35 Burst results for "Theater Company"

Elevating Unheard Voices With Rimsha Afzal and Karyn Raynor

Artist Soapbox * Local Artists on Creative Process

01:49 min | 3 weeks ago

Elevating Unheard Voices With Rimsha Afzal and Karyn Raynor

"Hello rim show. Hello karen today we are doing great. How are you. I'm doing really well and very excited. That spring has sprung around here. And i'm very excited to be talking with you about the ink project. We are so credit to to be here so thank you you're welcome. Let's start with what the project is. I saw on your website that you describe it as a global writers liaison. So why did you choose that word. Specifically the idea. The liaison for us we just visualized kind of the gap that we were seeing in our day to day society and we can get into more of that a little bit later but this idea of a liaison to be this intermediary body between two parties and for us those two parties are underrepresented voices narratives and publishing companies specifically oriented towards you know performance spaces and performance oriented writing. The idea liaison was really important to us. When we were coming up with our mission. You know we're not a theater. Were not just a writers organization but like being liaison between those faces. It was really really important to us. I think the idea also is important because kind of like karen is saying if we remove the label from being a theater company free removed. The label from being writing service opens the door possibility for what we as on in actually do in our society in our community and our whole outlook to have global outreach. How can we be that intermediary space on a global level.

Karen RIM
"theater company" Discussed on Voices of the Community

Voices of the Community

03:01 min | Last month

"theater company" Discussed on Voices of the Community

"On the show today and stay safe out there as we work our way through this strange new normal to. That's it for this episode of voices of the community. You've been listening. To the voice of playwright actress and executive director of the left coast theater company erica and draco to find out more about left coast theater companies. Upcoming productions sign up for their mailing lists and to make a donation. Please go to l. c. t. c. Dash sf dot org least tune into next week show where we'll be featuring.

"theater company" Discussed on Voices of the Community

Voices of the Community

03:06 min | Last month

"theater company" Discussed on Voices of the Community

"I go and it turned around and that way and it was at the end of the show. They were so gracious they were just like oh that was so fun. That was gray. And i loved it. It was so wonderful to see this cute little theater company produced the show like it was so fine and we just completely lost it. You're so excited. That's a really great story. Thank you. i was fine. So final question. What do you see as some of the positive things that could come out of the pandemic in the financial meltdown. That would really support performing arts organizations and also to your point all arts employees. I'm really hoping that the industry takes a hard look at itself from everywhere from the top. So broadway all the way down to this tiny little theater company called left coast theater company in san francisco. That doesn't have a huge yearly. Budget really takes a hard look at itself and supports the type type of work. We really need to see onstage these days with regards specifically to bypass artists which is black indigenous people of color and the broader lgbtq community for myself. Personally i wanna see stories have never seen before and i think the industry because we've all sort of sat down and taken a hard look at ourselves especially after the ruthless murderer george floyd and everything that transpired last summer i really feel that the industry needed a shakeup and as horrific as that experience was it shook the industry as well as shook the world but it also shook the theater industry. I'm very involved.

san francisco george floyd left coast theater last summer lgbtq
"theater company" Discussed on Voices of the Community

Voices of the Community

05:37 min | Last month

"theater company" Discussed on Voices of the Community

"If you wanna be on the back end of either company and help out with admin stuff beyond the executive team reach out and let them know that you're interested because otherwise you know they won't know and then it seems like foundations are now actually providing funding specifically for just operations overhead to keep focused going instead of a specific program. Yeah and that's what's been a real life saver for example grants that you're to apply for our project driven so they wanna see what the project is that you're gonna be doing and when there's nothing to produce and with left theater company for example we're not the type of theater company that does well in this virtual world and i have a hand to the theater companies that have made it work for them or the other arts organizations that have made it work for them because they're doing amazing work and i'm so inspired but left coast is never had that sort of that's never been our forte. Where an in your face were fun in person and were not as lively on four boxes on zoom and so we tried for a little while. I didn't really work by the grants organizations that are giving that are allowing arts organizations. Reply for grants are not asking anymore. Four project driven grant applications which has been so helpful because now we can say. Hey when we come back. We plan on doing x. Y. and z. And if we get awarded a grant then it's like oh yes. We have money in the bank. We don't have to just sitton beg for money on the street when we come back. Because everyone's going to be doing that. It's gonna be a rush all at the same time right. In s we were talking about before we came on. Just the whole. Everyone is struggling with that. The state of california's trying to come up with and of course. San francisco's trying to come up with an cities and counties as to how to safely open theatre again inside let alone there now. Working outside he's because that's where everything's going to start with the outside venues in the outside performance bases. I'm very excited to see how they come back before. Theater companies that are looking forward to having indoor performances again. It's going to be interesting to see because we're all going to be in the same boat. It's not like oh this. You know theater company in ohio figured out before anybody else like it's going to be everyone all the same time. It's going to be a huge amount of trial and error to figure out what works what we're allowed to do with how we can keep our actors and crew and audience safe. It's gonna be interesting to see how that works out. Because we've no idea true. And i think everyone in the industry is really struggling with that along with the funders the audience the government etc. It's hard and it's been really hard to watch your friends. Just who lived off of gig. Work struggle. i have so many friends that were from theater show to theater show in that. Said they need their living. You know maybe doing a little bit of office work here and there to keep you know bills going when everything shut down it was wonderful to finally see the unemployment allow for gig work to apply people who were doing good work to apply but because i had never been the case before i mean we also happened. Everyone was completely overwhelmed. And i look forward to seeing. How.

ohio california San francisco left coast Four project four boxes
"theater company" Discussed on Voices of the Community

Voices of the Community

02:39 min | Last month

"theater company" Discussed on Voices of the Community

"A whole season planned for twenty twenty as any theater company would have done and we essentially had to postpone everything. We didn't necessarily cancel anything everything offensively. It's been postponed. But we've sort of been in hibernation because we are no matt theater company. We are in a lucky position to not have to pay for venue fees or having to deal with hades staff were fully volunteer organization and so all of our costs were production and when there's no production there's no incumbent those are also no expenses so we just sort of sat down for most of the last year going. Okay when can we come back wing. Can we start to get moving again and in the positive light of it though we've done a lot of really good working behind the scenes to sort of get ready and then plan as far out as we can cosby. Have all this time to sit around thinking about how to make a theater company and the works that we really want to see happen. And so it's been a lot of networking with other organizations and just a lot of planning on the back. End more admin stuff like the general public really doesn't care to know about for us on the back end of a theater company. We're like oh my god. We needed to get this done so bad and we had time. We'll into point. I of what can people who are listening to this. How can they help left theater company but also other theatre companies. That are out there. What are some of the needs that you're seeing besides more funding of course to keep everybody alive until we in quebec. Sure one thing that i always tell people is if you have the ability to donate donate your favourite theater company like when you used to go out and go to the theater and go out for a night with your loved one or your friends and you would go to. For example piano fights or to the exit theatre. those are venues in which are small indie run organizations that are sad and they're suffering because there's no income for them either and the way to kind of keep those going is to donate a little bit he doesn't have to be donate to some giant broadway organization. If that's not what you feel like if you enjoyed going out and seeing certain theater shows donate to those companies and keep them at least a little bit alive and for those that kellyanne afford to do that. Join their mailing lists so that you can keep up with them for when they do come back and you can be involved when they call out for maybe writers if you want to be a.

quebec last year kellyanne twenty twenty one thing
"theater company" Discussed on Voices of the Community

Voices of the Community

03:53 min | Last month

"theater company" Discussed on Voices of the Community

"'bout fourteen thirteen years ago and through random connections met other people who were doing admin parts of theater and i realized at that point i was tired of being an actress and i wanted to do other stuff and so i really started stage. Managing and then i eventually became the production manager for left coast and then just through process of climbing. I suppose i became the executive director. And i also do play writing and still act a little bit and still right and just trying to keep your head above water industry so love coast theater. Company has a really wonderful history in an audience and the community. It serves tells a little bit more about them. Yeah locator company is exclusively in. Lgbtq plus Theater company that does works primarily new works. we're known for doing it. Theologies which is a like ten to fifteen minutes short play over the course of one night. You'll see maybe six or seven of them. Under once. Seen for example we did a show years ago called the morning after and it was like the morning after dot dot dot. What and it was you know. Seven plays that were all about the morning after some events and it was all. Lgbtq related and the company has been doing this for coming up on nine years this year next year. Two thousand and twenty two will be our tenth year. The company was founded by rodney. Wrote a taylor. And just a frank back in twenty twelve and primarily what we have adjusted into is not just doing anthologies. We've transitioned into doing full length. Plays some pre produced plays off broadway shows just to keep the audiences engaged because it's sometimes difficult to sell new works. And you guys don't have your own theater space you essentially in renting space. Yeah we're what you call nomad theater company. We sort of just exist but we don't exist in place. We just rent theater spaces in all francisco goal some point to actually own venue. It's definitely a dream of mine to be able to own our own. Lgbtq arts venue where. It's not just theater. But i would love to be able to have a venue where it's more broad than that. Maybe artworks along with theater and rehearsal spaces and things at the city is kind of lacking a little bit is just a plain artistic center for lgbtq arts. Well it's funny. You should say that because in my conversation with wayne over two answers group and then randy. Add intersection for the arts. They've been talking about the idea of trying to come together to get space and feeling is since there's so much vacant space in san francisco coming out of the proverbial economically and the pandemic. There might be an opportunity for groups to really coalesce around a building. Yeah that sounds fantastic. I know that the gay men's chorus just bought. I think it's a church a write off on the lens a- and they had plans of. I think they're still doing it. Like everything in the world is just on pause of making that their space which i am definitely like two seconds away from knocking on their door being like. Hey can we play. You can use their space. I'm hoping yeah. I'm gonna knock on many doors when the world comes back. Exactly i think a lot of people are going to be a lot more open than they used to be. Yeah i think so too. I think it's going to be a lot less competitive will and that brings me to my next question which is so much of what left coast theater. Company does obviously is in person right..

san francisco ten six tenth year rodney seven Seven plays francisco two seconds fifteen minutes nine years wayne this year one night twenty twelve fourteen thirteen years ago Two thousand Lgbtq lgbtq two answers
"theater company" Discussed on Voices of the Community

Voices of the Community

02:25 min | Last month

"theater company" Discussed on Voices of the Community

"Your host. This episode is part of our series exploring covid nineteen impact on nonprofits and small businesses in the san francisco bay area back in april of twenty twenty when we decided to create this ongoing series on covid nineteen impact i or nonprofits and then on small businesses in the san francisco bay area. We like you had no idea how long the pandemic would go on. And what the health and economic impact would be in our community going into twenty twenty one. The pandemic is now killing more people shutting down more nonprofits and small businesses on with wiping out the livelihoods of families neighborhoods and communities. We will continue to shine a spotlight on the nonprofits and small businesses that make up the fabric of our community along with the founders and staff who are struggling to deal with the impact of the covid nineteen pandemic on their operations services is ability until we can all get to the other side of the pandemic along the way we will also share with you all the amazing solutions that are nonprofits. Small businesses foundations and government leaders are working on to help us all get to the other side of the pandemic and come together to rebuild our communities with more economic social and environmental equality. I look forward to seeing. How sort of the general public reviews how they look at artists and go. This is a valid life choice. This isn't for the faint of heart for one and we need to support them. We need to allow them to flourish with. There are and not punish them because they don't have an office job if that's not what they want. So could you please introduce yourself. My name is erica. Indirect and i am the executive director of couse theater company amongst many other things. So could you please share with the audience. A little bit of your background. Because you're not only the executive director. You're also playwright. You're also actress. I am. I've sort of been the lady with many hats for a number of years now. I started off acting in when you're in high school in early college days. It's i'm going to go to hollywood and be a famous actress. And then you realize that doesn't pan out quite as easily as you think it does. And i got very involved with the san francisco theater seen as actress..

erica april of twenty twenty san francisco bay san francisco hollywood covid nineteen impact impact twenty nineteen pandemic one
"theater company" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:19 min | 3 months ago

"theater company" Discussed on KTOK

"Up up in smoke and fire. Theater companies, props, costumes, furniture and other equipment destroyed in a four alarm fire last night. You're downtown Oklahoma City. It happened in the intended block of Northwest fourth. Firefighters rescued a woman from the burning building. She suffered smoke inhalation but is expected to be okay. They cause of the fire is under investigation. With the state's Covad 19 vaccine supply consistent and growing. Deputy State Health Commissioner Kim's Reed has announced that beginning on Monday, all adult Oklahomans will be eligible to schedule a covert 19 vaccination appointment, He says. With no vaccination requirements, people should not wait to get the vaccine. Hanging out because we want to get us many people vaccinated as possible. We want to stop transmission of covert in the community, which means we've got to get the public vaccinated. So far more than 1.8 million Oklahomans have received at least one dose of the vaccine. Today is World Tuberculosis Day When health officials educate the public about the impact of TB around the world. The disease kills more than 1.5 million people every year worldwide, about nine Million people become sick. Oklahoma had 67 cases reported last year from the Alan Samuels. Volkswagen Weather Studio. Allen Samuels, Volkswagen Your friend in the car business. Partly cloudy today with isolated storms this afternoon and tonight we'll have a high of 60 today are low tonight will be in the upper forties. Tomorrow will have clearing skies after some morning showers and then we'll have eyes in the upper 50. Yes. I'm Jacqueline Scott Newsradio. 1000 Katie. Okay, Use radio 1000. Katie. Okay Studios, a service of trade and wealth. Your local trusted financial fiduciary traded wealth calm. The Bible is under attack. Some countries even ban it. And in the United States, laws are being proposed to limit biblical values in society, as if it wasn't tough enough to get out of bed Purple is making it even tougher. Thanks to the purple grid. It's comfort. Reinvented. The purple grid reduces pressure points and minimizes body heat for asleep, so supportive and relaxing even morning. People.

