42 Burst results for "The new york times"

Fresh update on "the new york times" discussed on The Best of Ben Shapiro

The Best of Ben Shapiro

00:34 min | 46 min ago

Fresh update on "the new york times" discussed on The Best of Ben Shapiro

"His VP pick, and then you forgot who it was. And then you remember it was Camel Harris. As I like to put it, Heiress apparent. Harris apparently got it Got it got it because he is not going to live through this first term. Okay, I know we're not supposed to say I know we're not supposed to say that. But six in 10 Americans agree with me, including some 57% of independents and 49% of Democrats. The reason that the VP pick matters this time, and I have been a longtime advocate of the notion that the VP pick does not matter. Nearly all it matters this time because everyone assumes that Joe Biden is at the very least, not going to run for reelection and probably will Mom finishes first term He himself is called himself a transitional candidate. He is obviously State of cognitive decline. It is perfectly obvious to everyone. And at this point, President Trump should simply ignore Joe Biden and go directly after Kamala Harris and say This is the next president of the United States, Not Joe Biden and Joe Biden made her the issue. This is a real strategic blunder by Biden. I'm frankly amused and astonished by the number of people in the conventional political class who have suggested that this was the safest pick. This was the pick that made the most sense. It makes no sense at all. None. Biden's entire campaign is predicated on the assumption that Joe Biden is basically A return to normalcy. He's a non threatening elderly grandfather, Leigh character who's not going to threaten anything about the way America was running before President Trump became president. He's not a radical, he's not transformed him. He's just a dude because he's just a dude and kind of an elderly doddering due to Dad. You don't have to worry about Joe Biden. You don't have to worry about chaos in the streets. You don't have to worry about the crazy tweets coming out of the White House. All you have to do is simply go about your business, and Joe Biden will have your back. That was the Biden campaign in a nutshell. And so you should focus when you go into the voting booth on his opponent should focus on the volatility. And the kind of craziness of Donald Trump's presidency when he choose to vote. So when he picked a VP should have underscored the strength right when he should have done is you should have picked somebody like Amy Klobuchar. You should've picked somebody who was inherently nonthreatening somebody that the American public widely perceived to be somewhat moderate. Instead, he decided to cave to the Twitter, Roddy and he made this mistake for a couple of reasons. First, he decided very early on that he was going to pick a woman. Well as soon as you say that you are basically going to pick a VP based on token mystic concerns and let's face it. That is a token is too concerned whether your VP is woman. That does not say anything about her character. It doesn't say anything about her politics. Nikki Haley is woman. The idea that this is a criteria for picking the VP is the the sex to which they belong is a bizarre idea on the face and becomes even more bizarre when you realize that the Democratic Party platform at this point is that women don't exist, and a man can be a woman. Soon As my friend Matt Walsh has pointed out, it's very bizarre that the media are championing first female black v P pick by a Democrat. Interesting, incredible, incredible stuff. They don't believe women exist. So I'm wondering what's so historic about, eh? Individual with the cervix as the media might put it being selected as the VP candidate. They can't They literally say they're no no differences between men and women to the point where a man can be a woman, but it's very historic. That Kamala Harris is, in fact, a woman. In any case, Joe Biden early on signals who's going to take a woman? Well this box him in, but then box him in that much because there still a bevy of qualified women who are out there then. Because he had already caved to. Okay. I have to pick somebody who is representative of particular demographic population in the United States. Then he was pushed into okay. It has to be. Ah, black woman has to be a woman of color. Okay, so he sort of fun between black woman and woman of color. And finally he settled on Kamala Harris, and she was probably the worst available pick. There were some other people who are up for this thing. They'll Demings in Florida. Largely anonymous, but at least not disliked by the American public had Karen Bass in California who's kind of a Communist, but again, not very well known and at least had significant support in the black community as the long time head of the Congressional Black Caucus, And then you had Camel Harris, a woman so deeply unpopular that she dropped out of the presidential race before her voters in California even had a chance to vote on her. She was registering at 7% in the California primaries. Kamala Harris was such a bad candidate that after jumping to the lead early on in the race based again on those Twitter blue check marks, checking particular about his woman, Black. Well, she jumped to the top of the race, and then she immediately flamed out because it turns out that she's garbage. This. She's a terrible politician. She's manipulative. She's Machiavellian. She has very few principles and the principle she does have are radical. And that's who Joe Biden chose. Is that supposed to make people feel saying, What about the future of the country? Is that supposed to make people feel comforted and solidified and their belief that he is, in fact a moderate who's going to carry America and gentle waves to better days? Is that really the pick that makes a lot of sense? The answer, of course, is no. And so the media have been attempting to spin this thing as though Harris's moderate, This is an incredible attempt. It really is because as we will examine throughout today's show, and in the coming days, comma Harris is not only not a moderate, she's extraordinarily radical in her policies. She's been rated one of the most liberal senators in the United States Senate tracked at US raided her as the fourth most liberal senator in the United States Senator in the United States Senate just behind Bernie Sanders and Kirsten Gillibrand. She voted with Bernie Sanders, 92% of the time. And while she was in the Senate, okay, that that is not a moderate, and she's not a pragmatist. Either she is She's a hard core leftist who is a pragmatic only in the sense that she will do nearly anything to get ahead. Politically. She'll switch positions she will flip on a dime. She will make accusations that are really ugly about people simply to push yourself forward. If I'm Joe Biden and getting a food taster today today Do not have Kamala Harris in the same room when you're in lunch, Joe Biden for your own preservation. At the very least, you might want some life insurance already. So the media have been attempting to spin this thing and spin it. They have. The New York Times headline They tweeted this out. Quote Senator Kamala Harris in California is Joe Biden's pick for vice president, a pragmatic moderate, She's the first black woman on a major party ticket. Well, the only sentence the only part that attends the matters to the New York Times is, as we'll see the last part of that sentence that she is the first black woman on a major party ticket. I don't think this has the same, quite historic appeal your black woman on a major party ticket as Barack Obama first black president for two terms. I think we've already established in the United States that we are willing to elect black people to extraordinarily high office coming here is not breaking any glass ceilings here because there was no glass ceiling. Hillary Clinton was last major party nomination won the popular vote. So I've already had a woman who won the most popular vote in the presidential election of already had a two term black president. So the notion that Kamala Harris faces unique obstacles. Is absolutely ridiculous. Infact, you faces such non unique obstacles that you could flame out so dramatically as a candidate..

Joe Biden Senator Kamala Harris VP United States President Trump Donald Trump Twitter California America American Public New York Times Congressional Black Caucus White House Nikki Haley Democratic Party Hillary Clinton Senate Barack Obama Bernie Sanders Amy Klobuchar
New York - 5 More People Charged in Public Corruption Investigation

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 10 hrs ago

New York - 5 More People Charged in Public Corruption Investigation

"Have been charged an ongoing corruption probe, including a former status involving a former state assemblyman in a Jersey City school board president. New Jersey's attorney general says these new defendants are accused of giving more than 1/2 $1,000,000 to political parties and candidates to be secretly reimbursed by a law firm. Later. The firm then claimed it made no notable contributions in places it was soliciting contracts. These five new defendants are charged concealment or misrepresentation of contributions. Officials say New Jersey's pate play laws are intended to prevent exactly this kind of buying an unfair advantage.

New Jersey Jersey City School President Trump Attorney
Fresh update on "the new york times" discussed on Ken Matthews

Ken Matthews

00:54 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "the new york times" discussed on Ken Matthews

"Into the weekend edition of the Dom Giordano program. Alex Barron Sin has been with me before. Several times. I want you to hear what he's found recently. Based upon massive test around the world about treatment for Cove in 19 about going back to school about sports about all the things that we talked about. From a very unusual perspective. Here's what Alex told me saw him again last night with Laura. I guess it wass Alex Bernsen is the former New York Times reported. We first had him on When he wrote this massive book as Faras Data and Insight about marijuana, the severity of marijuana today and things associated with that his new book, Unreported Truths about covert 19 and lockdowns part to update an examination of lockdowns. As a strategy. How is killing us with the titles there, But this guy is somebody who is a national go to and we're honored to have him back with us in Philadelphia. Alex, you're back on talk. Radio 12. 10. Thank you for joining us this morning. Good. Yeah, thanks for having me and you know the title. It's from your You were hearing you read in on. Wow. That's a long title and You know, it's kind of it's kind of funny in a way that it is so long, but But here's the thing you know, on Twitter, and I don't know if you follow me on Twitter. I do, But maybe I could. You know, I could be pretty like aggressive and a little bit a little bit angry, maybe, or or sarcastic and people who I think are not telling the truth and stuff like that. And the booklet is different. Okay, the booklet. He's concerned a true work of journalism and so its its source, and it's you know, it's long and it's sort of you know, it's very Um, if any, I don't think it's slow, but I want people to understand the depth and the breadth of the evidence and I That's how I presented it in the booklet. And so the title sort of reflects that, But but his people need to understand. They need to understand what a what a mistake we have made in the last few months and and the people out there in the public health community told us that this was going to be a mistake before March, And then everything got thrown out in March when we lock down And now the media. And some of these public health experts, especially on the left won't admit it, and they're actually pushing to lock down again. That's why that's why I wanted to have you on when I saw that with Laura and she was intuitive to get to that our gut is sensing We're starting to hear that again. And after the initial mistake, I guess you can chalk that up to Unintended country here. Yeah, but the second time around, I got to say, Alex, I don't know about you then when that happens, you're in top of this more than I, But some kind of situation like that. Intuitively told me there is some benefit to it. But then, as it dragged on as it started to morph and never end And as here in Pennsylvania, you know, I don't know how much you've analysed here. It was ridiculous. The winners and losers picked. There's no science with these guys. These governors Toward what they do and what they don't do. It's obvious Oh, you mean in terms of re opening, like, Oh, you could have been a restaurant, Not a barbecue. Really? Exactly. Only on Tuesdays, but exactly, Yeah. And in the shock of the nursing home, and they still double down on this, and the media will not At least the media is I usually think I don't know about you and you were inside The New York Times. I know about agenda driven, but on a lot of levels, I think they're kind of incompetent. First, an agenda driven second. Yes, I mean, that's that's true. And there's a lot of porters don't understand math and don't like and you know one thing I said on Lauren last night, which you know I almost had rung true was until I said it, Okay. You want to you want to attack the President United Fine have at a democratic society. You know, Ifyou're Jim Acosta, and you want to ask him nasty questions. You don't respect the office. Okay, so be it like that's that's our society. But do the same thing to the scientists. Don't be afraid of them. Ask some tough questions and you don't have to. You have to go into the details of how despite protein binds the receptor in the cell, like those air, complicated technical side of the detail that you can ask somebody you recommended ex Five months ago, and suddenly you changed it. Why did you do that? Explain it to me in words that I can understand exactly that. That does not disrespect. You know your scientific credentials or anything like that any more than asking Donald Trump hard questions. Disrespects the office of the presidency. That's what we're supposed to do. His reporters that is beautifully put. That's exactly because look, I held doctor Falke and pretty high esteem over the years. I saw him on Sunday shows and all the rest of it. Couple things coming out of this, though he's been wrong quite a bit. He is a bit of a grandstander, and I just don't think the media has pushed back on him enough. Appropriately And if they are unskilled, they can't do it. Scientifically enough. Then the nationals will be putting their scientific reporter in there with, um you know, at the other guy I've completely lost respect for is Sanjay Gupta. I used to sort of have a modicum. He's just a hack during this. I don't know if you feel the same way on CNN. I mean, honestly, I basically don't want CNN and nor do I watch Fox that much. I get my data from scientific journals from, you know, from government databases. I'm looking to the primary evidence. And and so and so you know, I look and obviously most people aren't going to do that. Most people have jobs. Okay, well, except interrupted. Just hit the white ball. Hit me What I wanted to ask you and I could talk to you all day. But I wanted to ask you this. Okay, we are on this year because my background is I'm a former teacher that got into this on. I'm use nationally and education issues. Why some schools are opening. It seems to be chance. They're not following the science. Here's what I wanted to ask you, though. For a school to reopen safely at the highest level. I'll put it that way, because I trust your judgment. What should they be doing then to reassure parents? That optimally. We're taking every precaution we can, yet we're not going to just go hybrid. We're going to go five days a week. What should they be doing? I don't know what they should really be doing what they have to be doing as a result of this panic and you know liability, but they should be doing is re opening period reopen the schools. Okay, no special precautions. There is no need, because the CDC said, this is what I'm talking about. When I say when I say the data is out there the Centers for Disease Control, the director of the Center for Disease Control, said in mid July, okay, not not, you know, not three days ago, he said in mid July, the odds that a child under Aged 18 will die from the crown of ours are one in one million much lower than the flu..

Alex The New York Times CDC Laura Marijuana Alex Barron Sin Twitter Alex Bernsen CNN Cove Pennsylvania Jim Acosta Lockdowns Donald Trump Philadelphia Sanjay Gupta FLU Doctor Falke President United Fine
Bryce Harper’s Walk-Off Single Gives Philadelphia Phillies 6-5 Win Over New York Mets

SportsCenter All Night

01:51 min | 11 hrs ago

Bryce Harper’s Walk-Off Single Gives Philadelphia Phillies 6-5 Win Over New York Mets

"Team impacted by Kobe, 19 sources telling ESPN today's game between the Cincinnati Reds and Pittsburgh Pirates likely to be postponed after a Reds player tested positive for the Corona virus, which is heavily impacted teams like the Moreland's and Cardinals more than any other, But other teams that have played those teams have been impacted themselves with days. In quarantine. The Philadelphia Phillies won such team, but they were playing on Friday, cashing in on the faceless Mets. It was a 55 game bottom nine with ducks on the pond for none other than Bryce Harper. Swung on line two right that is going to fall in front of Conforto for a hit he fields on one hop. Here comes Quinn the throw to the plate and he is safe at home plate Safe is the call the throw beat him. Ramos applied the tag Wagner called safe. And for the moment the Phillies have won the game. And here's the call from New York. The headsets come off and he is safe in the game is over, and the Phillies have won it. It is, in fact, a walk off winner is heard on Sports Radio 94 W I. P. Bryce Harper getting there. Game winning blow with the Phillies cashing in as I mentioned on the ace, less METS, New York, Scratching the reigning two time Cy Young winner Jacob the ground for Friday start because of neck tightness. No D L For now. Harper on NBC Sports Philadelphia on his walk off winner really fast out there, and I kind of thought of all those hard. Um, but you know he's earned it. Let him score right there. So pretty happy about that one. You hold your breath. I would imagine now waiting for that replay to show up on the big screen. Pretty pretty special slide by Roman when they put the kid in there is that ball beat up by a little bit 100%. I mean, you know, being able to have a guy like that on second base. I mean, He, uh He's one of those guys in league so good throw by Conforto right there and just bang bang and he got in there so very, very happy about that

Philadelphia Phillies P. Bryce Harper Mets Cincinnati Reds Conforto Quinn Wagner Cardinals Kobe Pittsburgh Pirates New York Espn Philadelphia Cy Young Ramos NBC Jacob
Fresh update on "the new york times" discussed on This American Life

This American Life

00:13 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "the new york times" discussed on This American Life

"I really need to point out he would only have to wear the Speedo for the test, which last a minute in 20 seconds on the job, he'd wear board shorts. Most of the lifeguards dio young and old. Why not just put it on for the test? Why didn't Rosa Park just go to the back of the bus? There were plenty of seats. Of course. What Roy was fighting for is quite different from what Rosa Parks was fighting for better. Roy is the principle of the thing. Standing up to each discrimination. When I read about all this in The New York Times, I really didn't understand. What's the connection between the Speedo and age discrimination? I've certainly seen older dudes in Speedos. So I went out met Roy on a beach not far from his house in Long Island. It was 6 45 In the morning. He was about to go for a mile swim before work. Roy brought one of his official Jones Beach, Speedos to the beach to show me just describe it for me. It's an exaggerated song like that, but it's full coverage in the back, So it's not quite a songwriter, not quite right. Asteroid. Lots of guys. It might as well be a thong, which is why the Speedos earned a stable of nicknames. The weenie bikini, the dangling sling the speed. Don't the banana hammock, the grape smuggler. The Miami meet tent, the central pay truffle duffel the screw. The reason the jammer is preferred by older lifeguards is that you're saying it's more discreet. Modest or modest. Yes, then the Speedo. Yes, because it covers your size. I You know I don't want to get graphic. But A year. The word begins with B basically are hanging out with the with the Speedo. I get it now. I think Don't really with the jam is it's not like that, like a little bit more of a roof over your house. Yes, yes. This is the nut of his argument, Mori says. Once he passed 50 he felt self conscious in the Speedo and nobody should have to feel self conscious to get a job. So Roy refuses to put on the great smuggler to take the swim test. A few weeks later, there's another chance to take the test. He shows up and this time he is wearing the official Speedo. He's.

