38 Burst results for "The Wall Street Journal"

Fresh update on "the wall street journal" discussed on KPRC 950 AM Programming

KPRC 950 AM Programming

00:35 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "the wall street journal" discussed on KPRC 950 AM Programming

"Forward slash radio and not only will you be able to hear the show, you will be able to see the video that we make each and every show. It was just a few weeks ago, we talked about the National Association of Realtors, where their arm or realtors than homes available here in the United States and in fact, also in the Wall Street Journal were seeing indications in certain countries. There's Real estate boom is well, kind of like we're having here in almost each and every city. So we're gonna take the temperature once again today talking to three real estate professionals in Houston, and in fact not really by planned, but the way it worked out, we have someone from Conroe. We have someone from the middle Of the Houston area and even in the.

United States National Association Of Realto Houston Today Few Weeks Ago Conroe Each Wall Street Journal Three Real Estate Professional Every
Over 100 corporate leaders meet to discuss state voting laws

Rush Limbaugh

00:29 sec | 1 hr ago

Over 100 corporate leaders meet to discuss state voting laws

"And corporate leaders have gathered online this weekend to discuss what to do in response to changes to some state voting laws, According to various news reports by the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal and others. The leaders numbered more than 100. Including executives from major airlines, retailers and manufacturers, plus at least one NFL owner talking about potential ways to show they oppose the legislation, which has already been signed into law in Georgia and is being considered elsewhere.

Major Airlines Washington Post Wall Street Journal NFL Georgia
Fresh update on "the wall street journal" discussed on Jim Strader Outdoors

Jim Strader Outdoors

00:38 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "the wall street journal" discussed on Jim Strader Outdoors

"Make sure the vaccine is that much closer to the arms of folks who need them. A number of top executives and corporate leaders have gathered online this weekend to discuss what to do in response to changes to some state voting laws, according to various news reports by the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal and others. The leaders numbered more than 100, including executives from major airlines, retailers and manufacturers. Plus it least one NFL owner. Talking about potential ways to show they oppose the legislation, which has already been signed into law in Georgia and is being considered elsewhere. You're listening to ABC News. This'd news radio. Wait. 40 w h A s your news now. On Monday morning, Kentucky's governor Andy Bashir, is going to be paying a visit to the state's largest vaccination site. The governor, along.

Monday Morning Georgia NFL More Than 100 Abc News Andy Bashir Kentucky Wall Street Journal Washington Post This Weekend ONE Governor 40
Amazon workers in Alabama vote not to form a union

Rush Limbaugh

00:13 sec | 2 d ago

Amazon workers in Alabama vote not to form a union

"Forming a union. With 72% of the ballots counted, 71% of the voters voted against joining the retail wholesale in department store union, according to the Wall Street Journal. On Wall Street this afternoon Stocks remained

Wall Street Journal
Fresh update on "the wall street journal" discussed on The Financial Quarterback

The Financial Quarterback

00:40 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "the wall street journal" discussed on The Financial Quarterback