Allen Samuels Alan Samuels 67 cases United States Tomorrow Monday Volkswagen Volkswagen Weather Studio tonight last year today Jacqueline Scott Kim's Reed more than 1.5 million people last night World Tuberculosis Day this afternoon Today more than 1.8 million about nine Million people
How theater weathers wars, outlasts empires and survives pandemics

TED Talks Daily

04:07 min | 4 months ago

How theater weathers wars, outlasts empires and survives pandemics

"Oh firm use of fire that would ascend the brightest heaven of invention a kingdom for a stage princes to act and monarch to behold the swelling scene. Though to be totally honest right. Now i'd settle for a real school day a night out and a hug from a friend. The words that i spoke at the beginning firm use a fire etc are shakespeare's. He wrote them as the opening to his play. Henry the fifth and there are also quite likely. The first words ever spoken on the stage of the globe theatre in london when it opened in fifteen ninety nine the global go on to become the home for most of shakespeare's work and from what i hear that shakespeare guy was pretty popular but despite his popularity just four years later in sixteen zero three. The globe would close for an extended period of time in order to prevent the spreading and resurgence of the bubonic plague and facts from sixteen zero three to sixteen thirteen. All of the theaters in london were closed on and off again for an astonishing seventy eight months here in chicago in two thousand sixteen new theaters opening as well. The steppenwolf had just opened at seventeen hundred theater. Space the goodman down in the loop had just opened its new center for education and engagement and the chicago shakespeare theatre had just started construction on its newest theatre space. The yard today. Those theatres as well as the homes are over two hundred and fifty other theater companies across chicago are closed due to covid nineteen from broadway to l. a. Theaters are dark and when or if the lights are ever going to come on again. That means that tens of thousands of theater artists are out of work from actors and directors to stage managers. Set builders costume designers. It's not like it's an easy time to go wait tables. It's a hard time for the theater. And it's a hard time for the world but while theaters may be feeder as an art form has the potential to shine on how we can process and use this time apart to build a brighter more equitable healthier future together. Theater is the oldest art form we humans have. We know that the greeks were writing plays as early as the fifth century. Bc but theater goes back before that it goes back before we learned to write to call and response around fires. And who knows maybe before we learned to build fire itself feeder has outlasted empires weathered wars and survived plagues in the early sixteen hundred. Theatres closed over sixty percent of the time in london. And that's still looked at is one of the most fertile an innovative periods of time in western theater history. The plays that were written then are still performed today. Over four hundred years later unfortunately in the early sixteen hundreds a different plague was making its way across the ocean and it hit the shores of what would be called american sixteen nineteen when the first slave ships landed in jamestown virginia. Racism is an ongoing plague in america but many of us in the theater like to think we're not infected or that we are at worst as symptomatic but the truth is our symptoms have been glaring onstage and off. We have the opportunity to use this intermission. Caused by one clegg to work to cure another. We can champion a theater. That marches protests burns bills. We can reimagine the way our theaters institutions work to make them more reflective. And just we can make this one of the most innovative and transformative periods of time in western theater. History one that we're still learning about celebrating four hundred years from now. What we embody in the theater can be embodied in the world. Why because theater is an essential service. And what i mean by that. Is that theater is in service to that which is essential about ourselves. Love anger rage despair. Hope theatre not only shows us the breadth and depth of human emotions. It allows us to experience catharsis to feel our feelings and rather than ignore compartmentalize them move through them to discover. What's on the other side

Seventeen Hundred Theater Shakespeare Center For Education And Engag Chicago Shakespeare Theatre London Chicago Plague Goodman Henry The Globe Jamestown Virginia America
"theater company" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:39 min | 5 months ago

"theater company" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"So that means some people are going to lose a lot of money, Tim. So many people today were wanting to buy shares. If that guy wanted to sell his shares, he would have had no problem finding buyers tomorrow. It was talking to sell today, though, because you know there was so much action on it that Ameritrade and they stopped it because they were overloaded. Look in AMC Entertainment, a theater company, which has had is trying to avoid bankruptcy because he can't go to the movies here. They had over a billion shares traded today that that has never that is like never happened for that company before. It's it's um it's zah game. It's a war. It's fun to watch. But I wouldn't put, you know. Look, I'm old and conservative. I wouldn't. I wouldn't play that same way. Can you stay with us? I want to talk to you. When we come back. There's a company that just had a for the 1st $100 billion quarter. And I think you know what stock I'm talking about. Let me look at my apple phone. Maybe it has looking on my iPad. We'll come back. We'll talk about that. It's the first time it's ever happened. They made $100 billion in a quarter. That's incredible. Jane Wells is whether we're live on K a fides, Conway show live on Ko Phi. More now. Debra Mark, drugmaker Eli Lilly says a two drug over 19 antibody cocktail cuts. Hospitalizations by 70% for high risk covert patients, Public health officials and Riverside counties say post holiday surge of covert cases appears to be ending. New Netflix show. Bridger Tin has become the platforms most viewed.

Bridger Tin AMC Entertainment Ameritrade Eli Lilly Ko Phi Tim Jane Wells Debra Mark Netflix Riverside apple Conway
The New York Actors Experience With Caitlyn Piccirillo

"Diary of an Unemployed Actor"

05:39 min | 5 months ago

The New York Actors Experience With Caitlyn Piccirillo

"Is there much. Are the theaters. Closed down there as well. Oh yeah they've been They shut down broadway on march thirteenth. I believe End there hasn't been any live theater in new york city as far as i know There's been some like socially distanced park performances What small theatre companies. Just trying to keep busy but for the most part Most of the theater being done in in new york city right now seems to be a via zoom or now that filming is happening against tv productions coming back the show that i'm we just started rehearsing for the dining room where rehearsing over zoom and then we'll be Recording it over like the course of three days and someone's apartment interesting help. How do you find that then. Immigrants regards to rehearsing over zoom versus in person. Because you're not getting as much instant feedback in that experience. Just being right next to the person. Yeah it's a little weird just because Everyone has technical issues. might internet sometimes is a bit a sporadic and this production My friends directing it but he casts instead of doing the way traditionally would do the dining room which was six people. every character is played by different persons. Losing fifty something people in this cast. So it's really hard to just have that one on one moment with with your scene partner but when i've done zoom Readings and stuff. It's not that bad. A as long as people are really trying to stay in the moment and kind of committing to what they're doing. There's been some beautiful theater being done over zoom Yeah i know a lot. Some as being in it's same here. Some theaters are broadcasting over zoom. I haven't really watched anything. Maybe i should give it a try though because people that are doing it and in theaters need to stay. Afloat is the thing like our they. I mean they're not earning any money right now and so you know. What else are they supposed to do. They had a a scheme here. That's i don't remember. One of the politicians proposed was basically just like a well. You know if all the actors and stuff are complaining about not having work right now they should just go back and retrain and do something else was. I saw that Jesus seriously how much. Money is generated for the city of london from the theaters on first of all and then like just ridiculous thing to say exactly so much and i don't. that's something i've found even talking within Like with my family who who are not art people their science people and they really don't get it they really do think that Performing as like a glorified hobby rather than something that you really work in train for. However many years you know. I not only have like my bachelor's in acting but i also have my masters in theatre i've spent. I couldn't even tell you how much time and money on a acting classes voice lessons. Dance lessons and To to Like out of nowhere. Have your entire industry disappear. It would be like out of nowhere having the entire publishing industry disappear like sure. Books are like a commercial item. But you would very much notice if out of nowhere known was writing publishing reading books anymore. That's good point. It's i wanted to ask you about that too because you have a ton of training which is amazing. So what is kinda value. Get out of doing so much training. Because i know a lot of hollywood actors. You could look into it in say well. They didn't have any actual acting training them. But i think there's a value in love to hear kind of your take on it because like you said you got your bachelor's you got a master's in theater will. My masters was primarily in theatre history. Because i have a real interested in drama turkey and in london they actually really have an appreciation for drama turci which i approach which i love but in the us it's not it's kind of a dying art. But i think it's super important for performers to have at least some idea of of that of doing that kind of research. Because i find that i can always tell a performer has done their homework in. That's homework on the character homework on character. But it's not just like what are my motivations. Who am i talking to. What is background. But it's the show of it things like okay well. What is my socioeconomic background What does that mean for. How i was raised end Because someone who was raised in like a upper middle class lifestyle versus someone who is poverty stricken as a child is going to have different reactions to different Situations in a show or talking. About what what era was it and what was going on in that timeframe you know A story about you know a two women in love is totally going to have a different feeling context. If the story set in the nineteen sixties the eighteen sixties

New York City London Jesus Hollywood United States
How Hackers Hold Schools for Ransom

Slate's If Then

15:24 min | 7 months ago

How Hackers Hold Schools for Ransom

"To try to put the attack on jessica school context. We reached out to dave bertie. He covers cybersecurity for the wall street journal. And he's been writing about this uptick in ransomware attacks across the digital world. There's been an explosion of ransomware this year. It's an increasingly common way. for attackers. to target businesses healthcare organizations nonprofits or as the case may be schools in the reason. Why is just because. It's an effective business tactic if you encrypt in organizations data. That's basically what they need to function particularly in a digital environment. So as you've had a business or school that have moved more remote learning. That sort of expands. The opportunities to take advantage are there demonstrably more attacks on schools this year. Are we just aware of them. Will the first thing that's always important to point out here is that it's hard if not impossible to count the dogs that don't bark there have been probably about three hundred fifty or more. Cyber incidents reported across the united states this year in schools in schools and others probably a few dozen have been ransomware but that said those are only incidents that have been publicly reported so in many cases schools. They don't wanna take the pr hit an embarrassing situation. They don't want people to know. They paid off a criminal group to get their systems up and running. They might just keep that on the dl and not notify anyone. Even though schools aren't the richest targets around one of the reasons that hackers focus on them is that unlike big businesses. They often aren't equipped to defend themselves. We have seen attackers really zero win. On some of these districts may or may not have built out. It departments in many cases in addition to them being sort of under funded over the course of years their it departments. The also had these really really insane strange just put on them so the coronavirus remote learning getting kids up and running with their chromebooks. Or what have you so. There's really a lot of moving parts here. And i think criminals are smart enough to take advantage of them. So yeah is there just sort of like a handful of people who are in charge in your typical school district of distributing the chromebooks and also guarding against malware. I mean i would say the vast majority of school districts they don't have dedicated cybersecurity professionals even in most districts aside from the larger ones. You don't have that much of a built out. it staff. I talked to the chief information. Security officer of seattle public. School district is a very large school district in the grand scheme of things the only have eighteen. It people for that entire district of that team. Only two of them are dedicated on cybersecurity. So when you're in a position where you are suddenly thrust into remote learning environment and you need to get tens of thousands of devices online with seattle. I think it was fifty three thousand devices for students alone. I mean you really spread thin across a very big network of devices and potential threats. The threat of ransomware attacks has extended to fertility clinics and company providing software for one of the covid vaccine. Trials and the human consequences can be harrowing. There was an incident in germany where a hospital was targeted with ransomware. And as a result of that who is actually in an ambulance on her way to the hospital had to be diverted into another facility about thirty minutes farther away and this wounded women ended up dying. She didn't get care especially needed to get so german. Prosecutors basically tried to connect those dots they were asking the question can we show in a legal way. Causation between these attackers can we show causation. That they actually causes woman's death and ended the day they couldn't it was more of a correlation not causation situation. And i think that was the closest that we've come collectively to getting to a point where we're saying. Oh there's actually a cyber attack that has taken someone's life Let's walk through how this happens. Let's say you are a school administrator or hospital. it percent what do you notice. I will typically you know if if you really if something's wrong with your laptop and you really need to get to work you'll call the. It guy you'll always it guy and you'll say hey what's up with my laptop. I can't log into my email. Then typically they'll run through some scans and see that something's wrong with the system. They'll eventually get some sort of communication from one of these ransom. Learn groups saying. Hey we're here we've gotten into your system. We've locked up your data and we want x. Number of bitcoin in response. So that's really when it sort of gets this point where a school or business has to decide okay. Are we going to alert law enforcement. Are we going to call an outside forensics firm to try to understand what happened. Have we backed up all of our data within our system. And how quickly will be able to get that back. Do we want to pay this ransom payment. Like is the tradeoff. Good enough for us to do that. So there's a lot of moving parts that a lot of Businesses or schools or hospitals have to evaluate is all as happens the baltimore schools. Where just by works. They shut everything down. They sort of put everything on pause for a couple of days. Is that standard. Yeah i can typically standard. I talked with a school district in southern california. A administrator notices email was down the. It guys said it's ransomware for sure. So they physically went to every device in their school district. So we're talking about a school district of six thousand kids. Went every room went to all of their offices. Disabled unplugged device in that entire school district. And that's that's one way you know sort of a crude way of trying to limit the spread of of these things and then obviously on the back end when all these problems need to go through each and every one of those devices can them makes your their clean. Get them back online. What how often do victims turn to outside help whether that's law enforcement or whether that is digital forensics company to help them abc's extremely common there is entire ecosystem cybersecurity firms specialized in this sort of work. So you have a forensic firm that might come in to try to understand. Hey this is exactly how they got in to your computer system. This is exactly the type of software that they're using. This is exactly the type of data that they took from your system. In addition to that you have other groups. That are adept at negotiating. They actually talk to these groups. They have long term relationships in some cases with many of these groups and they say we can talk them down from ten bitcoin to five bitcoin. Whatever whatever the the number is the so it is sort of an emerging field just within cybersecurity as this is becoming a bigger and bigger problem. How much money are we generally talking about. Because my husband actually just how to ransomware attack on his nonprofit theater company and the attackers were asking for fifteen hundred dollars in bitcoin and eventually they said you know what we're not gonna pay them. We have the backed up data but they did have this moment of thinking in the scheme of our business. It's not that much money like. Are we talking about people who are shooting for big amounts or you know are they targeting twenty five different places for relatively gettable sums across the security community. It's broadly understood that ransom demands are basically going up. The trend line is pointing upward. But it can vary between in the thousands of dollars like as as a case with with your husband. But if you're getting to a larger corporation you have some people who specialized in this area saying that ransom demands could be ten million twenty million dollars. Well so i mean. Obviously attackers are smart enough to know they're not going to go with to attend with a ten million dollar demand to a school district. That certainly can't pay that in. That would make it an easy decision for them. They're they're trying to find like the right price point as well where they can have some sort of a six rate. Do school districts do hospitals. Do these places tend to pay. It really varies. It depends on what type of data has been encrypted. It depends whether those school districts have backed up their data beforehand which would make sort of rebooting the system much easier but what is almost always true. Is that school very cagey about saying whether they paid. No one wants to say that. They paid off a hacker that they gave someone from a country in the side of the other side of the world. A million bucks get their systems online. It's a very difficult. Pr situation for any organization or school to tiptoe around because it says what your system is rable and that you're willing to pay or that you just were bad cybersecurity. I mean all of the above. And i think one of the sort of broader questions that the entire cyber community is really wrestling with is. Should you pay broadly speaking. Are we incentivizing hackers to keep taking advantage of schools or keep taking advantage of businesses if they keep on paying and i understand that argument completely. It's it's very straightforward point of view on the other hand. If your business is offline for two weeks or a month or if your schools taken off line paying off might be the better option to you if it means basically losing all of your customers or you know having kids go out of school for a month or so. Dave says it's a bit of a vicious cycle vulnerable systems plus a willingness to pay tends to lead to more attacks but the victims are only half of the equation. The other half the perpetrators behind that screen demanding. Bitcoin are part of a criminal industry. That is surprisingly organized. One of the interesting things that cyber security researchers really say is these groups oftentimes act almost as corporate entities. They're very professional. They have partnerships between groups at times they subcontract to specialists within the hacking profession. If they have you know someone who's particularly adept at getting into a system. They'll go to that person to try to launch their attack. So you'd really do have this sort of our in de element almost a within the hacking community when it when it comes to them trying to hone their craft and zero win an exactly the right targets when people are negotiating or even having a conversation with. The attackers are to be trusted. Like you know are. Are you gonna trustees folks if they say like okay. Pay us are fifteen hundred bucks in bitcoin. And actually you're going to get your data back or is that a terrible idea. You would think that criminals are not to be trusted in. Obviously they're they're not But at the end of the day these groups are also playing a long game when it comes to their business and they have as i said a reporter with some of these negotiators that work with businesses and schools. If they don't pay if they don't decryption data after you pay them money. Those negotiators will know for their subsequent clients and they will know to not advise clients in the future to pay. So you had this weird dynamic that develops were. The groups are actually like worried about their sort of like brand in some respects. That's completely fascinating. Yeah it's totally wild thing and one lawyer who works in a lot of these investigations like re recently told me we don't wanna get to the level buber comparing it to customer service. But they're like definitely getting to a point where once you pay up in some cases they're trying to be helpful so that in the future they're known as sort of an honest broker while attacks may be more. Frequent ransomware isn't new like with so many other things cove it just accelerated existing trent so we have just seen a growth in the amount of ransomware with some of these criminal groups that have been long established in countries around the world just gravitating toward an effective tool that they're using so when you talk to cybersecurity researchers who follow this closely attribution is very difficult but they tend to say that the countries in which these types of groups operate our might might be the ones that you tend to think of korea iran china countries in the soviet bloc or central asia countries that may tend to look away when cyber criminal groups within their own borders launch an attack on a us business and do foreign governments step in or they unhelpful. I think it's safe to say that the the reason why a lot of this activity oftentimes stems from those countries is because the government's take a more lax approach some of this hacking particularly if it's sort of geared at the united states the. Us government recently has tried to warn businesses against paying somewhere demands. They basically have looked at those states. In particular places like north korea and iran and they've issued warnings to companies saying. Hey if you're targeted by ransomware think twice about paying anyone who is affiliated with someone who sanctioned from those countries. You could violate sanction rules by actually paying up this ransomware. I was really struck by that. Yeah the treasury department was basically sort of saying. Gee even if you're a victim you might be maybe committing a crime here if you pay up. What was their reasoning. Their i mean. I think goes to that discussion that i was mentioning earlier about how we're creating a market for ransomware essentially and i think it's it makes sense to the. Us government's official policy as we shouldn't pay people on our sanction lists and create this market. That said if a company that employs ten thousand or twenty thousand americans has to choose between paying one of these things or laying people off. I mean that's a much different conversation. Be curious to see whether people in law enforcement federal regulators etcetera might take sort of a case by case approach to actually enforcing that sort of thing. I'm trying to figure out where all of this goes. As we maybe move to a post pandemic world Obviously people are gonna still do lots of stuff online. And that's not something. That's going away. But i wonder if you think we are going to keep seeing this increase in ransomware attacks or if this is maybe a bit of a bubble wrought by the pandemic. I think it's probably safe to assume that it will continue increasing. You will still have these criminal groups that make tens of millions of dollars per year doing this stuff who will continue to innovate continue to look for new ways to go after businesses. Continue to do that. Research and development that we mentioned earlier so. I think it's safe to say that. None of that's going to stop

