18 Burst results for "Therapeutic Company"

"therapeutic company" Discussed on TechNation Radio Podcast

TechNation Radio Podcast

08:06 min | Last week

"therapeutic company" Discussed on TechNation Radio Podcast

"Have an abandoned fitness wristband in your desk. How about a lonely exercised by the solution may not be more better technology. Rick anderson is the president and general manager for north america at darrow health. Well rick welcome to the program. Thanks for having me now. We have a number of digital health technologies today from fit bits. Web apps on apple watches to bicycles under your desk to track for diabetes and weight control and for every chronic condition under the sun. Why are so many of these devices. Used for just a short period of time and then they are abandoned. Well we think that the primary reason is that people lose interest in them over time if they are not personalized to their experience so they need to provide value and continue to provide value to a member Or a patient in order for them to continue to use it and like you said in a lot of cases we see people will stop using whatever devices within ninety days or three months around that and a lot of that is that they've gotten the value out of it that they were gonna get or they get bored with it or something else happens in their life and therefore they get distracted from doing it so being able to personalize and not just fingerprint to somebody. Hey you look like somebody else who went through a journey. That looks like this but actually have that change over a period of time in order to be able to be relevant to that member. So you know what. I might wanna do today. I might not be willing to do tomorrow and versa or you know. Maybe i have back pain now. So i'm not focused on my other chronic condition. So you know how can those digital applications really take all of that into account and provide people value at every point during the process. How do you second guess that. How do you figure that one out. That's that's a real challenge. Yeah in really. This is the advancement of what digital health is becoming we. Have you know all kinds of data that we can collect. A dario were collecting more than five billion. Data points a year across a variety of domains. Both passively inactivity and member input data and by being able to take that data and put it through a journey. Engine we really can use the data for a force of good and understand what the member is doing how they want to interact in what they're willing to do. And not do. And therefore adjust journey over a period of time or what we call dynamic personalization across the journey. Now dairy health has been working in this direct consumer space for seven years. Really at the beginning of this. You know personal mobile app. Revolution of of being able to use so many of these devices What are the various areas that you're able to provide support him. So is a digital therapeutic company. We started in diabetes and then expanded into hypertension and then expanded into prediabetes and weight management and recently added a musculoskeletal conditions as part of what we're managing and we're looking to continue to add Conditions that will be useful in our you know exist with the existing condition. So there's a a high level of people who have diabetes that also have hypertension for example and and roughly. A third of the people have diabetes. Have musculoskeletal issues as well. So it's the ability to really provide that integrated experience to members around that personalization piece now. I'm sorry i'm not familiar. What do you mean by muscular. Skeletal i asked. I didn't even say right. Yeah so a lot of times we think about that is Orthopedics so really what. It is pain. My i have lower back pain or you know. Maybe i'm out Being a weekend warrior. And i hurt my shoulder. Because i'm you know. I can't quite do anymore. My body can't quite do anymore. What my mind thinks it can do. And you know i i. I take it too far. And that generates pain so you know also paying can be generated by weight and the way that you know the posture that we sit in etc. So you know more sedentary lifestyles tend to have more. Msk pain or like. I said the weekend warriors associated with it so when we talk about musculoskeletal were primarily talking about pain that relates to the joints and the muscles. I think part of the importance here is that many of these things are related in for people so you could get something for weight management and get something for your pain. But they all come be integrated. Yeah you really have to address the whole person. i mean. the patients are really more than the sum of their conditions. And it's also the behaviors that play through. All of those things together so having an integrated approach is part of that personalization of four members and driving that value. Like i said you know people can move back and forth between what's their priority trying to manage my weight today. Or i worried about my glucose or you know i now have back pain in. That's becoming an issue for me. Well i'm really glad that you have a at dario health artificial intelligence who could live without it. But you have a secret. You have a secret here. It's not just about technology or a i You actually have people actual counselors. I think they might be real intelligence. There what the what are the cap counselors do well. It's really again. It's it's it's all of the pieces so it's the connected devices so we have Glucose monitors we have blood pressure monitors a we have sensors related to The musculoskeletal pain and range of motion. And things like that. And that gives you the biofeedback piece. And the i engine can help deliver and coach digitally but the other thing that it can do is really bring in coaches as you mentioned. And we have two types of coaches coaches that are primarily focused on engagement and teaching people how to utilize the information that they're getting and the application itself and then we have what we like to call. Clinical coaches in these would be the experts in the field. So dietitians nurses diabetes educators etc. That can help the members with particular issues that they have. And we use ai to both help those coaches and really kind of make them superhuman so help them understand. What's going on with those members. And then those coaches can add the personal touch and the empathy that is really missing from a completely digital solution and in what we see. Is the behavior changes. What happens when people are working with others that they believe care about them. And we believe that the coaches really can can drive that piece of the puzzle. This is very interesting this parallel effort. Because no matter. How good the coaches are. They can't just look at a couple of numbers and figure out what's going on. Hey i go into the depth of when and how an instruments being used how it how. It is in comparison to others. It can draw a picture that they're on to see some like you need both to be optimal and machines can think in many more dimensions in humans and recognize patterns that we don't recognize and serve that up in a way that we can use it to really add that human element back into the system. Now my hunch about this parallel humans and artificial intelligence real intelligence and artificial intelligence. Together a hunch. Do we have a way to measure. If the inclusion of the human element is more successful than leaving people literally.

Rick anderson seven years three months tomorrow more than five billion rick today both apple Both ninety days four members two types a year dario health artificial intell couple of numbers second guess north america one people
"therapeutic company" Discussed on Pivot

Pivot

05:50 min | Last month

"therapeutic company" Discussed on Pivot

"Competence and leadership doesn't hurt either And i'd like to think that's where we're going to gain out in the vaccine rollout scott last question. What would you like to see if you were to say. Let's stand on an optimistic note and obviously my sense is And i'm a glass half empty. Kind of guy andy. And my sense is we're crushing the curve. And i don't wanna use that as as excuse to not not to be relaxed but as motivation to put to put a stake in the heart of the saying but my sense is we are crushing the curve. What is your responded out. What's your sense right now So can't predict the future at all but it wouldn't be hard to imagine a bumpy spring a kind of smooth much better summer and then a question mark about the fall and winter. This goes to curious question about boosters is you know what do you have in terms of what pops up again In the terms of a variant. What is your do. What are you scared of. What keeps you up at night. Well these variants. That evade are antibodies and vaccines. Ar-kar bowl that. I don't care what people say people did expect. I know a couple people young who kept warning about them. And i didn't spend a lot of time listening to it. But it tells you that. A i'm way over the tips by skis here. But one of the things about this particular pandemic. That's different in one of the reasons why things don't weaken. Is we have these vectors. And these vectors are these asymptomatic people kids and otherwise that ad kinda like mosquitoes do in other diseases. And that actually acts as a buffer to prevent the disease from weakening So what this means is We will be playing could be playing scenario game with this now. I will in optimistic note as well scott. I spent a lot of time talking to the scientists research scientists. Ceo's of the pharmaceutical companies At the the therapeutic companies and all of them science will win. I do believe that they will be on their game. And whatever the throws us whether it's it's an ongoing set of mutants or whether it's You know whatever else. It is Science will arrest on. This is not gonna get the best of us so i think i think it's Near term. i don't think we're done. i think it. I think we're going to have some more tough. It'll be the meteor you're going to deal with next. That's the meteor hurdling towards earth. You know like that the meteor or someone someone wants i get it was it said it would. I wish i could take four is like global warming. There's no mask no vaccine like we have at least half asking a vaccine for this. There's other endemic problems Resistance to antibiotics right. Where's there's there's there's natural mask you can just throw on fix the problem and we weren't even willing to wear the masks so would it be fair to characterize it crudely as a race between vaccinations and the variants that that it it did. Vaccinations are i mean. It's who's gonna win here if if we've is isn't it really isn't a nightmare scenario that we kind of had meddling vaccination acceptance in distribution and give the variants a chance to avoid into more superbug so to speak. I think that's i think that's a fair characterization In general yeah we gotta we gotta take all our measures of which vaccines are most powerful one and overwhelmed us quickly and we can't do it in the. Us has spent this whole conversation talking about the us. And i'm hired by the us tax payers but I'll tell you that we have an administration that absolutely believes in two things one is. You've got to stamp this out everywhere. Yeah and second that we rich countries have a moral obligation to the rest of the world and and so we have to finish the job here and then we have to help the globe to make sure that we finished. we help. Every on the mountain we will end on that positive note and by the way and say hi to microsoft for me now estimate sunny during the summer. Someone just texted me But i wish you good luck you know. It would be really great for everyone who wants to get a vaccine to be able to. A lot of people are very enthusiastic about getting it and it's just it makes them feel hopeful in that it sounds silly but if you feel hopeful and then you get continually frustrated gets makes you not trust government and also makes you not it makes you wanna to cheat. You know what. I mean like for a brief second i was like i'm changing my birth date because of glitch in the system because i knew that's what was happening they they hadn't changed the dates and i thought no i can't do that. It's a lie but like it causes a discomfort from people who really do care and who've always done the right thing during this whole process and we should celebrate those people all those people anyway. Thank you so much. We really appreciate it. Good luck keep working really hard and they become exhausted and making sure appreciate it. Well that was good scott all right one.

microsoft earth two things one one of the reasons four second couple people things scott Ceo
"therapeutic company" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:16 min | 3 months ago