ROY Rosa Park Jones Beach Rosa Parks Official Mori Long Island Miami The New York Times
Elizabeth Wetmore: 'Valentine'

Bookworm

05:48 min | 2 d ago

Elizabeth Wetmore: 'Valentine'

"Today. I'm rejoining Elizabeth what more Beth what more to talk about how? At Age fifty two, she published her first novel Valentine. A novel that not only is superb. It made its debut at number two on the New York Times bestseller list. The book is wonderful an impressive demonstration of the power of women's voices to carry a novel. Now, I'm very interested Elizabeth. How is it? That this. Is Your first novel at Age Fifty Two when did you start writing? Well I don't think I wrote my first short story until I was in my late twenties and I was a reader and I loved books and I read voraciously and impulsively as a little girl if somewhat in a somewhat unfocused manner and and really I don't come from a background where one becomes a writer at least not as a profession. So I think that this sort of combination of of a a kind of holding writers in such esteem I as a little girl in even as a young woman, I thought authors were. Other worldly they were sages and priests and rabbis and holy people live all sorts but I didn't think of writers as being particularly human or occupying the same world as the rest of us So I even write my first short story until I was in my late twenties but I read a lot and I love to read and I thought it must be a pretty holy profession to spend your time telling stories. I fell in love with reading and I had a hard time imagining who a writer might be. I, confused my teachers with riders. I thought that they and the books they taught me came from some specially magical and creative source and I felt song lucky. that. There were special classes when I was in elementary school, it had the ugly Title I. G C Intellectually Gifted Children. By the time I was in high school it was called AP advanced placement but whatever it was called we got to read the best books. One of my teachers took us not to the school library but to a public library where the head librarian was a friend of hers and we were able to take out adult books in this book, your new novel your first. Novel. Valentine one of the characters is reading the scarlet letter. There's a beautiful quote it's not identified, but I recognized it from Charlotte's Web. She here's the beauty of language, the children who are readers here that beauty and they find it on the local bookmobile. The comes to a nearby parking lot a parking lot that's near the strip. Strip joint. It's kind of amazing on the one hand you have. lost. Romantic children getting books and on the other hand you have the men watching the women taking their clothes off and that defied is the divide that defines this novel. But at a certain point Beth, you are at Iowa the Iowa Riders Program How did that happen? When I was waiting tables in Phoenix I started taking community fiction workshop It was being taught by to Grad students at Arizona State, and at that particular time, I don't know if they still do this. But at that time they the MFA students had to do some kind of community service project. So these two guys were teaching this community fiction writing workshop and. I sort of made my way into that and that was where I started and then at some point I was able to to sort of I wouldn't say sneak-in but I was able to get permission to sit on an MFA level workshop at Asu and just sort of as a guest It was really lucky and I'm not sure it would happen today. But but the long and the short of it is I was able to sit in on a class being taught by Ron Carlson who really encouraged me than to apply to Grad School, and I'm the first generation of my family to go to college I. Grew up in a really really working class background. So Honestly It wasn't until I was in my late twenties that I even really knew that there were such things as MFA programs when I signed up for that community fiction workshop was when I learned that there were MFA programs out there So So I was encouraged by a by a mentor to to apply and I did and You know initially he had said to me go do some research and come back in. So I, I went and did a little reading and came back with a sort of list of places to fly in University of Texas Syracuse Iowa was not even on my radar until he said, why is in Iowa on?

Iowa Writer Beth Head Librarian Elizabeth New York Times Arizona State Ron Carlson Grad School Valentine Syracuse Charlotte University Of Texas
Fresh update on "the new york times" discussed on The Car Pro Show

The Car Pro Show

00:45 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "the new york times" discussed on The Car Pro Show

"Initially being held virtually Vanesa G is going to be laid to rest in a private family funeral today following yesterday's memorial. There's going to be a Car caravan before the funeral at five K T. R H News time is 11 03 the Postal Service's warning states to allow plenty of time for absentee ballots to be delivered. In a letter to states, the general counsel for the Postal Service warned some deadlines for requesting and casting mail in ballots are incompatible with delivery standards. Urging states to require residents request ballots at least 15 days before an election. Some states allow just four days for that request. The New York Times first reported The letter sent in July 2 election officials across the country including Michigan, Pennsylvania in Florida. As Democrats included billions of dollars for the Postal Service in relief package to meet absentee voting demand during the Corona virus pandemic. President Trump has signaled opposition to widespread voting by mail. Jared Halpern Fox News in Texas. The deadline to request a mail in ballot is October 23rd. Your Don Alvarez that it was Cove it that kept him from playing ball. But he is back with the Astros first at bat. Last night, he hit a three run homer. They play again this evening news on demand and Katie are h dot com We're going to have another update at 11 30 I'm Nicky Courtney on Houston's news, weather and traffic station News Radio. 7 40 k T R H Finding The next job.

Postal Service Don Alvarez Astros Jared Halpern President Trump Nicky Courtney General Counsel K T. R Katie Texas Houston Michigan The New York Times Florida Pennsylvania
[Unedited]  Dario Robleto with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:06 min | 2 d ago

[Unedited] Dario Robleto with Krista Tippett

"Ning and. Welcome back to winter. Someone someone wrote me today instead it's raining feathers. So welcome to the institute. I'm Liz Armstrong. Curator. Of Contemporary Art, and we are very pleased to be hosting the second live interview with Krista Tippett for her show and broadcast of on being. As. Many of you know Christa was here two months ago when she spoke with Hamilton and what was a fascinating and far-reaching conversation they covered everything from spiritual act of art making to the strange intimacy of museums where people can be alone together. The the this interview, and that one we're presented. In conjunction with the exhibition currently on view. In our target wing simply called sacred, which is a series of installations, the probe, the nature of the sacred within a secular multi-faith society. By, juxtaposing works of art from Multiple Times in places, the sacred exhibition invites visitors to explore historic and contemporary. Expressions of the divine, the spiritual, the essential in the beloved and to ponder the words meaning in their personal lives. I want to thank the MIA's affinity collectors, group contemporary art for their support of this program, and for helping us visits from artists such as Hamilton. Dario. And now let me just briefly introduce each of our guests. KRISTA Tippett Enduro. Christie needs little introduction on this stage. She's a peabody award winning broadcaster and New York Times bestselling author WHO's highly acclaim radio program on being fills a huge void in the public discussion of spirituality and faith. She's not afraid to. to discuss the big animating questions of human life from how do we want to live to what does it mean to be human? She and her guests explore meaning ethics and what is sacred miss the political cultural and technological turmoil that is first century life. Dario fo was houston-based artists who's known for his highly original repurposing of rare and archaic materials. Like a DJ sampling music and he just told me tonight, he was a DJ once Doria spins in shapes such unconventional materials as dinosaur fossils, meteorite remnants, hand bones, and hipbones, and pulverized vinyl from vintage records. He's been called materials poet. I think of him as a passionate alchemist who memorialize the past while finding new meaning in the tangled roots its history. He's a maker of extraordinary objects that are meditations on war, love death, spirituality, and healing. It's going to be really interesting to him talk about these objects without seeing them. But you can imagine and then you will see them So I'm really looking forward to this conversation. Please join me in welcoming Chris step and Dario. Thank you lose. It's great to be back at Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Feel like I'm an old timer now. So I welcome you. So, Dr. you grew up in San Antonio I grew up in Oklahoma. It did not snow in March where we came from. I've really been looking forward to this for several months as way I planned it. Thank you. Very much. So if I ask you a about the spiritual and religious background of your childhood, where would you start to think about what that means? San Antonio is maybe Catholic central. In America So it's It's hard not to be around that in San Antonio. My grandfather was a Baptist minister. I didn't grow up around ten so much but his is influence definitely. was there the Beckham ahead? And he was definitely a passionate passionate man. My mother. Religion in the home was not ever really an issue but as. I searched it out on my own. I'd asked my friends I could come to church. Catholic methodist I probably sample every every church. Afraid I had. And? I continually. Even at that early age was was very, very interested. So my childhood it I would say it was very self directed. maybe always within the background knowing that thing about my grandfather, there was still this mysterious thing that I didn't really understand. So, maybe it was fairly field that to the searching.

Dario Fo Peabody Award Krista Tippett San Antonio Contemporary Art Hamilton Liz Armstrong MIA Beckham Christa New York Times Minneapolis Institute Of Arts Doria Catholic Methodist Oklahoma America Chris
School districts struggle to teach online; quarantines grow

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

01:56 min | 3 d ago

School districts struggle to teach online; quarantines grow

"Has all well over 500 cases of covert 19 The New York Times Inside Houston Methodist Hospital in July, or 60% of the covert patients are Latino rosary beads resting in the hand of a 30 year old Ivan Sanchez, who for weeks has been on a ventilator. Sorta markets Deadliest day yet 277 lives. Lost cases are declining in 23 states. But there's also concern about the potential for spread in schools across Cherokee County, Georgia, at least 925 students and staff or quarantine after 60 people tested positive masked required for teachers, but on Lee recommended for students. When schools reopened last week. Parents were hopeful so many of us were desperately wanting our kids to be face to face. I feel 100% safe in Texas debate over re opening classrooms Please go. Middle school teacher Rebecka Azure quitting at the school board meeting. I respectfully offer you my resignation for I need to take care of my I just didn't feel the district had adequate plans to keep both students and teachers safe. Across the country. Nearly 180,000 new covert cases reported in Children in just the last four weeks, an increase of 90% 6 year old Jadon Coulter of Philadelphia was severely sickened by that rare multi inflammatory syndrome. But breathing too of damage. Throw thes coming from his neck, his arms They came in the room every three minutes. And this was a lot. Jaden is now recovering. But he'll be going back to school online and I was right about coals for one of my childhood school banana second guessing like it. Maybe Virgil's not their big here in Texas. The emotional debate on whether to go back to school continues. Most districts will even go back online or in person a little bit late this year. After Labor Day. ABC is

Houston Methodist Hospital Texas Middle School Jaden Ivan Sanchez Cherokee County Inflammatory Syndrome The New York Times Virgil ABC Philadelphia LEE Georgia
Big Ten and Pac-12 postpone 2020 football, pushing the college sport closer to total fall shutdown

the NewsWorthy

00:58 sec | 3 d ago

Big Ten and Pac-12 postpone 2020 football, pushing the college sport closer to total fall shutdown

"The most historic and powerful conferences in college athletics. Given up on false sports, the big ten and PAC twelve postponed their fall seasons. This is a big deal, not just because of sports as the New York Times explains big football programs in those conferences, -versities recruit students and attracted donations even though college football is a multibillion dollar industry, it's apparently no match for the corona virus. The conferences say they're worried about the health of their players and they point out the can't just put them in a bubble like some professional sports leagues are doing. That's because the players still. Still have to go to class with other students and be part of the broader campus community that said, the conferences are hoping to hold their football soccer and other seasons in the spring instead. So this'll be shaking up hundred million dollar TV contracts and scouting deals with the pros remember to other smaller conferences also backed away from fall sports over the last few days. All in all the AP says, forty percent of major college football teams will not be playing this fall and more are still expected to bow out.

Football PAC New York Times Soccer
COVID-19 Impact and Recovery

This Week in Photo

06:15 min | 3 d ago

COVID-19 Impact and Recovery

"All right gentlemen welcome to the show. This has been a long time in the making this particular episode as you both know, we've been dialoguing over the the you know through email after the first covid type production I put together, which was in a Web webinar format. We decided to do this when Moore's a prerecorded livestream instead of doing the Webinar format because. There's a ton of things that we need to talk about and I just think this format makes more sense to get the information out. So I would think both you guys for coming on the show and covering this with me from the standpoint of having much more knowledge about it than I do. So which is which is important. Marcucci when it started just with some some introductions, obviously I did the brief introduction in the open there. But just a more personal introduction mark. Let's start with you who is Mark Fujio, and Why are you on the show today? Let's talk about that and then we'll go to you vincent. Okay. So I. Talk about how we've been friends for a decade if you want. Okay. Yeah. So Yeah I. was going to lead into that the I've been involved in all sorts of different You're leading edge technologies. I've lived in Santa Clara in the Silicon Valley for twenty nine years Known Frederick for about ten years and helped get him out of adobe and into a startup storage company named Robo and You know along at That's when I started listening to the this week in barrage podcast hosted by Vincent. So I've been listening to that show for man. Over over ten years, I think even longer than I've known you Frederick. So. I've had quite an interest in urology Personally last November and a dark Moon it you new moon you know night had an accident coming home where I ran into an Amazon. and. Which I wasn't expecting to be there and shorts long story short. You know I tour the complete tear their quadriceps tendon on my left leg. So I spent basically three months into brace. And then than three months sheltering in place. So, during some of your initial cooeperation obviously had a lot more time to pay attention to things and I remember seeing in sort of late November early December, a little bit of a blurb of news about in new virus coming out of China. So Fast forward So the whole incident about the Chinese doctor who had was fighting it. Got Suppressed and who ultimately died, and then you know what we turned into January. This year just exploded as a story and the US and I don't think anybody can go anywhere and a gathering you know A. Virtual. With the friends or family without covy becoming a major topic of discussion. So I very much enjoyed the the seminar you did you know a couple months ago Frederick and. Be Able to put you in Vincent together to Have a follow up. Survey and that is that is that. That's perfect and that that that. Discussion on Cova we did that you mentioned back in the day that will link to that in the description for this episode, but that was designed to be I think the title of it was. Something around demystifying covid nineteen hundred photographers, but it was turns out photographers are actually human so it doesn't does. It back then it. Doesn't really matter but I wanted to definitely follow up on that since we've done that. So much stuff since we did that. Webinar. So much stuff. Vincent that you're intimate with. In the rest of the world obviously is to a degree intimate with has happened both on the understanding of the virus side of things all the way through to disinformation and the politicization of. The whole mask wearing thing and you're not American if you wear a mask and now you are American if you wear a mask and you know all all this stuff has been happening. So I don't want to make this political but I do want to touch on the politics of that before we before we dive in then can you tell us a little bit about yourself and the podcast this week in virology? Well I am a Professor Virology at Columbia University, which is in New, York. I've been working on viruses for over forty years. I've been doing research on them. I wrote a textbook. I have taught many virology courses and twelve years ago I started a podcast. Decided to call it this week. Envir- Allergy I was inspired by Leo LaPorte. Chipper. Who probably inspired you as well I would guess, absolutely. Father. We have done this for twelve years and at the beginning of this year we noticed this outbreak in China we started covering it and I think almost every episode from the beginning of Twenty twenty now has been about the virus and the disease SARS covy to in Covid nineteen. And you know we have always talked about the threats of new viruses emerging. but they weren't taken seriously enough and we've had big outbreaks. You know we've had big ebola outbreaks. We've had Sika outbreaks, influenza outbreaks, many other viruses, but. I hate to say we were not ready for this. This all could have been avoided quite sadly. So now I am full on in educating people trying to counter the misinformation our listeners have gone way way up. It's just great. We're getting mentioned by Malcolm. Glad. Well, we got in USA Today The New York Times this week. But I think more people need to listen because we really tell it like it is and so that's the story.

Vincent Frederick China Moore Professor Virology Edge Technologies New York Times Mark Fujio Santa Clara Leo Laporte United States Covid Cova Adobe Malcolm Silicon Valley Columbia University Robo York
U.S. weighing order to deny entry to certain citizens

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 4 d ago

U.S. weighing order to deny entry to certain citizens

"President Trump is considering a new immigration policy that would allow border officials to temporarily blocking American citizen or legal permanent resident from returning to the U. S from abroad if there's reason to believe that person may be infected with the Corona virus Those two groups have been exempt by current pandemic related rules that van entry by foreigners into the country. But the New York Times says Ah draft regulation would expand the government's power to prevent entry by citizens and legal residents. In certain circumstances. Federal agencies have been asked for feedback on the proposal.

President Trump New York Times U. S
California Judge Orders Uber And Lyft To Consider All Drivers Employees

Daily Tech Headlines

00:37 sec | 4 d ago

California Judge Orders Uber And Lyft To Consider All Drivers Employees

"Uber and lift were ordered to convert their California drivers from independent contractors to employs with benefits. San Francisco Superior Court Judge Ethan Schulman agreed with California, Attorney General Javier Sara that Uber and lift or violating assembly bill five, but paused injunction for ten days. So the companies can appeal the preliminary injunction with both companies said, they will do Uber See yo Dr College for shot. He wrote an opinion piece for the New York Times outlining third. Third, way for workers to be classified beyond for additional and contractor distinction calling for an industry-wide benefits fund to let workers build up benefits across different GIG services.

Attorney General Javier Sara Ethan Schulman California Superior Court New York Times San Francisco
Makeover: Oil Giant BP Promises to Cut Oil Production, Invest in Renewables

Business Wars Daily

04:09 min | 4 d ago

Makeover: Oil Giant BP Promises to Cut Oil Production, Invest in Renewables

"Somebody had to go I. It's no surprise that Covid Nineteen Delta Draconian blow to the oil and gas industry stay at home orders and line shutdowns of dramatically reduced the need for oil and gas prices and earnings plunged well. Now at least one giant oil company says demand for fossil fuels will never be the same again and it's taking steps not just to pivot, but to make itself over entirely. That business is BP the london-based behemoth last week, the one, hundred, ten year, old company announced a seventeen billion dollar quarterly loss and multibillion dollar writedown of its assets. But what generated headlines was its announcement that over the next decade, it intends to discard its identity as a fossil fuel business. Instead, it'll invest heavily in a wide variety of renewable energy technologies on its way to achieving net zero emissions by twenty fifty. Specifically bb says it will cut oil and gas production by forty percent over the next decade. At the same time, it plans to put ten times as much money into renewable energy investments as it currently does with a goal of investing five billion dollars a year by twenty thirty bio-energy hydrogen, carbon, capture and storage investments in electric vehicle charging stations are all said to be on the menu as our wind and solar. From. A business perspective the move does make some sense BP expects demand for oil to fall between fifty and seventy five percent over the next thirty years as the world attempts to slow global warming. In June BP officials acknowledged that the pain caused to the oil business by the pandemic isn't temporary. It's permanent. They say in a statement, they said covid nineteen would accelerate an existing transition to a lower carbon economy as country seek to quote, build back better meaning in ways less harmful to the environment. The shift is taking a toll on BP's employees. The company announced in June that it plans to lay off ten thousand people. BP's dismal second quarter didn't seem to faze investors instead they embrace the company's new renewable energy shift its share price leapt seven percent on the news stuart joyner an analyst at the market research firm redburn remarked that the move was major positive, thoughtful, and largely unexpected the New York Times reported. Unexpected too many perhaps, but close observers of the company may not have been that surprised. BP has spent the last decade clawing back from its disastrous deepwater horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. For obvious reasons, the company hasn't exactly been a darling of environmentalists, but quickly after becoming CEO in February Bernard Looney made a pledge for BP to achieve net zero emissions by twenty fifty it was the first of giant global oil companies to do so. At the time both socially conscious and traditional investors applauded BP's pledge Andrew Logan and oil and gas director at series a climate change advocacy organization said EP was setting a new standard for leadership in the oil industry CNN reported and Barclays analysts called the plan both fundamental and radical. Last week. Looney. said in a statement quote. This coming decade is critical for the world in the fight against climate change and to drive the necessary change in global energy systems will require action from everyone but so far oil giants. Exxon and Chevron have not followed suit indeed mobile continues to expand oil exploration and production around the world despite its own sharp drop in earnings. The Washington Post reported BP has attempted and failed at other eco, friendly initiatives over the years and BP will continue to invest in and make most of its money from fossil fuels for at least another five years. Still observers agree that this is the company's most transformative move yet, and the realities of business may give BP's ecoconscious strategy more momentum than has existed in the past. As reporter Steven muffs wrote in. The Washington Post for. BP. Is trying to get ahead of what climate change might forced the industry to do. Anyway.