Dave Bertie Seattle The Wall Street Journal Jessica United States Southern California Germany Baltimore ABC Bitcoin Wrestling Dave Korea Iran Central Asia
"theater company" Discussed on Ghost Light

Ghost Light

04:24 min | 8 months ago

"theater company" Discussed on Ghost Light

"Yeah, or maybe it should take away from the story is that we shouldn't let people who are Seventeen be National Guards in the National Guard. I think that's important when I called when you're in the bath when you're in the National Guard, you know what I mean? A national Guardsmen. Oh, right. You just said that. Yeah. Wow, it's lovingly calls itself home of the green monster as something which has proudly stated on the welcome sign as you enter Town most however know the creature by the name Flatwoods Monster or the Phantom of the Flatwoods this story started out as oral folklore and eventually became the town's claim to fame several chairs statues which by the way chair statues. I don't really know how to explain them, but they're like giant there's like giant chairs you sit in like you take pictures and like like this dog. Chairs so picture that players. Yeah that you like like tourist Harris like yeah. Yeah. Yeah, totally anyway and like they like crafted like the Flatwoods Monster into the chair. So it's like a big chair statue and there have been there have been multiple of those erected in the monsters honor and there's also a Flatwoods Monster Museum and a three-day Festival in its honor War dead. So yeah, they really latched onto that story. I mean lesson why else are going to go to Flatwoods, you know what I mean. Church, you know just to Flatwoods know we love flop. I'm just saying. Hey, I mean I want to go there I would love to go there me Merced it says that she would also love to go to the festival and I agree like we should go to the Festival it would be so fun and stood on the street and you can take pictures looked at pictures and you can take pictures with pictures pictures pictures. You can take pictures with like someone dresses up as a Flatwoods Monster and like you can take pictures of that. Yeah. She's cute dog. So also by the way, you know Mothman, right? So Mothman Town also known as Point Pleasant West Virginia is only a two-hour drive from Flatwoods. So Mothman like originated of hours away from this town and much later too. Cuz like like I said, this was in nineteen fifty-two. Yeah, so but yeah, it's kind of fun. Like you can go I mean Merced is rights. What the fuck is in the wash West Virginia that's coming out these insane Cryptids, but really that's the real investigation that should happen. Nearly fifty years later investigators concluded that the light was a meteor shower and the creature was a barn owl perched in a tree with shadows making it appear to be a large humanoid. Okay, but let's said you laugh but I don't know. I don't know if I believe it. Well, yeah because we're did they get off? Fiery redhead and robot and a poodle skirt. Yes, exactly. Where's the poodle skirt. So it says great it says page is mostly due to Kathleen maze description of the figure as having small claw, like hands clothing like folds and a head that resembled the Ace of Spades. So like barn owls like they did you have like they don't their head is not pointed but like with their nose and everything they do kind of have like I can see like the general shape but again, like I don't know if I don't know if I buy this an owl so long I know did you know the owls like kill people every year like, they're super dangerous. Excuse me? No, I did not have that. I mean, they're not like terrorists, but they like if they attack you they can like in Jerome badly..

Flatwoods Flatwoods Monster Museum National Guards Merced West Virginia Point Pleasant West Virginia Kathleen maze Harris Jerome
"theater company" Discussed on Ghost Light

Ghost Light

04:19 min | 8 months ago

"theater company" Discussed on Ghost Light

"Milquetoast not have ghosts and just doesn't it doesn't exist. That's true, too. That's true too. Like Do you think the theater that CTC was performing in was haunted? I don't know because that wasn't like some really just a theater. Yeah. Yeah. It was like a theater is like a black box in a building. Yeah like forever and I thought it was it was like an office building. It was like a big office turned into a black box. So it was like a warehouse of all these other offices so it wasn't really like a professor. Yeah. It reminds you of Shakespeare in Love for some reason. Yeah for some reason. Yeah for a very specific reason. Okay. So summer support seeing people and shapes in the mirrors as they prepare for shows one of the sources that Merced has pulled this from said that maybe the shadows in the mirror are the ghosts of former actors who are like putting on their own shows and like a shadow realm which is super cute and creepy and I love the wait and I buy it. I have a question. So yes, there's just a straight-up Shadow. Yeah. Yes. Yeah. There's like Shadows birth. There's like shadows and shapes in the mirrors explicitly and do they just like flit away kind of or you just like see a fucking Shadow. I mean like a place a little bit of both. I think they probably just like see like Shadows like passing through the years which is what is so scary especially cuz it's theaters are a little bit like sucks. You know, yeah. Yeah. No, I know. I just have a mirror like directly across from my bed. And then I they're like just came a point where as like I think I have to have to take that down. I think it's time to take that down my house growing up my room growing up in Tucson. Oh, yes. Yeah. It's oh you've been there. It's not really like a whole like took a closet and it's like a whole like wall of mirrors. Basically. Yeah. Yeah. It was like I looking but like I also saw on like which I saw like on which Tik-Tok that it only matters if it's silver-backed mirrors, like only silver-backed like like it's a type of mirror and it's like how like a lot of old mirrors were made like in like, I don't know home. Gear but basically a long time ago, they're like, they're Silverback. So it's like literally like the back of the mirror like silver. It's like, you know, this ones that like those ones like I have in my apartment right now actually, which is just make sure Blake can't hear me because he'd get really scared. But basically, you know, like how like there's like this meme is that like look dirty because it looks like there's like all those like freckles. Yes doesn't like others are often times like Silverbacks. So like looks like it's like wiping it and you can't get anything cuz it's behind the mirror..

Blake Merced professor Shakespeare Tucson
"theater company" Discussed on Ghost Light

Ghost Light

03:41 min | 8 months ago

"theater company" Discussed on Ghost Light

"I remember that. Yeah. Yeah, I heard it. So I just ask you like if I say a word that like is objectively not the right word. Please interrupt me and tell me because I don't know where my brain goes the second the microphone comes on. Okay. So the Sacramento Civic Repertory company became a hub of theater that provided a creative outlet for many in the area and throughout the suburbs of Sacramento one such person to make use of this beloved theatrical troupe was in caps lock off Hanks some of his earliest acting was done with the Sacramento Civic Repertory company. Everyone's favorite man. He really is everyone's favorite man. But like and like I get why phone not listed I'm not speaking out of it. I like don't notice about to happen. I actually cool. I'm ahead but I don't know. I love him and I I just bought I just I guess I don't know why he's everyone's favorite. Is he just like everyone is he is he's everyone's favorite because he's like a non problem. Yeah quite straight man. Yeah, I think like everyone was like like during like the big like me to like when everyone is like literally every week like a different thing was coming out. I think that's kind of when it started where like people not Tom Hanks like and another event totally see like my fav. Like non-problematic White Street, man is Paul rod. Oh, okay. So like yeah, I'm just saying like like like one. Yeah. Yeah. He's cutie. Okay. Well eventually the nonprofit Sacramento Civic Repertory company. It's really a mouthful evolved into a for-profit professional Theatre becoming the Sacramento Theatre Company during the 1980s. I'm glad they changed their name because it's it's a lot nicer and shorter. However, it remains support of space for up-and-coming theater creators and produces different learning programs to this day from 2003 to 2006 money came together to give this much-loved company a facelift and the building a home to the Sacramento Theatre Company was remodeled and renovated three different performance venues were created besides resulting in an improved mainstage theater with larger dressing rooms and a new laundry area.

Sacramento Civic Repertory Sacramento Theatre Company Sacramento Paul rod Tom Hanks
"theater company" Discussed on Ghost Light

Ghost Light

04:53 min | 8 months ago

"theater company" Discussed on Ghost Light

"Know, I know it's good. It's good. It's good. It's it's just funny cuz like I think I think it's just funny cuz I think we both I was about to do it needed. I just think we both default to are we not doing them anymore know we can do that. That's totally fine. Those are stick. Hi everyone. Welcome to Ghostlight. Hi. I'm I'm saying I'm Lina and this is a show where we talk about haunted theaters. If you haven't figured that one out yet. So welcome aboard Explorers Club. This is the first time we're actually recording in a very long time. Yeah, we kind of recorded the first eight episodes or so in August. And this is our first time back on it off is really good to be recording again since the release of Ghostlight. Yeah, it's nice. Yeah, just more leisurely. Yeah, and we feel we're talking earlier and we feel probably a little bit too confident at this point just like with just like the vibe so it's probably will only get more chaotic, but thank you for listening and thank you for sticking with us because it means a lot. We love you. We love you. How are you today? Lena? I'm good. I had a busy day. I was working and then Yeah, that's pretty much it. I'm excited to be here. I'm drinking some Gatorade green love that. How's everyone at home? How are you all doing? I'm doing good. Good. Yeah. I'm happy to hear that. How are you chase? I'm good. I have a dog only had a donut and an iced coffee today, which I think I've said before on the show somehow within eight episodes. So that concerns me a little bit. But so I'm pretty I'm feeling pretty high-energy, which is good for them. Yeah, that's good. I haven't eaten anything. Great other than my blue Gatorade. We really help first here. Okay, so I I don't know. I mean should we just kind of jump into it? What are we doing today? Sacramento Theatre Company? Yeah, let's just jump in great. Let's do it. This script was prepared by Mercedes and I will be your host. I will be telling us your guys lovely story your guide. So a little bit like this is like kind of like a prologue. This is like a deep history cut of the Sacramento Theatre Company wage, which is in 8-4 18-49. The Eagle Theater was built in Sacramento, California and the Eagle Theater offered a variety of entertainment for folks journeying to California during the gold rush home as well as entertainment for Pioneer settlers..

Ghostlight Eagle Theater Sacramento Theatre Company California Lina Sacramento Explorers Club Mercedes Lena
Sumner Redstone dies at 97; media mogul who said 'content is king'

Todd Schnitt

00:36 sec | 11 months ago

Sumner Redstone dies at 97; media mogul who said 'content is king'

"Is denied ever of using anyone. The billionaire media mogul has died. Sumner Redstone has died. He was 97. He started with a family own drive in movie theater company National Amusements and turned it into a media empire that included CBS, Viacom, Showtime, MTV, Nickelodeon Comedy Central Paramount Pictures Radio, the Blockbuster movie rental chain and Simon and Schuster. He was one of America's richest men. Forbes estimated his personal fortune at more than six billion. In dollars. He's credited with popularizing multiplex cinemas.

Sumner Redstone Forbes National Amusements Schuster Viacom Nickelodeon CBS Showtime Simon America MTV
"theater company" Discussed on Hold On, We Got This.

Hold On, We Got This.

