. Labor says it would try and force a general election. It would do that by tabling a motion of no confidence in the government. Although to resume could well win that even if even if she hasn't got support for her deal. There are plenty of MP's who would try and bring about a second referendum. They would try and force the government to go back to the public before any deal takes place to his may says if parliament doesn't back her deal the O'neil turn a tube is a no deal. So we crush out with n without any free trade agreement or anything in place MP's. In particular, labor leadership say, they won't let that happen. They'll try and put down motions in parliament or amend bits of legislation to make that impossible for the government to do or tentatively. The government could end up having to extend the deadline, which they would need approval from the other EU Member States for if it's in a position where it com get all of this done in time. Something could happen is that Theresa May be challenged for the conservative leadership her own party decided wants to put someone in charge of this process. Low time would be short to do that before the Brexit deadline at the end of March you've done sixty seconds on backstop. Gimme sixty seconds on who could be the next Tory leader. Any number of candidates such Javid? The home secretary probably looks most likely he's playing very canny game. Boris Johnson is an out of the race. David Davis, quite fancies himself as a short term caretaker leader to get bricks over the line. And then there are sort of quieter candidates, Damian Hinds, the education secretary and various backbenches, even Tom too. It's incredibly difficult to say sounds like a load of blokes have there's a lot of them. Yeah. Yeah. And just tell me is there a way through this for her. We'll look at still not impossible that she manages to strike that deal. She bullies and cajoles enough MP's over the line in parliament to get it through or perhaps that she fails the first time, and then she comes back with something slightly different. And you know, maybe the markets are crushing and peas feel the stakes higher. And finally, they give their backing, but it's certainly not going to be easy. Thank you so much. Thank you. Keep up with all our coverage on Brexit. In brussels..

Theresa May Labor Northern Ireland Brussels Unionist Party Jimmy Kuban Tom MP Boris Johnson Damian Hinds Brexit secretary David Davis prime minister EU sixty seconds
"theresa may" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"Welcome to coffee shops, political Einar Pentagon. And I'm stage ROY by phase Nelson and James Saif to phrase the DP of accused may of breaking promises on the border. They about to cause more problems for made you think while they're certainly threatening to the IRAs. Valetta that's reason than was supposed to be reassuring them saying the EU onto split Northern Ireland. The I'm going to let it happen. But they read into a small print of that. But that's exactly what she intended to do. Now, there are two very different questions about the video threes May's about to get but she would rather not answer not directly one is going to make any separate demand of Northern Ireland veneers and the rest of the UK. In other words, is it going to have a means of lee-ing some kind of claim Northern Ireland is she about to agree it? I'm the second is how difficult it will be booby ticket out of her deal. Now, the DP handed to them they'll go this. Of course. The clues named unionists this laser like focus anything, which might weaken the Northern Ireland from the rest of the UK. And the reason may well have said it's funny that Madejski Downing Street. She was saying my very passionate unionist do think she's been on a bit of a learning curve as to what's eating is means to those who are genuinely passionate about it. And how something that might not cause a practical problem will be a deal Ricky for the DP everything is how likely the artifact against her. Now, you might think well with the DP caused that much trouble. Surely, they knew about Jeremy Corbyn in the IRA, surely they would not do anything to hasten Corbin going into number ten, but the thing was to the UP is if they are seen by people who elect them to allow any kind of delusion of the union, and they won't be elected again. So their jobs, depend on safeguarding lists. And I for one take them at their word. In the problem. Threes may is hurt him. Reassurance. Doesn't actually address. What worries the DP reasonably says all will not allow this to happen? That's not what worries the DP DP ward. If is Northern Irish backstop is underneath the UK backstop in the treaty. It might end up being triggered not today. Not tomorrow, but five ten years down the line when Theresa May is no longer prime minister, she called bowling hands of her successes. And so what do you worry about is? If it is that what you might get is a situation where the parliamentary particular different, but DP don't have a don't hold the balance of power parliament and a future prime minister, my are either left wing reasons to stay eight or writing reasons economic competitive, perhaps their corporate and they want to United Ireland. Yeah. Okay. Right. Waigel deeds for the UK Great Britain and ends up with Northern Irish backstop. Being triggered by the EU. So be it. That's what worries the DP. And this is what went so wrong when the DP onc- Michelle body, which is the dining sweetheart on a good job of reassuring DP about what would happen today. Tomorrow next eighteen months body events that what would happen to over ten twenty thirty years as the UK and the EU diverse, and it's very telling when only about good deal. She does a good deal for her, grandchildren. Because that is the kind of timeframe DP thinking and Theresa May's pretty expert political survival waving anyone expected to still be prime minister. When owning fosters grandchildren are coming of age. And so these promises from Theresa May are only promises that point that ain't into success of that reason the DP don't find them that reassuring story making headlines this morning as the as demanded fishing rights in British water is going to be another headache for me. I've been in attendance that would have been headed against desk moment because this is. Fishing fishing's, a small part of economy in in the political? This is a to- Tamika..