"Again. It will be mine. Thank you. How wonderful and Elizabeth. I know you've been in the industry again. We've known for such a long, long time and you just keep yourself so relevant with weeds and the Moody's and You're always out there doing great and really, really cool, relevant pieces that just appeal to everyone. In fact, just this week, I was reading all about you in the Wall Street Journal. And, of course in Page six, and you were talking about your role and big with Tom Hanks and how you don't think that It's that love C and would have happened in today's modern world. So how did you start thinking about you know today and what we're going through it? Are we too politically correct for something like that. Well, you know, times have changed, and we in the media, you know, roll at the time, and it would never have occurred to us in 1987 that there was something untoward about that scene or about the fact that they fall in love. Um, but you know, which were always changing, and we're always growing and you know, we're a little bit more conscientious about, you know, putting things out there. So, um, I think probably we wouldn't have shown me taking off my shirt. I think it will. Hey, Lucille and loud And does your nest had to be Filmed in separate beds, and the babies came from the stork, and we couldn't talk about menstruation and everything is very different. So that's a very interesting point that you roll with the time you roll with the times. But at what your take on this exact point was, you actually were you happy that we're in a society now where that wouldn't be okay with the norm, or were you kind of thinking, Oh, it would be sort of a bummer that we wouldn't be able to have that part of the movie in there. Well, I do think it's twofold. I mean, you don't want Tonto offend anybody when but you also want to be true to your vision. And to, um you know what you're trying to say? I do think we probably would just pull it back a little bit and and That's okay. You know, we don't wanna, You know, we don't want to push the boundaries to the point where we're offending people. But at the same time, you know you want to be funny and you want to. And that entire scenario of us, Um Sleeping together was sort of Joke. Where is the next morning? The elevator doors open and he walks out. He's like, Hey, I'm a guy, you know. So the whole thing was just sort of a setup for a joke. And, um, you know, you want to be able to have the freedom to be funny, so I think I think it's a two fold. Situation and now you also said that that particular casting between you and Tom Hanks on both ends almost didn't happen right, especially with Tom. He kind of came in later in the production. Right? I think Penny Marshall had originally wanted Tom Hanks and he was busy doing splash. I think itwas with Daryl Hannah, the Great Mermaid movie The Ron Howard films on Guess. Oh, she had gone with Robert De Niro, who was a dear friend of hers. On. Dhere was attached to it when I was actually cast in it, So it was a very different kind of movie with Robert DeNiro attached to it, and then Robert fell out income became available. So and then it became perfect that it is, you know, big became big, That's for sure. There's no going back from that. Nothing like the original and especially, I'm a big fan of the moody is I know you just premiered season two. When this project happened. Did you know that it was going to become such a popular? You know, a popular TV show, and it was really a great role for you. I mean, you and your on air husband, Denis Leary. You're such a great match, and it's so so funny and again listening audience We're here with iconic actress Elizabeth Parkins and her show The Moody's is about a tight knit but little bit dysfunctional family. I think we can all relate to that a little bit. They're always having some adventurer rather miss adventure. So How excited are you have to bring the second season toe life? Well, I adore Denis Leary. His humor has always grabbed, you know, he's just sardonic. He's sarcastic. Um, and he and I actually grew up about 40 miles away from each other in Massachusetts. So We sort of are cut from the same cloth and I've been running to work with him for a really long time. So when this show came up, I was like, Oh, I'm onboard immediately. He's a sweet man. He's a humanitarian. He's Philanthropist, I I just adore everything about him. I know. I know that I mentioned before that you were born in queens. But you mostly grew up in Massachusetts, right? You grew up on a farm there. So I guess you had a lot of running wild that really spur on your imagination. Oh, absolutely. I was mourning in Flushing and my family moved to my grandfather's farm, which was on the border of western Massachusetts and southern Vermont. Um we were completely ill equipped to leave the city and move up there. But I think my parents at the time, but you know, we're going to grow our own vegetables. And then they got up there and like, how do you grow vegetables? It was really a learning curve for all of us. But being raised in nature like that just was a great fuel for imagination. And I was I'm really proud that I grew up on a farm. I guess I think that parallels a lot of us New Yorkers now so many of us and scolded started. We're heading out for greener pastures. And I think everybody's like, Can we make it? Are we coming back anytime soon? So What we will you know how it goes. Elizabeth. If you can make it in New York, you could make it anywhere. So you had the roots of New York power and then you are ahead of your time with form to table. I think that's another sitcom coming down the pipeline for you. We loved me that one. New Yorker flees to Southern Vermont and all heck breaks out. Yeah, I think it was actually Diane Keaton movie in the eighties about baseball say you didn't even know Oh, man. Well, Elizabeth, this is Jackie. And I just want to say that the height loved your character's Celia Hodes and weeds. That was probably one of my favorite characters, and I think it was one of your favorite roles in my right. Absolutely one of my favorite world. It was the first time that I I've been cast as somebody wicked. You know, I've had always sort of been cast. As you know the strong but girl next door kind of Woman and this is a chance for me to just, you know, be evil, and it gets so well delicious to play. You know, I think any actor loves to play somebody That's just, you know, uneven person. A lot of it is a lot of fun. I love. Yeah. Let it fun to watch too. It's still one of my favorite shows. Oh, I mean, really, really grew fast there no pun intended with those those weeds there. I mean, when, when you first took on this role. Were you expecting it to become the phenomenon? I mean, it's really a part of pop culture. I mean, everybody's seeing weeds. Right, And you know it's interesting because we really broke new ground with that show. It was one of the cables first real successful half hour comedy and, um, if you look back, you know, talking about the movie big, You know, we pushed a lot of boundaries on weeds as well..