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"theater company" Discussed on Hold On, We Got This.

"We formed this company with the goal of bringing lesser known works to the stage, and have I mean. You guys do evil dead also do You do there's one show in particular and forgive me? I'm totally forgetting. It might be able to you one show in particular almost every year. Is that right? Yeah, it was evil, Dead Evil W darn three times. and I'm sure come back again. It's we did the. We had the Colorado Premiere of it. Back in two thousand, thirteen I think no twelve. I think something like that. And we premiered in Colorado and it was what I loved about it evil dead. It's silly can't be. You'RE NOT GONNA. Find a whole lot of you know. Tony winning art there. But. People into the theater that had never stepped foot in a theater before. Yeah. Yeah, it was so rewarding. I have these like you know big bro, guys. They come to hugging me and be like I. Love this place. It's awesome, and it just brings everybody in, and so we kind of joke once we started doing that kind of stuff. We realize that was our audience. Yeah, and that's I mean you and I have talked about before. Making theatre more accessible to more audience members than just your. Typical theater demographic exactly. There's other companies in Denver doing rogers and Hammerstein really well. We didn't need to do that, too. So. Things like evil dead, and if you've done reefer madness, musical, three times and That's like the real close. We missed that one. Oh my gosh. We did it on four twenty a couple of years ago Nice Nice. I mean you're kind of almost like you know. The has as to filmmaking. There's there's big productions. Rodgers Hammerstein stuff, and then you have the Kevin Smith's world. At a contract or the independent filmmakers so almost to a degree, maybe I'm oversimplifying it, but you're almost like a Kevin Smith of of Denver Theater. That title.

Rodgers Hammerstein Colorado Kevin Smith Denver Theater Denver Tony rogers
Shetler Studios In New York City Closes Due To Economic Downturn

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:31 min | 1 year ago

Shetler Studios In New York City Closes Due To Economic Downturn

"Theaters large and small across the country are closed. Due to the coronavirus pandemic which means a lot of businesses that support them are also on hold and one of those with Shetler studios in Manhattan. It was a place where New York theater artists from. The famous to the yet to be discovered auditioned and rehearsed but shetler studios announced that a can't hold on as Jeff London reports this iconic studios closing his sent shockwaves through the theater. Community cabaret producer. Robert Schneider says he worked on almost all of his shows. It Shetler Studios. Shetler was a big blow to a lot of us because to us. That's the home. That's the home. Wear whatever you see on stage. That finished product was all created at Shutler. Schneider says it was affordable so it attracted everyone from Broadway stars to up-and-comers he recalls waiting for an elevator that took forever with a group of college students. And I hear one of the girls say boy I just WanNa get an agent and be successful. I don't know what's going to happen next for me. At the same time she gets on the elevator the other elevator doors open and I swear to you. Christine Baranowski walks out to me. This is incredible. You're watching someone who's reached the peak of their journey right next to someone who's just beginning their journey but that's Shetler and that happened like on a daily basis. Shetler is part of the New York theater community as much as Phantom of the opera or something way more visible is theater and cabaret producer Jennifer Ashley Temper. The second that this was all announced and I posted about it so many people came out of the woodwork. To like talk about Shetler. There's no one that hasn't worked there when he heard. Shetler was closing Lin Manuel Miranda's sent out a tweet recalling how he tried out Hamilton material there. Oh my goodness. The odds of sadness in grief over the death of the studios has been literally overwhelming owner run. Shetler opened his facility. Thirty years ago it grew to twenty three thousand square feet on three floors and we pride ourselves in being a professional home away from home. Not only for teaching acting and singing but for auditions rehearsals in performing all in complex for Fifteen Years Janice Goldberg Co directed. The End Theater Company. A tiny off Broadway group and says she sometimes spent five days a week at Shetler studios. It's almost visceral loss. If you've spent so many hours in a place doing something you love and bringing ideas and people's work and your own work to fruition have that energy behind you and then all the sudden that's taken away forever. It's a blow but owner Ron. Shetler says he felt he had no choice but to close the enormous way to finances required to put everything on hold in the fact that everything that we do in the studios can't be done under the confines of the covert Pandemic Protocol and that the entertainment world will be the last open up again. That made the decision quite imminent. I DIDN'T WANNA stick my head in the sand and just Deny what was going on again producer Robert Schneider. It's very hard for me. Because the beginning of my career in the city was all done at Shetler I practically lived at Shetler and now I'm going to have to find new home but those memories I would not trade for anything for NPR news. I'm Jeff London in New York.

Shetler Shetler Studios Robert Schneider Producer New York Jeff London New York Theater End Theater Company Janice Goldberg Co Manhattan Christine Baranowski Lin Manuel Miranda NPR Shutler Jennifer Ashley Temper RON
Shares of movie theater giant AMC spike after report signals Amazon’s interest in potential takeover

The KFBK Morning News

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Shares of movie theater giant AMC spike after report signals Amazon’s interest in potential takeover

"Yeah in premarket trade this morning Christina shares of AMC up almost twenty five percent it's a report from the Daily Mail that's as Amazon may have been talking about a potential takeover of the movie theater company nothing

AMC Amazon Christina
The coronavirus lockdown opens the door to VR theater

The 3:59

12:38 min | 1 year ago

The coronavirus lockdown opens the door to VR theater

"So you've got an interesting piece on VR. As immersive theatre now. I know you're a big fan of of theater. What what is this experience like? What what is this experience about? Short so for a couple months now There's been a game or an experience in VR Called the under presents that was created by tender clause along with a theater company called Pie Hole And with OCULUS and it is a game but it also has actors performing in it so they created this as a way to look at immersive theatre. Vr that was back in November and it was supposed to stop with the live performances in March. Then Corona virus happen and decided to extend the performances for these actors. This is now their their main job. And there's also been an opportunity to look at how this experience can grow what what theater really is in Vr. It's taken on a different so I thought it'd be great to revisit and talk to these actors about what they've been learning. What what is that experience like? Obviously you've tried it You been in the immersive world. What is the like s? So it's not like theater the way you'd expect it and it's also not like zoomed theater and I want to say that because all of a sudden now we are surrounded by zoom as a theater experience and now this you know you look at Saturday night. Live you look at Hamilton I had a friend who acted in something. That's where everybody's in a great talking. You get the opposite here. You don't get faces and you don't get is you get cartoon because that's what. Vr Can do right now. Graphically and we can't scanner faces. And you're moving through that space. What you do get is a lot of movement. A hands. FIT body movement. The actors can talk. But you can't so if you ever have been to a Immersive theater experience usually in big cities. Famous one asleep. No more. You wear mask and you're not allowed to speak that's kind of what it's like you're an observer moving through the space able to move your hands and do a few things but not much more than that so you with a lot theater Cinema right idea the point. Is you sort of connect with the performance? Right sort of see there is you could sort of see their facial recognition the facial expressions. What the story about what what this whole experiences about. But you can't do that with this experience. So how is that likely? How did you connect with the performance? If you couldn't really connect with the performers what's really wild subtlety of it and when you go in you think houses can work then you not in. There aren't always actors. It's like a you know or were other people. Sometimes they'll pop up sometimes. You're alone there other things like a game to do when you find someone they will acknowledge you and if you're another perform if you're another audience member could Nikola tip of the head or movement of the hands there's also some magic gestures and things you can do. You could take off your mask and conjure weird things. That's another part of the game but the performers have different dashboard. They can see. Who's coming and going may even know who individuals are not who they are but they can find individual you know anonymous identities so they have regulars and in a sense they can craft the performances to Kinda see they want to kind of get a feel for that so they said as they go they start to develop this relationship even with actor even with audience members who can't speak to them which sounds weird. But it's it's wild now this fascinating look at. How many times have you done experience every time you gone in? I've got in like like somewhere. Like the the over a dozen less than fifty. You know like I would say in some sort of round like that. Far Less than what What what regulars would be doing right. But I mean that's still a decent number of visits right so I'm just curious how the experience has evolved over time especially as you've gone back in consuming. They know it's not you say but they know that you're like a regular Has performances like how have they evolved over time? So I didn't get a chance this weekend unfortunately to do. What is a new thing where they're expanding into a variety larger variety performance or they're trying to build up theatricality but when you find someone it? I found them to be very simple very direct. Like little almost like mine performances. Where you kind of go with them do something for a bit And You wonder. What am I supposed to be doing right now and you think ok well stop do something else. And you kind of almost like Improv. You of just started doing this thing and it seems kind of silly but you're all doing it together and there's something comforting in that that's how I found it is is it's not like A. It's not Shakespeare but it is These little moments and what I think about that is like it's the beginning of something so if that answers at like if feels like like little little dives and I think they're also knowledge that like unlike theater where you're GONNA be there for two hours. I could take up this headset in five minutes or could keep it on for an hour and they have to address both sides of that Because you're not gonna want to necessarily spend a finite long amount of time in VR right. Now there's an interesting point story when one actor talks about people you know getting more the virtual world a lot of questions about that but the idea was like this is sort of a reaction to lock down. Potentially Mathis station were frustration. But like how did that work? Like do people when he says getting violent like what does that actually mean people like attempting to attack the performance virtual lure or what did that actually mean as a question and the thing that? I talked with them for about an hour and a half so I was like trying to put this in a one story that made sense to clarify on that. They're only so many actions in the game. It was interesting. I think what the actors were doing was observing more micro motions like so. They were saying that they felt. The people seem more bound that they were getting into people's spaces more but also and not to speak on their behalf. But there are there are some things you can do like their certain items like could be like a knife or like. You can't shoot people but like you know like their their props in the world and I think if you bring them close to somebody you kind of do that make it look like you were. You're bludgeoning somebody but like you know I think that that's about it and the person does not die. It's just like but the play acting of it in a way it's like a play acting out and I think there's also like the idea of like a respectful spaces standing back versus getting in people's faces And so it sounded like in the beginning. It was like a a pushy intense Another actor in the show so there's a more intense needy sort of feel but then it became more about emotional like reception. It kind of became kinder over. Time will people. I thought that was amazing. The here also those interesting how they observed how we perform. How like like that Like that laughter seems like choking you know that if you see someone laugh and then people would start to enhance those gestures like a like Emoji. They start to do these things that represent certain emotions and it's like they're becoming these like mine performers. There's also by the way there's also a whole discord group for the under presents that they work basically like a like a very active chat where people are also sharing secrets. Kind of like an animal crossing secrets. You have the unders- present secrets and they had different. Totems they carry around in ways to represent themselves so like a whole new sub languages emerging which is a little crazy intimidating. If you're a first timer but I think that's a really interesting thing that happens in a lot of like really invested world's well so this is interesting because it seemed like there is obviously a to entry with this. You obviously need to have the hardware. What is the minimum threshold? Like what what type of gear that you need to actually take part in this experience yet so you need you need Vr headset and you need. You need certain types of your headsets It started out on oculus question rift and In then it has moved onto steam VR. But what you need versus the old phone. Vr cardboard headsets or even oculus go just before the real limit. There's you can't move your hands around so like things that have with six degree of freedom or the ability to do not hand tracking it but in the future it might be that too. It's the controllers that can make your hands move. I think that's really important because without that you are just kind of like doing this. So your hands kind of become the way you act. So could you like if you had not goes go? Could you experienced this or would work at all? Yeah you need a quest you need a or now with a PC VR headset. That can get into steam but still that's a limited group of people. Vr headsets that is that also ecstasy. -Vivor yes so anything. That can use team so so that you could use a you could use. I think Microsoft the are a lot of heads now can hook into steam in in different ways and but yeah but he's still need the gaming PC It's definitely limited and I think that's the big point. Vr Is that right now. The are has its own set of APPS versus the world of APPs that we live in. Which are the phone? Google Apple Your pc your Mac. I think in the future. Those are obviously going to dovetail. But we haven't seen that yet really so it. I think that's the hard part. Is you think. Well what do I need to buy extra versus? What can I use that? I already have so look. Vr Has Been Vr has been on the rise. Because like you can't buy those things are pretty much sold out Even facebook has talked about. You know the the success of Tad with that gear. Obviously we've we've got a captive audience. The are right now. People are literally stuck at home And is a I deal forward escape but do you think. Vr Theater has experience appeal to people even after lockdown ends. And we all go back out to the real world yet totally. Do I think that what we're looking at now is like the Beta test. That was already in the works but is now reached a different level of intensity because you have a captive a global captive audience that that is trying to figure these things out work tools ways to connect but companies are trying to figure this out you know had tele presence. We'd seen this at Mobile Congress and other places you looked at stuff. Were in a ways to protect yourself other places now. It's just taking on a different level of intensity that I think it's interesting because like immersive theatre for instance or even theater is a really hard thing to experience for a Lotta people you. We live in New York where you take that for granted that you can go see your show. Even the tickets are expensive and hard to come by and immersive theatre is like a rare flower. Thing that POPs up disappears really. It's a privilege to go to those things I hope it doesn't cannibalize those worlds. But I think it can definitely expand the reach of that to do things that you could can't get to or want to build. Maybe it's like a directing tool is asking them about Tender clause about who who created this about active audience members performing more bill building in his a creative tool. It sounds like they're not ready to do that yet. Not that they're not interested but it's a different thought process and I think that right now. It's working well for what they've got. They're GONNA keep expanding. But I think about like you know what if you got a bunch of actors or a bunch of people building inexperienced together Or do Improv. Or whatever you know and we could use it like that So yeah I think there's a lot of possibilities

VR Vr Theater Congress Nikola New York Facebook Microsoft Google Mathis Station
Cinema owners are hard hit by coronavirus closures