Northern Ireland Theresa May UK prime minister EU Einar Pentagon Corbin Jeremy Corbyn Nelson James Saif Tamika Ricky United Ireland Michelle body Britain ten twenty thirty years eighteen months five ten years
"theresa may" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"You may think that having a weekly leader is better than getting someone who might from that point of view, less easy to put pressure on, but there are no real reserves of loyalty that I can detect within the conservative party to those still a desire to get to deal. With Brexit, but there's an absolute determination not to let her fight another general election. So she is going to be replaced at some point. And if she has one bad full, I think that point people might say, well, as nine point in carrying on with Theresa, May she just being propped up by these officials and she hasn't got it and she leading us to petition on that point of the Tory party will is very difficult question they will. They will think, well, we've thought to be ruthless. They have. They ought traditionally ruthless party. They'll throw our Gordon. Have someone else on that thought, Andrew, I, if the conservative party would to rediscover that the taste for regicide in in the near future, who do you see as the subject of the next chapter of any expanded edition of Jim sins? Prime ministers who who is the likeliest next occupant of number ten. This is a very difficult question because it hasn't been the likely or expected person since Anthony. Eden, succeeded win. Entrenched at nine fifty five. So it might be whoever manages accessory to be not Boris Johnson off the downfall Margaret, that show it was John Major who was very good at not being Michael Hesseltine. So on that your herself who had the courage to go for the leadership in seventy five. She got it by not being Edward Heath. So this strange sort of negative quality that comes into play. I've written a biography of Boris Johnson. I didn't think he can be ruled out because he's one of the very few senior politicians on either side of the house of Commons of whom people who've actually heard nor the many people have very, very angry with him and disgusted with him. He's still probably has greater gifts as an election near which one thing. One of the criteria that the Tory party will be thinking of and most of his rivals, and it's very, very difficult while you're in power when you're out of power, you can bring in someone like Cameron all, blah, who's never held ministerial office. But while you're impact, I think it would be incredibly old to pluck some gifted. Person from the backbenches on saying his new prime minister of someone who hasn't even been in the cabinet Terry, I do like where possible to try and close the discussions on on vaguely update, not even even if you have to drift into the rooms of the hypothetical to do it, which is, which is what I'm about to invite you to do. If we gave Theresa May as much credit as one compulsively give her full good intentions. And if we removed from her intrigue the not inconsiderable burden of Brexit, what would she want to be able to do as prime minister? How would she like to change a country. It's interesting looking back at what she said when she arrived in Downing Street, she was talking about things like fighting against burning injustice, which was seen a pretty good phrase, but does he say was a come by Brexit? And she did want to talk more about the criminal Justice system and more about social mobility. I think the trouble though with Paul, her record as home secretary, is that some of the things that she did in that ferry long tenure on our will say, coming apart onto her prime ministership I'm, for instance, she brought in what she called a hostile environment towards immigration. One of the fatty constant things about her has been trying to restrict immigration to a certain extent..