"therapeutic company" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Without food. All right. Thank you Want today? Thanks. Here, Tom Double Carl, the author of the divided era. And of course, you could go to his website, political vanguard dot com. And take out his his cheese. His writings almost ready. He's a He's a pretty famous dude, I can't wait to, you know, ride those coattails as I mentioned in his next artist, So here's the deal. So, uh, Gavin Newsom, the governor. The governor of California started this whole thing, and he started to talk about the social distance Thanksgiving or he tried to tell people what they couldn't couldn't do in their own homes. And soon and so forth, And that's a political argument to be sure, but really, what it comes down to is. I've got one daughter flying in from medical school. I've got another kid flying in from New York City. Got one daughter who is who's medically compromised? I've got my dad's 92. My mom's 81. It makes you think. Do we stop the Thanksgiving train? And yet you have to think about it, right? I give us for the sake of that for this that you could give us you know, like people. That's what look, I say for a year. Give it that. Let me tell you what I said to myself. I'm a really tested Thursday. Just so I could see you. At least I don't have it. So you guys make your own decision When you wanted a Thanksgiving out this year, 25 were here. Well, the current state of coded testing Really is. You're seeing it with the news of our journey today you saw with it is a visor last week. The real interesting one, though, is the anybody testing right? Remember. That's the one where they told you. You had Kobe trust right on will get it for a couple weeks. You can't get it for a while because it had John Hugh Miller is the CEO of a company called Axum. Biotechnology is one of the greatest parts of the show is you viewers email us in our producers Go out and hunt these guys down If you wanna hear from We have an email from someone who's a big fan of Johnson, His company. There are publicly traded on the stock symbol eight x. I am You can go Toe Axum Biotech comedies joins us here today in the big Bishop John, How are you, sir? Good to talk to you. I am good. And you guys good. Good. Let's talk about the current state of anybody testing because we're not where we were back in February or March. We got a handle on this. Don't wait. I mean, there are we Are we to the point Now? Where have we got? Everybody tested by Tuesday of will be able to go Thanksgiving on Thursday. Talk to us about the current state of the anybody testing as well as everything else. Well, we're certainly testing many, many more than we were, you know, six or eight months ago on a daily basis. Now those tests are really just to see whether or not you know the PCR test whether or not you have the virus or not, And if you do then Obviously gotta quarantine And if if you had the virus and you've gotten over it, we've developed a new test for neutralizing anti bodies. For people who have recovered from from the disease. Let's talk about that. And so actually biotechnology's You are a real bio form a biotech company, and when you talk about neutralizing antibodies, does that mean for the rest of us that aren't in the lab assistant? I mean saving anybody's for later they could be used for other things. Freeze my talk about we will specifically. Well, not all anti bodies are created equal, and what we found is that people who have gotten over the disease as many as a third of them do not make neutralizing antibodies. Neutralizing antibodies, in our opinion is the only anti bodies that make any any difference because they can actually stop the virus from entering into your ear cells. Um And we've developed his house, which measures on Lee neutralizing antibodies, and therefore, you know, we can tell how many of those you have or what quantity you have of them. Whether or not you're safe to go to school or the baseball game or or and you mentioned other uses, You know, certainly Convalescent plasma is not being used widespread for people who have got the disease where they give him plasma from somebody who's gotten over it. So here's what So my question is this? So you're at the tip of the spear here I want And I do want to talk about your mask, which is really they got a first ever mask that could capture the covert 19 virus within the mask. They've got oncology research or try to get everything but I have to ask you. How do you think we're doing as a country in this year of the tip of the spear? You're right in the middle list. Now. I mean, there's a lot of rhetoric that you hear from the news. How are we really doing? And obviously what you guys were doing An accent is pretty significant letter grade on. How are you? It's a letter grade e. I mean, how are we doing in the country? I think we're think we're okay. I mean, there's really what are you gonna do about an airborne disease? It is the size of a you know a micron so it can stay in here for hours. It's going to it is obviously widespread, but another. We've come up with other other cures, quote unquote or other drugs, monoclonal antibodies and and Other drugs, which can neutralize that virus from entering into yourself or making a lot easier for you to get over it and not have to go to the hospital and end up on an interrogator. I think we're in a much better position than we were when this fire's first came out. Hey, let's talk about your mask. You guys, the other acts a mask that is the captain. It's the first ever and I'm assuming that there's some I Pierre surrounding and talk about what you guys were doing there. Yes, so we developed we found for a patent for the Mass. We haven't developed any masks. We've merely been testing existing masks. What we do is we spray a virus binding protein unto the mask and let it drive. That's what actually captures the virus. When it comes into body on DSA we're doing the exact same thing is is that it's the south in your body where the stars Kobe, too, is coming in. We were able to capture they bind together like magnets and a refrigerator and it's not going anywhere and then you know the virus dies. 100, Tom, So And how is you guys closer here is close to having that in place. And what kind of what kind of FDA approves? Yeah, definitely. We're trying to work through the FDA Does it on What do the Dolby thing That's what John Humility is the CEO of Accent biotechnology portrait to have love to have you back. Also, you guys are oncology research company had a lot of discoveries, private pivoting. Covert 19. I gotta I gotta say that was, you know a solid management move when you saw an opportunity had to fill that opportunity. Also, it's you know, a bit altruistic. But talk to us about the company because obviously you had to move on a dime on that, but it doesn't dilute what you were doing previously. Yes, I mean, we had been a non ecology focused diagnostic as well as a therapeutic company was some some therapeutic that we license from the male clinic and Arizona State University and we were awarded a grant by the National Cancer Institute to develop analog is to that drug that we licensed and we.

Tom Double Carl Kobe CEO Gavin Newsom FDA Toe Axum Biotech California New York City John Hugh Miller Arizona State University baseball Accent biotechnology Axum Johnson Bishop John Lee John Humility National Cancer Institute
"therapeutic company" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:57 min | 3 months ago

"therapeutic company" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"What do the Dolby thing That's what John Humility is the CEO of Accent biotechnology portrait. They have love to have you back. Also, you guys are oncology research company. A lot of discoveries, private pivoting. Covert 19. I gotta I gotta say that was, you know a solid management move when you saw an opportunity had to fill that opportunity. Also, it's you know, it's a bit altruistic. But talk to us about the company because obviously you had to move on a dime on that, but it doesn't dilute what you were doing previously. Yes, I mean, we had been a non ecology focused diagnostic as well as a therapeutic company with some some therapeutic that we license from male clinic and Arizona State University and we were awarded a grant by the National Cancer Institute to develop analog is to that drug that we licensed and we continue to do that. But our expertise is really in the rapid diagnostic testing, and that's where we came from the expertise of being able to do that. In a very simple little lateral flow test. You know about the size of a pregnancy Aston and with a drop of blood, you know, in 10 minutes we can tell whether or not you have neutralizing antibodies, and this is a point of care. It's extremely inexpensive compared to drying blood and taking thousands of those to the lab and skinning them and eccentric. So you know we're very excited about our rapid diagnostic tests and Look forward to getting into market. What's next for you guys got going? You know you got a weird 2020. We gotta assume that point this big giant ugly Kuti is gonna go away sometime in 2021. How do you thought he has a CEO of a publicly traded company? How do you plan when you can't really plan Well, you know the key with this with this test for neutralizing antibodies. That's really the vaccines that are just starting to come up all of these vaccines you need. You need to be tested 30 days later, 60 days, 90 days, another protocols. They're end points for all there for the vaccine.

CEO Kuti Accent biotechnology John Humility Arizona State University National Cancer Institute
"therapeutic company" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

06:59 min | 5 months ago

"therapeutic company" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Out his cheese. His, uh, writing someone. He's a pretty famous dude, I can't wait to, you know, ride those coattails as I mentioned in his next artist, So here's the deal. So, uh, Gavin Newsom, the governor. The governor of California started this whole thing. And he started to talk about the social distance Thanksgiving, where he tried to tell people what they couldn't couldn't do in their own homes and so on and so forth, And that's a political argument. To be sure, but really, what it comes down to is. I've got one daughter flying in from medical school. I've got another kid flying in from New York City. I got, um one daughter who is who's medically compromised. I've got my dad's 92. My mom's 81. It makes you think Do we stop the Thanksgiving train? And yet you have to think about it right now. Given us for the sake of that for this, that you could give us you know, like people. That's what look, I say for a year. Give it a test. Let me tell you what I said to myself. I'm gonna be tested Thursday. Just so I could see you. At least I don't have it. So you guys make your own decision When you wanted a Thanksgiving out this year, 20 points were well. The current state of covert testing really is you're seeing it with the news of our journey today you saw with the news defies her last week. The real interesting one, though. Is the anybody testing right and member? That's the one where they told you. You had Kobe trusts right on will get it for a couple weeks. Right? You can't get it for a while because ahead. Uh, Jon Hue Miller is the CEO of a company called Axum. Biotechnology is one of the greatest parts of the show is you viewers email us in our producers got hunt these guys down if you want to hear from We have an email from someone who's a big fan of Johnson, His company. There are publicly traded on the stock symbol eight x. I am You could go toe Axum Biotech comedies joins us here today in the big fish. Oh, John, How are you, sir? Good to talk to you. I am good. And you guys good. Good. Let's talk about the current state of anybody testing because we're not where we were back in February or March. We got a handle on this. Don't wait. I mean, there are we Are we to the point Now where we get everybody tested by Tuesday of will be able to go Thanksgiving. Our Thursday talk to us about the current state of the anybody testing as well as everything else. Well, we're certainly testing many, many more than we were, you know, six or eight months ago on a daily basis. Now, those tests were really just to see whether or not you know the PCR test whether or not you have the virus or not, And if you do then Obviously gotta quarantine And if if you had the virus and you've gotten over it, we've developed a new test for neutralizing antibodies. For people who have recovered from from the disease. Let's talk about that. And so Axl Biotechnology's You are a real bio form a biotech company. And when you talk about neutralizing antibodies, does that mean for the rest of us that are in the lab business? I mean, saving anybody's for later they could be used for other things. Freeze my talk about with me specifically. Well, not all anti bodies are created equal and what we found is that people who have gotten over the disease Aziz, many as a third of them do not make neutralizing antibodies. Neutralizing antibodies, in our opinion is the only anti bodies to make any any difference because they can actually stop the virus from entering into your your cells. Um, can we've developed this house, which measures on Lee neutralizing antibodies, and therefore we can tell how many of those you have or what quantity you have of them. Whether or not you're safe to go to school or the baseball game or or and you mentioned as abuses, you know, certainly Convalescent Plasma is not being used widespread for people who've got the disease where they've given plasma from somebody who's gotten over it. So here's what's so my question. Is this? So you're the tip of the spear here? And I do want to talk about your mask, which is really they got a first ever Mass that could capture the covert 19 virus within the mask. They've got oncology research will try to get everything but I have to ask you. How do you think we're doing as a country in this year of the tip of the spear? You're right. The middle list now. I mean, there's a lot of rhetoric that you hear from the news. How are we really doing? And obviously what you guys were doing An accent is pretty significant letter grade on the house. It was a letter grade. E mean, how are we doing in the country? I think we're I think we're okay. I mean, there's really what are you gonna do about an airborne disease? It is the size of a micron so it can stay in here for hours. It's going to it is obviously widespread, but another. We've come up with other other cures, quote unquote or other drugs, Monoclonal antibodies and Other drugs, which can neutralize that virus from entering into yourself or making a lot easier for you to get over it and not have to go to the hospital end up on a ninja gator. I think we're in a much better position than we were when the spires first came out here, Let's talk about your mask. You guys have the ax a mask. That is the captain. It's the first ever and I'm assuming that there's some I Pierre surrounding and talk about what you guys are doing it. Yes, so we developed we found for a patent for the Mass. We haven't developed any masks. We've merely been testing existing masks. What we do is we spray a virus binding protein onto the mask and let it drive. That's what actually captures the virus. When it comes into body on DSA we're doing the exact same thing is is if it's the south in your body, where that that stars Kobe, too, is coming in. We were able to capture it. They find together like magnets that a refrigerator and it's not going anywhere and then you know the virus dies on its own. So and how is it? You guys closer here is close to having that in place. And what kind of what kind of FDA approves? Yes, Definitely. We're trying to work through the FDA. Was it on What do the Dolby thing That's what John Humility is the CEO of accent by the technology of Fortune to have love to have you back. Also, you guys heard Oncology research company had a lot of discoveries priority pivoting to cope in 19. I gotta I gotta say that was, you know a solid management move when you saw an opportunity had to fill that opportunity. Also, it's you know, it's a bit altruistic. But talk to us about the company because Obviously you had to move on on a dime on that, but it doesn't dilute what you were doing Previously. Yes, I mean, we had been a non ecology focused diagnostic as well as ah therapeutic company with some some therapeutic that we license from male clinic and Arizona State University and we were awarded a grant by.