BP Washington Post BB Mexico EP New York Times Exxon Andrew Logan Bernard Looney
Unwanted Truths: Inside Trump’s Battles With U.S. Intelligence Agencies

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

04:36 min | 4 d ago

Unwanted Truths: Inside Trump’s Battles With U.S. Intelligence Agencies

"Us now is Robert Draper writer at large for the New York Times magazine. He's the author of several books including most recently to start a war how the Bush administration took America into Iraq Arbor draper has just published this landmark piece of reporting the Times magazine. It's called unwanted truth this inside trump's battles with US intelligence agencies among the scoops embedded here is news that. The. White House pressured the Director of National Intelligence to change and intelligence community conclusion that Russia wanted president trump reelected in two thousand, twenty, the intelligence director at the time Dan Coats said, no, he was then fired his successor signed off on the change, but he was then fired after one of his deputies briefed Congress that in fact, Russia is working to reelect president trump this year. Mr Draper I, thank you for this reporting for joining us here tonight to help us understand it. Thanks very much for your time. I've said a lot of words about the. Words that you have reported here and that you have printed. Let me just ask if I got anything wrong or if you think that I'm looking at anything the wrong way around. To actually think presences I did when issue two clarifications the I rooted in the most important is that I am not aware the Joe McGuire had anything to do with the alteration of the National Intelligence Estimate this all took place during his first couple of weeks on the job when his hands were very much full with Ukraine whistleblower incident as you correctly pointed at and so this really. Anthem it matter win the in I was approved on September the twenty six inch testifying on the hill all day long. So he wasn't able to cheer that meeting. So that's the first second thing is that You know they're a don't want the story to give anyone the impression that the intelligence community as a whole has been bent to the will of Donald Trump. There's still plenty of analysts in case officers who are doing very good work. The problem is that the people above them have been in the line of fire with the trump administration and had begun to water down such that the intelligence products do not have the integrity that they once did not mean saying black is why end up as down but they are saying things in a more equivocating fashion and we saw this most recently just out of this past Friday. On a no deny official release this election security report saying that for the first time did yes it did appear the Russia. Trump essentially the same breath saying that China in Iran. Favored Biden is if it were kind of a jump ball or something in that was working patient, you did not see before the trump presidency. I feel like I. Thank you for for those clarifications and for drilling down on those things in that way I feel like. When I read it, the beginning of your piece that Dan Coats was pressured to change the National Intelligence Estimate around Russia's intentions for the two thousand election and he said, no felt like, wow, that's that's really big news about Dan Coats to find out that that happened just before he was fired. Is itself a scoop. But then to find out that the National Intelligence Estimate. was in fact watered down in the way that the White House wanted under Joe McGuire. It it does seem like the sort of bending to the White House's will equivocating on things that aren't equivocal casting things in a way that doesn't you know is designed not to upset the president or put things in ways that he likes it does feel like it's not just pressure, but it's effective pressure that's actually working on the I say. Over sharing in. A. probably Rachel that the matter of. Russia in election security has been a sore subject since before trump's presidency and everyone knew I in the NFC in the West Wing and certainly in the intelligence community that to bring the very matter of Russia interfering in two thousand sixteen, it's likely interference patterns through the midterms and into twenty twenty an most of all that if they were trump would be to call into question the legitimacy of this presidency. That's how he would receive this and so because it was such an unpleasant thing as report out then chief definite Mulvaney and then national security advisor. John was a considerable lengths to to keep this completely off the agenda would get on the agenda for example, when it was a single in a seat meeting at relating to Russia in Election Security Pearson Nelson than the secretary of. Homeland Security didn't get five minutes into it before trump started interrupting her and asking questions about a wall along the Mexican border. So this has been a distasteful subject to him people around him have known that and they have adjusted themselves unfortunately accordingly.

Donald Trump Russia Dan Coats Joe Mcguire Director Of National Intellige White House Robert Draper Mr Draper President Trump United States The New York Times Magazine Writer Homeland Security Iraq Arbor America Rachel Biden Mulvaney Director
Why South Asia's COVID-19 numbers are so low

World Affairs Council

10:02 min | 4 d ago

Why South Asia's COVID-19 numbers are so low

"States is approaching five million covert 19 infections. We've passed 160,000 deaths. This virus has paralyzed the richest, most powerful country in the world. And we know this was preventable because at the same time and parts of the developing world countries with far fewer resource is have kept infection and death rates remarkably low. Rhonda's carried out nearly 180,000 tests. Since the start of the pandemic, Erica has applied a combination of mandatory social distancing. A strict lock down and wide scale testing. It's a strategy. We can learn a lot from these apparent success stories this week. We're taking a closer look at Southeast Asia along the Mekong River. As of this recording, five countries with a combined population of 243 million people have had fewer than 5000 cases of covert 19 and 72 deaths. The water Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia and Myanmar doing that the rest of the world finds itself unable to do in controlling this virus. Well, I think if we knew that answer for certain there would be epidemiologists and government officials from all over the world lined up on the door, trying to figure out the secret. That's Hannah Beach. She's Southeast Asia bureau chief for The New York Times. Race wars reached her at her home in Bangkok. And she says, there isn't just one reason that these countries have been so successful. I don't think there's anyone magic bullet, but there is kind of constellation of things that countries Thailand has done, which would seem right. First of all people started wearing masks very early, even when the W H O is dissuading people from doing so. Second of all, it's not really a touchy culture when people greet each other. They do what's called a Y, which is when you put your hands together like you're like you're in a prayer like motion. Sort of all hospitals are good health care's not prohibitive. You know, one of the things that people have been looking at that that it might be some sort of Innate resistance that has been built up, particularly in Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar and Vietnam to the current virus. One of the theories that the people in Thailand are looking at is the way in which the novel Coronavirus Cove in 19 evolved. And it started off most likely in bats on DH. Then it went from bad to some sort of intermediary mammal, and then from that mammal to humans, there is there is some speculation, looking both that kind of the genetic origins of the current virus, but also looking at something animals that were at the wet market. In Wuhan, where the outbreak seems to have proliferated that the animal that was thie kind of intermediary animal between bats and humans might have been an animal that was indigenous to this part of Southeast Asia. And that it might have been a pangolin which looks like a kind of like an artichoke cross. Listen, armadillo. If it came from this animal, there is the possibility that something a precursor even this novel, coronavirus had been sort of floating around. In the ecosystem in this region for a long time, and that could potentially explain some sort of resistance that had been built up within the local populations here. And if you look at, for instance, in in southwestern China, which is very close to this region in the number of cases of Corona virus were very, very low. Compared to a place like Wuhan. So again, you know is this is this magic bullet That explains everything We don't know. But it's certainly a factor. That is that seemed interesting. That is interesting. Will you live in the region? You cover the region as you watch these numbers and as you watch the toll in the rest of the world Are you at all suspicious? Do you think these numbers of credible all of these places whether it's Thailand, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar If the numbers were so cooked if there were bodies lined up at the morgues. If there were mass graves, we would know there is social media. People talk, people whisper, and we would we would have an idea. S O. I think that's I don't think it's fair to say that the numbers are simply made up. I'm in Thailand right now has fewer than I think 3500 cases. Vietnam, which has had an uptick has fewer than 800 cases. This. Maybe it's off by a couple 100. Maybe if given off by a couple 1000 But if there were bodies at the hospital's piling up from a mysterious respiratory disease, we would know you've spent the duration of the pandemic in Thailand. Let's go back to those first weeks. In January, Thailand confirmed what was believed to be the first confirmed case outside of China. Around the same time the U. S experienced its first case is well. What happened in those earliest weeks? Well, it was interesting that this this first case Thailand has a very good kind of geological service, and in mid January, they confirmed that the Chinese tourists coming from Wuhan, China, which is where the outbreaks believed to have started Had had flown to Bangkok for holiday, which millions of Chinese do every year Bank office in fact, one of the world's most visited cities, and it's one the most visited by Chinese. And at that point, people in Thailand became nervous because there was a mysterious disease up north in China, and there were a lot of Chinese tourists arriving and one thing that didn't happen and we can kind of look back at this. And obviously it's hard to say we know we knew that this is going to be The deadly epidemic that it's become. But in the beginning flights weren't stopped two flights captain arriving from from Wuhan from China, and yes, there were efforts to try to much temperatures of people came in, but there wasn't really that much that was done. Fast forward a few weeks people of their own accord with with government advice started wearing masks and you know there's there's no no sense in Thailand that That wearing a mask is anything but good for public health. There was no there was no no sense that that was somehow infringing upon their individual liberties you've experienced since you there with the ties. Six weeks of pretty strict national locked down. Is it getting any easier now? What's day to day? Life like in Thailand? Now, can you send your kids to school? Can you eat a restaurant? Can you go into stores? You know, I talked to friends back in the states and I feel a little bit guilty because we started our lock down in March and then in Early April. Essentially all international flights stopped. Commercial flights stopped. And so we've been sort of under lock down for months. But beginning in June, the lock down started easing. So all the restaurants all the bars, all the massage parlors, all the all the kind of normal establishments, businesses have slowly been opening up. And now my life is pretty normal. Yes, I still wear a mask everywhere. My kids wear masks everywhere. But schools high schools are back in session on their social distancing. Now they have school kids have school every other week. They wear the masks. They have plastic dividers and things. But there's commerce on DH. There's there's kinda semblance of normalcy, which again makes me feel a little bit that when I speak to people in the U. S, because that's very different from From what? What Americans experiences. You know, we've gone more than almost three months without a case of of local transmission, which is remarkable their cases. Every day, but they're all in people who are coming back from ties were coming back from overseas, whether it's the United States or Europe or the Middle East since that strictest version of the lock down ended Did the economy bounced back is AH are some of the worst effects economically of the lock down starting to ease Because people are spending money again, People are making money again. That's the real tragedy of of Thailand. Thailand did a very good job of controlling the virus and making sure that it hasn't spread. But economists absolutely devastated and the reason is devastated. It's because it's a very tourism reliant economy anywhere. Between 20 and 30% of GDP comes from from tourism, and they're no tourists coming in. So you can. If you want to come on a beach holiday to Thailand, you can't do that right now. So that means that anybody who was a tour guide, our hotel operator restaurant operator. Millions of people have been put out of work. And so the Thai government's really kind of facing a difficult decision right now, which is you can open up. But then if you open up and try to save the economy, you might be also allowing the virus to come in and assistant. It's an issue that Many economies and in many countries are dealing with. But given the success the Thailand has had and being able to control the virus, you know, it makes it that much more. On fraud to even consider bringing people back in and

Thailand Wuhan China Vietnam Southeast Asia Myanmar Laos Cambodia Bangkok Mekong River Rhonda Erica Hannah Beach Coronavirus Coronavirus Cove Fraud Thai Government Bureau Chief The New York Times
Uber and Lyft ordered to classify drivers as employees

CNBC's Fast Money

04:04 min | 4 d ago

Uber and Lyft ordered to classify drivers as employees

"Are following a developing story and Uber lift both stocks are on the move following California court ruling Deirdre has got the very latest deirdre. The court's ruling is stayed for ten days to allow Uber to appeal but it would force the ride sharing companies to immediately we classify their drivers as employees in California in a statement Uber says quote when three million Californians are without a job our elected leaders should be focused on creating work trying to shut down an entire industry during an economic depression lift for its part said quote drivers do not want to be employees full stop will immediately appeal this ruling and continue to fight for their independence. If the appeal is not granted or there's no further stay, there is a chance. Melissa that. Could shut down their APPs entirely in California Uber keeping. Mind has over one hundred, thousand drivers in the state and bringing them on his employees I'm told would be nearly impossible. Now, the other option is that they continue to operate and risk legal liability as you were saying, shares of Uber and lift their down about one and a half and two and a half percent respectively in the after hours investors, they do know very. Well that regulatory pressures had been building, but as I said, Melissa, this was a key battle in one of the most one of their most important markets and it comes as other states from New York to Illinois Massachusetts are looking at similar legislation and to be clear this doesn't just affect ridesharing Uber's pivoting towards food delivery. The classification of those drivers are also at stake here back to you did your thanks dude or both? And I I would think that the stocks would be down even more if this was seen as a true threat to the business particularly for Uber. Yeah I think Deebo said it I mean the expectation was this outcome here we know that Dr Uber was out in the New York Times pending an op Ed making a lot of the points that Deirdre just mentioned here there isn't a whole heck of a lot of evidence that a lot of these workers actually WanNa be fulltime employees they actually like driving for lift and Uber Maybe doing a little post mates little caviar here so it'll be interesting to see what happens just mentioned this would lift you know. They're going to report in a couple of days after the close. After we saw Uber's seventy five percent year every year client ride bookings. GonNa be a really important one for lift the only North American rideshare. That's why this issue in California is probably more significant to them. But I'll just mentioned this at a seven and a half billion dollar enterprise value lift is way too cheap an asset even with all the losses that they have right now ridesharing whether these gig economy workers are employers are not is here to stay in Google wants fitbit for two billion dollars for their data. So many certainly wants lift yeah. I would also think that these drivers in during a time of pandemic one job whether it be classified as a contractor or full employees. I'm sure they're not that picky at this point, Tim? I think there's a lot of folks that enjoy being an independent contractor gives a lot of flexibility not only with how they live their days and how they deal with their families and what they can do. But also from a tax perspective and I I agree with what dancing and there's a lot of these guys at work for multiple a rideshare companies and also agree that I've said this before if you WanNa hail a cab in a major urban center now good luck it's not happening and rideshare is here. There's arguments that this did not do things for pricing for people all around the country, but but the reality is I love Uber here but I look at the chart and yes, they've had about a fifteen, a little twelve, thirteen percent pullbacks, their numbers. But at the bottom here of this rain been in around thirty three bucks, this is a stock that takes you back to a level where I think it's it's found support and you've priced in a lot of bad news. This post mates acquisition gives them thirty seven percent essentially delivery of the food business. And I think it's something that ultimately allows them to leverage their platform don't love the stock, but there's a lot of bad news in here and I think most of that bad news has been priced in.

Dr Uber California Deirdre Melissa Google New York New York Times Deebo TIM Massachusetts ED Illinois
Trump says adding his face to Mount Rushmore would be a 'good idea.' It would likely be impossible

Dear America with Graham Allen Podcast

00:49 sec | 5 d ago

Trump says adding his face to Mount Rushmore would be a 'good idea.' It would likely be impossible

"Donald Trump and mount rushmore. Hear the story at saw I. Didn't know if it was true or not. So New York Times apparently said the White House contacted South Dakota about potentially putting trump on mount rushmore. and. Trump's like more fake news, but considering all the good things I've done. Of course, second, get idea to me. Like fly in the way they make him like. Posted a photo. On, Rushmore look people are freaking that this. Story on. This right now, I swear to the Lord, above if they carve donald trump's face on mount rushmore and we are not there. We're GONNA have. Some problems.