Brexit Boris Johnson prime minister Theresa May Edward Heath Margaret Gordon Eden Anthony Andrew John Major Cameron Jim Michael Hesseltine Paul secretary Terry
"theresa may" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"The first question we need to ask is what is merit. And what we find in politics is that men's merit in politics is often just taken for granted while women constantly have to prove that they deserve a place at the table. But now that we Todd quotas in many countries for many years, we can actually look at and compare quota women and non-quota women and men. And what we find is that actually they tend to be as qualified if not more qualified and their male counterparts, but also that if you ask politicians voters, many of them can't tell you who's a quote, a women and who's not a quota women. So you don't see that kind of token affect or stigmatization that you see elsewhere. And in fact that so for example, colleagues in Sweden have done a very interesting study that shows that what happened when you put quotas in for women was that you got rid of mediocre men. So what happened is that the most highly qualified men and the most highly qualified women were selected. So actually the quotas have a positive impact on merit rather than a detrimental. One RV particular times in a country's history which possibly more prepared. For women seeking to make it in politics, and I may not always be the best of times. This is the gloss cliff as opposed to the glossy feeling theory. The idea that men possibly a little bit more inclined to step aside and let women clean it up when things have gone to heck in a hand cut. Yes. Certainly. There's evidence that women are more likely to get the chance to lead parties or lead governments in times of crisis. So times where you've lost power, you've lost favor with voters. You've had a corruption scandal. So they tend to come in when the jobs at the top are not very desirable, and they tend to come in and be left cleanup someone's mess. And it's exactly because other rivals are more likely to step aside because they want to wait for opportunities down the line or they might be weak candidates in the women candidates might be more experienced. So again, kind of in some ways, opens up opportunities, but also the evidence seems to suggest that women are more likely to then be thrown out of those posts. Quicker than men if they fail. And we see that not only politics, but in things like business and so on. So it's a kind of poison chalice in some ways. How big a handy Cup still for female politicians at any level is the. I mean, it's all the difference in the way the media responds to writes about a female politicians as opposed to male ones. The different aspects of the background, their appearance that get concentrated on are we getting anywhere near a media ceasing to treat women in politics as as some sort of peculiar novelty in that respect. I think we still do see a lot of gendered media coverage, particularly because with women leaders because political leadership is very masculine is and particularly as we move towards kinda more presidential is individualized election campaigns. And what you see for a women leaders is this double bind of having to live up to the kind of masculine. Assumptions and expectations of leadership, but also kind of manage their femininity. So the coverage of Theresa May's shoes and her outfits and things like that. You know these kinds of things. You certainly saw also with Hillary Clinton, and I think those kinds of tensions. But also I think the other issue is that we've seen with the rise of social media and new media, the kind of abuse, violent threats faced by female politicians and particularly women of color. Diane Abbott, for example, as a frequent target for sexist racialist abuse. So there's a new kind of arena for political women that may deter them from seeking office to bring back to the subject of today's program to raise a may..

Hillary Clinton Diane Abbott Theresa May Sweden
"theresa may" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"Is there a may ISM if she said she was on the side of the justify managing 's, she is from a much as gilded background than David Cameron. Father was a with a country club German, and they went to a well off. His father was a regimental sergeant major, and both her grandmothers were ladies Mays. So she's from a much humbler background than than Cameron. And I think she spent about the previous two years being patronised really by Tories, particularly Tori men who rather underestimated her, and obviously that to her was extremely task. Once she got in she, she had a sort of firing squad and got rid of all the prominent Cameroon's all the people who who taunts she had been putting up with while actually a highly competent and successful secretary Terry. If we had to guess who her political heroes would have been growing up, is there any sense that she fashioned herself after any other politicians where the. The British or not. It's interesting because reading profiles of Theresa May. She is reported to have said to people even at very early days in in Oxford, where she was a student politician that she wanted to be prime minister. There's not that greater sense. I don't think of being particularly driven by ideology. I mean, one of the names that is mentioned when people talk about her political heroes is Joseph Chamberlain who was mayor of Birmingham. He was he was more about, you know, municipal politics and about society as a whole, rather than grand ideological systems. I don't think Theresa May as somebody who's particularly argued or debated whole world view. I think as Andrew said she is somebody who grew up, you know, with the