Kobe John Humility CEO Gavin Newsom California New York City FDA Axum Biotech Arizona State University baseball Axl Biotechnology Jon Hue Miller Axum Johnson Fortune Aziz Convalescent Plasma
"therapeutic company" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:02 min | 5 months ago

"therapeutic company" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Testing on that. We've got tremendous test. You know, we really don't want to become a Let's say a mask manufacturer. So you know, we're trying to find some manufacturers out. We can look through the Dolby thing. That's why John Hugh Miller is the CEO of accent, biotechnology and fortunate to have him I'd love to have you back also, you guys run oncology research company had a lot of discoveries priority pivoting to cope in 19. I got it. I got to say that was, you know a solid management move. You saw an opportunity had to fill that opportunity. Also, it's you know, it's a bit altruistic. But talk to us about the company because obviously you have to move on a dime on that, but doesn't dilute what you were doing previously. Yes, honey, we had been a non ecology focused diagnostic as well as ah, Therapeutic company was some some therapeutic that we license from male clinic and Arizona State University and we were awarded a grant by the National Cancer Institute to develop analog to that drug that we licensed and we continue to do that. But our expertise is really in the rapid diagnostic testing, and that's where we came from the expertise of being able to do that. In a very simple little lateral flow test. You know about the size of a pregnancy test and and with a drop of blood, you know, in 10 minutes we can tell whether or not you have neutralizing antibodies on this is a point of care. It's extremely inexpensive compared to drying blood and taking thousands of those to the lab and spinning them. And so you know, we're very excited about our rapid diagnostic tests and look forward to getting it to market. What's next for you guys got going? You know you gotta wait. 2020, and we got to assume that some point this big giant ugly cooties gonna go away sometime in 2021. How do you think he has a CEO of a publicly traded company? How do you plan when you can't really plan Well, here's the key. With this with this cast for neutralizing antibodies is really the vaccines that are just starting to come out. All of these vaccines you need. You need to be tested 30 days later, 60 days, 90 days, another protocols. They're end points for all their you know, for the vaccine themselves. Require six different blood tests, and that's extremely difficult and expensive to do. And we believe that this is the only way that it can be done with millions and hundreds of millions of people who are going to get that vaccine because you need to know whether or not that vaccine is. You need another poster shot like the flu every year, or you're where you're neutralizing antibodies are. Yeah, that Z. That's it. That's a test of your pocket there, But that is Hey, Tom. Will you come back with us at some point really interesting stuff. And I appreciate you taking that. Time out with us. We'd love to see it. See again and perhaps even get you a studio here. John Humility is the CEO of a company called Axum Biotechnology's. They are publicly traded under the socks. Symbol eight X. I am and you can also go to their website. Axum Biotech calm. That's good news. I Yeah, I'm developing in a spray just walking in the room, You know, like a C s I just whatever we had that guy who.

CEO John Hugh Miller Axum Biotech Axum Biotechnology Therapeutic company flu John Humility Arizona State University National Cancer Institute Tom
"therapeutic company" Discussed on a16z

a16z

05:56 min | 10 months ago

"therapeutic company" Discussed on a16z

"Today's episode covers the topic of Digital. Therapeutics given that earlier this month. The FDA approved its first ever prescription video game. And since this is journal, club, we go into one of the key clinical trials, underpinning this historic decision published recently in Lancet digital health by Scott Collins and colleagues, which evaluated this games ability to improve attention and kids with attention, deficit, hyperactivity, disorder, or adhd. Are Sister podcast. Sixteen minutes on the news also covered this topic debating the bigger picture. Questions of what is an isn't a digital therapeutic and where pricing and regulation comes in. You can find that episode at a Sixteen Zero Dot. com forward slash sixteen minutes. A sixteen. Biodiesel Team Partner Former MD entrepreneur. Justin Larkin joins me in this discussion where we cover the pros and cons of this video game compared to traditional pharmacological therapies. The game specifically targets the attention impairments in twelve year. Olds by having them help an Avatar navigate digital environment in the face of other distractions. We also discussed how the randomized controlled clinical trial or are. CT was designed the limitations of the study and the open questions to be addressed. Will you begin with what question this paper answers? Video game via digital therapeutic and I think this paper resoundingly answers that question of yes, a video game target, a specific mechanism of action can have advocacy to cross that threshold of being considered at their pubic, but then I think more importantly is. Can this specific video game have an impact on a child with Adhd? To the point where it could be considered a tool in the toolkit of physician, treating this patient and I would argue the resounding answer from this is certainly this is considered, both because it there's an obvious benefit, but also the risks associated with it proved to be pretty minimal. There's plenty more research to be done, but I think this does a great job at answering that in the subsequent FDA decision just went on to reinforce study further. My favorite part of the paper was getting to watch that supplemental file, showing the kids video game and see what the kid seems and being able to connect that to kind of the goals of the game. If you're to watch that video outside of. The context of knowing that this was coming from a digital therapeutic company or clinical trial. You probably wouldn't know that it was a digital therapeutic. You'd probably think it was any other game that our kids are playing these days, but I think the opportunity for digital therapeutics that creates an environment where a therapeutic can actually be enjoyable, can actually be entertaining, and the really cool thing about this program is that it learns it's able to know what the kids ability is, and then Taylor the game, and how hard it is based on how quickly they pick it up and it's always responding to that level of engagement as a kid learns to adopt those skills. If you think about nutritional therapeutic lake uphill. There's opportunity for real time iteration of the therapeutic. There's no ability to say hey. This person is responding great, so we're going to cut the sing off. This person isn't responding, so let's up titrate the dose. Where in the game there's this ability in real time to iterative on how the person's experiencing that there. Yeah. I've known kids with ADHD and some days. They have good days and some days. They have days where it's more difficult being able to have that happen. Real time seems really appropriate for this type of condition. I think it's a really great match. Between kind of underlying mechanism, underlying patient characteristics in the method of delivery of the therapeutic, so there's proof of concept evidence from previous studies. This therapeutic video game can help kids with Adhd, but this particular study really test that hypothesis with sophisticated and careful clinical trial design, so let's dig in now to some of the important details of the study, the built upon the pita studies by having truly randomized controlled trials. So this is where there's a control group women interventional group getting <unk> developed intervention, but then also importantly, all of the researchers involved were blinded to the intervention. Of Selves and the patients themselves are blinded to whether in the intervention group or not, so the control group also got a video game, and it was a word search game that it also learned was also rewarding, and also had a lot of the same kind of game design elements, but that video games doesn't target those same pathways that are issues. ADHD, an important is also used a method called the intention to treat meaning all of the people that were initially stratified into the two groups were included in a statistical analysis, regardless of whether they completed or not so really meeting at the top level criteria what it means to be a rigorous are ct for therapy. Yeah. This study is pre registered, and so the idea behind Predrag distraction. Is that you as a researcher? Lay Out exactly what you're going to do before you ever do the study how you're going to collect the data how you're going to analyze that data, and importantly you determined to be a significant outcome before you look at any of the data and that really help prevent that kind of post talk. We looked at the data. We see this as significant. Therefore, this is important. You're saying from the start. This is important and will only know if our study is successful if it meets this particular endpoint. To Study Island, importance of having got foresight in the design, but also another thing that was interesting in the study was the choice of outcome metrics traditionally adhd research. A lot of the outcomes have been focused on the number of different metrics and batteries of surveys, subjective measures to assess symptoms of adhd whereas this particular study use a measure called the Tova Api. That's Te'o via API, which is really focused on assessing objectively attention. They picked an outcome that really got out. Some of the core impairment comes along with Adhd and then a lot of circumstances is equated with some of the challenges. Kids have in the classroom and other settings.