Donald Trump Mount Rushmore. New York Times South Dakota White House
"the new york times" Discussed on Marketing Secrets

Marketing Secrets

07:04 min | 5 d ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Marketing Secrets

"He's here. All right as of today I'm officially New York Times Bestseller. So the big question is this. How we're entrepreneurs like us. He didn't cheat and take on venture capital spending money for own pockets. How market in a way to let us get our products and our services and the things that we believe in out to the world and yet still remain profitable. That is the question in this podcast will give you the answer. My Name's Awesome Brunson and welcome. Martha Secrets. Oh my gosh. Okay. So I just wanted to celebrate you guys. This is one of those like really weird moments where. Goal it's weird because. I, I've been a big old center, whole life right and most goals is go. I want to a state champion wrestler right? You go out there and you do it you do and you and you kill yourself and then you out real quick if you got it or you didn't get ready to win or lose but like its final and there's like this finale of right with business back to make a million bucks and you go and you do it you either do it or you don't, and then there's finality there's something there. I've never understood nothing I've understood but I I never competed a sports where you had judges the judge derive. where they look at you and they go you got you got an eight or nine you're gonna Ted like always. Like he either winner you lose. You know and there's no. Judging US do the thing in it and you you don't. and. It's interesting though because I was in this. Competition. A visible competition to call it. Where had this goal? My goal? As a probably know our guest was to somebody hit the New York Times best selling list. It's funny 'cause Before I wrote the dotcom secrets books I started writing as if I'M GONNA do this book like I don't know I'm I'm somebody who always wants to win right so it's like what's the goal go sell out of books but like the way you win, you become a New York Times bestseller like that's like own Olympics. Athlete the the best thing you can win the gold medal off. The best thing you can do is get on New York Times soloist it's like, okay. Well, how's it working? I found out you know obviously, it's how many books yourself this other things like always WanNa make sure there's a lot of publicity NPR and all sorts of around us. We kind of figured out what we take. I think at the time when the DOTCOM secrets book out most of the books there were on the list for selling I. Think it was like ten thousand copies a week or something like that. So in my head I was like if I can get more than ten thousand copies. It'd be on the list is going to be amazing and that became the goal, and so we created this product launch everything and and we did the launch to sell ten thousand copies and week and we ended up selling. I can't remember it's been six years. Now he was twenty or thirty, thousand copies that week and he's a funnel obviously, but then we. pre-sales rams on other channels and stuff, and it's like, okay we did a bunch much PR and podcast interviews and all these things trying to make as much as possible and I was like, okay it's GonNa Happen it's GonNa. Happen and we waited in the first week. It didn't happen. The second didn't happen third week and there's just as little seems like I would like. My hand should have got raised like I. I sold enough right past the have more books sold in the person's number one on your times by Solis. Why am I not there for some reason I wasn't and you can just call him today. Kate. Why did you give list? We just wants things were there's however the process works there's judges there's people they they pick. WHO's on the list and he's not in is other criteria obviously than just books being sold in whatever is ending list and being so upset and make frustrating depressed just like, Oh, I think hidden win make what was the point of writing the scene. Then luckily, the book did well and people loved it in helped a lot of people so very proud of. Book bookie now, expert secrets and it was close to five of I don't I. Don't. Want to. I don't really want to To retry for I, remember ruined my publisher like well. The Oath, you WanNa hit New York Times with traditional publishing things you have to do like a year out. It's all these different rules you know and I was like I don't WanNA sell the book. So we called crashing the boards or something basically I. The book and I two months. Later we started selling it which made us pretty much can get on the New York Times list because you know all the cells coming in. The New York Times the book publisher wherever the distribution people didn't know. The book is coming out and we end up selling like seventy thousand copies of that book first month, which you know outsold all of the books on the your times list. But because no one anyway because the process obviously to get to listen in your car. So the traffic secrets book came out, I'm not GonNa lie like secretly that'd be cool list but I'm going gonNA think about it Dave Woodward was one is like like we have to you have to do this like you earned it. You sold more than always the people's on the list should you should try for you should work for it and and Miss Kent back and said I wasn't take was it looked like to do that and and it was hard like I did. I think over one hundred radio interviews because it's not just like how do you sell? Make, know this is traditional publishing lists. We'll see like radio you're on TV where you authors who sell books like these are the things that they do, and so I had to be an all spot. So I had to do TV interviews we did hundreds of TV interviews, podcasts, facebook, live they did. so much stuff so much work that went into it you we sold books on Amazon Bookstore finally through bookstores like everything we couldn't anthony could to try to get the list and And it's funny and then during that time when Kobe it's crazy 'cause when Kobe hit Amazon shipping. So when we had all these books are supposed to be shipping out during the week they supposed to happen Amazon shipping books because they weren't essential items and so the couple weeks that's like we're definitely have the list we didn't because Amazon ship lists didn't ship the books they didn't count towards the whatever they algorithm is however works and nothing happened nothing happened in we tried hand two or three months to trying everything could and and then like two weeks ago we gave up you know what? Folks here this. Self driving traffic to all these other places just focus on funnel because then you know we're making money there, and so we shifted back to that. And then crazy is today I will up and I got a text from some friends people. With a picture of my book on The New York Times bestseller list and I was expecting that and we start freaking out, and so I've been frigging out all the to do with myself. It's like Louise Goals elusive that I have given up on things impossible in more than just happened and anyway I just WanNa share with you because it's a big big milestone life in my career and it's something that I'm really proud of and And finally, I can say the New York Times bestselling author, which is pretty cool the more important is the fact that. You know the shot there. So anyway share with you guys because. We go after goals and we don't hit him for me. I took on to book sold half a million copies of the books without getting rewarded with the thing yet we still did it because you know with the the product things are putting out there. Even if even if you know you're not being judged correctly or the way you think you should be by the outside judge just still doing it four more important reason which changing. The lives of the people that you're putting things out for and so but it also does get to be to be recognized. So I'm grateful for everyone I team who helped to be part of that do the hard work who helped US government lists and Yeah, I'm really proud. So anyway, thank you guys all again for reading the.

New York Times New York Times Bestseller US dotcom Amazon Martha Secrets gold medal publisher Ted NPR Solis Olympics Kate Amazon Bookstore facebook Dave Woodward Kobe Miss Kent anthony
Prominent Pro-Democracy Activist Arrested in Hong Kong

BBC World Service

00:54 sec | 5 d ago

Prominent Pro-Democracy Activist Arrested in Hong Kong

"Police in Hong Kong have arrested a prominent pro democracy activists and media tycoon Jimmy Lai for suspected collusion with foreign powers. Still, I was detained along with his two sons and four other people early today on suspicion of breaching the new National Security law. America. Oi has more details. The newspaper he founded Apple Davey has been very critical of Beijing. But to see the live pictures of police raiding the office is quite astonishing in the city, where free press was very famous because this is the first time will has been used against media as well. And, of course, just last month we saw The New York Times. Announcing that it was moving part of its Hongkong bureau to South Correa and several outlets have complained about a foreign journalist these and not being renewed. So this arrested definitely a significant blow to Hong Kong status for it's a

Hong Kong Jimmy Lai South Correa Beijing Apple The New York Times America
Hong Kong police raid pro-democracy media group, arrest founder

On The Media

00:53 sec | 5 d ago

Hong Kong police raid pro-democracy media group, arrest founder

"I'm w est with the BBC News Police in Hong Kong have arrested a prominent pro democracy activists and media tycoon Jimmy Lai for suspected collusion with foreign powers. Still, I was detained along with his two sons and four other people early today on suspicion of breaching the new National Security nor America. Oi has more details. The newspaper he founded Apple Davey has been very critical of Beijing. But to see the live pictures of police raiding the office is quite astonishing in the city, where free press was very famous because this is the first time will has been used against media as well. And, of course, just last month, we saw The New York Times. Announcing that it was moving part of its Hongkong bureau to South Correa and several outlets have complained about a foreign journals these air not being renewed. So this arrested definitely a significant blow to Hong

Hong Kong Jimmy Lai South Correa Hong BBC Beijing America Apple The New York Times
Enormous snake videotaped as it slithers along subway platform in New York City

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 5 d ago

Enormous snake videotaped as it slithers along subway platform in New York City

"An unusual sight on the New York City subway posted on Twitter today, and let's hope none of us run into this passenger in person. Video shows a gigantic black snakes slithering across an above ground subway platform. It's not clear which station this is so you won't be able to steer clear. Unfortunately, that said Snake lovers who commented on the post believe it's Obree. That's not dangerous. The empty says it hasn't gotten any reports of subway snakes recently and can confirm the

New York City Twitter
Fed's Kashkari calls for 6-week economic shutdown to control coronavirus spread

Business Beware

00:35 sec | 6 d ago

Fed's Kashkari calls for 6-week economic shutdown to control coronavirus spread

"President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, called for a nationwide economic shutdown of up to six weeks to get the Corona virus pandemic completely under control, warning that the rest of 2020 could be much worse than America has experienced thus far in the New York Times op Ed, he wrote, the next six months could make what we have experienced so far seem just like a warm up to a greater catastrophe. With many schools and colleges, starting stores and businesses reopening and the beginning of the indoor heating season, new case numbers will grow. Quickly using information from the Center for Infectious Disease Research. President

President Trump Federal Reserve Bank Center For Infectious Disease New York Times Minneapolis ED America
Public health expert: 50 percent effective coronavirus vaccine would be 'better than what we have now'

NBC Meet the Press

05:21 min | 6 d ago

Public health expert: 50 percent effective coronavirus vaccine would be 'better than what we have now'

"We hit five million US cases yesterday for some perspective. The first nineteen case in the United States is believed to have occurred on February six. We hit one million cases on April Twenty, eight, eighty, two days later. It then took just forty three days to hit the two million mark on June tenth. We hit the three million mark on July seven that was twenty seven days later then just sixteen days later we rich four million US cases and July twenty third and again it took us just sixteen days to hit this five million reported case number right here in the United States joining me now is Dr Tom ingles beans, the director of the Center for Security of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Dr Ingles. Be Welcome back to meet the press. WanNa get a little big picture here. You know last week you were you put out a lengthy list of ten recommendations. You guys didn't call it a reset, but sort of like how do we get control of this virus? Now another one of your sort of colleagues in the larger sense Michael Star home is an op Ed. He's basically calling for a reset of some sort New York Times today editorial page calling this. It feels though as public health officials are all calling for some sort of reset. Partial. lockdowns things like this and yet we are not having that conversation at all on the political side of things. Are, are we doomed to sort of live with this virus now if we're not GONNA at all look at your recommendations I DON'T THINK WE'RE DOOMED To this fate I? Think we we know what to do. Other countries have done it. I think the purpose of these resetting reports these for a kind of a reestablishment of the basics. Is that we know that another country's universal masking fiscal, distancing, avoiding large gatherings. Those kinds of things have worked. If we look at countries like Italy and Spain and France, they have a total of about seven or eight deaths today and we have thousand, but it's not magic what they did. We know what they did. So I think if we act together in national unison, we can get there and that's what the purpose of these many of these reports are I want to bring up the issue of masks there've been some people that said if we had ninety five percent compliance unmask wearing, we could get rid of we could sort of get this fires under control. Is that unrealistic and we do need to do more than just mandating masks Do. Not, alone. Not by themselves or alone the solution, but they are a critical part of it. We know that physical distancing makes a big difference. We know that large gatherings are places where super spreading events occur and people have the opportunity or the virus has the opportunity to get around quickly and for. Many people at once. So we have to do a number of things together in terms of you know simple things like diagnostic testing results coming back much more quickly. It's it's unacceptable for the country to have to have testing comeback a week or even two weeks later it's not useful at that point there's no point even doing the test. So a number of that we have to do, but they're not they're not complicated they may be hard, but we have to do them kind of in unison. And all of those, they're not hard except when you when the word politics gets involved, it makes everything a little bit harder and I wanNa keep you out of the political space here. Let me ask you a question about that scenes and to sort of set expectations doctor Fauci implied that the first vaccine that we get, he hopes it's seventy five percent effective. The FDA has said they will approve any vaccine that's at least fifty percent effective. Can you explain to the public what that means what it means and what it doesn't mean and what our expectations should be for the first vaccine Well, we know that many of the vaccines that we use are not perfect. They don't prevent every case of disease but if they prevent a substantial portion of disease than that can help us get to a point where most of us are protected, the disease can spread quickly between people anymore a concept that is called her immunity. Herd immunity doesn't mean we will won't disease anymore. It means it's not gonNA efficiently as efficiently spread in an epidemic form. and. Is there a percentage figure in your mind that you think will sort of give us a huge? Huge step in the right direction is at a vaccine that is at seventy five percent or does fifty percent do you fear that could be a false sense of hope. I think we would take fifty percent because it's fifty percent is a lot better than what we have. Now we've we've no tools to no no vaccine tools or medicine tools that we can use to slow this down. So fifty percent would be would be far better than what we have. Now of course I think we all want something that is seventy, five, eighty, five. Ninety percent effective. But we'll have to see what we get and I think for the amount of time has passed since the beginning of this pandemic to have a vaccine that's even fifty percent effective in in the coming months or the beginning of twenty twenty, one would be phenomenal. But again, we hope it's better but fifty percent would be better than what we have now. Tom ingles be from Johns, Hopkins One of our experts that we have on here regularly, really appreciate you coming on and sharing your expertise with us. Sir.

United States Dr Tom Ingles Twenty Twenty Dr Ingles Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Tom Ingles New York Times Director Michael Star Center For Security Doctor Fauci Johns FDA Italy Spain France
Big Tech, Antitrust, and Democracy

Exponent

04:59 min | Last week

Big Tech, Antitrust, and Democracy

"I James. I'm doing. Okay. How are you? Good thanks. All Things considered I'm busy. Tell You I've complainer this on multiple guess at this point. But what's another one I feel like? Because no one is traveling or going anywhere what is usually the slowest months? August is just insane like stuff happening constantly it started off where it got very slow in March. I was walked down people don't know what to do and were nervous. I was over whelming sense of doom and the weird thing. Is Obviously, it's not that stuff has changed that much but we talked about this on the last episode people have adapted, and now they're like making up for lost I but they're just like news coming out everywhere right a no more so than in the capital. That's right. So last week last Wednesday the editor subcommittee of the Judiciary Committee in the House had a hearing with the four tuxedos Apple Google facebook and Amazon Microsoft was notable by its absence, but it was clearly a. Focus on consumer tech. In the reason I say that this was clear is not just because such. Adele wasn't there but it became pretty clear through the questioning that Tim. Cook was only they're Kinda wanted to say that they got all of them because they were not prepared to ask him questions at all. It's clear that all the work of the committee has been mostly focused on I would say first and foremost Amazon they had the most detailed stuff there they were pretty detail. About Google, they were somewhat detailed about facebook, but you could see sort of the quality of questionings really starting to come down there, and then they didn't even know what the percentages were in the APP store. You is kind of embarrassing. They would ask cook a question and let him just talk because they didn't know what to ask next wherever else interrupt because they wanted that points to make et Cetera et Cetera and I've thought that difference in the quality of questioning per company. was pretty striking. Yeah. It's interesting. The New York Times ran a tally of the questions and I thought that in itself was interesting and it looked pretty evenly spaced and then apple was dislike fifty percent of the other three frustrating in a way because obviously I've been sort of fixated on the APP store for literally since the beginning of attack relate what am I I set of articles back in two thousand thirteen was trying to understand what how is doing such a crappy job. Imagine the APP store and one of my conclusions there was there. So scarred from their near death experience in the nineties when they had to beg adobe and Microsoft to continue supporting the Max can remain viable and I wrote this is back in two thousand thirteen that they would never allow themselves to be in that position again and well. So interesting about that is the way that has manifested is that again, this is a long running things that they've really had kept productivity APPS. In particular, it's hard to make money. You can't charge upgrades is really important sort of business mile away. It's worked on other platforms white the internet which Tim Cook Pretends doesn't exist also testimony they jumped straight from brick and mortar to the APP store. There's no intervening period there where you could buy stuff on the Internet. It's funny because when you read his testimony, you don't notice until someone points out she's like Oh my word. Yeah. You just kinda skipped fifteen years of distribution. So I didn't watch it old but I did watch part of it, and the only thing that I can remember is someone was questioning him around he has complete control of which APPs and he's like I'll well, if the native APPs that's true except Web apps so think he's not to the Internet was like little buttons that you create insofar which by the way are totally handicap progressive lobster totally handicap on IOS in wipes away all their cookies and settings after a week in. Where are the interesting things about this is because apple was held captive by productivity APPs in the nineties all of their sort of onerous APP store terms in my estimation have mostly affected would be productivity APPs in your abyss situation where you get no great innovator of APPs on these platforms in part because much risk like maybe you're going to build something in apple's not gonNA prove it or there's no business model it and it just doesn't make sense to make a new sort of productivity after the most difficult in-depth after build from a physical. API's on the device or perspective and what actually has come to dominate are. All these network based APPS that are mostly API driven and what's interesting is because apple is not a social company I message notwithstanding that they kind of weren't paying attention to that and what happened was we talked about this China where we chat actually became the exact sort of dominant APP that I think the APP store was designed to limit. But because they weren't sort of paying attention, they ended up the exact same situation as a nineties is the apple as a company is much stronger than back. Then it's not even remotely comparable but the fact that we chat is more important than your phone is definitely the case you. Like Oh we trade the same well then why is it? We have a mini APP store for on purposes and no one else has allowed it like one of the most obvious examples of APPs not being treated the same and it's not true the same because we chat as more important than the IPHONE.

Apple Tim Cook Facebook Amazon Microsoft Google Judiciary Committee The New York Times Adele Editor Adobe China
Chlo Valdary on Love & Race

The Psychology Podcast

04:37 min | Last week

Chlo Valdary on Love & Race

"Today it's so great to have coli Valerie on the podcast after spending a year as a Bartley fellow. At The Wall Street Journal, Thou developed the theory of enchantment, an innovative framework for social emotional learning character development and interpersonal growth that uses pop culture as an educational tool in the classroom and beyond. Khloe trained around the world including in South Africa the Netherlands Germany and Israel her clients have included high school and college students, government agencies, business teams, and many more because also lectured in universities across America including Harvard Georgetown. Work has been covered in psychology today magazine and her writings have appeared in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal coli. So so glad to finally tell you. Likewise, well, where do we begin? There so many so many potential starting points. If it's cool with you, I'd love to start with your theory of enchantment I'm enchanted with it as A. I know. But. I am enchanted with it because I. You know I have a deep interest in education and making sure that no kids fall between the cracks and I just love to hear how your program addresses some of those issues and just. Inspires you most about that work that you do? Sure. So theory of enchantment is a social emotional learning program. I've designed about a year and a half ago. And it comes out of my my desire to construct a framework to teach people how to love using the things that we already love and that we already gravitate towards. So things like pop culture for example, because I believe that there are narrative within our pop culture that teach people how to believe in their own sense of south worthiness believe in their ability to overcome obstacles to endure hardship. Until by blending those elements of pop culture that teach these lessons with ancient wisdom my theory is that you can teach people how to love themselves, and then in long run be able to get along with and love others. I'm really inspired and motivated by especially getting it in as many schools as possible but really. Young people, teenagers, and adults I'm I'm I'm really excited for for the possibility of seeing how many people become. Enamored with this approach. So how many years have you been doing that? When did you create the program? So I created it formerly a year and a half ago. Right on. So, how old are you right now and twenty, six, th moment. Cool. Yeah. So let's back up a little bit about your history. So what was your major in College? My Major was international studies with a concentration in diplomacy. Oh Wow that's gonna come in Handy now. You're applying it well. Applying it on twitter you're applying those people's finale. Try My best. It's much much needed more more people like that on social media and in the world broader. So when did you get interested in education? So what was the point you before you create this program? You're like, wow, they're really this indeed. So, basically, after I graduated graduated in two, thousand fifteen and then I moved to New York in the summer of two thousand fifteen because I got a job at the Wall Street Journal. At The Wall Street Journal for Year working on the desk and Um for nine months while I. was there I worked on a thesis that ended up being the catalyst for theory of enchantment are trying to again figure out how to create a framework for teaching people how to love within the context of conflict in diplomacy because that was my background but there was no framework that specifically explicitly laid this out like how do we get people to learn how to love there were frameworks Potter we get people to stop fighting each other, but not necessarily, you know to start loving each other. So I created a thesis came up with a theory and then lectured on that thesis for two years. And then increasingly when I would lecture get the response from parents in from people from all walks of life. Saying, Hey, this isn't just applicable. Within the context of conflict resolution is also applicable within the context of social emotional learning in the classroom with when talking about high schools we're talking about interpersonal matters when you're talking about just trying to create a society with more human flourishing in general. So you might want to consider taking what you've done and expanding upon it and building upon it and developing it into a full course. So enough people told me that and I decided to run with it.