The Frame

06:39 min | 1 year ago

Cinema owners are hard hit by coronavirus closures

"Tens of thousands of theaters around the globe are closed for the foreseeable future. The major studios have many upcoming theatrical releases and distributors are either accelerating the premiers of their films on video on demand and streaming platforms or bypassing theatrical releases entirely. It's an existential crisis for movie theater owners who already were facing flat or declining admissions North America before the Global Pandemic Patrick Corcoran is the vice president and chief communications officer for the National Association of Theatre Owners. Patrick welcome to the show. Thank you John How are you? I'm well? Let's first talk about the scope of the problem. John Fithian the head of NATO said quote overnight. We went from an industry that makes fifteen billion a year to one that is not going to make a penny for three or four months unquote. So what does that mean for your member companies? Well what that means is they need help Just like any public facing business right now. That's closed off. You know sense of public responsibility or because of government action. They're not bringing in any revenue which means they can't pay their employees. They can't pay their bills. They can't pay their rent or their mortgage so we need help from the government Direct help to our employees so that they can be sustained through however long. This crisis lasts Also won't guarantees for our members and small business administration loans for our members so that companies large and small all across this country can get through this crisis so they can open their doors when the crisis passed ad be there to serve their communities and to have jobs available their for their employees when they come back how many people theater staff you know people work the ticket office. Maybe do the clean have been laid off overall. We'd play about one hundred fifty thousand people in the US and the vast majority of them are laid off Executives and management at headquarters are working with no pay a lot of cases strong to talk to bags talking to their landlords. And and all the people say. Oh you know money. To and as far as you know without revenue coming in we simply cannot pay our workers on top of that. There's another big issue. And that is that major studios including Universal Disney and Warner Brothers so far are postponing releases or collapsing. The normal time period between a theatrical release in films appearing on video on demand or streaming and to me that feels like a potentially fundamental shift in. How movies are released and I will. Argue could be an even greater threat to theaters than the corona virus in and of itself. What is NATO's position on that our position on that as we are in close communication with the studios as our our members and in a crisis situation people do things that they would not normally do and we'll continue to do when the crisis is over. We understand since theaters are not open and movies that were in theaters a week and a half ago. We're doing fine but are suddenly now. Taking a no revenue the studios need that revenue. So if they have to move those titles into the home quicker we understand completely. There's no theatrical window at stake because there's no theatrical right now in terms of titles that are delayed. We respect those decisions to delay them till later in the year or into next year with the exception of two movies. One which trolls Universal which decided to go straight to video We think that was a mistake. They probably should rescheduled as they did with the fast and furious nine. Sometimes they're going to have to make money and hand them off to streaming. That's going to happen. Occasionally but the vast majority of titles vast majority of studios are merely delayed. We're talking with Patrick Corcoran from the National Association of theatre owners so NATO said of universal's decision to bypass a theatrical release for trolls world tour quote. Exhibitors will not forget this. What does that mean out a threat? It's it's a simple statement of fact I mean we were in and are in a crisis situation. The way that universal announced it the way they described. It were deeply unhelpful. To theatrical it added to the perception that there was this existential threat beyond the corona virus that is simply not the case and theater owners will of course make their own determinations in the future and as always about what they do in terms of studio policies when this crisis is over the business model still obtains short windows. Do not make the studios any more money. We have some data that were were getting looked at the suggests that the studios actually make less money in the home when they have shorter windows. And you can look over the last fifteen years in show the just incredible shrinkage of the transactional home video market. It's gone from twenty four point. Nine billion dollars in two thousand four to nine point three billion last year a sixty two percent decline people are not they're behavior in their home is not going toward transactional home video when it's going towards streaming and streaming of the second or third window so people can obviously wait people say they're not going to wash Pretty much saying no to it. Larger publicly held theater chains might have access to credit or cash that smaller independent chains or mom and pop operators of theaters. Don't is there a greater threat to us? Thanks to the smaller chains or the independent theaters than there are to the bigger chains right now. I think the threat is across the board and one of the elements of the relief package. That's being negotiated in Congress right now with the administration is for Small Business Administration loans. That will be aimed directly at the kind of businesses that you're talking about the smaller theatre companies smaller mom and pop kind of Dang across the country. And there's also the element of the loan guarantees that will be aimed at larger companies generally and what's necessary for theater owners. It's what's necessary for restaurant owners bars and restaurants all these things that right now have either extremely reduced revenue or no revenue at all. They've got to get through this period of time because I think what what the real risk here is along with the need to fight this pandemic and get that under control is when it's done. We can't have destroyed the economy and you know you talk about vital businesses but these are vital businesses in every community across the country.

Nato Patrick Corcoran John Fithian Vice President And Chief Commu North America United States Government Universal Disney Small Business Administration Dang Congress Warner Brothers National Association Of Theatr
How social distancing is affecting performers

The Frame

03:12 min | 1 year ago

How social distancing is affecting performers

"Life during an active pandemic. Means a lot of lifestyle changes with social distancing as the best defense against the spread of cove in nineteen. We can't attend performing arts in person for the foreseeable future with virtually every live performance canceled across the country all of the artists and professionals who create that live theater music and dance are now out of a job. So we're checking in with Kristy Edmunds. She's the artistic and executive director for Ucla Center for the Performing Arts Christie. Welcome back to the frame angst on. So let's start first with your organization. You've had to cancel pretty much. Every performance going forward is that right. Yeah what it is. Is we work in a season at the center for the art of performance and all of the programming. Now that would end through you know up until June Completes OUR SEASON and I've had to postpone all of the projects that were going on there. We've really worked to reschedule. Everyone into the future. I WanNa ask you about their performers themselves about how they've been affected a lot of them have been traveling. They've made plans to come. Visit your venue other venues in conversations with your own staff and with other arts leaders. How are the performers handling this? And what are the biggest issues facing them right now for the international artists? You're going through a variety of different things. We had to international companies here that were directly coming towards Los Angeles and Cap. Ucla and one was ladysmith. Black Mambazo and the other was Puerto Parolee from Canada. A theater company so we began immediately working with them to see how we could support them. As the you know deepening realization of what was going to happen. Would we let them know we were going to work two words postponement and with the Canadian company? They were notified that Quebec was going to put them into some form of quarantine upon their return because they've been in the US in the case of Ladysmith Black Mambazo. Who would've been performing here? You know tomorrow night in Rice Hall. Their tour was counseling and Around city after city closures. And we had them here so that they could rest a little bit because they just flown from South Africa and then what we decided was do the performance with no one in the hall and record it and figure out later how we could find a way to share that with people which will working on. Now they too would face Different kinds of restrictions on their return back to South Africa. So there's that whole sequence of things with local artists and national artists you're experiencing the same thing. We began a process because we're in touch with hundreds of artists at any given time. You have a duty of care to the artis right away so we were working to see where they were how we could help in what way. Us artists and others who are in Europe the US embassies were not open at all and so that creates complications with their visas and various other things so we had to connect people to immigration. Lawyers could help various things like that.

United States Ucla Center Executive Director Ladysmith Black Mambazo Rice Hall South Africa Ucla Los Angeles Europe Canada Quebec
A Chat With Guy Gsell, President & Founder of Field Station Dinosaurs

Dose of Leadership

10:31 min | 1 year ago

A Chat With Guy Gsell, President & Founder of Field Station Dinosaurs

"Now. Let's join a conversation with Guy Gazelle the president and Chief Executive Producer of field station dinosaurs here on those leadership guy. Welcome the show so happy to have you here. It's great to be here. My curiosity is piqued. I have so many questions first and foremost I'm a kid I was. I guess every boy's goes to kind of girls. Go through horseface think little boys go through dinosaur phases maybe right. I was like a dinosaur fanatic. It was a freak about dinosaurs. Now we see more and more girls are into the dinosaurs in fact one of the most popular web series now is Dyno Dana. Yeah that's right. That's right. I've seen that that it had really gone out of fashion have they. They just always consistently popular yeah when I was putting my business plan together and I I was going out to investors trying to convince them to invest in a dinosaur park which is not something that exists you know really and because what I had to sell was the popularity of dinosaurs yeah and that the dinosaurs have been popular so they I sparked the imagination. You're in the eighteen eighties. They were lines around the block right to see the first dinosaurs in in London and in Philadelphia the the biggest blockbuster movie of the of the nineteen teens was was Gertie. The dinosaur which is a which is a cartoon in on the biggest blockbuster movie. The of twenty eighteen was drastic world three. I mean it's just has never has never gone down right. Why the FA- I mean I guess I guess it's intuitive who'd of why we're so fascinated with him because he seems so unreal I guess but what do you think the fascination is around. I think that they seem unreal but they were real and that's the fascination and that's what kids love about them because at an age where more and more things taken away from kids so there is no Santa Claus there is no tooth fairy. There is no Easter Bunny. There is no abominable snowman but but there is this they were real. We never take the dinosaurs away from the kids and the other thing that I think that really resonates with children is they have a shaky sense of time a few days in a while two years ago seventeen million years years ago. That's all the same to a little kid but when you tell them they lived right here so here in Derby we have a you you know a tyrannosaurus which is the kind of dinosaurs that actually marine reptile that lived right here in Kansas Yeah and when you tell them they lived here right where you are that really resonates with kids. They're like Oh. This giant thing was here that I think is what's interesting you so. I oh I think back to that. When I was that age you know eight nine when I was just so every tunnel to the library has picking a book doing learn everything that could about it and this isn't the seventies and when I found out that these lived here and I remember going to one of the I guess it was called the on this fear here at the time it was used to be the old original library and they had you know those fossils of this marine animal lived here and I'm like what you know. This was an ocean just fascinating. It's interesting that you put it that way. Yeah how how okay so. How did it all start so were you fascinated with dinosaurs as a kid yeah I was? I might really really early. Earliest memory was going to the New York world's fair in the in the nineteen sixty five at the world's for ran two years but I only remember number nineteen sixty five to sixty four and they had the the very famous sinclair dinosaur exhibit and I remember that exhibit and being really fascinated with with that and you know my first my favorite book when I was a kid was Danny and the dinosaur the whole dinosaur kids still read that makes me very happy happy and if I go anywhere and I say have any of you have read this book all the kids for his hands so yes now. I did not stay a dinosaur this or fanatic I mean that was something from my childhood that that I remembered fondly search like dinosaurs went ahead kids of my own taking them to the American Museum of Natural History three to see the dinosaur bones Was You know a big highlight of of being a dad for kids that age but I came back to the dinosaurs really when I started working in the exhibit business and how do we get involved in the business. I mean were you kind of looking at your background where you you integrate drama theatre acting. That was kind of what you thought your dream. Your path was going to be yes so I worked in the theatre. My my whole career as of of playwright as stage manager I did. I did some acting I became the managing director of a theater company. I mean I sort of worked my way up what you would call a theater generalist and so I was working at a theater in Red Bank New Jersey in we've did the capital campaign and we built a brand new theater and what happened is that caught the attention of some New York theater producers they were developing. I Am Exhibit Hall in The New York Times building in Times Square and because I had years of theater experience and I had just built a brand new building just done exactly what they wanted to do and almost built from scratch an organization they hired me to come in and and develop Ben. I was the original director of Discovery Times Square so that's how I got into the exhibit business guys in the theater we're going into the exhibit business and they hired a guy from the theater to go into the exhibit business with them and it was in the exhibit business and we did. King Tut and Titanic Harry Potter we did the the largest taurine exhibits that are that are currently out there and in the exhibit business we were constantly doing testing trying to figure out what what what exhibit to bring in next and dinosaurs always scored the highest every every time we did any kind of Nielsen intesting audience testing dinosaurs came in as the thing that was going to be the most popular and it wasn't appropriate. We had fairly low ceilings. Nothing being big enough to bring in a giant dinosaur. We were doing more high end. Shows like King Tut. We did the densities girls the producers didn't I think that animatronic dinosaurs really was a good match with the Dead Sea Scrolls so I got the idea then I said yes I should somebody should go out out there and do an outdoor animatronic dinosaur exhibit in New Jersey and sort of hit me that is actually the most qualified person to do that so in what way why why well I had the exhibit experience. I've grew up in North North Jersey just outside of New York City so I knew the the area. I knew exactly what would happen. I just built a exhibit hall. I had just built a theater so I had a lot of experience launching things and building things so I don wow so. Let's hang hang on so that that nudging that you've got he say okay I'm going to we need to put this dinosaur park. In New Jersey came in a dream and a PIFF AENA calling thing on a train on a journey what if you had to look back in retrospect and evaluate why this calling you think is it because you like the excitement of creating an exhibit. Do you like the educational aspect of it. What do you what what is it So I spent twelve of my years in theater. I spent working in children's theatre. touring internationally with a theater company called the paper. APOR bag players so teaching kids entertaining kids that is something that that that I really like and and understand hand so that aspect of it is very exciting to me. and that's what we do there. I mean in addition to Amtrak dinosaurs we have over forty live chain games and shows and activities that kids participate in so it's. I really did take my my years as a theater artist and combine line that with my experience in the exhibit business and my experience in in administration and and and management and I said I'm just gonNA put these altogether and I'm just GonNa Start this dinosaur park so sitting on the train you felt this was the purpose of calling. It was so strong that you immediately jobbers is something that you ruminated marinated over for quite a while so I not a fool so I was gonNA. Just quit my job I because because I had been working in the theater and had done a capital campaign. I knew a number of people who were both philanthropists but I also knew a number RAV people who were had had done some investing in theater had done investing in Broadway shows and I went went to them and I said to this my my business partners now my business partners then my perspective business partners and explain to them the the allure of dinosaurs and why I thought this would work and I said I need some seed money. I and the seed money was enough for me to quit my job and to scout out locations and try to secure location for the park and to find out more more about the business of dinosaur park because they exist. They're not they're not as big in North America much bigger in Asia and there are many more in Europe than than here it and find where I would find these animatronic dinosaurs and what they would cost and sort of got a business plan together so those investors said yes we. We are excited by this. We think this is great. We see the good work.