ADHD FDA Taylor
Therapeutic Video Game on Trial

a16z

05:56 min | 10 months ago

Therapeutic Video Game on Trial

"Today's episode covers the topic of Digital. Therapeutics given that earlier this month. The FDA approved its first ever prescription video game. And since this is journal, club, we go into one of the key clinical trials, underpinning this historic decision published recently in Lancet digital health by Scott Collins and colleagues, which evaluated this games ability to improve attention and kids with attention, deficit, hyperactivity, disorder, or adhd. Are Sister podcast. Sixteen minutes on the news also covered this topic debating the bigger picture. Questions of what is an isn't a digital therapeutic and where pricing and regulation comes in. You can find that episode at a Sixteen Zero Dot. com forward slash sixteen minutes. A sixteen. Biodiesel Team Partner Former MD entrepreneur. Justin Larkin joins me in this discussion where we cover the pros and cons of this video game compared to traditional pharmacological therapies. The game specifically targets the attention impairments in twelve year. Olds by having them help an Avatar navigate digital environment in the face of other distractions. We also discussed how the randomized controlled clinical trial or are. CT was designed the limitations of the study and the open questions to be addressed. Will you begin with what question this paper answers? Video game via digital therapeutic and I think this paper resoundingly answers that question of yes, a video game target, a specific mechanism of action can have advocacy to cross that threshold of being considered at their pubic, but then I think more importantly is. Can this specific video game have an impact on a child with Adhd? To the point where it could be considered a tool in the toolkit of physician, treating this patient and I would argue the resounding answer from this is certainly this is considered, both because it there's an obvious benefit, but also the risks associated with it proved to be pretty minimal. There's plenty more research to be done, but I think this does a great job at answering that in the subsequent FDA decision just went on to reinforce study further. My favorite part of the paper was getting to watch that supplemental file, showing the kids video game and see what the kid seems and being able to connect that to kind of the goals of the game. If you're to watch that video outside of. The context of knowing that this was coming from a digital therapeutic company or clinical trial. You probably wouldn't know that it was a digital therapeutic. You'd probably think it was any other game that our kids are playing these days, but I think the opportunity for digital therapeutics that creates an environment where a therapeutic can actually be enjoyable, can actually be entertaining, and the really cool thing about this program is that it learns it's able to know what the kids ability is, and then Taylor the game, and how hard it is based on how quickly they pick it up and it's always responding to that level of engagement as a kid learns to adopt those skills. If you think about nutritional therapeutic lake uphill. There's opportunity for real time iteration of the therapeutic. There's no ability to say hey. This person is responding great, so we're going to cut the sing off. This person isn't responding, so let's up titrate the dose. Where in the game there's this ability in real time to iterative on how the person's experiencing that there. Yeah. I've known kids with ADHD and some days. They have good days and some days. They have days where it's more difficult being able to have that happen. Real time seems really appropriate for this type of condition. I think it's a really great match. Between kind of underlying mechanism, underlying patient characteristics in the method of delivery of the therapeutic, so there's proof of concept evidence from previous studies. This therapeutic video game can help kids with Adhd, but this particular study really test that hypothesis with sophisticated and careful clinical trial design, so let's dig in now to some of the important details of the study, the built upon the pita studies by having truly randomized controlled trials. So this is where there's a control group women interventional group getting developed intervention, but then also importantly, all of the researchers involved were blinded to the intervention. Of Selves and the patients themselves are blinded to whether in the intervention group or not, so the control group also got a video game, and it was a word search game that it also learned was also rewarding, and also had a lot of the same kind of game design elements, but that video games doesn't target those same pathways that are issues. ADHD, an important is also used a method called the intention to treat meaning all of the people that were initially stratified into the two groups were included in a statistical analysis, regardless of whether they completed or not so really meeting at the top level criteria what it means to be a rigorous are ct for therapy. Yeah. This study is pre registered, and so the idea behind Predrag distraction. Is that you as a researcher? Lay Out exactly what you're going to do before you ever do the study how you're going to collect the data how you're going to analyze that data, and importantly you determined to be a significant outcome before you look at any of the data and that really help prevent that kind of post talk. We looked at the data. We see this as significant. Therefore, this is important. You're saying from the start. This is important and will only know if our study is successful if it meets this particular endpoint. To Study Island, importance of having got foresight in the design, but also another thing that was interesting in the study was the choice of outcome metrics traditionally adhd research. A lot of the outcomes have been focused on the number of different metrics and batteries of surveys, subjective measures to assess symptoms of adhd whereas this particular study use a measure called the Tova Api. That's Te'o via API, which is really focused on assessing objectively attention. They picked an outcome that really got out. Some of the core impairment comes along with Adhd and then a lot of circumstances is equated with some of the challenges. Kids have in the classroom and other settings.

Adhd FDA Sixteen Zero Dot. Study Island Researcher Scott Collins Mechanism Of Action Biodiesel Team Partner Former Justin Larkin Taylor
"therapeutic company" Discussed on a16z

a16z

03:52 min | 10 months ago

"therapeutic company" Discussed on a16z

"Both because it there's an obvious benefit, but also the risks associated with it proved to be pretty minimal. There's plenty more research to be done, but I think this does a great job at answering that in the subsequent FDA decision just went on to reinforce study further. My favorite part of the paper was getting to watch that supplemental file, showing the kids video game and see what the kid seems and being able to connect that to kind of the goals of the game. If you're to watch that video outside of. The context of knowing that this was coming from a digital therapeutic company or clinical trial. You probably wouldn't know that it was a digital therapeutic. You'd probably think it was any other game that our kids are playing these days, but I think the opportunity for digital therapeutics that creates an environment where a therapeutic can actually be enjoyable, can actually be entertaining, and the really cool thing about this program is that it learns it's able to know what the kids ability is, and then Taylor the game, and how hard it is based on how quickly they pick it up and it's always responding to that level of engagement as a kid learns to adopt those skills. If you think about nutritional therapeutic lake uphill. There's opportunity for real time iteration of the therapeutic. There's no ability to say hey. This person is responding great, so we're going to cut the sing off. This person isn't responding, so let's up titrate the dose. Where in the game there's this ability in real time to iterative on how the person's experiencing that there. Yeah. I've known kids with ADHD and some days. They have good days and some days. They have days where it's more difficult being able to have that happen. Real time seems really appropriate for this type of condition. I think it's a really great match. Between kind of underlying mechanism, underlying patient characteristics in the method of delivery of the therapeutic, so there's proof of concept evidence from previous studies. This therapeutic video game can help kids with Adhd, but this particular study really test that hypothesis with sophisticated and careful clinical trial design, so let's dig in now to some of the important details of the study, the built upon the pita studies by having truly randomized controlled trials. So this is where there's a control group women interventional group getting developed intervention, but then also importantly, all of the researchers involved were blinded to the intervention. Of Selves and the patients themselves are blinded to whether in the intervention group or not, so the control group also got a video game, and it was a word search game that it also learned was also rewarding, and also had a lot of the same kind of game design elements, but that video games doesn't target those same pathways that are issues. ADHD, an important is also used a method called the intention to treat meaning all of the people that were initially stratified into the two groups were included in a statistical analysis, regardless of whether they completed or not so really meeting.

ADHD FDA Taylor
"therapeutic company" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"therapeutic company" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Nineteen the members of our community are doing so much to help. Combat this disease and It just was a great opportunity to put together some resources for them to share with you. What they're doing to help you come at it to help your patients combat it or to help your employees and the people that you serve most combat Cova Nineteen Albion. Joy The series. And if you feel like you have an opportunity to contribute to this series. Go to outcomes rocket dot health slash Cova nineteen natural. You'll find these interviews the show notes and also an opportunity to collaborate. Thanks and I hope you enjoy. Welcome back to the outcomes rocket saw Marquez. Here and you know what today I have a treat for you my friend Paul Grand. He's the founder and CEO of medic innovator has a very special event happening April twenty ninth. That's Wednesday April twenty nine it's a virtual event and I have 'em here to give you the details about what it's about and why you should be there so Paul why don't you go ahead and take it away? Welcome thank you saw a great to be back. so Let me give you a quick quick version of what we're doing here said sound good. Sounds Great and and and folks by the way a little a little background on Paul Metric. Innovators extraordinary They're doing so much for MED. Tech innovative companies matching a strategic with companies have promised and Just a lot of great things happening. We had the privilege of going to WANNA pause events in in Chicago. I was so impressed. With with the work that he and his team are doomed there Just just just incredible work. And now they're offering this virtual meeting for free so Paul Take us through what it is and why people should attend. Thanks all so Med Tech Innovator as you mentioned is a company that is focused entirely on improving the lives of patients by accelerating medical innovation. We really are not regionally tied anywhere so even though we're based in Los Angeles we're looking fine. The most important medical innovation in terms of technology that we really think can bend the cost curve and improve outcomes and make sure those technologies successfully reach patients and And that's our entire mission you know. We're a nonprofit and this is what we do all day every day and of course Right in the middle of our road tour where we saw you not too long ago feels like a very long time ago in some ways but regular that road toward covert hit and We immediately switched doing online. Pitch Events and Of course given that were kind of right in the middle of a lot of things that are happening in the medical innovation space. We thought it would be a really important to take pause and focus on Kovic nineteen specifically because we've got some amazing companies in our portfolio. We as you know. We have two hundred fifty eight alumni for med tech innovators programs and we also have two hundred companies that we were in the middle of seeing in person now been seeing online. As part of this year's pitch cycle out of over a thousand companies you applied so The Cova companies the ones that were going to be featuring tomorrow April twenty ninth Our companies in our portfolio or who? We'd already met as part of our our road to our this year Who have a Kobe? Nineteen application that they are either already. Deploying were can rapidly deploy And that was out of about eighty companies that had a Kobe related solution So we pick sixteen those to be part of a special event. We're going to do tomorrow in partnership with Barda. Wow that's pretty cool. So sixteen. Companies that have a covert nineteen application that could potentially help caregivers payers providers employers the right. That's right we want to. We want to make a difference in you know these companies are out there doing that already or are soon to be doing that and just like you know. Everything Med. Take a meter. We WanNa give them the best chance of success that we possibly can so You know the the goal is to get these technologies out there And if they're already out there to help them scale well super awesome. Paul I you know I. It's Tuesday right. It's Tuesday evening right now and so if you're listening to this and it's still Tuesday. The twenty eighth The Meanings tomorrow morning. And and but if you're listening to this after the fact after the meaning already happened. Paul is their way for them to livestream. After like I guess you know. Wouldn't it be livestream but is there going to be a way for them to catch it on the back end or is it only available when it's happening now? A good question Saul so yes you can either livestream it from med tech innovator dot org slash Kobe Either live or later. Either one will be just fine. The event is tomorrow April. Twenty ninth it. Starting at ten thirty am eastern time. Seven thirty A. M. Pacific And it's going to be the holy band is actually Three hours but the part that will be available to the public is only less than an hour. It's probably about forty minutes. Forty five minutes in total. It's going to be an intro by me. as well as One of the team members from Barda. Which is the biomedical advanced. Research and Development Authority the Agency. Who was Stood Up to develop medical countermeasures for bio hazards in particular relevance in this current pandemic the right in the middle of getting vaccines and Tests Diagnostics developed. So that we can really make a difference So Baras doing this with us. And we're going to have about eighty judges who will be participating to give feedback. I call them judges by by habit. But it's really more about experts so people can actually provide feedback and we'll have people from all sorts of Corporations like Johnson Johnson Baxter those kinds of corporations but also People from the VA and from other hospital systems. obviously HHS and others but the idea is to give people feedback and if you're somebody out there who has a resource that could help One of these companies so these are diagnostic Remote Care Therapeutic companies in some cases That are specifically focused With applications for Kobe. You're somebody who's either on the front lines. You're somebody who manages people who run the front lines If you're caring for patients in any way or involved in that You could help these companies so we love you to go to that site. Med Tech innovator dot org slash Kobe nineteen You'll see a list of all the companies that are participating contact information for them and the ability to reach out and most importantly kind of what they're looking for because all these companies have some kind of an ask so you know I'm hoping that A moment saw that we get some people to To go participate in addition to the ones we're gonNA have participating already. You know any of those people in your huge audience who are involved in caring for patients you know. We hope they.