The Wall Street Journal New York Times Valerie Bartley Harvard Georgetown Twitter Khloe America New York Israel South Africa Netherlands Germany Potter
"the new york times" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

09:46 min | 2 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Skullduggery

"Editorial page as well or opinion pages well like I, don't see an incredible array of wild leftists and incredibly hardline rightwingers. They're like it seems to me to be pulling people gravitationally towards. What it uses a reasonable center now, no, I agree with you one hundred percent on on the way that Fred Hi although. He, did I think get a lot of criticism from the left for being a neo con, or for that for those pages to reflect the views of neo conservatives, which I think was unfair so I mean. Even. If you push toward the center, you're to in some ways you're going to get. You'RE GONNA get. You may get hit even harder by both sides. Let's talk about just for a moment as we wrap up here. The Philadelphia Inquirer because they're the offense was running a piece under the headline. Buildings matter to and look the point. Leave aside the headline for the moment which you know may not have been the most sensitive headline writing There was I. mean the point of the piece was there was indeed violence specially those first few. During these protests. To say that is not in any way to take away from the fact that there was legitimate outrage over what happened to George Floyd and legitimate outrage over the way African. Americans have been targeted by police, but there were I mean I live. I live in Washington that the on Sunday night a week ago. You know there was a burning. Nursery at Saint John's church. There were stores broken into not far from my home and looting that took place and I guess the concern is when the executive editor of the paper gets. Out Over perhaps infelicitous headline, the concern is that reporting core facts such as yes, there have been violence at some of these protests becomes expendable that perhaps that doesn't get reported because people are too intimidated about offending the woke brigade, so Richard totally reasonable for people to cover the idea that you can't cover the beyond vandalism at times, destruction of property, the idea that businesses and communities have no stake in the question of whether storefronts or shattered and inventory looted is wrong. It has to matter it has to be covered. It's part of the community and you see that. That not only from columnists in the Philadelphia, inquirer or stayed pillars of the establishment, but also some of the protesters themselves people who have fought for years to build up their communities to establish strong foundations on which to construct a strength particularly for people of Color, particularly for people in working class communities in neighborhoods, often ignored by politicians, they understand that the destruction of property and the the hitting businesses can have a real repercussion and last and endure, and we saw that in cities across the country in you know more severe and sustained rioting in say, nineteen, sixty eight. After the killings of the killing of Martin Luther King, for example and other places so. And other incidents I should say so. This is an important thing. They headline did suggest in the minds of reporters in the enquirer that somehow the paper was. Equating destruction of property the loss of life, but usually editors don't lose their jobs over a single mistake. Ben Bradlee fortified by Watergate. Doubt didn't lose his job over Jimmy's world in which Janet Cooke. invented. A A a a US tiny you know I think he's supposed to be seven years older something who was a heroin addict and built a huge project around this fictional person. That won a pulitzer that had to be returned about as big as a global embarrassment. A newspaper can get into Bradley. Had Reservoir of goodwill Bradley had A. You know a record to stand on? It rally also incredibly for about returning thing and and being contrite, even though its top leaders had essentially warned him ignored some warning signs that have been. Set off by some of the editors who had interacted with her on the project so I think in this case the question is, is this just some sort of French revolution where people who are being taken out to the Guillotine or You know an individual circumstances. Did people not have effectively the political capital and I don't mean ideological, but the the goodwill reservoirs of goodwill and trust within their newsrooms to survive the these controversies on this subject, and at a certain point, even beyond the merit if you can't. Read your newsrooms. It's not going to be useful for you to do it. That's different than saying that you should be fired or forced out over a single. A single mistake, the publisher Philadelphia said that she wanted to set the enquirer on a new course. Rethink the way in which the newspaper dealt with issues of race in light of the convulsions that the nation's going through for the past. You know weeks. And that probably This editor wouldn't be you know a a white male in his late fifties. I believe wouldn't be the best one to lead the paper this time well, I was GonNa say it is also the case with James Bennett who is otherwise an excellent journalist, did a terrific job editing the Atlantic magazine, and did a lot of good things at the Times magazine, but over the course of his years as editorial page editor. At The Times, there were a number of mistakes. There was Sarah Palin defamation lawsuit. There were a couple of columns by Brad Stevens that were controversial, so he may not have had the kind of certainly didn't have the kind of capital that a Ben Bradlee had. Probably is part of the story here. Cure I just think there's. A lot of this is generational journalists, instead of things evolving over time at the panel discussions that schools of journalism and public policy are sort of arguing things out in slack channels on text and on social media in real time, and you know I covered a story in Pittsburgh this week about a black reporter who was sidelined for a tweet, she did that sort of was flippant about the effect of looting in Pittsburgh comparing it to the aftermath of tailgating parties. That kind of trash the area around Kenny Chesney concerts. Pittsburgh and she was told by her. She couldn't cover the protests because she. She had shown her hand now turns out. She's the daughter of a retired State Trooper and retired probation officer, so it's hard to make the prima facie case that obviously she's pro looting, an anti law enforcement, but she's one of the very. She's one of a relatively small number of African. American journalists at the Pittsburgh Post Gazette. She was sidelined that same day. A white reporter was about a tweet. He sent out calling a man accused of looting by police. He sent out a tweet tagging and story. He wrote about this in which he called the man who had been accused a scumbag. And is that her said don't do that. We don't think that's appropriate, but he was not pulled back from covering issues, leading to protests, violence and vandalism in the wake and two days later. The Union pointed out this disparity thing. A white journalist was cautioned, but not punished. A black journalist was preventing prevented from covering issues about race and justice in her hometown. Pittsburgh and then what the newspaper decided to do to prevent the white reporter from covering the protests two minutes after the union left a meeting with top editors so. You're seeing you know that's an instance in which you know. These two journalists, one, twenty, seven, one, twenty, eight, both of them from Pittsburgh. Both of them felt free to sort of maybe show a little bit of where their heads are added a moment in a way that. Before social media, they couldn't do, but a reporters who had done so saying basically, Hey, there are times where people do violence and. y'All. Don't get that upset about it. Let's at least think about it. She was sidelined and remained sidelined a week later and I you know I, think that newsrooms are that newsroom is in tumbled as a result of this episode as well and newsrooms are kind of grappling with this issue in the leaders. Don't have control of the narrative I. Think is what I take from this rather than right or wrong is that leaders don't have control of its social media is giving an outlet for journalists in the rank and file to speak out and to find support. And I think it's very unsettling for those who seek to run these major institutions at this time. Well, it does sound like newsrooms across the board are a engulfed in tumult. Although I should probably say it's, it's virtual tumult since. Most people actually aren't in newsrooms these days, and it does make me wonder if that's a factor here. The fact is that nobody is actually sitting next to each other anymore. Talking these things out, but just hurling Bromides as we are, all want to do on social media might be contributing to it, but David I really WANNA. Thank you for your always helpful insights, and it sounds like you'll have lots of media issues to talk about on your next on point God knows. Thank you always a pleasure to join you. THANKS TO NPR media, correspondent and host of.

The Times editor Pittsburgh reporter Ben Bradlee vandalism Pittsburgh Post Gazette Philadelphia The Philadelphia Inquirer George Floyd Bradley Union Martin Luther King US Sarah Palin Kenny Chesney executive editor Saint John Brad Stevens
"the new york times" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

08:21 min | 2 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Skullduggery

"It's been asserted by the Attorney General of. Of the United States and others in the US government, but as an assertion in an op Ed, it does not strike me as it hasn't been debunked, either and I was gonna say as an assertion in an op, ed. It doesn't strike me as really much beyond what you could read in. OP EDS in the New York. Times across the board every day by their columnists and others, there are assertions made I mean as you read the cotton piece, let's take away the headline. The crudity of the in jarring nature of the headline did you find it objectionable on its face and something? You would not have run if you were in James. Bennett shoes such a good question. I would I you know. Here's what I'd say I I tend towards wanting to ventilate arguments. People are able to knock down his arguments by reading it closely I. DO think that you know the Times mistakes. Itself thinks that good news coverage of something setting it out fairly, but also setting out legal and moral than other objections, and and challenges to. It doesn't accomplish the. The job as well I did note some Michael. Powell not known as a reactionary commentator for the times, and not a right winger at now laboring in Sports, previously a columnist in the new side, you know, he said this was an embarrassing retreat from principal when the Times effectively apologized, and regretted the publication that said CJ shivers a former war correspondent for the Times A. I guess currently an investigative reporter for time. Who's himself a veteran of the US? Marine Corps said the decision to publish. This was wrong on its face and talked about what he's seen abroad when protesters face not domestic police, but military forces, trying to keep control of circumstances, and how that heightens tension, and you know he to talked about what journalists have faced. You know reported on fairly extensively as well the kinds of hostility and violence that journalists faced at the hands of police officers and law enforcement officials across the country in these recent weeks. Well beyond the Pale you know in the US It's often considered beyond the Pale to include for example, people from Hamas or leaders from Hamas in talking about what how you would deal with trying to come up with some sort of long-term peace surrounding Israel Palestine and the middle. East right in Israel. Newspapers are much more likely to publish those things. Yeah, that's within the accepted bounds of discourse. You know so I think these things are very fluid. What we saw as? was in some ways as a result of market forces, it was useful for newspapers as the number of newspapers dwindled in major cities across the country to appeal not too strong niches like cable news does now, but more blandly to a broader part of the population. So that's how impartiality was embraced by newspapers and became a journalistic ethic. It became a matter of principle, but it was really driven by market forces. You don't. Don't have to be a Marxist to see that right, so you know the things that we take as points of absolute morality and principal in our profession often evolve overtime forces that are actually apart from that so i. think that whether or not you think what Bennett was right, the clearly was strong reaction from their readership, but in this case the readership that that undermined him. What's inside the newsroom across the way? At a on the news side of the divide there, and that was a problem for Sulzberger and I think that right now. Journalists are raw and I think that they are. It's more like the seventies to me. You know people are talked about this being sixty eight, but it feels to me like the seventies where people are like, are we inventing new forms narrative or inventing new forms of what ethics mean what it needs to be an ethical journalist, and sometimes that can lead very positive results, and sometimes it can lead to chaos because. It's not clear where the lines are drawn right now and I think he's in that. You know like The Washington Post where Ben Smith, had a great column in The Times about how Marty Baron perhaps the best newspaper in the country right now nonetheless has a sort of rigid control over what's appropriate for people to say on social media it drives out some of their very talented people, and it also caused great confusion, because the editors don't always know what principles they're applying other than trying to shut people up, you know, David. You mentioned Israel. I had been thinking the same thing I was based. There was always struck by the. The vigorous debate in the newspapers and the kind of you know basically a battle of ideas, and it seems to me I guess one of the questions coming out of this episode at The Times and the other ones is that there's a danger of a chilling effect that these op. Ed Pages ought to be forums for vigorous debate in our society and I remember years ago as a young journalist, I worked for the Washington Post editorial page for the late great. Meg Greenfield and I think one of the things that she used to do. With part of the problem. is you run a piece like the cotton piece? There's no context. All you have is a piece. That's very provocative, and that is very prominent. It's the op-ed page of the New York Times. She used to run kind of point counterpoint when there was a more provocative piece of that sort, so I kind of wonder like. Because I think it would be kind of a sad thing, if opinion editors were no longer willing to run provocative pieces, so what are the kind of prescriptive things that you can do to continue running those kinds of pieces, but avoid some of the pitfalls that has you know led to? Bennett's being pushed out and I. Guess The question is. Are you worried about a? A chilling effect as a result of these kinds of decisions, Bari Weiss, who's a conservative something of a contrarian at the Times was hired as an editor, and soon became a writer on under her own name, is basically characterized this as tensions between the woke young `uns, and the more, classically liberal, forty and fifty. Something's at times, and she tributes this kind of Smothering correctness that she attributes to college campuses now I can tell you having been a former higher education, reporter, college, campuses, or clamorous paces, player, people, debate and outrage each other all the time. There may well be a left of center ISM, but it's you know they're a lot of conservative voices. They're to you in a lot of lot of clashes there. You know it's really question how times conceives of itself is. For Liberal America. Is it for all America? You know back in the day they used to have basically one conservative voice and William Safire Right, and I thought he was enormously engaging in reading with the morning lists was great, but you know he was pretty alone there for a long time and under Bennett they've tried to increase that to be honest under his predecessor. They tried to increase that, but there's always been this sort of wink till Abramson. Once said to me, you know we're not a liberal paper, but were a cosmopolitan paper. That understands the sensibility of the upper west side, and you know so. They wanted elite. They wanted bankers advertising type people, and they also wanted people who aspired to the kind of life reflected in the pages of the New York Times and the issues interested in the issues written there and so there's this kind of wink and. As I think it's easier than ever you know. The Times I think stumbles over itself not to be too explicit in going after president trump in characterizing it I think Washington Post Times harder hitting, and it's things about calling things racist calling things lives rather than evasions and yet in terms of social media. It is much more rigid about what it lets people do, and how voiced it lets people be. And you're just two different models of of an approach there each with its own problems i. do think that you know good news. Organizations allow the ventilation of a lot of different kinds of ideas from a lot of different perspectives. I do think under Fred Hi. Meg Greenfield, successor at the Washington Post I, think that is very careful, centrist editorial stance, but also by and large a fairly establishment..

The Times Bennett United States New York Times Meg Greenfield OP EDS Times Israel principal New York Attorney James Washington editor Hamas Marine Corps ISM Michael Israel Palestine
"the new york times" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