Dinosaur Park New York City New Jersey King Tut Guy Gazelle Red Bank New Jersey The New York Times American Museum Of Natural His President Trump Dyno Dana Chief Executive Producer North America Managing Director Derby Gertie Nielsen North North Jersey Discovery Times Square
How Portland’s black community and police are sharing their stories through theater

PBS NewsHour

01:35 min | 2 years ago

How Portland’s black community and police are sharing their stories through theater

"Portland Oregon has had its own history with racial discrimination and tension with the police there's a new effort underway to address those tensions special correspondent cat Weiss reports when the theater companies attempt to change the city's racial ecology through the arts so to speak it's part of our ongoing series on arts and culture campus on a recent morning an old fire station turned play house was packed with theatergoers but this was not a typical theater crowd it was a who's who of Oregon law enforcement police officers FBI agents district attorneys and judges they were joined by prominent community and civil rights leaders thank you so much all of you I'm a little overwhelmed just by just looking out and seeing who's in the room Kevin Johnson his wife Leslie mine as are the co founders of the August Wilson red door project a Portland based arts organization this is Bob or Robert day retired deputy chief of the Portland police bureau in our partner in crime we really have believe that there is some opportunity here and some work to be done both on behalf of the black community and on the criminal justice system over the last few years the three have formed an unusual partnership to spark new conversations and ways of thinking about race relations in Portland played and they're using the stage to help bridge the divide when you're talking about issues of race you can't

Oregon Kevin Johnson Leslie Mine BOB Deputy Chief Partner Portland Cat Weiss FBI
Jeff Daniels ('To Kill a Mockingbird') on playing Atticus Finch

Popcorn with Peter Travers

13:33 min | 2 years ago

Jeff Daniels ('To Kill a Mockingbird') on playing Atticus Finch

"Hi, everybody. I'm Peter Travers. And this is popcorn where we tell you. What is popping in the culture? And my guest today. Jeff Daniels who has multiple wards and the way I looked at it, he's too modest to say he's just been nominated for Tony Ward as best actor for tequila Mockingbird on Broadway, which is totally deserved. I don't even have to blow smoke with you. You know, I actually loved this, you know. Well, it's very nice. I think too. So are you just completely in Newark to all this now? It's you have your Emmys. You've been nominated for Tony before for God of carnage. Does it? What impact does getting nominated for an award have, you know, it's, it's? It is an honor to be nominated because I've been there when I wasn't and, and this was a big season for drama big season for drama Broadway, there, a lot of them and, you know, Mockingbird didn't get in as best new play did that make you stomp around for a couple of minutes when they will stop arounds big phrase. But, but it it goes to whatever the reasons are it goes to show that it's not automatic. You can't just go on, then I'll get nominated, and it's still you wake up in the morning. Bill ness. You wanna be invited to the big party, you know, and, and it is an honor to be there. And I, I noticed that when I was nominated for God carnage. I was probably the first big award. I'd ever been Emmys came later and all that. But I was in that room in Radio City Music hall, and I looked around at all the great work. That was all in one place. And these are just the people were nominated. There's other work that didn't get in that was, and you just feel I'm just glad to get it took it to the party. You really now anything after that, you know, would be great, but it really is to get in. Take something to well, and there's something about the Broadway the theater community, and I'm speaking to you as theater guy. Because back in Michigan. You have your own gross theater. You know this is something that matters to you. And you have even before we start talking about to kill a Mockingbird. You've signed on for one year doing this show. Nobody does anymore all stars. Don't know. Working after's, who need the job or in Evan Hansen, their second year and all of that. So it is, you know, it used to be what was done. Jason Robards Brian Dennehy comes to mind. Fonda Henry Fonda did mister Roberts for over a year looked at up league Cobb death of a salesman. Pretty sure over a year those guys were good. But that was kind of expected, you know that's what you did. And you and it's a big long commitment, but it's not that long when it's Atticus Finch, it's not that long when it's to kill a Mockingbird is not that long when you see what this play, and this production does to an audience night after night after night after night to get to be Atticus Finch, on Broadway six months, wouldn't have been enough so was happy to sign for your, and I'm interested to see what happens to the performance. Over the course of your I'm six months in now, and it's changed. It's deepened and it's gotten smarter and more, it's just gotten better. And so I'm interested to see where it is at the end when that happens when you have a director whose, they always use the phrase in the theater, okay after rehearsal. We've now frozen this show. This is now the way we do it, but can any actors really do that, because you are discovering something he's actor you can do it. You call it the mule on the trail performance going down the Grand Canyon. The mule didn't even have to look, you know, the meal just goes down. And then I do it this way. And then I get to here, and I do it that way. And you think about where you're going to eat throughout the whole show. I've seen that. I have ten that's the trap, you can get into that. You can literally your mind, just floats away and your thing and you go and stay here. Stay here stay here because, you know it so Bart. Shared the director Mockingbird. Basically, he's saying this is going to move around. I expect you to move it around expect you to explore a little bit here and there. You gotta you gotta have enough sense of story and experience to know when you're, I think Ellen all called stuffing the dog when you're just suddenly we've added four minutes to the show and it's probably you. You got it. You gotta is what you're doing. Is this thing you found in month two? And does it lead to something else? And now as a better place or do we need to go back here to where you gotta kinda gotta stay in the lane. But you get to move around and Bart has given us permission to do that. But I think this cast is really don't agree job of serving story. So they're in while it moves and changes a little bit. It always seems to be pointed in the direction of serving story, not some individual. Whereas my light kind of thing, not in this cast, but what I noticed when I was at this show was that there are people that I had seen at the theater before because of this property because of what Harper Lee wrote, there are suddenly because we read it in school, you know, but it wasn't work and there's just something about it. And watching, what Aaron Sorkin has done to take what Harper Lee did. And to update it without updating it. But just. Making something that's going on in this play speak to us. Now you had a lot of controversy with that in the beginning. You know there were people doing you can't around with the, the state, who was there say is the lawyer for the estate one person had some issues with an early draft. I think he ended up with twenty two drafts. By the end of it. So pretty good chance some of that stuff would have gone away anyway. But, but in whatever it, we got it settled and the risks for us. I thought once the lawsuit went went away was three adults playing the kids. Are we going to get away with that? Are we going to overcome Gregory Peck? And the last third third act of this thing, basically. Deviates is this is a play based on the book. And now we're gonna put out of his through something that the move in either the movie nor the book put him through in by putting him through that, that I think, is where Aaron was able to relate it to today. Is there goodness in people that we can rely on will the better angel in all of us? Rise to the top in twenty nineteen that isn't necessarily true. And I think you're on was forcing Atticus to face that, that sometimes you can't just wait for them to do the right thing. No, there's not much and Atticus does some things in this play that aren't very Gregory Peck. Yeah, there's flaws in him. But it makes it just so more mature engaging because I'm seeing somebody with human flaws doing this. Yeah. And, and to be more than fair to pack who only won an Oscar for it was a different time, early sixties. And it was from the point of view of a young scout nine years old. Whatever she is in the book looking up her great father. So he really kind of stayed up on a pedestal throughout the book and pretty much for the movie and we weren't we were a small town. Lawyer gets paid in vegetables and trying to raise two kids and he handles land dispute service agreements for closures inning. And right will, and then the judge comes over to his house in his life changes. That's how we approached it. But do you feel competitive in any of these awards with other actors that are nominated in your category? In other words, you and Bryan Cranston. Now just cold staring. Each other because everybody was nominated wants to win. Everybody wants to make the speed. Everybody wants to take on that toll because it's called it anyone who's ever stepped on stage. Once that it's there's, it's so special it, it's I've never been nominated for an Oscar, but I started in the feeder, high school and community college, and my purples theater companies twenty years old and off Broadway. And coming back to Broadway. Keep returning to it. And now forty two years later, you get to Atticus Finch you get to do the role of a lifetime on Broadway in the theater, that's a lot to be proud of. So this sit there with, with Brian and Patty and, and all the other guys. Adam driver all them. Yeah. The kid Jeremy pope. But you know, it's a great group and you're part of a lot of great work that competitive thing, nobody scores the most points. These things we're doing five different things really, really well, go back to the day that you decided you were going to be Atticus Finch on Broadway. Was there any terror about that ultimate decision that had nothing to do with you committing for year because it's one of the great roles it's a great character? And despite the fact that we see flaws in him, there's virtue in him to me, as watching actors all my life and reviewing them the hardest thing to plays virtue. There's, you know how do you play good and make good interesting? And you get and maybe Atika struggle to remain. Good to remain take the high road and there's a bit of a struggle. This is a helps that yeah, but that's his aim because while he sitting on that porch this world in the south in nineteen thirty four in Alabama KKK's there. He's not initially he's kind of letting it happen. He's not going. He's not out there trying to change it. He's not carrying plan. No, he's I thought that was really interesting. Certainly where he starts. He knows that if he takes this case to defend Tom Robinson. And he sits in front of a jury of white Christian farmers men. He knows what he's going, this is no longer just executing will or foreclose and, and he's avoided that just raised his kids. I'm just raising my kids without a wife. I'm raising my kids, and he knows that will change thing unpleasant, things will be sent to us, and it's going to go beyond that you're gonna have the KKK come up and visit you on your porch and go, what are you doing? And I did a lot of research to kind of understand that kind of just keep your head down and don't get involved and stay out of trouble as family and just raise your kids and don't get involved. There was a lynching last Tuesday night, we missed you there. We got another one Friday, common and Atticus has to either say, no, I'm not or tied up that evening. Bob can't make. And there's a lot of there are a lot of people, especially in today's America that are don't wanna look go wanna see don't want to. I. I don't wanna know about Russia. I don't wanna know any, we'll do errands kind of speak into that, that American that decent honest, hardworking American lose just doing this, and it's not enough to just look the other way not now wasn't for Atticus and it isn't for us. Now there's denial and there's a combination and enabling. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And that's why I think people sit there watching this like this, you know, this is somehow speaking to us right now involve you gonna get. Yeah. Yeah. What was what was your first encounter with this story? Did you read the book? I did you the first encounter really was? I probably had seen the movie as a kid. I don't remember we didn't read the book, we read, Lord of the flies and farewell to arms, which wasn't on the public school curriculum where I was at Aaron said, do you wanna play? Atticus finch. And I didn't blink. Absolutely. I think partly because the last five years ten years now. I've been taking chances are been. Challenging myself doing things that I wouldn't that other people think I can do, but I don't know how to do. So say yes.

Atticus Finch Aaron Sorkin Gregory Peck Jason Robards Brian Dennehy Bart Tony Ward Oscar Peter Travers Jeff Daniels Newark Radio City Music Hall Harper Lee Michigan Fonda Henry Fonda Director Bill Ness Grand Canyon Bryan Cranston Evan Hansen Jeremy Pope
An Interview with 'Game of Thrones' and 'After Life' Actor Tim Plester

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

11:49 min | 2 years ago

An Interview with 'Game of Thrones' and 'After Life' Actor Tim Plester

"My next guest filmography includes game of thrones kick, ass bohemian, rhapsody in the absolutely wonderful afterlife. He is an actor. He's been a playwright. He is a wonderful documentarian. His name is Tim plaster, Tim. Thank you so much. How's everything? Good evening was evening here in, in London. Yes, I'm fine. I'm fine. I think we before we spoke. I mentioned you know with the time difference, essentially almost my bedtime here, so are trying remain awake and lucid as much as possible, but I would normally be getting into bed him up Djaama's. All right about this time. No. I think the world of you for coming on, and I can't even thank you. If we were face to face at buy you a logger or whatever. Nice bitter or Brown. I l is my is my drink of choice. Fair enough fair enough. So I have to say, you know, before we get into your acting in some of your training, I didn't realize how wonderful and how really skilled, you at developing documentaries, my goodness. Tim, not that I didn't think I would think otherwise, but, you know, you think you also he's going to be an actor. It's the traditional path to acting but you're a pretty talented guy, you've got play writing you are absolutely wonderful developing documentaries, touch a little bit about that. If you would. Is kind of the two things in a way. I mean they are connected in my. Distant past of, you know how it got into doing any of this really is that I think, in my initial kind of interest in it was was wanting to be an actor kind of understood an early age. I think that that was something that was a job. And people did it and I might be able to aspire to do it one day, and I somewhere along the line I started to write as well. And then I think I had this notion that how they would work together as I could be a writer and then right? The best part, so myself to be in and be a writer actor, that was my own when, when it was, you know, I'm talking about when I was, I don't know, ten eleven years old. I wrote my first. My first play which I don't have a copy of anymore. It was an adaptation of the hound of the basketball's show comes adventure, which Adat loosely adopted from the original source material by Conan Doyle, and then cost myself as a show comes in it. So I think in a way it was quite an egotistical thing as a as a young man, I would write plays. And then I would be in them as well as the kind of the, the lead actor earned slowed and I went to college, and I continue to do that, that I then at that point, I had a real Kashin the I wanted to be a kind of comedic actor on thinking about going right back to, you know, Monty python an had growing up. My dad had grown up making me not making me watch Monty python. But my dad was Monty python San. So it'd been exposed to that kind of. A knock kick. British humor Anneli agent. I think no something that I thought I wanted to do, when I was at college, I was still writing then. But if more sketches comedy sketches on somewhere along the line while it was a college, I decided, I was ready. I got more and more interested in the writing and slightly less interested in the acting and the writing took over for a while. I ran a theatre company when I first left college and wasn't acting tool. And then I fell back into acting. I think the thing that I was scared about with the suing acting actually, as a career when I left. College or university was I just had that fair sitting waiting for the phone to ring and I just felt I couldn't face it. And I wanted to do something that I thought I could be a could be doing something move proactive. I just felt it was very you basically had to sit and wait for the world to come to. And I felt if I was wrong to I could always be developing things I could be a home. You know, writing what I could I could do you can do that on your own team? You have to you. Can't you can't act on your own, you know, it doesn't it doesn't work that way. And so originally, the first things I made were were. We're not talk. You mentioned a toll my route to, to documentaries quite a long, one really in the first short films. I made were narrative comedies and I only fell into making documentaries about ten years ago, and that was again, just it was very, it was a personal story that came to me it was it was a story about the village. I grew up with I grew up in and the story that was connected to my, my father and my uncle and kind of ideas of English identity and just my uncle. Basically suggested to me one day that somebody should make a film about. It's about this English tradition of Danzig code Morris, dancing, which is open to much much ridicule in the UK. An I'd always lofted it myself when infected run away from it as a young man in never wants to do it. Morris dancing in the US as well. Unin Canada, Australia. There are more stones teams. A my uncle just told me the story about what Morris dancing meant to him onto the village where I grew up, and he suggested some they should make a film about it. And I sold about it for awhile muscle. Why don't I, I might get? And I didn't really know anything about documentaries. It wasn't a passion of mine and. It just so I think the kind of moving into documentary came from a very personal connection initially, and then I found out, I really enjoyed doing found it was a really interesting way to work. And I think you know this thing about documentary that I enjoy so nerve wracking the unlike writing script, which had been used to you end up writing the film in the edit. Don't do it. You flip the whole thing in you, actually if you if your instincts right on the day. Thank you, filming the right. Kind of things Mateen Durant kind of paper. But ultimately, you start to do the writing when you start to do the, the editing the pace, so yeah, and you're you clearly a skilled writer. I mean that, that just is pretty evident. But are you able to do you have any are you also documentary films his own documented, or is that something you pass off the somebody else, or hire somebody else to do? What you mean kind of doing behind the scenes not a like. So when you so I, I know you the documentary, I believe was it on Shirley Collins. Is that right? Yeah. Yes. Yes. So when you look at you hire somebody to do the camera work, or are you able to do that on your own? Gotcha. I'm with you. I am not a south futa. The term is I learned that, that muchly lost year. I am not self shoots. I work with another director could rub curry. Who I made two feature films with now and to shorts documentaries. Nice yet to Scholtz to features a Nive of us, and rope does a little bit of camera work, but I don't do any I we saw we, we always we, we hire people into, to do that side of things to do Cameron sound. And in fact, last year, the most recent projects men rope worked on together. We shot in the in south in deep, South America last year, which was never been to that part of the US before and had always wanted to go. And we hide a CHA from New York actually could Damian who came down a met in Charlottesville. And we went on a road trip with him. And he, he handled picture and sound and man rope kind of handled questioning and kind of start. Tried to steer in the direction that we that we saw it should go. But I, I would like to be able to be a bit more hands on, on the camera. But that's somebody list of things to do. Derek, is it seems talk? This seems very difficult and I to say, you know, I was on your website, today, which is fantastic. I learned a lot about you manageable research that, obviously, but, you know, I was watching your film, film real and so forth. It's you know you have a couple of projects coming up in the document documentary portion of your life. It's I believe I'm going to say gray, owl, and Daniel Boonsak, correct. Yeah. So both of those are in early stages of development that kind of connective tissue between the two. I think they're both about ideas of wilderness. Think. Yep. Done. You boom we did a bit of research on, when we were I've written in states lost you. We actually spent a bit of time in Daniel, Boone, national forest in, in Kentucky, and we spent some time with this poet, cold Morris. Manning is from Kentucky and he wrote a book in, I think, thousand full companion fouls. And it's a collection of poems written in the voice of Daniel, Boone. An I read that book or read read, not just that book, but a couple of Morris Manning's books. When I was filming a HBO project in, in Canada four years ago. And that's when I first is thinking about. Maybe doing something about Daniel Boone because it had been a, you know. A figure that a known about for a long time. It's quite a not of English people know very much about Daniel, Boone. Because I always had to the vested interest in, in kind of the, the, the American west and ideas of wilderness. He was definitely a you know, a nine the I knew I didn't know a great deal by him. But I, I knew something about the mythology around Boone and Morris Manning's book is, is fantastic pace of pace of work sites. A biography as poems is just a really kind of spoke to me and made me think that, that was definitely some, some room in not to be use Morris's poems. Maybe, as, as a starting point to make some kind of. Documentary about Boone and it just strikes me that nobody's touched upon boon for awhile, Don aware of right. There are popular TV shows are now in resting in the fifties and sixties, but he's kind of fallen out of favor in a way.