church with a strong sense of duty with a strong sense of a ferry small-scale traditional conservatism, but that's not necessarily very inspiring pitch. It's very difficult to to sell in a big way, but I think she's sort of progressed gradually through politics. Probably the most controversial thing that she said before she was prime minister was the famous nasty party speech that was in two thousand and two. She was the chair of the conservative party under Iain, Duncan Smith's leadership, and she arrived at conservative party conference, and she told them people think of us as the nasty party. And that came as as a real shock to a lot of people that that that was how they were perceived. One of the things that Theresa May did try to do in that role and others is actually to get more women MP's in parliament and to increase the sort of the representation of of women within the conservative party. So there are some constants that have been there all along. She just hasn't always been the best person at at selling them during. This was of course what happened last year, having arrived in office because her predecessor misjudged the calling of a popular vote. He then did the same herself in cold a general. Election in attempt to establish her own mandate. Now, everybody, I'm sure herself included assume that this was a an obviously done deal. Everyone looked the opposition labor party who were then as now a a rancorous in chaotic, rabble and assumed she would be someone to victory. And yet she did not. She just fell over the line as it were most that a forgivable mistake. I mean it it. It has been used since then as a criticism of her political judgment, but wouldn't anybody in the position. She thought she was in at least have done the same. I can totally understand the reasons why you would have done that in a way it was a very unto resume like decision to make. You know, she famously went off on her walking Holiday Inn in north Wales and came back with the idea that she was going to call a general election for someone who has always been cool shis who has always wanted to be in control of the way. Things happen suddenly doing this seemed quite out of character. Looking at the opinion polls. She should have been right. What then went wrong was partly the manifesto. It was partly the campaign. She had policies which they put into the manifesto, for example, the plans to do with how to deal with social care, which became known as the dementia tax. In the debate. They had plans that seemed to really alienate in many of the conservatives cool vote..

prime minister conservative party Mays David Cameron Joseph Chamberlain Cameroon Tori Birmingham Terry Wales Andrew secretary Oxford Iain Duncan Smith two years
"theresa may" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"There is probably never an easy time to become prime minister of the United Kingdom. However, not since the end of World War Two has anybody moved into number ten Downing Street in more peculiar circumstances than its current occupant. The premiership of Theresa May was brought about by and will be defined by Brexit, which lest we forget she campaigned against unless may really has completely changed her mind about the wisdom of leaving the European Union since she voted to stay in it and urged her fellow citizens to do. Likewise. She is in the deeply weird position of devoting most of her time and energy to the pursuit of a policy. She believes ill advised in the second episode of our summer series profiling four global leaders with unusual amounts on their plate. We'll look at how many is handling this predicament, how much longer she can reconcile these contradictions, and whether she's only being allowed to stay in the job because nobody else presently wants it. We'll also consider maize place in history. As the United Kingdom's. Second female prime minister. This is the foreign desk. You got to go into negotiation with an idea of what you want, but then also, inevitably, there will have to be given take throughout this process. She's not somebody who not truly forms alliances or political friendships. So I think she's very good at looking at detail. I think she's probably less good at seeing the overarching goal and being flexible in the pursuit of she has made some high profile female appointments early on. But recently you've seen more men be promoted. And part of that, I think is given the kind of tension she faces in her own party and potential challenges to leadership. You've got a case of keep your friends close in your enemies closer, and it's meant that women haven't necessarily won out in the cabinet if she has one bad full. I think that point people might say, well, I point in carrying on with Theresa. May she just being propped up by these officials and at that point of the Tory party will fare well, we thought to be ruthless. They are traditionally with this party. They'll throw overboard. He have someone else. Hello and welcome to the foreign desk. I'm Andrew Muller. My guests today are the journalist, Terry, Stephanie, an Andrew Jackson. Terry is the author of the political novel conflicts of interest. Andrew is contributing editor to conservative home. His book gemstones prime ministers was released early this year. Both have, of course covered the ongoing circus of British politics longer than either make it a recall, but welcome both. Nevertheless, we are here today to discuss the presence and possible future however long it may last of the current prime minister of the United Kingdom Theresa May Andro. I wanted to go back to the start of her premiership in in somewhat bizarre circumstances. A couple of summers ago remind us, and I guess in particular, are international listeners