08:33 min | 2 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Skullduggery

"We're saying we want somebody with bayonets, putting down anything that strays over the line and lawlessness by the way sometimes involves mass protests without permits. Permits in public streets, but David, I mean you talk about readers more than ever being in the driver's seat, but I think you could also argue to some extent. Reporters inside the newsroom more than ever are in the driver's seat. If you look at this particular case and others out there and you know I think it is the case that social change is often driven by younger people and driven by generational changes, and I wonder if. If in this particular case, you know what it reflects about what's going on more generally in newsrooms out there and had a new generation of reporters kind of fueled and liberated by Social Media You have the excesses of course of the trump administration, and in some ways a rethinking or even discarding of kind of traditional standards and conventions that we've all relied on journalism, you know striving for kind of pure objectivity balance reflecting both sides both. Both side ISM becoming a bad word these days in favor of different kind of notion of truth, which is closer to the idea of taking moral stances in some cases, so is this something that you're seeing in newsrooms around the country, and is this kind of reckoning? That is taking place right now. rummy disentangle some of the important things that you're talking about here because I. Think you're onto something. I would characterize it a little differently. I would say. We moved from this notion of impartiality of objectivity. And progressive notion of about a century ago right to one I wouldn't call it to truth. I would call it to fairness, and the idea is to be fair to your readers to be fair to you. Particularly the people in subjects writing about the communities your rooted in and also to the facts and the truth, and that was the idea of fairness was a way of getting out of the pit of saying well, you know we said candidate X., said this, we said candidate. That candidate X. was actually making slanderous claims that are ungrounded fact unsupported by evidence, but we presented both sides. That is actually a journalistic failing. That is both lazy, and not you. What is the point of what we're doing? I always feel like the point of what we're doing ultimately is to enable people to act not just as consumers of news, but as citizens that they have the. I don't need to tell somebody what to vote or how to vote or what to think, but I want to tell somebody happy information the context that they can make up their own minds about what's going to best serve them their families, their communities, their nation, right and I think fairness was way of getting at that now there is I think among some journalists particularly, but not only younger journalists and idea. Even that is A. A fool's game when you were reporting an asymmetrical age, the symmetric calorie has a lot to do, but not only to do with partisan politics that is the Republican Party and the Democratic Party play by different rules. When it comes to journalism, it comes to facts and it comes to. The respected doesn't afford journalists in the role. They play in the political cycle. They're certainly extreme figures in an unscrupulous figures on the left as well. And Online, but there's a way in which people are saying, you know. Let's just get to the truth. Let's just get to what is moral, and what is true, and what is moral, and what is professionally ethical eric kind of different. And you know you can be amoral and still ethical. You can tell the story without saying this is wrong, but you can present the facts in a way that allow people to get there. And there's attention you know. I Value Opinion Journalism. It can be done well from the right and the left, but it's got to be fair to the back there. Other people who say you know we have to be clear on morality here and there are people you know. Newsroom editorial pages genuinely are run separately from newsrooms from the reporting wing of newsrooms as you guys both know in conventional legacy news outlets, and yet people at the times and people at the Philadelphia Inquirer say this is representing my brand. This is representing who I am publicly, and it's not in keeping with where I'm at. Yes, there should be dissonant voices. Yes, there should be con-. Pro and con, yes, there should be a vast rate things debated, but certain things shouldn't be amplified by the New York, times and giving credence and credibility they should be covered in the news pages, but as the. Clear violation of civil liberties that they represent whatever they have again. I think that. There's a real case to be made for what Bennett did. She has mean he has harbored the aspiration for his time at at the new. York Times of ultimately taking over for team Buckeye as the editor in chief, called the executive editor there and leading the newsroom, and he is seriously mis read the news from a number of Cajun what whatever the merits of his decisions. You have to be able to lead in those positions. Maybe bring people along to a place. They didn't initially want to go and he has failed on a number of cases to do that PG, Bird. The publishers backed him a couple of times. He just say you know finally, said you know. There was a lapse in editorial decision making here, and not for the first time I think the souls. Burgers have spent a little too much time explaining why what James Bennett did was right. To their own staffers. To the point where they ultimately felt this was a liability. Well I wasn't it wasn't helpful to his cause I don't think that he did not read the piece which he ultimately acknowledged and an editor of a section that produces a large amount of copy may not read every piece, but it is his or her responsibility to make sure that those pieces that are going to be very provocative and controversial. They read sure and look you know again. I kind of admired some of the things Bennett was doing. I think that. That it was a more dissonant, more interesting editorial page than the one he inherited by in this moment I think you're seeing in real time playing out in front of US journalist, hashing out what's accepted and what's interesting in part because social media affords more junior reporters and more rank and file, journalists, the ability to speak out publicly and to commune and share with one another where they're coming from simply because somebody has said this is the right decision doesn't even that's accepted in the same way at once was. Even reluctantly and I think that means that that it's more like almost like college faculty at Times. Let's talk about what actually happened at the time because. I, think you alluded to this before Sulzberger the publisher at first defended Bennett and defended the decision to run the op-ed, and then there's this extraordinary blowback from the news room and reporters and editors are complaining and. Raising their objections to it and Sulzberger reverses himself. I mean it seems a little like a mutiny of a of a sword, in which you know, the rank and file got to dictate to the brass what they should do and I'm just you know your first and foremost a reporter on these things give us insight into how that reversal by Seoul's Burger came about. My understanding is that he didn't know originally that Bennett hadn't read it. And that ultimately he concluded or said he concluded that the process to get it on wine was a little flap dash. This was initially scheduled to run in the Sunday paper you know. The Review Section is published in advance of Sunday, but. They didn't have to get it up Wednesday at the time they did. They could have taken a little more time with that, too. that it out. The fact that some of his assertions were challenged on a factual basis by reporters enabled grapple hold for critics to try to tear it down. Let me just say this I thought. Rich lowry had very interesting piece in the back and forth, and we've allred columns in the New York Times elsewhere that make bold assertions that are perfectly or even ordeal agree well backed up facts so yeah. I was just going to say I. Mean You know one of the factual assertions that the editor's note that they appended to it challenged. Was that Khadr as of left wing? Radicals like Antifa were contributing to the violence. Now that has not been substantiated..

James Bennett reporter editor ISM David Philadelphia Inquirer New York Times New York Sulzberger Rich lowry Khadr Republican Party Antifa York Times US Seoul Burgers allred
"the new york times" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

07:50 min | 2 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Skullduggery

"No secret that our worlds has been interrupted. World. Interrupted is a daily podcast telling stories of coronavirus and its impact on the economy. We want to cover the issues in the macro global economics, the stock market and our political climate also cover the micro stories. Maybe the ones you don't hear as much about in the news or the media. We hope you'll listen and be a part of the journey subscribed today on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. We now have with US David Folkenflik. The media correspondent for NPR and the host of on point in NPR, show on the media David, welcome to skulduggery a great to join you guys again so quite a few days in the media world, the resignation of James Bennett The New York, times, editorial page, editor and Stan wish now ski the executive editor of The Philadelphia Inquirer both basically forced out. It seems because of controversial headlines, and in Mr Bennett Gaze at the New York Times and OP. Ed that ran under one of those headlines from Tom Cotton the Republican senator. Senator of Arkansas this seems to US pretty extraordinary. I can't remember too high level resignations coming back to back over pretty similar issues. What do you make them yet? Quite a week tour having accusing it's it's quite a year. We're having this week. It does seem like a moment. It's a moment where these prominent us rooms are grappling in a different way with some of the same issues that we're seeing. Play out at so many of these protested cities and communities across the country are black lives are black sensibilities, being taken as seriously as those of their white counterparts. Rethinking intently about the choices we're making editorial he as journalists, and about not only the good and use that they can have in serve, but the harm that they can do. These are the kinds of questions I'm hearing from African American journalist, those newsrooms and others including my own I think that what you're seeing is a journalistic judgments being called into question. Not, simply about whether or not, they were the right calls, but whether they reflect a blindness or deafness to the way, life is lived for people who aren't white and aren't at the top echelons, the top elite positions running these institutions and I think you know there's been a kind of resentment burgling for a while for for decades, probably as long as there have been African Americans in newsrooms, but about. About issues very closely related to the ones we see, play out, and some of them have to do with who gets to decide what gets covered and who gets to decide how the things that do get covered, get covered, and that may seem well journalism, and that's true James Bennett ran this piece called. Send in the troops by Arkansas Republican Senator Tom Cotton, you know a guy with sort of A. I think it's fair to say a bit of an authoritarian streak when it comes to what he would characterize as law and order, he wanted the president to invoke a little, known and little used statute to send in military troops, even if over the objection of governors and mayors to quell civil unrest, he framed it as going after looters, and seemingly drawing distinctions between leaders and protesters, but as we know sometimes mass protests, episodes of violence occurred that don't involve the vast majority of protesters and yet if you're militarizing those interactions between protesters and and looters and law enforcement, those distinctions are. Are GonNA. Get Lost but David, isn't it? This is the editorial page of the new. York Times, and isn't it one mission of editorial pages to reflect a diversity of viewpoints, not just ones that stroke the sensibilities of the majority of readers, but viewpoints that challenge them, and it seems to me. That's what basically the Times was doing here running a piece by a sitting united. States senator that reflected a viewpoint of many in the White House many at the highest levels of the US government, and you know we shouldn't. Readers want to be exposed and understand what that viewpoint is. Something very interesting I don't think anything I've said necessarily means that there isn't a rationale to running it. But I'm describing what journalists themselves are. Feeling and their reaction to it, I think part of it is generational, I think people under the age of forty under the age of thirty eight field bit differently than people who have been in newsrooms for decades I think some of it reflects you know a racial divide in terms of experience of how life is lived. That is not uniform in either direction and I do think that you know part of the original mandate of the Times opinion page, which really helped introduce phenomenon to American print journalism was look. We have aditorial that reflect the opinion. Opinion of our owners, or at least as reflected by people, they designate to write an official editorial position by the newspaper, but we are going to expand the range of opinions presented to our readers as a way of fostering debate, embracing the marketplace of ideas, which doesn't say that idea just dominates. It says that ideas are tested by often country, thinking and the Times editorial answered self is very much against the idea of militarising the law enforcement response to figuring out how to handle this this wave of protests, and at times eruption of violence in looting. And vandalism and and writing, but all of this is true, and James Bennett was an interesting and sometimes controversial figure he came to the from the Atlantic four years ago to the times and I think did an impressive job of expanding the range of opinions presented by The Times both on the right, and on the left with some really disparate interesting thinkers, as they broadly expanded the number of folks who they published online, but you hit on a really interesting point you said. Shouldn't readers want this well? Readers are now much more than in the driver's seat at the New York Times and this is increasingly true at other publications as advertising withers right. Paying subscribers are increasingly important to newspapers. I can't underscore this enough and digital subscriptions for the Times approve stratospheric. They've never had despite what hear from. The president never had more subscribers in existence since eighteen fifty one times was founded and digital subscriptions has really propelled that it is the way to add readers at very minimal cost, and what the readership expect is increasingly important to what people who are running the news reports and the editorial sections decide to do because if you lose those digital subscribers, you lose the ability to keep adding journalists I mean they now have like seventeen hundred journalists more than ever before at the Times at a time when newspapers generally are. Watching their finances go down the drain, so the readers are actually very important expectation of what the time is, maybe a little different than what you've said. Tom Cotton is not just conservative Tom Cotton, saying the PE- your sons and daughters, your friends and neighbors, you people who paid or read us..

The Times Senator Tom Cotton New York Times James Bennett David Folkenflik US senator Arkansas York Times president NPR Mr Bennett Senator coronavirus New York Apple
"the new york times" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

07:31 min | 2 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Ideas

"The Keith MacArthur unlocking bryson's brain is a podcast about my son. I am the rare disease that keeps him from walking or talking Bryson's perfect. His life is really hard and our families. Search for a cure. Oh My Gosh. Maybe science is ready for this. It's part memoir part medical mysteries. We can do just about anything modifying. Dna Heart in my throat cure. His controversial unlocking braces brain. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. This is a CBC podcast. I'm I and this is ideas in Shakespeare's play hamlet. The Princeton Bites a group of traveling actors to perform a play for the king. Claudius it's an old play one that hamlet himself has partially rewritten to resemble the murder of hamlet's father by. Claudius his own brother. Hamlet is also the director of the production. He instructs the actors on how to deliver their lines and then gives them a little lecture. The purpose of theater he says is to quote hold as were the mirror up to nature to show virtue her own feature scorn her own image and the very age body of the time his form and pressure in hamlet scheme if Claudius sees the murder of his brother played back to him he'll be reminded of the evil that he's done and show his guilt. It's an ancient idea that theatre exists to show us the underlying meaning of our actions and the forces that shape the society in which we live today on ideas discussion from the Stratford Festival. About some of us and specifically the ways in which theater itself is shaped by the very thing on which it comments and reflects on the panel three arts journalists from the New York Times theater editor Scott Heller Culture reporter Kara Buckley and theater critic Jesse Green. The moderator is ideas producer. Philip were calling this program to politics. Fbi thank you. And I want to begin by saying what a wonderful privilege. It is to be here today. As a producer with ideas to acknowledge the fact that we've had such a wonderful relationship with the Stratford Festival for many years now but particularly over the last seven years. We've been recording events like this and broadcasting them. Today's session is about theater in politics. I remember as a teenager growing up in Dublin and very entrenched with theater. There was a touring production of the. Black Light Theatre. Prague came through at a time when the political scene Czechoslovakia was very fraught. They were interviewed in one of the local papers and they were asked about. What's the relationship between what you're doing? The horrible very conflicted politics of your country and the artistic director had a very short answer. He said all artists political. I would start with this idea of all art being political and specifically all theater art. What specifically do you think it is about theater? That makes it such a rich and fertile ground for the discussion of big political questions. And let's start with you. Scott well I would frame it slightly differently in that whether or not. You're talking about big political questions. I think that what makes theatre inherently political is that it's an art of conversation and it's an art of being in a room watching people talk to each other and work issues out and that is inherently political and. I think that that's why unlike digital forms or other visual art forms. There's something small P. political about being involved in watching theater that leads you to think big P. politically in that in that the art of theater is the art of people negotiating and that to me therefore immediately leads to sort of larger ways to think about about politics people figuring out to understand each other get along and come to some sort of sense of calm agreement on common mission and what the kind of values of community or society are. I think that's theater at its best helps both reflect back and almost model how that can be done. That's I think fundamentally why people in a room watching other people work issues out is mixed theater. One of the most powerful and exciting political art forms Carlot's past to so my coverage has been primarily film. So I'm going to just sort of shift a little too that I think one of the things about film that can be so powerful as especially these days is it so like he audience sitting together in Durkan's place having a common experience and what happens on that screen is so important for the audience in terms of how they see themselves and how they relate and for me you know I remember in covering film seeing film Meryl Streep About The suffragettes and I'd never seen so many women on screen doing smart political things that I was kind of taken aback. And that that it was I think it was two thousand and thirteen or fourteen when that came out and that it took to that time for me to just have that experience as a woman to speak to me the need for representation which is political and having different voices because the effect on the audience is profound. When you see yourself and don't see yourself being reflected back to you by your culture and it's very profound on young people growing up and this is maybe a top down way of looking at it in terms of the performing arts. What they mean but I just think of like studies out there like young people watching television so when you expose young children to television the the youngsters who feel best about themselves or white boys and then okay about themselves or white girls and then black roles and black boys feel the worst about themselves but watching television so to me. That's a very it just shows how important it is to have this representation onscreen and that's something. I look at it my cover tonight. Think about a lot in terms of. Who's creating this content and who's allowed in the room to do it. I was going to speak to the liveliness of live theatre particularly as opposed to film. There isn't an art form that we have that is as immediate end as public at the same time. The you are adding a movie theater. You're sitting next to the other people who are watching. But you're also within spitting distance of literally of the WHO are perhaps enunciating to clearly and the there is a feedback loop between the players and the audience that does not exist in film and I find that very powerful powerful as we move into a more political theater once again your friend who announced that all theater was political. Had Not yet taken into account boards of directors and a sensors in some.

director Claudius Stratford Festival murder Scott Heller producer bryson hamlet Fbi Keith MacArthur Philip New York Times Light Theatre Prague Princeton Shakespeare Meryl Streep Czechoslovakia Dublin Carlot
"the new york times" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

07:05 min | 6 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"Fighting with each other the place is a reflection that fight the same way that the Internet is this Weird Amalgam of the military industrial complex. Hippies like what like? They're sitting there protesting each other but quietly they're building this new thing. That's coming out you know and so I think that when you look at the tender rights fights you look at the gym be movement you look at all these different things happening in cities whatever the whatever the like trajectory will go on next is gonNA be. I think we'll look at this time as being like. Oh Oh wow that's how we got that thing but it'll be something when you and I can't even imagine right now because it just seems to strange so my point is I actually think that forty years from now somebody hopefully me can go. We'll go back and look at this period and the bay area at that time because I mean all the implications for democracy I mean who even knows the hall of these companies that are being created there and the effects. They're having on voting and social all. The stuff that were reconciling with every day. Whatever future we're going to have a horrible future. It might be a better future. I feel like we could see the seeds of it in this story. Yes I was thinking futures Better than you fear but worse than you wish. Well it's been my you know there. There are definitely points when you'd have been wrong but in general that's how it's worked out. The name of the book is Golden. Gate's fighting for Housing America. The author Connor Dougherty. Thanks so much connor. Thank you and now the Spiel man. Does THE NEW YORK. Times hate west side story when producer Scott Rudin announced. He was bringing the Leonard Bernstein and lyricist Stephen Sondheim musical Broadway in a new production directed by Ivan vanhove. You figure that everyone in the Times would give big cheer but everyone. There gave a huge sneer. Could it be yes? It could a new production. That's not very good but the thing is it is pretty good. According to most people have seen it other than New York Times not everyone but man does the times hated. I mean the New York Daily News called the show a gripping west side that you watch with both appreciation for the power of the young in love and a profound sense of all American doom. This is what Broadway can do when it focuses relentlessly in how it wants to make its audience feel the La Times said west side story blast back to Broadway kinetic bloody and modern to the core entertainment weekly gave it a b but the times critic Ben Brantley ripped it which is fine others did too. Anyway there's a new Spielberg movie coming out so if a show like this will give sorrow. You'll meet another one tomorrow. But it wasn't just the critic the main Broadway critic his appraisal. The new show has been subject to a torrent of negative coverage rotten reviews and outraged op eds. They've written to stories about the protests outside the theater aimed at the productions Bernardo Amare Roma. Sorry Roms are. When with the New York City ballet received naked photos of a company members? Girlfriend The New York Times ran and OP ED. That was against not this production specifically but the very idea of west side story being performed at all the headline let west side story and it. Stereotypes Dye sub. Had the latest Broadway. Revival can fix the painful ways it depicts Puerto Ricans the author their lights into this or any other revival of the show arguing quote these continuous revivals. Reinforce America's colonizing power to determine who Puerto Ricans get to be the Times Ran Brenton's main review calling the show a curiously unaffected reimagining of a watershed musical. And then it keeps. The drubbing wasn't complete and from all corners. They ran a dance specific review by Jia corless which decried the productions dancing as operating quote to varying degrees like wallpaper. Choreography doesn't make this west side story. Breathe there are other questionable moments. The review goes on as when the sharks jets position themselves on either side of Maria. Tony to pull them apart after the couple meets the gym it's an image embarrassingly more suited to an instagram post which is sad but fitting. This is an instagram show. The review which actually was I liked it was an insightful piece of criticism but I did think it also trying to start a rumble with a few of the other times critics. Who As documented? Load the show for other reasons. Jia Cordless wrote the production seems to be aiming for that cheesiest of words gritty cut to the Brantley review the irrepressible iconoclast van. Hove it was said would be taking a grittier roller approach. He wrote Gritty cheesy gritty. That's not witty. But shitty at you right by the way that diddy I feel pretty is not in this version of the musical. The opinion of the New York Times is obviously vital to a Broadway show so important that the publicity machine for this west side story took a straight news article written about the show and cobbled together a Frankenstein's monster of disconnected thoughts than bought a print ad which gave the impression that the New York Times said the show was quote gravity defying Daesh uncompromising passionate and beautiful. Some of those words are actually in many cases. Variations of those words did appear in the original times article but they were not applied to the show or the quality of the show itself. That ad did run in the New York Times lying about the New York Times and today the New York Times announced it was pulling that ad I guess. The producers of the show were desperate to see something less than scathing about their product in the paper of record and if they had to buy their way in with lies well they still thought there is a place for us. I'm not sure what's really happening with this. One Institution The New York Times on the corner of Eighth Avenue and West Fortieth and this other institution currently playing on the corner of Broadway and West fifty third. Is it a turf. War Isn't a culture clash. All I know is there seems to be a lot more to this west side story and that's it for today's show. Priscilla lobby is the associate producer of the gist. Where she's drawn the line so keep your nose is hidden. She's hanging signs saying visitors forbidden. But don't worry she's kidding. Oh wait hold on. And she ain't kidding. Daniel schrader just producer knows a boat. You can get on the gist. We ain't no delinquents. Were MISUNDERSTOOD DEEP DOWN. Inside of us there is good for a Debra do Peru and thanks for listening..