Elizabeth Parkins Denis Leary New York Robert De Niro Penny Marshall Massachusetts Elizabeth Robert Deniro 1987 Tom Hanks Daryl Hannah TOM Flushing Dhere Diane Keaton Southern Vermont Lucille Wall Street Journal Celia Hodes Western Massachusetts
Professor Tom Eisman: The Real Reason Why Startups Fail Now

The Small Business Radio Show

02:11 min | 3 d ago

Professor Tom Eisman: The Real Reason Why Startups Fail Now

"One of the eternal questions in entrepreneurship is why do so many startups fail here with some answers. Is tom eisman. Who's the howard h stevenson professor of business administration the harvard business school and faculty co chair of the arthur rock center for entrepreneurship thomas. Authored more than one hundred s case studies and his writing has appeared in the wall street journal. Harvard business review in forbes. He's the author of a new book called. Why startups failed tom. Welcome to the show area. Thanks for having me well. How have you been surviving through the pandemic. just great it's A great time to write a book and it turns out. I know i'm ready to yeah plenty of quiet time. So why do startups fail. That's the first question we gotta start with sure Startups fail because they run out of money and they can't raise more Which i guess isn't very helpful. It's like the coroner saying This this person died from loss of blood and so it is because i always say that every business fails because they run out of money and i think that's important because so many entrepreneurs don't value cash flow. They keep looking at sales. So i think it is instructive especially protect startups. Where where there's a tolerance for For losing money under the expectation that if you can big enough you're to make some money but but boy If you get in trouble along the way and you can't raise the next round when you when you're burning through cash you you're on the way failure or you don't listen to customers actually help fund your business in those smaller things that perhaps just a service oriented company exactly so do starts fail also because not. Everyone is meant to be an entrepreneur. I think that over the last. I guess since the internet bubble of the early two thousands. We've kind of romanticized. Starting a business as a get rich. Quick scheme i mean we know we think of mark zuckerberg and elon. Musk is it because sometimes the wrong people start businesses yeah. I don't think there's there's no doubt about that. I think some some sizable fraction of of new businesses fail. Because people aren't cut out for it.

Tom Eisman Howard H Stevenson Arthur Rock Center For Entrepr Professor Of Business Administ Harvard Business School The Wall Street Journal TOM Mark Zuckerberg Elon Musk
The Real Reason Why Startups Fail

The Small Business Radio Show

01:41 min | 3 d ago

The Real Reason Why Startups Fail

"Well one of the eternal questions in entrepreneurship is why do so many startups fail here with some answers. Is tom eisman. Who's the howard h stevenson professor of business administration the harvard business school and faculty co chair of the arthur rock center for entrepreneurship thomas. Authored more than one hundred s case studies and his writing has appeared in the wall street journal. Harvard business review in forbes. He's the author of a new book called. Why startups failed tom. Welcome to the show area. Thanks for having me well. How have you been surviving through the pandemic. just great it's A great time to write a book and it turns out. I know i'm ready to yeah plenty of quiet time. So why do startups fail. That's the first question we gotta start with sure Startups fail because they run out of money and they can't raise more Which i guess isn't very helpful. It's like the coroner saying This this person died from loss of blood and so it is because i always say that every business fails because they run out of money and i think that's important because so many entrepreneurs don't value cash flow. They keep looking at sales. So i think it is instructive especially protect startups. Where where there's a tolerance for For losing money under the expectation that if you can big enough you're to make some money but but boy If you get in trouble along the way and you can't raise the next round when you when you're burning through cash you you're on the way failure or you don't listen to customers actually help fund your business in those smaller things that perhaps just a service oriented company exactly

Tom Eisman Howard H Stevenson Arthur Rock Center For Entrepr Professor Of Business Administ Harvard Business School The Wall Street Journal TOM
Jordan accuses Prince Hamzah of plot to destabilise kingdom

Planet Money

01:17 min | 6 d ago

Jordan accuses Prince Hamzah of plot to destabilise kingdom

"Jordan's former Crown prince says he's under house arrest. Yet Prince homes have been Hussein and 20. Other people are accused of a plot to threaten the country's quote, security and stability. The half brother of King Abdullah, the second said he isn't allowed to communicate with anyone and that his Internet has been shut down through his lawyer. He released this statement to the BBC. It's reached the point where no one is able to Speak or express opinion on anything without being bullied, Arrested, harassed and threaten. Jared Nelson of the Wall Street Journal is covering this story, and he's on the line from Istanbul. Welcome to the program. Morning, So I recognize this is all about intrigue and things happening behind the scenes. But have you been able to figure out what prompted the arrests? Well, what the government is saying is they're describing what they say is a foreign backed plot to destabilize Jordan involving Prince Hamzah and two other men should it hasn't been saying who's a member of the royal family? And best of all, we don't know who's a four former Chief of the Royal Court and Finance minister on their accusing all

Crown Prince Jared Nelson King Abdullah Jordan Hussein BBC Wall Street Journal Istanbul Prince Hamzah Government Royal Court
Why did Brazil's defence chiefs quit?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

01:46 min | Last week

Why did Brazil's defence chiefs quit?