how she ended up in number ten in the first place? Well, because David Cameron called a referendum on British membership of the European Union and the confident belief that he would win it. He lost and the following morning, he announced that he would be standing down. So a leadership contest. Resulted the sudden death tradition in British politics, which he'd sought to limit by having a fixed term parliaments act to be reintroduced by holding this referendum losing it. So if you went now, the obvious thing then was for the Victoria side to provide the prime minister, probably Boris Johnson who was their strongest almost conspicuous campaigner, but Burs Johnson's colleague, Michael gov stabbed him in the back and suddenly rather mysteriously Theresa May seem the only grownup left in the fight. She'd being home secretary since two thousand and ten. She was refreshing change from David Cameron and suddenly the Tory party United around her because the people who had campaigned for Brexit her destroyed each other. Andrew, as we've discussed this, she's kind of an accidental prime minister. She wasn't elected to the job in the first place, and she was only very narrowly elected if you could call it that when she did decide to attempt to seek her own mandate, that being the case, do we actually understand or have we had a chance to. Stand, what drives her?.

prime minister Theresa May David Cameron United Kingdom Theresa Andrew European Union Theresa May Andro Andrew Muller Brexit Boris Johnson Terry secretary contributing editor Victoria Andrew Jackson Michael gov Stephanie
"theresa may" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"We mentioned on the podcast before because Jason thought, because you just had a baby that should be Brandon Lewis, the party chairman for the Tory. So neither would vote in these crunch votes. Brandon is did. There was quite love outrage. Taking the on Twitter and Jillian Smith, the chief whip and Brandon. News for quick to say, sorry to this wasn't honest mistake the times today claiming that it wasn't so nice. Actually, she ends Memphis trying to encourage other MP's on pairing arrangements to do similar thing because they were so worried about this vote. You've had Andrea leads him today, is that she was one of the MP's ONA Perry arrangement, and she received no such instructions, but I think we'd just go to see weather story goes because the times of the grants to think this is the case. Hence, when they ran with it, I think is very bad optics for the government. And lib Dem's went to make as much political capital out this possible. So they're trying to get an edge question on it and trying to get and Smith to give a statement in the highest. It's just quite wrath or chief whip today. I've personally suspect that Janine Smith is safe for this reason which is what you would need to force him out essentially would be for one of these MP's in a pairing arrangement to come forward and say, the chief whip told me to break the Pat on. I mean, anyone who's going to do that because it would be such a brutal act to your own colleague. And Secondly, if you took down the chief whip in such a fashion, you would find that the whips office would dedicate the rest of our life to making your life difficult. So when you base it, he asked for slip to head off to your daughter's wedding or whatever you resolve is crucial government legislation. You can't leave the building. So I think you know if he's not particularly high minded honorable reasons. But for this reason, I think I find it very hone to believe an MP will be prepared to come forward and publicly stay on the record. I was told to break a pairing arrangement show, and Theresa May is not the only one bringing out her diplomatic, a game today, new brakes, it's extra Dominic. Robb will be meeting Michelle Baena. In Brussels, James, what can we expect from that meeting those women's dome it wrong, trying to say on going to be more involved in these negotiations, van David Davis was one of Davis's, great complaints. Was he being Kakata of a loop on this? I think we wait to see where we get. There's no joint press conference Barney, but we wait to see what we get any hint from that. All what Bonier thinks of jackets plan. The word is that the commission on hugely skeptical but are trying to say, made that to opiates katie's love stay in the punt call Asia and also because they wanna find the trees may is forward. They they still regard her as the best person for them to negotiate with and they want more, but it's going to built in the UK which ruling on checkers would do. I wasn't as interesting because we will see a very different dynamic. I think between dome rob Amodio, Bonnie David, a very proud of the idea that he was kind of charming Boston the he could get on with these guys, all very smooth. I don't. Rob will seek a different kind of relationship with Michelle von perhaps more confrontational, perhaps more direct. Yeah, and we are going to get MS charbonnet conference on Friday, but it'd be answering questions from Jan this. So I think depending on how that goes, might James says, has skeptical that should revved up the engines from some exciting Sunday front pages of angry, Brexit, Erin, MP's, love it, and James labor, having troubles, too. That's an extraordinary from page from the Jewish chronicle this morning. What does it say? It takes on the Margaret Hodge comments about Jeremy Kuban legend. Here's a kind of anti Seema in a racist because of this refusals looking broadly accepted definition of antisemitism in the labour party's rules. I think this is quite extrordinary because the Jewish clinical doesn't normally do from pages like this, and it is a fact that this is happening..