Paul Kobe Med Tech Innovator founder and CEO Cova Paul Metric Paul Grand Los Angeles Chicago Marquez Johnson Johnson Baxter Saul VA Barda Kovic A. M. Pacific Tests Diagnostics HHS Remote Care Therapeutic
"therapeutic company" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

11:38 min | 1 year ago

"therapeutic company" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Twitter at jumbo talks well it now appears that possibly April could be the make or break month for all of this as Jim group reports now as the president has said this is going to be a very painful very very painful two weeks other elected leaders across the nation saying the same thing California governor Gavin Newsom says this is the month that could send hospitals in the state over the edge unless people strictly stick to the spread prevention guidelines it's really a civic moment meaning it's up to us as Los Angeles county supervisor Kathryn Barger says we all have a duty to change the trajectory of this pandemic I'm always I'm cautiously optimistic that the safer at home is working but I don't want to let our guard down I believe that April is going to be important to to insure that we slow down the spread and so to me that is a make or break but not not in the way that some people may perceive it I mean I really do believe that we have the opportunity to flatten the curve he says so far the numbers do look like the social distancing measures are working but it's still too early to tell the number of cases and deaths continue to rise all the more says San Diego county public health director Dr Joe Wilson Friel we stick to those strict guidelines he sketches out and sort of US six degrees of coronavirus scenario as to what the domino effect of defying the mandate could mean if your son thinks often visits his girlfriend and then you later sneak over to have coffee the neighbor then your neighbor is now connected to the infected office worker that the sons of girlfriend's mother shook hands with the pandemic has not peaked yet in the U. S. the sooner the peak the quicker to the other side and the path to that is through washing hands physical distancing and common sense gym group Los Angeles let's talk about that tonight with the repeat guests that retired Air Force veteran colonel Randy Larsen joins us and he has now for fifty years been the national security adviser at the Johns Hopkins center for health security and Randy thank you for being with us tonight always you won't well I'm curious about your thoughts about this a make or break month that we're hearing about it again it the the certainly the peak may yet occur in different places at different times but that the overall to the extent that you can generalize nationwide about this virus April looks to be pretty critical yeah I I have an article come out on Sundays called in nationals you talk about I was trying to try to put it in perspective from my experience in national security business and I as I say it into that article I did you know April nineteen forty three was a very very long well the Merica and I think April twenty twenty is going to be equally dark completely different type of enemy an invisible enemy yeah that article by the way is this quite does something good to read and just what the hell is this is from the National Review dot com and Randy did in fact a quote the end of his article here's how it began I remember the first time I thought about World War three it was October twenty second nineteen sixty two as president John Kennedy address the nation about the unmistakable evidence of nuclear tipped Soviet missiles in Cuba my dad whispered to my mom this may be World War three and of course as the we all know now thankfully you're father and many other fathers were wrong but you draw some amazing parallels not only between the potential of World War three and where we are but the actual very real very tragic World War two and where we are end up much as been made about the greatest generation correctly so for surviving and overcoming the greatest economic downturn in history of the greatest war in history I'm not sure that that we will ever have that opportunity we have this generation but we can certainly improve our credentials a great deal right now yes Sir and you know I I I talked about how you know that was all of the nation was involved incarnation was mobilized back there my mother father aunts and uncles you know twelve million served in uniform but you know I think if every man woman and child who's involved in one way or another and but you know after we talked many times since nine eleven but you know after nine eleven president bush told us you know go back to the mall can go shopping and you know exact time right after nine eleven I think that was a great advice because we couldn't let nineteen terrorist you know bring down our economy but frankly in the war on terrorism that's gone on since nine eleven you know very small percentage of the U. S. population was really involved in you know I my assessment is about less than one percent of our population less than one percent and the military folks and their families have suffered a great deal but most Americans have have not for one reason or another but this is different this is back through World War two for America all families are are going to be involved in this and we have to look at it that way we are all participants like it or not and actions that not only our national state local leaders are going to be making but what we as citizens who will make a big difference M. yeah in winning this war I'm confident we'll win but it's not gonna be easy there are a lot of course upsides to all of this but I think you've touched on one and that is that the war on terror has been largely a war fought by them and that has been our attitude J. those the wonderful troops of ours who we at least for a brief period of time would stand up and applaud in airports VA are defending us it's not that we would ever get our hands so dirty and bloody and sweaty but we're glad that they are we treated them a lot like frankly honored mercenaries we had no bird no no no no they did that all the people who couldn't get out of military service and whatever else you can say about the tragedy that we now have it is no longer the A. everybody's in this yep and M. the eight that includes their families and that's often overlooked but now it's all of our families are involved you know and so the question is how will we do it you know we are we we have seen some people doing a better job than others about the following the guidelines we should be following and you know I am in one of those what they call the high risk group so my wife Tonya is kinda had me locked down and and for people in the higher risk groups that's the best thing but most of us we have to maintain that social districts we do not have a vaccine and anybody said logical I'm kind of optimistic god most of time but I'm down your two years would be more accurate braking normally it takes us ten years or more we come up with a new vaccine our best hope for a medical countermeasures will be very therapeutic companies take after we get sick and there's a lot of them out there that are in the past and some looking promising and back could be a big game changer our biggest problem right now low is back in military terms we don't have much situational awareness right now and and no general from you know going to go back to Alexander the great or whatever you have to have situational awareness on the battlefield and we don't have a lot we are way behind where we should be work acting up there's some player but I will K. yeah I have a family member who got sick went into the doctor last Saturday and they gave him he had a fever and a cough and they gave him the full text which you can get instantly virtually at the box office that was negative they gave him a test for strep throat that was instant and negative so they gave him the culprit nineteen tastic first one that came out of CDC that was Saturday this is Thursday night he still doesn't have the results how can you fight a war with Iraq kind of situational awareness while straight away to my own question not very well not very well indeed a one eight six six five oh Jimbo is our number and colonel Randy Larsen is our guest and we have a call from Kelly in mix of Missouri hi Kelly hi thank you for taking my call I just want to say this you know just like the people and Cuba the missiles and all that was going on and they thought that it was World War three I'm one of those that are firm believers that with this contagion they came out of Wuhan which actually has a biological research center that uses these these type of things for research for weaponry I truly believe this was an attack from China and I truly believe that based on my assumption that that's the case that it's becoming even more clear that our government starting to look at whether this is in our atmosphere and everything else I think something got out of that little laboratory and I think they intentionally did it because I think that that matters are president for stepping on them costing them a lot of money and they know that we care about our people when they don't well when you look at that first of all yes indeed drive is a very big place over three million square miles about the size of the continental U. S. of this outbreak did begin just down the road from that research center having said that if this was a an attack by the Chinese it certainly was a sloppy attack because they lost tens of billions of dollars of worth of their economy not to mention of course a few lives so it's really was very well executed if it was an attack Randy Larson yeah you know I I had no evidence whatsoever of that I know people talk about that news find all kinds of things going on the internet I have said for years and have a lot of people in my field that there are three sort of pandemics that I have been concerned about them I thought the country should be better prepared for one of them is an attack by mother nature like we get from you know influence your every year or sars virus or Ebola whatever one would be one from terrorists like al Qaeda or whatever and then there's one about an accidental release from one of those type of facilities I myself and it's just ready Larson's opinion and all the research and whatever I think this one is from mother nature and yes our research facilities in a lot of places around the world I can get you jumbo's began object on country first I think this is naturally occurring and the problem is no matter what it came from we got it here now and we have to figure out how to win the war here in the U..