"Joined today by samantha pearson and fernando augusta per sheku cement to pearson is the brazil correspondent for the wall street journal. She joins us from sao paulo and fernando augusta. Yoshiko is from ceo palo. He's monocle senior correspondent and he is right here in the studio in london. A i will start with you samantha. And the story. That is the reason. We're doing this episode. It's the resignation of these three service chiefs. Obviously a choreographed move on their part. But how seismic has that been. It's been a pretty big may chair in brazil. Last time the heads of the armed forces left on the same day was nineteen ninety-five And that was the end. Up brazil's twenty one year dictatorship. So really it's not normal for this to happen in brazil and it's it's had a huge impact and just to follow that up samantha. Anyone know yet entirely what the motivations are actually at some level. Trying to bolsonaro out i think site mean a defense ministry said very little when they announced the change but sources close. The government told as essentially resigned in protest. Why do they do this. Because basically the past couple of years while sonata the president bus not has been trying to politicize military force Bat kim on political issues now. This is a lot of tension among the hiring sip. the military. They believe that they answer only to the constitution that they're above plots politics fair while they're going to be tarnished. The entire arms is brazil is going to be tarnished by both sinatra's administration and particularly his handling of the pandemic which is being pretty catastrophic care in brazil

Fernando Augusta Brazil Samantha Pearson Yoshiko Samantha Sao Paulo Pearson The Wall Street Journal Bat Kim London Government Sinatra
Asian American Business and Tech Leaders Raise Awareness

All Things Considered

00:47 sec | Last week

Asian American Business and Tech Leaders Raise Awareness

"And tech leaders are raising money and awareness for groups fighting violence against their communities. Hey, cuties, Nina Thorsen reports San Francisco Venture capitalists, Dave Lew said he wrote a letter to channel his anger and frustration after the Atlanta shootings, the targeted Asian Americans. He shared it with friends and now more than 1700. People have signed the letter, which appeared in the Wall Street Journal Wednesday morning. The effort. It's putting forth called Stand with Asian Americans intends to raise $10 million to help document hate crimes, provide legal help for victims and research, the causes and solutions of anti Asian racism. The group includes founders and executives from Zoom YouTube Door Dash, Pinterest Stitch, Fix and Pellet on. I'm Nina

Nina Thorsen San Francisco Venture Dave Lew Atlanta Wall Street Journal Zoom Pinterest Youtube Nina
Employers and the pandemic effect

Clark Howard Show

02:01 min | Last week

Employers and the pandemic effect

"We gotta talk you know. Employers have used the pandemic as an excuse as a way of getting rid of people that are older workers and they been able to avoid any discrimination age discrimination oversight really by using the pandemic as a way of paring back workforce's really giving it a older employees them taking it on the chan in the crazy thing is the reality companies that do that end up lowering their future profitability. And they think they're so smart. Treating older workers like dirt and treating them as refuse or surplus and hiring somebody younger cheaper and yeah there are advantages at least immediately with payroll. But what a you moves you move the institutional memory. I've seen that in so many industries so many businesses where they decide they're going to pare payroll and they really go after the older workers and end up thinking that they're doing something really clever. They know it's sturdy but they think they're doing something clever but they end up hurting the company's very future well now to surprise the wall street journal wrote a report about why getting rid of the older workers is actually going to harm the american economy because the number of workers fifty five and older that are in the workforce right now is down to thirty eight percent

The Wall Street Journal
What's The Real Tea on Celebrity Beauty Brands?

Breaking Beauty Podcast

01:36 min | Last week

What's The Real Tea on Celebrity Beauty Brands?