MP Brandon Lewis Janine Smith James labor van David Davis Andrea Michelle Baena rob Amodio Bonier Jillian Smith Twitter Jewish chronicle chairman Jason Theresa May Margaret Hodge Seema whips Memphis Barney
"theresa may" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"theresa may" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"It's been a tough you days to resume, but as no rest for the wicked and today, the prime minister flies to Northern Ireland Katie. What does she do in them? So Theresa May is trying to continue setting her check as banned by all the problems that has had all the backlash. It has received including Boris Johnson's resignation speech yesterday where he basically said it was Brexit and name only and pointed to the point where this bet wrong when to resume agreed that things on the Irish border. So Theresa May's response to this is to fly to Northern Ireland and took up why is good business and also respects the problems surrounding the Irish border and how office eviction. So that's her plan anyway. Meanwhile, there's still much anger in the Tory backbenches. I think there was a little sign of. Some peace house being restored last night at the meeting of the nine hundred twenty committee of backbenches when Theresa May address them because she had won consecutive pay, say the, I did send a letter to the chat at this committee cooling for competence to need by that. She retracted it, but I think we now have for the Davies today, and that's in that he has actually filed zone that too. So I think we'll probably still very neutral what one that is attracted. One letters going. One of the interesting trees has gone to know Nashville because when Downing Street tries to defend the checkers plan, the no-one hours is is front and center in their reasoning. Their basic argument is look at what we signed up from the nausea, Northern Irish border in December. And from that that creates an imperative, those absolutely no friction at the border. And then once you get to that position, that's where you end up having to have a common rulebook where you have to cover very complicated politicized customs arrangement. 'cause you can't just have two totally separate customs territories. As many bricks. Tears would like the UK on one hundred eighty you on the other. So I think it is an interesting question as to whether to resumes pitch today, ends up exacerbating toward divisions or ends up explaining why she's dumb what she's done. I think what you'll hear loss of is people say one after she promised not to use cameras or the Irish border because you could actually. Have some friction at the border. And if you had cameras, you could use technology to alleviate it. Once you say that you will not use those, then what's at musical solutions become basically redundant or impossible to execute, say James D think this will work this trip. I think it will explain what she's done, what she's done. But as I said in the Pokorny, the pulse of the problem is that lots of levers will say, well, why did he's on the piece of paper in December when that will be their emotional response to a do think though this, that she will be relieved in a weird way because the longest forty-eight hours of hopping better for her, I think she could have expected. First of all, she won not vote on the customs union which the whips office fort was lost. Then Jerry Kuban didn't impact any damage on her PM cues. Boris Jones in his resignation speech attack the checkers deal, nor her personally, I Katie says the media institute night, I think is. Lowered some of the temperature in the Tory policy. And I think other form of relief is that no one's quite noticed. The more negative noises that are beginning to come out of Brussels. I've won this round rig nines is when it becomes clear that Brussels once a once a loss of changes to check his plan, nearly all of which BreX tears will dislike, right Katie will she makes us a nationwide rate Trump? Is she going to other places too? Well, I've been pushing essence ever my icon for Theresa May ten bar on a nation of our influential..

Theresa May Boris Johnson Katie Davies prime minister Northern Ireland Brussels Ireland Nashville nausea Brexit UK Boris Jones James D Jerry Kuban Pokorny forty-eight hours one hours ten bar