Twitter Jim group president
"therapeutic company" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

11:41 min | 1 year ago

"therapeutic company" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"Michelle. Thank you so much for being on the show. I've been really excited to interview and find out more about your product. Find Mine funnily enough. Your name came up when I sent a tweet asking what makers I should bring on the show so thanks to a diverse for bringing Michelle to product. Tent radio Since you have a very unique product I thought it might be fun for me to just start off by getting you to talk about sign mine and what you do shore. So we're enterprise software solution for consumer facing brands and retailers and our software is actually helping to scale out what those organizations are doing internally by hand so the content that they're creating manually to help guide shoppers with how to be successful with the products that they're buying is something that we are using She learning and Automation TO SCALE OUT. So as an example Our clients include fashion brands and retailers that sell clothing and you might be shopping on a website and see a shirt and it will show you the pants in the shoes in the bag in the jacket that. I'll go with that shirt to help you understand. How would I wear this Day What could I wear with if I wanted to take it to work where it's work and usually that's being programmed manually? By someone called merchandiser within the fashion organization. Marketers might send out email campaigns. You know we just had Chinese New Year might have been an email campaign like all. The different looks with read that you could wear for Chinese New Year Dinner. 'cause reds kind of lucky color during Chinese New Year but a marketer was usually having to create that campaign by hand so what our technology is doing is actually predicting what those people merchandisers marketers personal shopping teams would do if they were to create a complete outfit by hand a furniture that if there are home furnishings company. A makeup look or a beauty regimen Therapeutic Company. What would they create if they were to sit down and do it by hand to help guide him or so that you know how to be successful with this face cream or with this couch or whatever you're buying so essentially what we're doing is we're trying to close information gap between a customer? Who is not an expert right in everything that they could be buying and the brand who is an expert at what they're selling and we're doing that in a way that's actually scalable so that the customer gets better information. They spend more money. The brands happier. They make more revenue on. They also have a longer lifetime value from that customer and they save time because they don't have to have those merchandisers marketers manually curing this content all the time trying to guide their customer raise. This is incredible. I think what's so interesting about your product is it's one which has a touch of complexity to it just because you're working across all two different types of verticals but when you took that beat to explain it ensure examples. I realized Oh benefit from companies using your tools because it is difficult you know I think the last time I just tried to find new outfit for work or whatever and it's quite easy to immediately be overwhelmed by the options available and I guess as a consumer. I don't spend a ton of time thinking about what happens when I click on that blouse and suddenly I'm being suggested the best pair of trousers or shoes or boots or whatever to go with it so it's quite interesting to hear about that and I guess the reason I wanted to draw out was to ask you how you stumbled across this challenge that retailers faced was it being in the industry yourself or was it. You're as a consumer trying to create experience that you prefer that you did not see out there. It was the latter actually so as a consumer by all sorts of things all the time and I had all these frustrating experiences where I would buy the product that I knew I wanted or would have stripe strike of inspiration for something that I really wanted and I was like. Oh that's cool Then I'd buy it but then there was this whole like after-sale struggle that I I couldn't figure out how to be the most successful with that product and then I would have to sit in my closet or I would return it or sometimes I miss my return window but then like now ended up using it in donate it. I don't throw my stuff away. And but a lot of people do could end up in a landfill and that just bummed me out because I spent the money on at the time by it and if I wasn't able to kind of be successful in success depends on what product you're talking about right so of course. This shirt success means like wearing it outside and getting compliments on. Hopefully if it's a you know a couch it means like it's in my living room and I feel good about the way it looks. A couch is really hard to return. So if you buy a couch and you didn't really think through how was all going to work and it's like in your living room now and you like I could return this giant thing and spend a whole bunch of money doing it and time and effort or I could just learn to live with it find. Maybe you learn to live with it. But you don't love that couch and you don't love Clear apartment so you sort of have this negative feeling towards the brand that sold to you might feel like Oh like. I don't know if I'M GONNA buy anything from them anymore. So essentially I had that experience. My life is a consumer more often than I was comfortable with and I was like you know whoever selling me this couch knows how to it look good. Why didn't I get that information? And when I started looking into why wasn't getting this guidance from the brands and retailers telling me products all the time. That's when I realized there's this big bottle lack that all the people who work there one. Give me this information. They just have a bunch of stuff on their plate. And they don't have all the time in the world to create a complete furniture steph every single product in their store. Bright THAN DOC. Changes from time to time they get new products in the seasons. Change like there's so much variance in the world. They couldn't possibly keep up with it. It's not really their fault but it doesn't really solve the problem that I'm not going to feel great about this brand if I buy a couch and I don't love it or if I return something or if I just don't buy it in the first place because I'm like well normally now. When he got that much use out of it absolutely. I always love. When makers experiences are directly inform what they deal with On I just wonder what then were the challenges you faced as you started building. Let's say the earlier versions of Fine Mine and then started having carbon relations with these enterprise companies that now became your clients. What were some of the challenges of just trying to better understand the other side of the table? I think that once I figured out that the retailers and brands have this problem became a lot easier for. Initially we were trying to solve it directly for the consumer were like. Oh Yeah I guess I do have that problem. They were really really willing to do anything about it so like they. Weren't you know having them? Download an APP or take or sign up for new service or new subscription was hard because consumers are kind of like fickle changing. Their behavior is challenging. I think more the tricks is such an amazing company. They actually got a massive amount of customers at scale to change their behavior in by through the subscription service but that doesn't work for everyone in all the people who are sticks customers probably still shop at other places so the realization was really like you have to meet the consumer weather at let them shop in however they want shop you know whatever method or channel or whatever you sue and just meet them at that place with the guidance and help and when I figured that out that I started asking the retailers and brands hey like why can't I get this. You know guidance when I'm shopping online or when I'm in your store and I can't find a store associate wise in their way. I can like learn more information about these products and how to use them and everyone was sort of like. Yeah of course. We'd like to be able to do that more often. But you know reality is a factor. Here we don't have the time or the manpower to do that. And so they sort of confirmed that the problem was the bottleneck of of manual effort. And that's where artificial intelligence is very very valuable or automation and generals very very. When they're sort of like a bottleneck goes of human effort. And what's really interesting? Is that the thing that we do is scale out human effort. That's very creative. Barring point has to be a human human has to you know like set the vision for what this fashion brand stands for and how we would define style and what we wouldn't wouldn't do or what. The rules of the road are for this beauty regimen. That's GonNa make you up ten years younger to like put on a certain order. You can't combine these things during the day. You have to have one for doing one for night. So all of that stuff has to be sort of divined by the human but then you can apply those same like paradigm all the rest of the products and repeat it. A billion times in a way require human the human sets off the process but they don't have to repeat it a million times you can hand it off to a machine to repeat it. You Know The fiftieth through millions time and then the human can go back to doing their creative process and setting up the next thing for success. Yes that's incredible. I think it's also like a important reminder of the fact that as powerful as ai and machine learning is right now. It's not anywhere near the point where it could just immediately at instantaneously start replacing human roles right and so to your point you have to actually understand the human processes and an perhaps you know the nuances within that brand and then you can find a way to create that process for it. Is that right? That's right and I don't think that you would ever use machine learning necessarily to do the whole humans job. You still need them to set off or vision Because they're the ones who are defining what is the brand stand foreign. What is unique expertise? And I feel like it's GonNa be a long time before human consumers are willing to take that cue from an Ai. Engine you know. Thi- and this is what's cool. I don't think I'm going to trust them. I'm going to trust a fellow human so that were long way from in my opinion. Sometimes you might not know instagram quote influencers who are completely long not real humans. This kind of interesting like play with that idea but I do believe that. There's like a point to having the person involved at the beginning of the process but there is very little point to having a person like repeat the same thing a million times that the poor use of a human's time that's really where a has the power to be revolutionary in at least in the space that we're talking about. It's not taking anybody's job because the person to do the work and nobody's creating a million outfits by hand in these organizations it's just not feasible so they weren't doing in any way they were doing other stuff and so it's actually just completely accretive rather than displacing somebody function. Yes absolutely. Thanks so much.

merchandiser Michelle Michelle. instagram Therapeutic Company
"therapeutic company" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