The New York Times producer New York City NEW YORK New York Daily News La Times Ben Brantley Puerto Ricans Connor Dougherty Bernardo Amare Roma Scott Rudin Jia corless Debra instagram Leonard Bernstein sharks Daniel schrader Ivan vanhove America
"the new york times" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

12:18 min | 9 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"Dreams is a sportsbook. But it's set against the backdrop up of unique part of the world the sprawling Navajo reservation in northern Arizona were basketball has long played an outsize Role Canyon Dreams James a basketball season on the Navajo nation has just been published and it is a pleasure to welcome to the sporting life. Michael Powell Michael. Thank you for being with us. Oh sure yeah my pleasure why this book I mean Your New York sports writer your New York Guy. You spend a lot of time covering national sports for the Times Times but around the New York locked rooms and club houses and stadiums This is farther afield. This definitely further. Afield feel this is about when you're on the Navajo reservation which is enormous. It's like the size of it not like the size. It is the size of West Virginia Do you feel as far as far away as you can get in the United States And it's you know I think would appeal to me was kind of precisely that I mean you know you had. This was a place where you know some very very American themes Play out. I mean you know. Do you stay at home. Do you go that tension which is felt profoundly family there The style of ball. which is you know in a strange way very kind of ood Koran? I mean they play the sort of if you will kind kind of a golden state you know Old Phoenix Suns style of play very reasonable. This incredibly fast paced sport. That goes back doc. I mean they've been playing this for well over a hundred years And it is absolutely the passion of the place I mean. It's it's you know you go. Chile is a town where I was based of thirty five hundred and if it was any kind of a big game they would have five thousand fans there at night I mean it's just You know it's a passion play for the for the kids the adults everybody. We're seeking with Michael Powell. The New York Times about his new Book Canyon Dreams Basketball Season on the Navajo nation. And you describe in the book. the style of basketball that is played played the passion for the game there. Why does basketball means so much on the seventeen million acre reservation? You know I think a lot of it. His sort of rooted in culture there I mean they have a very very communal culture With these kind of you know very the big extended families plans and the great emphasis in res- ball is on working. You know the sort of working as a unit running and running and running and running also An enormous part of actually all southwestern Indian cultures. I mean it was in their time before the horse way they got around to this day there the runners for me the Navajo Hopi any of the reservations reservations down there always rank among the very top distance runners in those states and sometimes the nation so it kind of combines those the two passions and they were also forced By the Bureau of Indian affairs this was you know fifty sixty years ago how they were forced to go to these boarding schools Far Far away from their families where they were refused the ability to speak Navajo. They literally really have their mouths washed out with soap in an in the learned basketball and in a weird way. We're not in a weird way. In sort of moving wave. They turned basketball into kind of their own cultural expression when we do stories when you write a book about Any Indian reservation. There is a legacy there The history of course of what what happened. Native Americans over the course of hundreds of years for the expansion of The American footprint the United States footprint. Well how does the legacy how do we. How did you feel and experience that legacy covering life on this reservation? I mean what's the history history is very much alive there And people know I mean they know the story of their fight against Kit Carson and you know the American military you know the army army They know their resistance. They were forced into war in March off. I mean all and then went through a a you know a tough hard sad but ultimately successful fight to get it back in all of that is very alive I mean you walk up canyons with Navajos and they will you know they'll play out. You know the sites of Ancient Bat battles against I you know the Americans and where they hid and all this sort of thing at the same time. They're an interesting way. I mean they're very proud. Roud Americans right. I mean they they sign up for the military at a rate well beyond you know the average American American I mean the percentage of them do that And they take a lot of you know kind of pride and they're both Navajos Hose in Americans and this is an American story Like a cliche. I mean this would come up a lot in talking talking so it's an interesting kind of duality that that you hear. I mean there's a real say just a real awareness of the you you know kind of a brutal aspect of their collision With our you know expansionist culture and you. It's actually the other thing is that it's playing out in ways. That are discomforting to them to this day when I was there twenty five years ago there was no TV. You you know there was only Navajo language radio Now of course they have. Everybody has a cell phone. Everybody has everybody but many any kids. Have you know Internet access. And that's the way in which the kind of broader culture now like a Su- NAMI is kinda pushing in washing over them And if you WANNA messing with you know kind of you know longtime I'm kind of cultural aspects of their wife In their language is you know that's very real and they're all kind of struggling lingw- that whether it's in a you know you know in Kuwait way or only in ways that they'll talk about with you so it's a complicated time to be there right right now. We're speaking with Michael Powell of the New York Times about his new Book Canyon Dreams of Basketball Season on the Navajo nation and as a journalist and and this is this is what you do this. What you've done so well for so long? But how do you approach going into a place you know a as we you know we sometimes say parachuting in spending a good deal time there but a limited amount of time in the grand scheme of things then coming away writing a book about an entire culture how how do you. How do you get comfortable enough In that situation nation to do what you've done which produced remarkable book but but still one coming from someone outside that culture. Sure that's a great question. I mean it's worn warn that I assume all of us right when we do these sorts of books you wrestle with and I mean you know I think one thing thing I try to do is tell the stories as much as possible through you know the voices of the people. I'm talking to you. Try to find people people and I did you know who were very inter- from medicine men to the Athletic Director of the coach who we understand that that culture and frankly lean heavily on them and then the other is going there. Twenty five years ago my wife had worked there a couple of months as a A midwife at the Indian Health Service Hospital and you know the place really kind of gotten in the very best sense of the word Kinda crawled under our skin. You know sort of remained with us. I've always wanted to go back there and I ahead done several stories and a lot of it you know this was just you know getting there in like slowing down you know my Anglo reporter mind long enough to just kind of sit with it right. Give people time to get used to me to get comfortable that I'm not it just parachuting in and I'm not GonNa you know get a quick take split In trying to get you know as I did as people were incredibly we generous so they invited me either. You know family cookouts and this you know where you could really just have a chance to talk. And I'm to watch and tried to go to ceremonies where I could and you just but having said all of that I mean I would never are present myself as you know an expert in that culture. I was you know I had the privilege of being. Guess I guess there and observing and I hope you know getting it a certain truth there but I mean you know inevitably. I'm not not you know I'm not Navajo. He ease is basketball. I it I know this analogy has been made by others Talking about basketball on reservations and And about your book is basketball For the Navajo reservation. What football is in western Pennsylvania? SELENA or in Texas. Is it the same Does it occupy the same place I made it. Is You know it's funny. I read Ed of course because singers. Great Book Friday Night Lights this it is. I mean it basketball occupies the same in fact actually as one assistant coach said to me the biggest you know one of the five big sports on Navajo and he said there Basketball Basketball Basketball Basketball Rodeo or Rodeo Rhodium radio basketball and you know they're just yes. I mean it is just us you'll sit. I mean it was kind of funny. It's sit in the stands you know. I talked to grandmothers grandfathers. Who A had? Both both quite all played for teams be. Had this really sophisticated sense of you know basketball. I mean they talk about having watched Bill Walton. You Know Cowan's play and and they would you know the the stuff they would yell at the kids was like you know settle you know settle low. Pick it it was. It was pretty sophisticated stuff. It wasn't just go go. Wild cats No it's it's a it is really a passion play on the reservation. Severi Michael Powell's new book is Canyon Dreams a basketball season on the Navajo nation. And it's clearly obviously about much more than basketball Michael. Thank you so much for joining us in discussing this German appreciated. I'm Jeremy Shop and you can listen to new editions of the sporting life every Saturday and ends Sunday morning on E._s._p._N.. Radio and E._S._p._N. APP beginning at six A._M. Eastern time..

basketball Navajo Michael Powell Michael Powell Michael New York United States The New York Times West Virginia Times Times Bureau of Indian affairs Arizona Chile Kit Carson Indian Health Service Hospital Bill Walton SELENA
"the new york times" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

Erin Burnett OutFront

02:50 min | 10 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

"Former then Senator Barack Obama what do you say to a candidate right before they go on stages it get get that Zinger ready or what are you what are you saying we've been actress that we have reheard. What do you mean by intervention but it was with another candidate with the questioner you rehearses thanks Ashley If if one of the questions brings up something that de Democratic audience doesn't want to hear that you'll hear candidates go after the media that's entirely download the Mar- tech podcast Amar Tech podcast tells the stories of real world marketers who use technology to generate growth and achieve business career success from advertising to software as a service to data getting brands authentically integrated into content performs better than TV advertising typical life span of articles about twenty four to thirty six hours for reaching out to the right person with the right message and a clear call an action.

Senator Barack Obama Ashley thirty six hours
"the new york times" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

Erin Burnett OutFront

02:31 min | 10 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

"We're just seconds away from the start of the big debate a little bit of time left for some final thoughts David Axelrod let me let me bring in you have coached a candidate before debate like this through everything for weeks we've practice this you know the point you need to make sure you hit them and then at the last thing you say is and go have fun and look at you like you're nuts because there's nothing but pressure on that platform for some of these candidates it really is a matter of survival as has been mentioned I mean this is a this is a an important juncture in the campaign and it is very hard on a stage of twelve people to to score in a meeting awful way so you have to make every intervention count and if I were one of the strategists I would say whatever you do make sure we have this intervention that we have debates are not re they're not like a trial of law their performances and candidates go in knowing where that what they wanna land and the question is can they landed in the right way does it come out awkwardly if you know you'd said musical chairs for the ones who aren't necessarily in the next debate does your music sound like the Texas chainsaw massacre does it come out more harmoniously and work for you I mean is so you know what a successful debates going to look like for you and it requires you doing what you rehearsed and practiced to do and I also expect that Ospel that happened during my debate well certainly around this Biden Biden questions amplifying some of the charges that the president has made will not be greeted well by this audience and other candidates look there's a free there's free applause lines here for defending Joe Biden all right the David axelrod thank you so much the New York Times Democratic debate starts right now are you interested in learning how great companies grow assume.

David Axelrod Ospel president Joe Biden Texas Biden Biden New York Times
"the new york times" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

Erin Burnett OutFront

07:15 min | 10 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

"Welcome back to debate night on CNN just moments ago the Democratic presidential hopefuls headed toward the debate stage here at Audubon universe city in Westerville Ohio outside Columbus Twelve Democratic candidates will soon take their podiums the most ever onstage at once in the history of man kind the focus tonight will be on Joe Biden Elizabeth Warren and all likelihood but it may also be the last chance for other candidates to get a moment in propel their candidacies let's talk more about this with our experts and Kirstin somebody we haven't really spoken about yet is the woman on the right side of the screen there Senator Kamala Harris who had a good first debate showing and his kind of stuck at four percent in the polls she's kind of faded and I think that you know she she came out with a big bang he had that moment with Biden and she seemed like she was on the rise and and she's she's sort of sputtered out so I think tonight is an opportunity for her to try to get back in the game and she's already qualified for the November debate so she doesn't have to do anything to radical because it's probably going to get winnow down there's people there's people on that stage at are in a more desperate position I'm who haven't qualified who who may go for this sort of kamikaze attacks because it's their only chance but I think that she needs to have good strong debate performance tonight and van just because people are probably wondering who were the four that haven't qualified they are Senator Amy Klobuchar Beto O'Rourke Secretary Houlihan Castro and congresswoman Tulsi they have not yet qualified for the November debate according to the rules and regulations set up by the Democratic Party this is the biggest musical chairs game with their life persecutor what happened to her in one of the debates she got some incoming she didn't know how to handle Tulsi Gabbard Tulsi Gabbard brought the incoming biden the incoming and she looked like she maybe had a class jaw not that you think you're surprised that they're not doing better I'm surprised that Kamala isn't doing better I think she's run a very strong campaign she's run into some really odd news cycle headwinds she spent a week having to answer for something at her husband's law firm he wasn't even involved in I don't think a lot of male candidates have to deal with things like that worried about some attacks from these folks on the sides maybe backfiring I saw a something Buddha judge just this week where he said Elizabeth Warren can't win based on pocket change and that struck me if you want to go after her for Medicare for all and have that policy fight that's one thing but pocket change those are real people this this democratic debate this campaign is being fueled by independent individual donors and we're still at the point where people are donating to multiple candidates just to keep them in a race he might be insulting his own donors with that so I think if he comes at it with specially on a day that she released her get big money out of politics plan which was not an accident that happened today I think she's hoping that he comes for her runs already though acknowledged his point because she said she will take large nations in the general election so in since she is confirmed his theory on I think being as dismissive as he was I think can be a really big mistake and if he does it on this stage in front of everybody I don't know what's going on I think there was something a little petty about his remarks there I think this was in an interview he was with the Peter Hamby I think the problem that has is Sergiy Buddha just having is that he's trying to find himself now of vis-a-vis Elizabeth Warren what is he bringing to the stage on his own Elizabeth Warren has been successful by defining in what her issues are giving people a sense of what an Elizabeth Warren Presidency would be right big bold vision for the country p Buddha is running on his personality and I like he's got to add more can he can talk about you know we haven't talked about foreign policy that's clearly something that problem we'll be raised tonight and Buddha judge has a has a story to tell as a veteran and he has a lot of credibility on that front one I had first thing Tom Steyer is on this day multimillionaire multi millionaire billionaire bill on the stage for the first time even heard from him will he come out of the box going on the attack say against Joe Biden why not by the way a multimillionaire by the time he stops Yeah I was just projecting in the future let's talk about the foreign policy angle for one second because it it hasn't been a major part of any of the debates in front of voters minds but with what's going on right now in in Syria and Turkey it might be a big topic tonight as this slaughter goes on things get worse and worse above Tulsi Gabbard and Mayor Pete Buddha judge have nick perspective they are the generation that carried that weight of these forever veteran both embedded but they would never have handled it this way and so I think that there is something that he can say on that I also I agree with you anybody who comes at Elizabeth Warren you better be ready to see your head coming back at you however he has a principal difference with her if she he is GonNa continue to hug a Bernie Sanders Medicare for all position which is you cannot have private insurance you've got to be on the government program I don't think that's a good Pete could flush out they listen you can't have it both ways you can't keep tap dancing and kind of be with burning when you want you and not are you are you going to force everybody you're not data confrontation I would love to see because that you've got an extraordinary moderate and extraordinary progressive on the issue that matters Lemme Lemme say this if he doesn't do it he is worked because he has signaled so profoundly that this was an exchange he was eager to have and if he can't find it in himself to have that exchange then he's not the Alpha that you have to be to be a candidates a big test for him and cares for one thing that's also interesting as Tulsi Gabbard I suspect we'll talk about how she wants to end ever wars and TV's not in favor of regime change wars and she'll try to distinguish herself that way from the rest of the democratic pack which which has supported the war in Afghan this Dan has supported other wars Joe Biden voted for the war in Iraq but also she has to be careful about drawing too much attention to her position on Syria because it's actually somewhat problematic Ed what do you think about Tulsi Gabbard on foreign policy. You're going to be able to thread that needle no I think this is the absolute worst possible foreign policy conflict for her to be dealing with yes veteran she should be able to talk about other things when you're talking about Syria she's met with Assad against US advice it's hard to get out of that we'll see what happens I'm sure it's GonNa come up in conversation because obviously what's going on right now in Syria let's go down now to the stage where my colleague Anderson Cooper is about to introduce the candidates.