Morris Manning Daniel Boone Tim Plaster Writer United States Djaama Daniel London Basketball Monty Conan Doyle Shirley Collins South America HBO Daniel Boonsak Unin Canada Mateen Durant Australia UK Kentucky
"Avengers: Endgame" has historic box office opening

Bill Handel

01:21 min | 2 years ago

"Avengers: Endgame" has historic box office opening

"So I think the big story. The big financial story is that Disney scored I mean, huge with avengers endgame, and they knew it was going to be strong. I mean, everybody knew that the experts said that the pundits people that looked at movies had all yeah. It's going to be good. Anybody have any ideas gonna be vis astronomical? And what does that mean for the bottom line for Disney for this year? Absolutely not. I don't think anybody saw this number coming in one point two billion dollars worldwide over the five day open. I counted up at three hundred seventy million of that was in the US, and I ended up twelve individual box office records this movie be over the weekend, including biggest three D premier ever. Forty five percent of all tickets sold to engage for three days. So that's a premium price. Right. So that helps the bottom line as you mentioned day in China. Biggest weekend in China hundred seven hundred seven billion dollars in Chinese box office biggest ever their biggest Saturday. The second day, you know, kind of premier to AMC biggest theater company in the country. Open twenty four hours a day. Hitters two point six million. People went just on Saturday alone. I mean, the records just keep falling. If you just go down into the agate on what this movie is pulling. It's kind of amazing

Disney China United States Hundred Seven Hundred Seven Bi Two Billion Dollars Forty Five Percent Twenty Four Hours Three Days Five Day
"theater company" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"theater company" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"It's nineteen minutes after the hour on this morning. Jennifer Kushinka is here with more of America's First News. But in the White House has refused to meet an extended deadline to deliver President Trump's tax returns to congress House Ways and means committee chairman Richard Neal says failure to comply with the April. Twenty third deadline would be interpreted as a denial of request Trump says he does not want his information disclosed it will not release. His tax returns while under audit. Democrats warn that legal action could follow White House. Deputy press secretary HOGAN Gidley spoke with FOX look as I understand it. The president's pretty clear once he's out of audit. He'll think about doing it, but he's not inclined to do. So at this time. The IRS has previously said Trump could release the returns, even if they were under audit an expert who has been working with the boy scouts has revealed that there may have been more than seventy eight hundred allegedly sexually abusive troop leaders and volunteers in the story organization and over twelve thousand victims that figures released yesterday by attorney Jeff Anderson whose firm represents the victims of sexual abuse. He says the boy scouts have kept all of this information secret, those perversion files that they've had reflect that they have removed thousands of offenders of childhood sexual abuse over the years and they've kept that in files seat. Secretly the numbers of alleged abusers was entered into the court record as part of a January trial about child sex abuse. At a Minnesota children's theatre company. Former vice president Joe Biden will launch his long anticipated presidential campaign tomorrow by will announce his intentions in a video announcement and hold a fundraiser tomorrow evening in Philadelphia. His first formal campaign event is scheduled for Monday in Pittsburgh after that by necessity to visit the early primary states, including South Carolina, where he enjoys strong support from longtime democratic leaders, including house majority whip James Clyburn. Jennifer garner is being singled out as the pit Amee beauty in Hollywood. The actress has been named the cover person for this year's beautiful issue of people magazine, the magazine due out Friday profiles Garner's roles as an actress businesswoman. And a mother of three suddenly, I've feels very warm in here by my my heart is racing cycle. Little sweater. She's one definitely go. Thanks, jen. Twenty two minutes after.

HOGAN Gidley Trump White House president Jennifer garner Joe Biden Jennifer Kushinka Richard Neal Jeff Anderson people magazine vice president America chairman James Clyburn press secretary jen IRS
Grammy snubs: Taylor Swift, Jay-Z and Beyoncé, Ariana Grande

Colleen and Bradley

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

Grammy snubs: Taylor Swift, Jay-Z and Beyoncé, Ariana Grande

"Care. That's kind of why. Because I don't really feel like the nominations are always reflective of what kind of is happening culturally with albums, and how how the how how how how the people are responding. To the music. Exactly. Speaking of music singer, Michelle, you're welcome. I honor your opinion yet. That's great to create a whole segment for you where I feel validated. Validate noon to three Monday through Friday right here on the Colleen and Bradley show. See your Michelle Williams announced in her Instagram stories and opposed that appears to be deleted that her engagement to pastor. Ted Johnson quotes didn't work out. Williamson Johnson announced their engagement in April after he popped the question in March. They met in two thousand seventeen on a spiritual retreat and the timing of the break up is a little awkward as their reality show. Chad loves Michelle has been airing on own after premiering a November. That is a little awkward. Yeah. That's an awkward time. And I wonder what will happen to that show for a minute there when you were telling that story because I don't really generally care about celebrity relationships unless they've taken somebody off the market that we. Don't want to be in a relationship. I thought you said Serena Williams, and I was like she's with a passer. I didn't know that she's telling you, what might brain. Happy Friday and finally validate my opinion, please stay on. I'll stamp it. Oh. The final season a game of thrones is kind of a big deal. Even though none of us watch the show. But the latest trailer is out it's thirty nine seconds long in animated clip, you can see fire and ice spreading through west arrose teaser trailer also confirms that the final season will start April even though that is already been confirmed, but how many seasons again too many so many that will never catch up. No, I think this is six I'm getting a five six seven eight eight eight. Okay. So what the count finger. Wow. On all cylinders today children's theatre company, and you know, education is enforced. Yes. I agree. Sees gets

Michelle Williams Serena Williams Williamson Johnson Ted Johnson Instagram Colleen Chad Bradley Thirty Nine Seconds
"theater company" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

No Meat Athlete Radio

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"theater company" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

"That's a pretty pretty good deal. And I think nice gift for anyone for any sort of runner person. You've got for yourself or anyone who has a standing desks. Really? That's that's I think the best use or cook you live like Mario batali the word those orange, whatever those were. Yeah. So are they are the bright color? I got the white ones all the way. But I knew I wouldn't wearing them out of the house. So I figured just would look sharp. And it does put on black socks put those fancy nice. Yeah. I mean, everyone actually makes fun of me the kids think look ridiculous air of old woman shoe or something. If I don't care. That's a good one. That's a really good one. Because I've heard I've heard good things about those. And I liked the price point. Really? So I think it's really it's a good recommendation. Good. I've got some more serious big ones. That's that's a nice. That's a good one for the athlete in your life. Or the standing desk person. Mine is okay. So now, I'm debating on whether to say, my my it's one of the bigger ones. It's something Katie not getting each other. That's fine. Do big one because I did a little big. Okay. All right. It's it's not it's not particularly health related, but I think it fits into this kind of lifestyle. Hobby things that we've been talking about a lot recently. And that is that we are getting each other the gift of. Of a membership or a season pass package. I don't even know she got to one of the feeder companies in town in Asheville theater companies. Yeah. To to to go the theater, so like one thing we used to do a lot was like see by performances and do all these things that DC ruined in DC. We'd go see a lot of theater or music and stuff like that. And I feel like we're we've been missing we were talking about what would make our lives. But what are we missing in background slash ashville? And the. Yeah. Well, no like arts like art. Theater? No, art. We looked at. We looked at like the orchestra. There's an orchid. There's Nashville orchestra here. And we decided not to. But the yeah, the theater company. So we're going to we're going to get each other as season pass to that. So we can go. I think it's like six performances a year you never couple months. A little date night have girl. Tonight's dinner and go go to theater, I actually liked that Doug. I'm not not a theater fan myself. But I used to go to a lot of not a lot a decent maybe three or four times a year. Symphony type thing or string quartet or something. And I've even seen a few in Asheville. But I don't do that much that I've kids and just got busy. So I think that's really good actually like that was that was a date day. And then I would do with my wife and right? Yeah. Exactly. It's not a luxury. But but a purely a hobby, right? You're not doing that to improve at it or or no, definitely. Yeah. No. And like, we're not like big theater. We're not we're not actors we neither of us have been in place except for maybe high school when maybe high school. Seventeen. At school. I was in several plays musicals. Nice, right. Yeah. Sing singing parts solos. Knows always kind of. I was never a star. Always a okay, always a bridesmaid never bread. But no. I mean, I used to like an icicle, but never never really like got it got super entity hitter outside of that. But I really like going to him and the cool thing about this in. I think probably most the your company's less you like in a big city, and it's like a huge production is that they have. Some of the really small theater shows where there's maybe like fifty people. Seats for fifty people. And then some of the bigger ones where there's several hundred. So it's a good mix of like some of the big productions and some of the small box stuff. So. Yeah. So yeah, I'm really excited about that. I think it will be a good way to like have some nice quality date nights and a little bit of culture. And I don't know like excited about it. It's not the mantra players is it now, it's the only one that I've heard of but I've heard of them..

Asheville Katie Mario batali Nashville Doug
Asia, United States and India discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

06:49 min | 3 years ago

Asia, United States and India discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

"We go to, Ed, Baxter in San Francisco Ed. All right Juliette North Korea. Is working on new missiles this just weeks after the Singapore summit at least that's what spy agencies from the United States are, saying Washington Post. Report ABC is reporting that Japan is seeing a lower threat, from North Korea and has withdrawn some anti-missile units US President Trump saying today that he'd be willing to meet with Iran and president, Hassan Ronnie no preconditions Italian prime. Minister Giuseppe, Kante says he and President Trump have agreed to work on bilateral trade deals verb Jabs between China and the US is US secretary of. State, Mike Pompeo says the US will invest money and the Indo. Pacific region to ensure free and open. Business climate new independent report of the four year old disappearance of Malaysia air flights three seventy finds that it was deliberately diverted. From its course and India's, on the greatest toilet building spree and human history prime minister Narendra Modi's twenty billion dollar. Clean India mission aims to construct one hundred. Eleven million latrines and five years and is spurring. An eighty. One percent jump in concrete building materials global. News twenty four hours a day on, Aaron a tick tock on Twitter powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and. Analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries in San Francisco I'm Ed Baxter this is Bloomberg Doug all right at twenty past the hour here on daybreak Asia let's get back to our conversation with. Eric Moffett portfolio. Manager t. Rowe price international he joins us from our studios in Hong Kong so we've got, a Jay meeting that will react up pretty soon and a fed meeting later in the week arguably the o., j.'s the bigger deal since most expect the fed not to do anything. What happens if they do begin to tweak the yield curve management even slightly what are we like to see play out. In the market well I invest in the, Asia extra pan region so I don't spend much time thinking about the b. o. j. but broadly. The spectre of rising rates could be, a headwind, for Asia what what's really special about, the time we're in today is we have high real rates in Asia so even as the fed hikes rates many the central banks at. Here are still. In a position where. They can. Cut them however if inflation picks up central banks. Here in Asia are forced to raise rates that's likely to slow growth down so. I think that could potentially be one of the. Biggest headwinds this year I wanted, to ask you about. The text by Eric because of course we have seen that near three, hundred billion. Dollars wiped off in the. US take area there's been a few broker downgrades in the tech space here I just made sent ASA tech we. Had Samsung's earnings coming through a little bit weaker than expected as well in Asia g think that it is time for a bit of a, pullback in the tech space well I think there are two important buckets there's the internet. Bucket and then there's the smartphone bucket and in the internet bucket companies here? In Asia are broadly you know very they Ryan with the? Stories, like Google Facebook but there many years behind, and so I think we still have many years of growth to go and so it's really questioning what you're willing to pay for that. Growth in terms of the smartphone supply chain stocks it's true that smartphone growth is slowing down and. That memory cycles long in the tooth, but, it's also very important to note that all these stocks look very very cheap I. Think, expectations are low and so some of the bad news we're seeing out there is really already reflected in a. Lot of the prices what about some of the gaming companies and any major Ten cents is exposed to gaming I, mean in. The last week Electronic Arts. Gave this forecast for disappointing earnings in that cloud continues to kind of hang over the group activision in the US. During the last session was down three to half percent A lot of the. Gaming companies in the United States are you can think of them as sort of movie studio so they. Have to come out with hits. The product cycles can. Be lumpy ten cents special in that in many ways it's more a movie. Theater company they can source the hits from various gain makers. And whether or not a hit comes out and win it's launched can make earning slumpy. I think at present there've been some delays and, approvals for, various games to be launched in China and so that may create, some weakness later in the year but it, does nothing to undermine the strength of this business, and the long, term potential, and I think particularly when you. Think of games you know historically, that just individuals playing games on the mobile phones on consoles but a very growing part of the stories the east sports market where folks are getting together having big competitions their sponsorships I, think that's really going to be the next leg of growth for this, industry over the next ten years looking more broadly at. Asia we have been saying. You know a little bit of a pullback of late but. There are, some markets that are doing very well I think of India, for example which continues to hit record, highs day after day where do, you see some good value in Asia well so I don't see it in India India's one of the most expensive. In loved markets in Asia and I think we have some risk going to next year with politics higher oil prices is, bad for India so that's not. Where I'd find a lot of good opportunities today today I find some of the best opportunities in China's. A-share market the domestic stockmarket now. You recall this as. A market driven by retail investors who tend to get really excited when things. Are good panic when things are bad it's a very much. Momentum market and we've had the market selloff recently the fundamentals for the kind of steady. Blue chip companies we look at our fantastic and, so I, think that's that's the best hunting ground today broadly Frazier it's important, to note that the valuation for Asia ex, Japan the gap between, that valuation and say the, valuation in the, United States Market is about as wide as. It's ever, been so you have markets out here that are much cheaper, than the United States with better growth, and so we think that's attractive All right Eric great to have you, on thanks so much for coming into Hong Kong studio Eric Moffett portfolio. Manager at t. Rowe price international doesn't see value in. India but certainly in the Asia market in China which is going to. Reopen in about five and a half minutes time looking like. Broad day, of sailing that here in Asia we have got this Singapore. Bucket down by four tenths of one percent Japan's. Nikkei index of by around a third of one percent. Of, course we closely awaiting any moved from. The bay. OJ later today just having a quick look. At the Japanese yen it is back at that one hundred and. Eleven handle yes bang at one hundred and eleven spot zero full we'll keep you updated on. Markets in Asia this is Bloomberg This is a Bloomberg pursuits look at. Luxury the architect of the disastrous 2017 fire festival luxury concert series in. The Bahamas has settled, civil claims with the US securities and Exchange Commission Billy McFarland admitted. He defrauded, more, than one hundred investors almost. Twenty seven and a half million dollars he faces. As long as ten years in prison, when he sentenced August sixteenth for all, you watch collectors out there here's a question, you may have asked yourself does it have any real benefits in a. Fancy wristwatch well aside from bragging rights of course and. Adding tens of thousands of dollars to the price according to our friends. At watch hub ho dinky the answer is no not really. But that, doesn't mean not.