30:12 min | 1 year ago

"therapeutic company" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"And they're on a mission to bring together five thousand plus senior leaders to solve the most pressing problems facing healthcare today and actualize the most promising opportunities to improve it thanks yeah it was written before the Internet age and it's you'd think it still works absolutely it's mandatory reading our company is that right yes it and became better well that's an easy one because I can point very clearly to in our in our twenty year history the biggest mistake I ever made and the biggest single mistake I and it's not even in the medical world it is I had and we help them move into the Internet age they in the beginning had less than fifty million dollars online revenues by the time relationship ended add one point two billion dollars in in revenues attributed to online sales yeah it was it was great and it was fantastic fantastic company all around but what I what I fail to understand was I thought at that time this was a huge lesson for me in this is back in two thousand nine that my teams production of new sales was the key to them retaining us as an agency in being or customer and they fired us in two thousand nine in July of two thousand nine I had to lay off twenty two people in one day in a company of sixty people wow and it was humbling but what I learned from that was is that my I'm hired to occur -CCOMPLISH A financial objective for clients and help them grow their customer base or their patient volume if you will but the the suspect more and expect better service experience from the expect me to be perfectly aligned in a tuned to their changing goals the because they have helping them manage their budget things that go outside of just managing the marketing and so I really after that I went on a on a on a quest that quest was to discover how to retain clients longer it was literally a re a retention quest but at that retention quest was probably the wrong that was the proxy that led me to a book a book entitled Trusted Adviser which is written five or six maybe maybe eight years ago named Charles Green trusted adviser transformed the way I think about customer service and clients service in professional services industry and all of our I brought Charles's team in my entire my entire clan service layer and leaders in the company have all been trained and trusted adviser thinking and you know what it is it's not so much do this do that it's more of a car context change where we had the problem wasn't clients like Home Depot the problem is us we were thinking transaction only we go in we made your marketing we get paid but this is it moved us to the mindset of being an advocate moving over in their shoes and thinking about all the difficulties that enterprise level client a hospital for example face it's politics budget constraints hypocr compliance all things in thinking about all those difficulties all they want is there is not just marketing to be effective they needed to be smooth and easy so now we focus on making the the way the engage with us and helping them create smooth and easy marketing for them how can we take a load off it's really a servant sort of perspective that Book formed me and I would say you know break we we had this phrase breakdowns lead to breakthroughs and that's clearly a case where a huge what a great insight can while you know just thinking through and it is important right I mean what are you doing beyond transactional and and it's key and so a component of the of the listeners can are you know providers so a lot of lot of physicians and spital executives but we also have a good amount of industry so as as we think about this type of marketing and the insights you're offering how could a medical device company or Pharma Company or or a digital therapeutic company take advantage of of of this method well I think that so here's a here's a great example my fitness pal that's an online platform right that's under armor now yeah so my under armor I used my fitness pal in my weight loss journey and it's a great tool but it frustrates me in many ways frustrates me for the number of ads that I have to see can I pay for premium yes when I look at the feature list for premium it's just not that much greater I mean I would I would be happy to pay for the for the premium version of it but I don't see that much more and there's no promises eliminating all the all the ads that come through and making the interface easier it's just a you know it's it's a they don't understand how how difficult it is to use the device to pull out data see trends like even the date ranges in the in the system I can't set the date rain ges in shorter than say one week in order to see a pattern you know of of whether my nutrition levels or protein levels or macronutrients or anything like that so I think that anyone selling tha customers doesn't matter the industry they have to step out of their shoes and step over into customers shoes and see how frustrating it is to use their product or their service it's think about this it's crazy that medical providers have gotten so efficient they've driven cost down so much that you one hundred percent of the time get a a voicemail system lar- An IV are when you call in now I don't know if you've if you have kids but I you know if you've ever had daughters played soccer I don't understa ny their EMT's on the football field at every game they have pads and helmets they're more concussions on a soccer field than any other sport what I've ever seen I've watched several daughters over the years being carried off a soccer field because he clocked each other at a full head on collision think about that the the mom puts daughter in the back of the SUV and the and the daughters disoriented and she's concerned about her she's laying down you know asking her questions to trying to rush her to urgent care or to to an emergency department and she's dialing the number maybe wanting to ask questions Hamlin to this urgent care the me call limb and let him know oncoming and ask questions and the first thing she gets while their daughters riding in the backseat is press one for billing press two four to reach your patient care coordinator press three first and then get on the phone and you you know there's so many questions there's not the sense of urgency about the customer experience so I think that is that's probably the greatest piece of advice I can offer is put yourself in the customer's shoes what friction are you creating in buying your product or using your product great advice so I if we had to take a look at the other side of the coin can you offered us that moment when Home Depot went away you laid off twenty two people insights for years later I mean now you guys are in doing so well what what's your proudest experiences to date in what you do well I there there are a number of things I'm proud of the usually relate to other people's accomplishments you know landing a large client or or are someone succeeding in a way they hadn't hadn't planned to but I think that if you're asking me personally I this this really wasn't at the time of the accomplishment I lost a hundred and twenty six pounds over a five year period and as I think I may have mentioned before didn't really do it with with a lot of exercise although I did exercise that wasn't the driving factor it was putting less in it was changing my diet and I was already Vegan. I haven't eaten meat in twenty-six years but I was a I was three hundred twenty nine pounds at one point so this is what makes me prideful about that it's not the fact I'm I'm thinner and can now buy off the rack instead of in the Excel Department it's the fact that other people in my company have lost weight and they will tell me I started this because you lost so much I went to dinner with you and you refused to have bread didn't have pasta in your eight a huge salad y eight steak and then you know my there are multiple executives in my company have lost more than twenty five pounds and three or four that have lost more than seventy five pounds and and most of them points to watch shing me go through my trans transformation over a four or five year period and that it's incredibly gratifying that makes it like wow I can't it's actually it's inspiring and buttressing against getting heavy again it makes me more conscientious it's about how I eat knowing that other people are taking a cue from what I did yeah congratulations on that can I mean that that was not easy eighty no but it was worth it and it was you know was no it wasn't easy but it wasn't not easy I mean at the end of the day I'd unlike my wife I didn't have to fight cancer that's true good point good point yeah you know and I one of my favorite quotes can is your the average of your five closest peers Dan that you did that you're really I mean it shows right everybody around us doing too which is amazing what you've been able to do you to positively impact the health of your company well thank you thanks so tell us about it Exciting project you're working on well we have spent the last several years working in the hospital environment and meeting with hospitals consulting with them working with them as clients and I think that in the last few months my head of client services and I have been working on what's the next stage for us what's next thing we should focus on and the most exciting thing I think that's going on at Response Mine Health is our push into telehealth marketing so all the hospitals now nationwide have telemedicine on their radar or they had the capabilities or they have large installed basis I mean Cleveland Clinic just gave up presentation this last weekend about the tens of thousands of people that they have signed up for for telemedicine but with this is truly retail competitive because now if you're a hospital let's say you have a market service area a you know the city you work in and your footprint but with telemedicine telehealth you can go nationwide you can reach into the most rural parts of the state you're operating in and people can use your service that means now every hospital will have the ability to compete with every other hospital isn't that amazing and most of the states in the last the three or four years have enacted legislation to allow medical providers to cross state lines using telemedicine and telehealth just hotly contested market we've decided it worked on a dedicate and make a huge push into helping market telemedicine telehealth and track the competitive environment so that people can clients can understand what are the features service levels and pricing that we have to pay attention to in order to be competitive and how do we have to deliver it and and helping them directly marketed and acquire patients customers to be you know on their telehealth platforms that that's probably the most exciting something to me because it's just exploding as a service offering and it gives it gives medical providers a lot of leverage Nah that's a that's definitely excited can and you know it is it is a growing field and we're getting closer there's regulations that are are changing our making it more favourable to providers so I think it's really interesting that you decided to to focus on that and and and with the track argued you have can I'm sure you'll you'll definitely have success so getting into the leadership course we're gonNA build a little leadership course here the ABC's of Ken Robinson and so I've got a lightening around for you for questions followed by a book that you recommend the listeners you ready okay all right what's the best way to improve healthcare outcomes give obsessive customer service what's the biggest mistake or pitfall.

five year three hundred twenty nine poun fifty million dollars one hundred percent seventy five pounds two billion dollars twenty five pounds twenty six pounds twenty-six years eight years twenty year four years one week one day
"therapeutic company" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

10:39 min | 1 year ago

"therapeutic company" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

"And now let's get back to my conversation with era so you're backed. I think it's fascinating to raise money for a probiotic business from huge celebrities is in venture capitalist because a lot of people don't know about the microbiome and you know what it is that you're doing science behind it and you have curly Clawson Jessica Biel and Cameron Diaz and some really really great investors. How do you go to them and say hey? I'm starting starting a back Thomas Bacteria business for your gut. Give me your money. Yes <hes> well. It's it's a it's a really good question <hes> so so one of the most important distinctions to understand about like what we were just talking about as Seguida segue the kind of answering the question you just asked is so there's your microbiome and then there's probiotics and probiotic is by definition a bacteria or microorganism that you take to have an impact in the human body which means that it's been demonstrated raided clinical research to two and not the fermented food or the computer that Kimchi but the the strain itself of bacteria is taken and has been studied to have an impact in the human body and so what we you know at one of the things as we were very mindful of who of course we have a lot of big investors who also invested in life science and you know the drug side of our business <hes> and the therapeutics that were developing which actually by the time this podcast comes out will probably be we will be public about our <hes> are for example are women's track which is our drug for urinary tract infection calm and <hes> and our interventions for a bacterial genesis and preterm birth and so I only say that piece to answer your question about the the investor pieces because as we were very careful so Jessica feels a huge advocate for women's health <hes> she works at the couple organizations that are really big advocates are also success at sex education as it relates to women's health. <hes> carly actually is a huge science nerd which I I think a lot of a lot of people know <hes> she not only understands kind of <hes> the importance of science <hes> and I think that was really exciting to her and I think she is is very mindful and has a lot of integrity around the thing she speaks about around health and <HES> <HES> and so I think she kind of got excited about the bigger vision and of course all of them are great business people as well and and and have great business people around them and so understanding products the fastest growing consumer health category in the world so I think it was not just for some of them and cameras her. She's written her beauty books <hes> which are actually even her even the gut part the gut health and microbiome pieces of her beauty books are incredibly well researched and so and actually she had she before knowing she had already interviewed some of our scientists for her <hes> some of her content for her books already and so <hes> while it looks like just a lot of celebrities were very intentional about the people we bring into our community. We care a lot. <hes> we recently launched a <hes> a university on Instagram <hes> specifically kind rooted in education for influencers and for partners because we take seriously like the people who have <hes> shown a lot of integrity in alignment in like not sensationalizing and not being hyperbolic about things around like health and wellness and so the people three three people that you mentioned we have some others <hes> really have demonstrated we believe at least publicly <hes> that they care a lot about the integrity of the things they align themselves because they were you know we're in a category where there's a lot of noise. What's next oh we we have a lot of things going on always sounds like yes well? We a few things we work in environmental health also so <hes> so we have a publication coming out soon <hes> for product honeybees <hes> which is really exciting for people who know that we have a big honeybee problem in the world <hes> so we have a probiotic for honeybees. We have some really exciting materials work. That's GONNA come out soon for bioplastics that are made from bacteria so a partnership with accompanying your up around some of the the ways that bacteria will start to help us think about our single use plastic problem <hes> and then on the human health side <hes> as I mentioned I think by the time this comes out we will be talking about are there will be a therapeutic company so essentially on the biotech side of our business snus will be thinking about the ways that we're gonNA use microbes <hes> to create interventions for your nurture confection. <hes> which is incredibly important there was a New York Times article this past weekend about urinary tract infection the antibiotic resistance <hes> <hes> to you to the floor Quinlan's which is like Cipro and you know some of these other antibiotics that are regularly prescribed is now gone from three to seventeen percent in a decade which means that they're no longer working U._T.. Is are the number of bacterial infection <hes> in the United States <hes> the impact half of women globally and there's the worst ten and it's the on my period and stomachs upset and like everything's happening disgusting. That's like no it's the worst oh and there's also a really interesting research about how oh they're often that they've been dismissed for a long time by doctors you know because it's you know they're they're not necessarily life threatening except for maybe some that are hospital acquired but it's it's it's of course from equality life perspective but now we're starting to understand the correlation between <hes> you know you T._i.. All kinds of areas like of or of the vaginal microbiome and like <hes> fertility <hes> susceptibility to preterm birth which affects ten percent of infants in the world and so are women's health. <hes> <unk> tracks an India's incredibly important to me <hes>. I think it's GonNa be a really I think it's going to be not just an opportunity to change women's lives with our interventions but totally change the way we understand our vaginas and how important that <hes> the bacteria is <hes> <hes> for protecting against S. M. S._T._D.'s H._p.. <hes> of course it's correlation with fertility is really important so you're going. Yes Yep what a success mean to you. Oh man you know it's personally. It's so funny. There's two words that that don't resonate with me. One is success in his career and the other is career. You know I I've spent a lot of my life trying to really figure out how to not be attached to things on. I genuinely believe and I'm certainly this is one of the oldest ideas you know from from Buddhism but I think attachment is where suffering lives on an I. I have really learned that I the idea serving attached to an idea in the future to me is just feels like suffering <hes> I I think most people are already successful. If you think about all the things that have to happen in your body on an everyday basis for you to just wake up <hes> and like live your life and go to sleep every day. It's actually pretty extraordinary. Just be grateful that your body yeah and so you know an an a as I said I mean most women and most people don't really start to understand and appreciate the spy and look I understand that that doesn't get you the house and it doesn't necessarily get you the car I you know and it's funny living in a living in a state now I'm in east coaster so living in state with earthquakes and natural disaster like you and those things don't does things matter to me <hes> I. It's not what I get up and like work for <hes>. If you to me successes I mean at least I can. I can speak in low articulation of around the context of seed <hes> which is I do. I think we have a huge opportunity to change the way to change human health unto changed health in general for trust human and planetary or kind of the same. I think if we play some what I tell my team and what we talk about all the time I'm actually this came out came out came out of a really interesting conversation. I had like a year and a half ago agenda from <hes> Wu Tang clan which I'm a I'm a big fan of and he <hes> and he he just had to me. He's like look. If you gotta wake up in the world feel like you like nudge the world for just a little bit every day and the and that's unto me like if I feel that every day we get emails. Someone will tell us even if we don't have the science for it that like sede fundamentally changed their life. They don't live with Crohn's anymore. They don't have this infection and again. Those are anecdote. Those are anecdotal. We don't claim them. We don't put them on our website. <hes> we get emails from people saying like I just I see what you're you're doing. The debt one instagram post fundamentally changed the way I think about food D- <hes> those are to me those are just nudges and like you end up creating a intervention for your nurture confection of course that's a huge win if you in the process change the way women may understand than start to DC stigmatize like people who live with these infections because sometimes just understanding is incredibly healing <hes> and we've learned that from like our customer service for example we have scientists that answer a lot of our customer service questions and people will say look I might I can't even take your product but the way hey you just explained to me what I live with. Every day is what noble doctor could have explains me has been able to explain to me in the past ten years and just sometimes information can be so incredibly impactful in someone's life so for me I just wake up and an successes like do I feel at the end of the day that I nudged the world for just like a little bit every day. That's our poll quote for Instagram. <hes> and there's something ask everybody that comes on girl boss Radio and we have this thing called girl boss moments which we have on our digital platform. That's part of something my journey which is really an opportunity to celebrate something that you made happen. <hes> that could be personal professional just like a moment where it could be. I gave myself a bubble bath. I bought a plant or I graduated from College College or we launched an amazing influence prog program this morning that my team put on slack I would say two things the first <hes> was that I built a spaceship <hes> with my son <hes> that he then like strapped to his body and wore around our neighborhood for like a day a telling everybody that he was going on a a space trip <hes> and that that was his new home and I thought how like what how incredible to to just be in proximity to that kind of like canvas of the House the world's Yeah <hes> and I'd say the second one is I think are women's health. Work is incredibly exciting an important and the idea that we could impact some <hes> women's health that way is like pretty meaningful to me era. Thank you so much for commander Australia things even Hajer and where do we find seed C dot Com. That's a good euro at at seat on..