Joe Biden Elizabeth Syria CNN Westerville Audubon universe Ohio Columbus Anderson Cooper US Assad four percent one second
"the new york times" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

Erin Burnett OutFront

06:13 min | 10 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

"The donald With the national anthem we're going to squeeze in a quick break up next it's a whole new world in a whole new race since the last time these candidates met our experts are going to tell us what to watch for tonight with us you know what's Kinda depressing being thirty nine and reading an article about money milestones to hit by age forty we weren't even close to having enough cash to cover three months of living expenses or paying off credit card debt so we met with financial planner who helps us create a budget but as Louis Financial Hack what's to consolidate all our credit card debt into one lower rate loan we shopped around and chose best dot com for three reasons great interest rate it's four point eight stars on consumer affairs and alone APP that literally took about a minute really smart best egg had the cash baked count in about twenty four hours we off all of our credit card debt banked three month cash cushion and even saved enough for sweet vacation it's a great feeling fragrances are difficult getting a person Malone from best egg dot com isn't visit best egg dot com slash fall that's best AAC DOT com slash fall fest egg dot com slash fall subject to credit approval actual rates visa approval times ferry hey guys this is Khana Rogers I live in active lifestyle with tons of travel during football season constantly on the go I can't sacrifice style for comfort and thanks Mak well I don't have to anymore I'm sure you guys can't stand shopping but it's easy and takes notes times a place in order on their website the underwear shirts and sweats are all perfect for workouts or when you're on the move this is the most comfortable clothing I own making it hard to go back to anything else and if you think I'm lying give it a try you can keep the first pair of underwear and they'll still refund you no questions asked for twenty percent off your first order Visit Mac Weldon Dot Com and enter Promo Code Warner W. A. R. N. E. R. Warner Stop Wasting your weekends in stores make it easy and get premium topnotch fabric with Mac wellman dot com don't forget that Promo Code Warner for a sweet twenty percent discount all right big night welcome back for live it Autobahn University in Westerville Ohio just a little bit outside Columbus the excitement tension building and with good reason we're just a few minutes away from the New York Times Democratic presidential debate the headline at this moment in the race Joe Biden and Senator Elizabeth Warren they are what we're calling I guess CO leaders David Chalian here he's a charge of telling me now I depict with the state of the race is it is fair to say the fight tonight is in the middle of the state Yes yes without a doubt and I would just say Elizabeth born is the dominant force in this race right now and so what I am looking for tonight is how she handles the incoming coming her way I mean some candidates are really clear and telegraphing like people do judge has made clear he wants to fight with her over Medicare for all versus Medicare for everyone who wants it this is not a night I think are we are in this race for you shy away if you're a candidate not named Elizabeth Warren about trying to some of the momentum that she's had over these last couple of months reporting data suggests that people are much more aware of the dynamic of sword and shield tonight and what are you hearing from some of the players and that's exactly right and just to pick up on what David Tang has telegraphed what he wants to do tonight with the pain that they've released this morning it was you know certainly not an accident also behind the scenes his campaign is saying that he does plan if given the opportunity to go after Elizabeth Warren on colleagues before the break which is the fact that she's a plan for everything not Medicare for all she just says I'm with Bernie and to press her on not just the specifics the plan but but one particular issue which is how is she going to pay for it and we'll she raised taxes and flip side I'm told that the Warren campaign s the character her for that exact thing how is she going to respond to that she's ready for it she's waiting for it and apparently she has response I look and I don't mean it as an insult we talked about this for Senator Warren's not easy to hit who you know and that's part of the political skill I'm not saying that cynically so what are you hearing about how people are kind of making adjustment because tonight is going to be the last shot at the title for about at least a third of that the people up there for months we've seen the rivals Senator Warren trying to get to media and journalists oh she had an easy ride during this kind of climb now it's their turn so it's a win there on that stage to be able to try to press her on some of these some of these issues but as who says the warranty heinous prepare for this we know in the previous debates John Delaney others even show bite or Medicare for all have tried to come and some of these issues she's ready for it she thinks the doing those town halls continuously has prepared her for any of the questions that she can get an I'm gonna see tonight if someone tried to one of those punches it's going to be tough well look I got to throw him I do think that we haven't seen her be a target and I think the person who's taking the biggest toll from that inactivity is Bernie Sanders yeah I do not believe I the reports are his health is good thank God Bernie Sanders full strength from what we understand and we hope that that is the situation but he's been too nice for too long he's eaten launched a young people she got center left perspective they took it from her his pie there's no doubt she has carved out some of his votes that is part of what is fueling her rise young people liberals there's there's no doubt about that of course Bernie Sanders is you know has been totally reluctant to take directly everything is always like where friends he he did not see he didn't believe from the beginning of this race that she was the mortal threat to his candidacy he thought he was going to be able to create the ad last time around and grow from there she's a huge blockade to that the other person always say the former.

donald twenty percent twenty four hours three months three month
"the new york times" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

Erin Burnett OutFront

10:13 min | 10 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

"Good evening and welcome to our viewers in the United States and around the world we're just moments away from the C. N. N. New York Times Democratic presidential debate. I'm Jake Tapper along with Chris Cuomo this is what is quite literally the field of candidates on a debate stage ever in American political history here in Audubon University in Westerville Ohio just outside Mambas Jake great to be here with you I don doesn't Democratic presidential candidates are here they've been streaming in over the last hour or so some with their closest friend ends and advisors in tow I'm coming to you from the proverbial spin room as the candidates in their teams put the finishing touches on their game plans for this critical night in the two thousand twenty right this Chris is it there's there's no night to know undercard debate no second-stage that's true and you know we'll probably never see this again in this election it's likely that up to three of these people that you see at twelve dozen Democrats up there they may not make the next round but the big story is going to be centerstage Joe Biden and Elizabeth warn sure they're going to be flanked by other candidates this may be that last chance to make an impact but when you watch those two can only be one number one so how are they going to deal with attacks on them whom will they target and how and of course there's a lot of news since they last debated Jake you know obviously we have a formal impeachment inquiry into the incident his personal attorney is under criminal investigation stemming from that White House release of a rough transcript of a call between our president and Ukraine's leader where the president asks for saver and talks about investigating his political rival who of course is on the stage Jake so it's a big deal and they're big stakes especially in the middle of that stage also the first time that there'll be a debate since the president decided to pull troops out of northern Syria but there's a lot to talk about let's discuss it right now with with my team what are you looking for tonight. The what is the most important thing for viewers the tuning in to keep an eye on a lot of folks on that stage the dynamics of this race exchange you've seen Warren ascendant she's essentially the CO front runner here I think she is going to have a lot of folks coming at her who comes at our easy going to be biding his folks are suggesting that maybe maybe not they're not going to necessarily attack are they do want to draw the contrast in terms of what he would do with healthcare what she would do with healthcare and then Opel's undercard folks right who might not make it to the next stage somebody like Tulsi Gabbard who's proven to be a bit of a wild car in previous debates what does she do how do they get in the mix how do they break through this pack of twelve and what is born look like the Senate also Joe Biden he's been sort of average at these debates weren't as much better debater how does he bring his a game something we haven't quite seen from him yet maybe he does it he's obviously under a lot of scrutiny what happened with Ukraine and seen a warrant in some ways a lap him at this point in some of these polls and David Hunter Biden the vice president former vice president's son almost like the thirteenth person on the stage and to be clear president trump and his team have lied significantly about Joe Biden and the sun Hunter Biden the president's conduct in terms of pushing asking other countries to investigate the Biden's has been deemed impeachable or at least enough for impeachment inquiry but beyond that there is also this question here is a question about Hunter Biden what he was doing and whether it was appropriate for him to be on the payroll of this mccranie energy company while his father was vice president and had the Ukraine Portfolio for the administration he said this morning that he he thought maybe he made an error in judgment by Hunter Biden Joe Biden hasn't given any quarter on this he said my son did nothing wrong but in my astray Shin he won't have any so it the the point I guess is he's done nothing wrong but he won't do it again right but one of the things when I asked US caboodle judge about this on Sunday Gloria Borger the first thing he did was defend Joe Biden and start going after president trump and president trump's children I think you're going to hear a lot of that on the stage some of them on the campaign trail have said we won't have our children serving in our administration but Joe Biden has said that as well now I think given the opportunity to take on trump versus Joe Biden on this issue and the conspiracy theories that are being fed by the trump campaign. Yeah I think they're going to do that one thing I want to say is I think we need to look at Bernie Sanders Tonight because Elizabeth Warren has risen and he's declined he's had a heart attack I think he has to look as vigorous as his looked at the last debates and show show voters that he's okay and I'm wondering whether in fact he will take on Warren he did it a little bit earlier this week where he said she said she's a capitalist ruin through Bates debate stage in the history of man as far as we go we had eleven and two thousand fifteen this is well one more three hours that is a long time for a twenty year old to stand on a stage and be deaf than answer questions much less somebody who just had a heart procedure because he suffered a heart attack Louis and you have a lot of candidates who might be trying to make breakout moments it's a very stressful situation I wouldn't want to be Bernie Sanders his wife right now watching this shoes I just hope that that he's that he's doing what we all hope he does tonight the other new thing about tonight is that we are having a debate while president is impeachment inquiry that has also never happened before in the history of man and a lot of these candidates came out really strong on impeachment very early didn't they were bowled they understood than Castro was born with second yeah was out there booker was out there this week so my question is the other candidates use that against Biden he waited until Congress public opinion fifty percent of independence and like a quarter of Republicans said it was okay before he said the president ought to be impeached so do they use that as a wedge issue like van the fact that an impeachment inquiry is going on right now does that mean do you think that Democrats should talk a lot about that and a lot about donald trump in their view he's unsuitable or more should they follow the example that you were telling me about which is you go out and talk about talk to voters all the time and they don't bring up right impeachment with you it really doesn't come up they've gotta talk about they've got to deal with it but I think that if they are thinking about the voters at the youngest look the question does Bernie still have his bark and Pete have a bite is going to do anything to separate himself this should be right Syria he is a veteran he he he can own that issue Tulsi Gabbard camp but he can also he has a big difference of opinion Elizabeth born on Medicare for all he said Medicare for all who wanted don't make people go on it if he does not find a way tonight to stop being the puppy dog and becoming attack dog I don't understand this strategy do agree with accuracy do you think that people judge needs to step up and be more aggressive he could stand me to be a lot more aggressive and this is really his opportunity to do it I think and if he doesn't do tonight is probably not going to happen and so I would expect to see a lot of around the Medicare for all that's that's really where the agreement is GonNa come between Warren Sanders and the rest of the people on the stage and that's where they can have a clarifying moment with them especially you know go after Warren now really a lot of people weren't going after her I think everyone understood that she was ascendant but now she really is a top two candidate and so I think it'll be interesting to see anybody can land a punch on her she is just so data such death debater how do you go after the this is a difficult thing in the dynamics of politics how do you go after a a woman candidate that can be dicey for a male candidate he comes across my Rick Lazio going after Hillary Clinton Donald Trump going after Hillary Clinton there's ask John Delaney went after Elizabeth Warren and she left him by the road so I think she's very equipped to provider she's the most deft debater on the stage in one of the reasons people haven't gone after her is because they're a little worried about tangling with her but she's the front row under now and unless they want to just spew strewn rose petals in front of her toward the nomination they better start drawing those distinct you've got to care for the the listen on Medicare for all she has played a cagey game she said I'm with Bernie she has a plan for every single problem but the one that's most for paramount in people's uh-huh healthcare my view is she's holding back trying to consolidate the left and then she will have a more nuanced healthcare plan but she she's going to be pressed on that tonight I think yeah who doesn't obviously I mean sanders has been doing that a bit Pete Buddha judge has been doing that a bit as well can he actually bring the other thing is who who kind of comes to her aid on between those folks so it'll be really interesting Biden could take her own let's turn our attention right now back to the stage where the debate is going to be playing out at the top of the hour and ladies and gentlemen please rise for the national anthem performed by Broadway star George Dada thousand sixteen graduate of university.

president Joe Biden Jake Tapper Elizabeth Warren Chris Cuomo Bernie Sanders United States Ohio Syria Audubon University C. N. N. New York Westerville Ukraine White House attorney fifty percent three hours twenty year
"the new york times" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"the new york times" Discussed on The Daily

"Thomas jefferson of course is deeply aware of the hypocrisy and aware of criticism of the hypocrisy so as he's drafting the declaration he includes a passage in there where actually blames the king of finland for introducing slavery into the colonies he'd call slavery a crime and he says that the king of england committed this crime but that's not our fault. It was not are are doing this is just one more thing that the king of england did to wrong us so he brings this document to the continental congress and and it doesn't take long before delegates from the carolinas and from georgia look at that language about slavery and one can imagine they said what the hell are you doing and they say that there is no way that they're going to sign this document as long as that passage about slavery remains and so it is struck and the thirteen colonies signed the declaration in the declaration goes out into the world without mentioning slavery at all and we start the revolutionary war somehow miraculously these thirteen scrappy colonies colonies managed to defeat one of the most powerful empires in the world and we become a new nation and silicon is gathering they try to figure out the language it they are going to create in the founding document that we of course come to know as the constitution but now they have a problem they're trying create a new one that they believe will be defined <unk> by freedom this country that was going to be based on individual rights on a government of the people for the people and by the people but this was also a place at this time was still practicing the institution of slavery and so the colonists have a choice to make aac. Are they going to be the country of their ideals. The ideals that they were putting to paper a country based on the idea that all men were created created equal and if they were going to be that country then they were going to have to abolish the toossion of slavery or are they going to be sweated to the institution of slavery because they depended so heavily on the wealth that was being generated from it and that case they can't really write the document that they want to right and so what they do is they decided they're going to try to have it both ways and they baked that contradiction right into the constitution both codifying and protecting the institution of slavery but never actually mentioning the word and so they have written what is perhaps the most radical constitution in the world and from the beginning. They knew they were going to violate. It's smells these sancho principals. They call this new country democracy but it wasn't one <music>.

england Thomas jefferson finland congress georgia
"the new york times" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"the new york times" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"To this particular this particular graphic on the cover of the New York Times, and the article itself is incredibly stupid. The article itself is basically about how he watched some videos in two other videos which led him to other videos, which led him to become a trad Khan, and then people were upset at him becoming a trade con. So then he became now detract con anymore that's the entire article. It's thousands of words, long thousands words. So a couple of things to note number one, there's a full on campaign by the left media at this point from the Washington Post to the New York Times from NBC to media matters, and I count media matters as part of the left, media infrastructure any publication that calls media matters. They watchdog group you can tell is on the side of media matters there is this overt effort now on. On the part of all of these publications to suggest that the tech companies are basically leading people down the rabbit hole of all right? White supremacists content by even allowing mainstream conservative contents. That's the goal here is to lump in everybody, who's a mainstream conservative with people who are. All right. And then suggests that if you watch mainstream conservative contents than inevitably, you will be led down this rabbit hole. Now, this is absurd and bizarre. They're legitimately hundreds of thousands of people who listen to the show every day or not even on the political, right? There are hundreds of thousands of people who are on the political, right? And believe that the outright is evil just as I do. But according to the New York Times, and the Washington Post and all of these other outlets. Basically, if you're on the right you're going to slide gradually white supremacism so long as you engage on YouTube now the reason they are directing this at YouTube is because they are hoping to use YouTube in order to quash conservative you points. They understand that there are certain shared forum where people post their views Facebook YouTube Twitter, all the rest of those Pinterest. And then what they're. Hoping to do. They, they understand conservatives aren't going to stop talking. So what they hope to do is make conservative speech so ridiculously outside the Overton window that all of these shared platforms have to shut it down. And they're hoping to do this in advance of the twenty twenty election. The timing is not a mistake here. It is not a coincidence, your ever since the left decided that Hillary Clinton had illegitimately lost the two thousand sixteen election and that she really one ever since that they've been looking for a scapegoat. And the scapegoat that is the most convenient for them are the tech companies and by attacking the tech companies with the left hopes to do is caused the tech companies to curb the content they allow on their platforms in advance of twenty twenty so the argument they are making is that the tech platforms didn't do enough to shut down the various loose keys, and therefore, they have to shutdown everybody on the right in advance of twenty twenty or at least curbed their reach, or at least elevated, quote unquote authoritative voices. So here's what this New York Times. Idiotic says Caleb Kane, pull the Glock pistol from his waistband took out the magazine and casually tossed both onto the kitchen counter. I bought it the day after I got death threats. He said the threats. Mister Cain explained him from right wing. Trolls. In response to a video he had posted on YouTube, a few days earlier in the video, he told the story of how as a liberal college dropout struggling to find his place in the world. He'd gotten sucked into a vortex of far right politics on YouTube. I fell down the rabbit hole. He said in the video. So a couple of things right off the bat number one. He didn't actual-. He was so crazily right wing, even own a gun until he became a leftist again. And then talked about it on YouTube mister Cain..

YouTube New York Times Mister Cain Khan Washington Post Caleb Kane Hillary Clinton Facebook NBC Pinterest
"the new york times" Discussed on Weird Work

Weird Work

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Weird Work

"Oh gay pride your headphones your car stereo are you bluetooth speaker today on the show we have will shorts the editor of the new york times crossword so of course were giving you a made for weird work puzzle what do you take before okay here chaos take the word elation e l a t i o n rear end though seven letter to name part of the human body sounds easy it's only seven letters but very few people get it if you we're net his this is the show you just need zoo year did you figure it out our at all i can tell you is the answers hit somewhere in this podcast episode so if you're looking to alleviate that curious case of headscratching you're just going to have to listen to the show today well and a high dig into the seventy five year history of the new york times crossword puzzle from its start as a distraction for readers in the wake of the bobby pearl harbor too well the welcome distraction from the new cycle of today and will breaks down how for the last twenty five years he added seven puzzles of we each day increasing difficulty here's a hit the story involves an arabian horse farm on one of a kind college degree and a crack team of whip smart puzzle heads i'm say of all dirt and this is weird mark len listen sudan's three aims a by their jobs which are quite unique aiming.

car stereo editor zoo year sudan the new york times bobby pearl seventy five year twenty five years
"the new york times" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Up doing a lot of side investigation like i wrote some projects using wordpress data instead of using the new york times is one of the other challenging things is that especially as a react to app you know we may have four hundred five hundred react components that all have these graft kyaw decorations in so if something needs to change across the board it's very hard to try out new frameworks saw a will typically try them out on a smaller scale on camera example project or aside project and um the thing about south that comes out of facebook is at facebook has a very specific engineering system to wear adding build time steps is not really a problem so like facebook's code has to be transpire old in ten different ways you know everything you do so there's kind of a culture around these built stops and that's not a huge problem for us but if we're going to introduce this built step it does add some complexity to our project but the real reason that we couldn't move forward with relay modern is this the ecosystem around it an ox by a little bit so when you do routing i'll which means going from page two page in a react app there are only a handful of choices that people tend to go to one of those his react router and to make react rider work with relay there's a library called rat rider relay but then to make it work on the server and server rendering means that like when i go to the page i see the whole page and then the i made the client may come in and actually react made you a rerun during the climb as well but you won't notice a client only app typically means that you come to the site and there's a bunch of these loading graphics that make you think there's a lot of loading happening in there is because we're making the request for the data and so if we don't have a server render have you to view the source of the web page there wouldn't be a web page there and so we do need that and want that so with related.

new york times facebook web page