Asia United States India Eric Moffett China Japan Ed Baxter San Francisco Mike Pompeo Bloomberg Hong Kong Singapore Rowe Narendra Modi Juliette North Korea Washington Post Pacific ABC North Korea
JK Craig Venter Institute, Cormon and Cindy Burkey discussed on First Light

First Light

01:31 min | 3 years ago

JK Craig Venter Institute, Cormon and Cindy Burkey discussed on First Light

"The islands arts community get back on. Its feet, after hurricane Maria, Rhonda says he'll donate all of the profits from his Broadway hit on its performed in Puerto Rico. In January I five included dance school and a theater company fault ever Rodriguez. CBS news Maybe Cormon. Killed police looking for answers I'm Cindy Burkey that's one of the stories. We're following on AM seven sixty a twenty four year old woman shot to death in oceanside apartment complex has been identified as. Devan right out a Camp. Pendleton navy, Cormon police arrested twenty five year old Eduardo are you'll look on suspicion of murder the to live in the same, complex but police say there's no known connection between the suspect and the victim A. Man suspected of stealing a car from a dealership was arrested around noontime Sunday. After leading police. On a chase. From current Mesa into Miramar the thirty minute high speed chase happened on highway fifty two and up the fifteen freeway an. Influential San Diego genetic researcher is under fire as the institute. Bearing his, name faces a lawsuit the union Tribune reports human longevity of LA Hoya is suing the JK Craig Venter institute for allegedly. Stealing trade secrets AM seven sixty k. FM be talk and breaking news Good morning and welcome to first light from Westwood.

Jk Craig Venter Institute Cormon Cindy Burkey Hurricane Maria Oceanside Apartment Union Tribune Puerto Rico La Hoya Pendleton Navy Devan CBS Rhonda Rodriguez Miramar Westwood San Diego Eduardo Researcher Murder A. Man
"theater company" Discussed on Maxamoo Theater

Maxamoo Theater

16:10 min | 3 years ago

"theater company" Discussed on Maxamoo Theater

"Audience members actually would exchange Email addresses phone numbers and keep in touch after the show. And we would hear from people, you know, yes, I made a new friend at the show, and blah, blah, blah, blah. And so, I think we do try to create a sense of community. And what that means is you have to pretend you're there, but the other thing that I think happens at site based work is that the site is a central character in the peace. So the pool is the central character of pool play. Right. The cafe and the behaviors that happened in a cafe, or the that's the central sort of seem. Journey character of cafe play. And so, for example, the perfume that somebody's wearing when they sit next to you. That's not outside the frame of reference. So when you sit in a prosciutto theater, and you're watching the stage. If you're smelling perfume, you, you, you teach yourself to ignore it because it's quote unquote not part of the play, but in cafe play. It is because that's how cafes are people wear perfume, or the temperature of the room, that's part of the play or you know, the smell of the wine or the coffee or whatever's being served that's part of the play. And so it becomes a much more multi sensory experience. Right. You feel the temperature of the water in pool play feel the temperature of the room you smell the chlorine. That's part of the play. And so, even in fact in cafe play the background sounds that were happening because occasionally, you know, the dishwasher would run that became part of the play the clatter of the dishes, etcetera etcetera. So all those things are not outside the frame, and neither are you. So in a way it's less realistic. Right. But in a way, it's also more realistic, because you are there as you and you're not sort of shutting out or editing. Some of the things that you're actually perceiving. A lot of the, the of preceding theater is to create this illusion of order, like everything has to run on time. Like, if allied, if a light bulb goes off, it's the end of the world. Right. But in your place or embracing chaos I am. I would love to hear some more about that. And what you've if this sounds like a very grandiose question. What have you learned as an artists theater maker from just giving up and saying, hey, case has to be my friend? Yeah. And I actually have to say I I'm a control freak in many ways. So in many ways, you could argue that these are exercises in me, teaching myself, how to give up control. Because again, incite based work, right? If an airplane flies above. That's part that just became part of the play. Right. And I actually to use cafe plays an example. I was driven crazy in her. First few run through about like home we can hear the dishes Clack in the background and blah, blah, blah, blah. And I went to the owner of the restaurant, I was like, is there any way that we can be quieter? And Finally, I had so many audience members come up to me, and I would say was it could you hear okay was it distracting? And they said, no, it was absolutely part of the peace. And in fact, if it wasn't happening, you'd have to record that and put it in the play, and I thought, okay, then I'm just going to I'm going to go breathe with it, and there was a time where. There's a time in cafe play where we serve food, and we have we call it the dance of crayons, because we draw with crowns, on the table clause, which is an idea that actually came simply because that cafe had paper table clause, and I thought, oh, well, then we have to draw on them and they had Crohn's and I was like, we've got to do this. So then we made some choreography out of it, and we, you know, we start drawing in the we give the crowns to the audience, and we them to draw on then people start drawing together. And in the meantime, were serving food that is then actually eaten and one time the food was slow in the kitchen. We had more audience members, I guess than they had -ticipant it'd and so there was some things that got left behind. And so. We were still serving food after the dance of crayons had ended an into the next scene, and I had been trying to control like we will deliver food in this two minute, blah, blah, blah, blah. And this is these are the two minutes when we're going to deliver food, and it worked so beautifully when it didn't work. And so, I thought, okay, right. I'm gonna learn to let go. In pool play one time, there was a birthday party going on in the yoga studio, which has a glass wall that it shares with the pool, and I thought it would be distracting, and I was I spent the whole. Night that night going. Oh, this is so distracting. And I asked people afterwards in heard, and they thought that was a great part of the play. It was just, you know, something happening in another room. Right. So I'm learning to to lean into the chaos and to appreciate it, and to not think of it as detrimental, but to really enjoy it and even sometimes to set up moments where chaos is highlighted were occurs deliberately. Or we embrace it or so, I guess chaos is the perfect sites. Go into subway place. Actually, I will say one thing we did do a piece called ready made cabaret, and we really embrace the chaos. So we had twenty eight scenes and on each given performance, we would perform twenty out of those twenty eight scenes and the scenes we performed in the order in which they were performed in was determined by rolling the dice. So we had a tray of different dice, and we would ask the audience roll the dice off ten. Okay. And we would countdown we had a list of scenes one two, three four five six seven eight nine ten, and we would name the scene, and then do the scene, and then offer the tray of dice to somebody else, and they would rule the dice and it would come up six okay? One to five six. Okay. And we would do this. And so each night, it was a different play well, and it was really wonderful, but it, it requires a particular kind of actor who can roll with that. And are actors were really brilliant. Not only in doing the scenes, but also in. In doing a different play every night. I mean so within the scene, the play was the same from night tonight, but, but also because of the scene order or the fact that a certain play a certain scene, wouldn't happen, you the audience made the meaning so you would sort of act seen would happen. And then why? And if x y and z happen, then you put them together in one way. And if a threes, zebra happened, you would put it together in a different way. And the play would mean something else. And so we were dealing with notions of ready made in notions of fate and chance and free will an order and chaos and the need to make meaning out of things. So you would always get some of that. But the nuances of that would come out differently. So that was my real lesson in bracing chaos. Wonderful. Can you first tell our listeners but the subway plays? And I guess the ferry play. These are I call them pods place. This is a term. I got from a company in Canada actually invented this Shawna. Pod plays are site specific audio plays. So we have one called ferry play you get on the Staten Island ferry in lower Manhattan and act one takes you to Stettin island, and then act to takes you back to Manhattan. And we've create an app called ferry play that you download from Android or apple the apple app store, and it gives you the bios and program in the instructions for doing it, and then the two audio tracks. And so. What I love about these plays and I'll, I'll talk about all use ferry plays the basic example, and then go into subway plays where it gets more complicated because there are three of them in the subways more complicated. But. Within the audio the audio track, obviously, never changes. But what's happening as you writing the ferry changes depending on the time of day, the day of the week, the month of the year. So, for example, these are what we call self scheduled place, so you go any month any day any time, and we had someone ride them at dawn, and say that, you know, they were riding the, the ferry and the sun was coming up behind the statue of liberty. And so that's one lighting design in one version of that. We've had people do them at night when it was dark, and you could see stars. And but. It's very different at rush hour, you know, when it's packed and crazy sunny Sunday morning in the summer, it might be full of tourists. You know, it's a very different vibe, who's on the subway, who's not on the sorry ferry. And we have certain lines that are flexible. So, for example, there's a line in ferry play with this young teenage girl says look over there, there's a creepy guy over there and your tendency because you hear it is to look. And if you look and there's creepy guy over there say, right? There's creepy over there, if you look and you see guy who is a creepy. You think we'll wait a minute. She being really judgmental or what's, I don't think that guy's creepy. And if you look and there's nobody there you think she playing a joke on me as she, you know, you looked, you know, that thing that we kids used to do in middle school. I guess I made you look, you know, that kind of thing, so the, the recording is the same, but the way you interpret it is different depending on what's going on around. You live depending on the live experience. And so we're asking the listener to mix the recording with the line. Live experience to create the play. And there are certain things that we encourage you to do or lead, you to do take a selfie with statue liberty in the background at cetera. So there certain things that are timed kind of that happened in the four to six minute range, which is when you're likely to want to take a selfie with the statue of liberty, and then we also encourage you because it site based to Paul says, feel the wind smell the you know. And so we encourage you to think of the wind as part of the play we encourage you to think of the smells on the ferry as part of the play we crude you to feel that rumbling of the of the Staten Island ferry under your feet. And to think of that not as outside the frame of production, but as part of the live experience, so it's also a bodily experience, you part of the place to smell it touch it feel it at cetera. And we do that. Also with subway place, part of the play is, you know, walking up and down the steps going onto the subway feeling the, you know, rumbling of the subway train. Part of it is smelling all the smells on the subway. Part of it is looking around and seeing who's on the subway with you. So as you know, we have three the subway places trilogy of plays. There's one for the N train one for the seven train in one for the L train. And they're very site specific, you can't take the seven train plane on the play on the L train, it won't make any sense. The characters are different. You'll be looking at what this doesn't make any sense, you really have to do the L train on the train, and I know someone who took the seven train play on the train and called me and said, well, this makes no sense. And I said, right, because you did it on the H rain. So if you take the seven train with our recording, we have characters speaking in Mandarin.

Staten Island Manhattan apple Crohn Paul Canada Stettin island two minutes six minute two minute
"theater company" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"theater company" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Wear neighbor build leader benjamin theater company warming in the heart of that historic historic district and we've created the beater it mighty level hall which are the great thing if he had a very intimate fate that only feed about eight hundred eight o n it the threequarter threequarter age any of that era eighth i did a date though it w two i'll down tonight that we eat a lot like he'd get wrapped up at any fellow they could either be live action happening all around you all the time uh whether you're you're you're you're the guy we have a heat heat plight or constructor that though it like you're we've never had before it got great did van delay that all iin eddie it really really great but i love it that's fantastic jeffrey one how long has a bright side been route yes great because it kicking off it pete lau it alleged date so what we did it we cairobased nikko outlets you got the right could and eat what what are we do it it didn't up she killed at least feel great heat hey so we thirty with britain economy and we're going at you albury that that night is it a great awesome incurred gently or actor like it either role i've seen that i've seen that per i've seen that show and i saw it i actually i sought in dublin when i was in ireland and i just loved it i absolutely love it and yet man that you're in that show you're in a work oh my god the other one bank character you're going to work together billy billy changing it at length yeah yeah yeah the big broadway lovable big eat ethic x ray that's a great season that's a great season so are you calling itself cinema two stages that we've known that that's fawn man that's really good well congratulations and i know that you are very excited about the about the the production that's going to be up the bridges of madison county the musical and dr by let's see let's say hello to were a couple of the cast member shall we now you already mentioned her you mentioned julie julie and julian are kornak is not only an actress but she's also executive director of of the of the of the of the players are at of the.

dublin ireland madison county julie julie julian executive director benjamin theater company britain albury billy billy threequarter