urinary tract infection Jessica Biel Thomas Bacteria New York Times Cameron Diaz United States instagram India Crohn College College Seguida commander Kimchi S. M. S._T._D. Hajer Australia seventeen percent ten percent
"therapeutic company" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

Boston Herald Radio

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"therapeutic company" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

"Some the party next to us, is some, kind of therapeutic company which could mean anything but they have been signed And they should share, it would make the, show though better for everybody Eclectic bunch of music happening next to us There was some country now we're hitting the seventy s. Going uphill or downhill depending on your perspective Jackson is timeless Okay We'll we'll talk about. That how, about let's bring in? Kara Kellie Kellie alley I don't know why I cannot remember. The name alley a. Blue lab fame welcome to morning meeting. On, Harold radio hi thank you. For, having me, well I mean we didn't have a lot of choice, sorta showed up so we'll give. You a microphone we have you here because you're the, the resident millennial but I have to say there's like one hundred people way younger. Than you here I know it's crazy already So let's talk a little, bit of local politics poll came out yesterday on. Our political days seemed like there so long could have been three days ago from massinc on the. Congressional race, between Presley. And Mike Capela. Wanna top line results I think good news for. Capital Lonzo he was leading by thirteen but that's, also a, number that's unchanged since the last time they pull the race, in February also, the number was was get into the the the other fall didn't have them close to. Fifty this one had a pretty, close to fifty these at forty seven. February forty eight in in now and yeah you're right. We're an incumbent. You, always want to be at that fifty. Mark, that's a pretty significant number. In, race where, they're you know we have a lot of primaries here, on the democratic side especially in. Massachusetts where there are seventeen candidates running and you can, win with three percent of the vote this is one with two candidates so that's. The number is is important Look deeper into, the numbers, and some other encouraging signs for capital auto I think one, of the sharpest, policy divisions maybe the biggest one or the only one is about abolishing ice just become. A bit of a national political. Issue cap is on the reform iside Presley is on the abolish iside voters agree with cap sixty four percent in the primaries user democratic primary voters say that I should be twenty, one percent say abolished which. Is interesting because it's such. A the district skews liberal progressive so.

iside Presley Jackson Kara Kellie Massachusetts Mike Capela Harold Mark sixty four percent three percent one percent three days
"therapeutic company" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"therapeutic company" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of a go slow signs that the two groups i've researchers and i want to emphasize that two independent teams of scientists one at novartis the drug company the other at the carolin institute in sweden again both converging on the same conclusion holding up a goslow sign and they both reached a very similar recommendation namely as scientists as companies continue to develop crisper to use to treat diseases you know what you better start looking at those cells to see if they might have lost their anti cancer mechanisms i know i know this study involves one variant called crisper castiron which is the one most of us have heard about now there are other crisper variants correct have those been studied and would we expect the same results there are more crisper variants than there are flavors of cupcakes at your local bakery so other that her hands indeed cupcakes well there you go and i suppose you like many flavors of cupcakes so that's where we are in crisper land at the moment anyway cast nine is one of the cutting enzymes it cuts out a sequences of dna but yes just as you said there are other cutting enzymes but more crucially there's a form of crisper that was developed about two years ago out of a harvard lab which doesn't cut the double stranded dna instead of cutting it and then inserting a repair gene which is the common idea for many of the crisper therapeutic companies this form of crisper which had called base editing makes just a single change in the dna and it has been likened to instead of using scissors using a pencil eraser and a pencil change in one of the dna letters to another and in many cases just that single base pair that single nucleotides is the reason for a devastating genetic disease so again this is called based settting company of course has been just launched to develop it so yes there are many forms of christopher and the two studies that we're talking about look at only the traditional original crisper past nine version since was talking about engineering here i mean could you not think that well maybe we can make a form of crisper that would skip cell with the bad gene pizza fiftythree in it and packing i'm going to skip it you know yes and that's what the two teams of.

carolin institute sweden christopher harvard two years
"therapeutic company" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"therapeutic company" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"So bob when you step back from the debate in the demise of the effort to repeal and replace obamacare and the affordable care act why is all this noise in washington blister left the sector unscathed consumers been quite focused in some of these issues but why have an investors view is material i think to jamie's point near you're talking about seventy five percent of the market cap in healthcare really being related to products and therapeutic companies that you might see some kind of volume impact over time if the proposals that we've seen are actually put in place in one way shape or form i don't think that the majority of the marquee cap within healthcare has really been impacted a by all this debate because i think in actual aladi over overtime a really won't have that much of an impact on the top wanted to these companies the obvious exception has been hospitals to very small piece of the overall market cap within the healthcare universe but that group has been very volatile relative to some of the proposals and deadlines and timelines that have come out from dc around the potential repeal and replace do you think about it they're probably still going to have to provide the care whether the individual currently has medicaid or not and so you have as they did before iraq's right it was just reimbursed through is simply another mechanism correct or not at all nine also i think that's important of they make a very small percentage of the overall investible universe within healthcare essentially a lot of the investment universe is really the drug companies and the product companies and a lot of what we think of the healthcare system is consumers is really not messed bullets directors orm nonprofit hospitals in the like exact.

obamacare iraq healthcare system bob washington jamie seventy five percent
"therapeutic company" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"therapeutic company" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Which were to date not really well understood and try to discover drugs and medicines based on those findings and we don't know yet physical scientific poor let's go back let's go back to your lead jack there for i v day at where are you in that lab bench ten market ready product arc we are entering first unmanned studies where we are going to evaluate the safety and the tolerability of that drug in healthy individuals so the very starting point of human clinical testing so that's where we are well you that a lot of work had any chance as quite a long path before you get to the market we are also interested in the same pathway in some patients upsets where the unmet medical need is high and where you can actually try to get to the market faster based on the unmet needs that you're trying to address so there are indications in the context of inflammatory bowel disease such as pouch ideas where patients don't really have many alternatives for their treatments and to require surgical interventions so we're trying to actually evaluate whether or not the same bacterial abnormalities are taking place in those patients as well what if that's a fascinating here is that you are pursuing therapeutic the same therapeutic company professional pds company would do that you have this.