"I think it's time to dive into our topic of the day and it's all about the real behind the latest celebrity brands that have come to light in the last year and i feel like in the last six months. It's been like every other day. You're seeing a celebrity step to get their piece of the beauty pie so in the last month even we've had covey skin debut in. That's from that model emily. Dj auto Haven't tried that yet. Gene are just confirmed to wall street journal Yesterday that she has a skincare line coming. Hebrews filed the trademark for road. It goes on and on and on fantasy harris dropping soon if the internet is to be believed and yesterday kris jenner and chrissy teigen launched a whole personal care home line of cleaning products. So it just doesn't stop so Why do you think this deluge of launches his happening right now. We would discuss day because we feel like celebrity brands was such a huge thing years ago when they will launching fragrances right and every snaps had a fragrance so like the thing to do and just kind of went silent i think with the rise of influences and influence a marketing and i guess people feel like they can trust influences. Moreover celebrities and mike percy kind of celebrities want a taste of that now they want to put the names backout. They still want to be the authority on beauty in general. I guess so. I think as far as skincare goes it seems such a surge in popularity especially over the last year of locked down and people wanting to expand with skin moon. I felt like everyone was of the pie.

Chrissy Teigen Kris Jenner Wall Street Journal Hebrews Emily Harris Mike Percy
Hospital price disclosure is the law not happening

Clark Howard Show

02:20 min | Last week

Hospital price disclosure is the law not happening

"Today's episode i wanna talk about hospital pricing. You know this is an area that is the probably the biggest problem in healthcare costs hospitals have conspired to prevent people to comparison shop. And if you look at where. the cost. medical care has skyrocketed in the last twenty years. It's all on the hospitals doctors not at all nurses not at all pharmaceuticals well. They're somewhat a problem but the whole ballgame has been the hospitals and the hospitals have fought every possible. Way doing what they're supposed to do which is give you the ability to comparison shop. They are required by law to allow you to know the price of a procedure based on your individual health care coverage you have insurance or what. It costs if you don't but do you know. An investigation exclusive investigation by the wall. Street journal found that hospitals are using code. Software developers have come up with to hide their pricing. So they're complying with the letter of the law. The pricing is there on the hospital websites but then they use coding to hide the prices. So when you go to comparison shop you can't this is disgusting. People have been fighting about obamacare since. What two thousand nine. twenty ten. Whatever and before obamacare during obamacare. Whatever comes after obamacare. The problem is not how we ensure people. The problem is all on the cost side. And it's all with these hospitals. They conspire against the best interests of our country.

Street Journal
News Corp. buys Houghton Mifflin Harcourt books division

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:25 sec | Last week

News Corp. buys Houghton Mifflin Harcourt books division

"An agreement to purchase the consumer arm of educational publisher Houghton Mifflin Hard court, which would mark the media companies second deal in less than a week. Deal without a portfolio of high profile novels. Monsters such as George Orwell, Philip Roth and J. R. Are talking to News Corp's Harken Paul HarperCollins Publishers division. The deal indicates that News Corp. Which in addition to Harper, Collins, owns Wall Street Journal and Market Watch publisher Dow

Houghton Mifflin Hard Court News Corp. J. R. Harken Paul Harpercollins Publ Philip Roth George Orwell Harper Collins Wall Street Journal Market Watch DOW
Suez Canal ship partially refloated

Sports X Radio

00:23 sec | Last week

Suez Canal ship partially refloated

"The shipping snarl at the Suez Canal gets untangled that skyscraper size ship that had been blocking the Suez Canal has been partially free by salvage crews. That's according to Bloomberg News and the Wall Street Journal. It's unclear at this point when the canal reopened for trade, but this is definitely huge relief as the narrow water route accounts for roughly 12% of global trade. That's folks is Marianne

Suez Canal Bloomberg News The Wall Street Journal Marianne
Investigations into New York governor Cuomo heat up as staff are subpoenaed

WBZ Afternoon News

00:58 sec | 2 weeks ago

Investigations into New York governor Cuomo heat up as staff are subpoenaed

"Guidance. The investigation into sexual harassment accusations against New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is heating up senior members of the governor's staff of no but subpoenaed by the state attorney general here, CBS is Christi collision. Cuomo Secretary Melissa Derosa's among the Albany officials subpoenaed an attorney general Tish James's investigation. Into a sexual assault allegations, according to the Wall Street Journal accuser and former aide analyst told the paper she was asked by investigators about Derosa's role is communications director in 2014 when less work for the governor list, said she didn't interact much with Derosa at the time. A state lawmaker says the separate impeachment probe into the governor is expanding. On top of looking into the sexual harassment accusations. They're examining now whether he unlawfully used his office to provide his family members with special access to scarce covert

Governor Andrew Cuomo Melissa Derosa Tish James Derosa Cuomo Christi CBS Albany New York Wall Street Journal
Report: New York AG Subpoenas Dozens Of Cuomo Aides In Sexual Harassment Investigation

Bloomberg Law

00:24 sec | 2 weeks ago

Report: New York AG Subpoenas Dozens Of Cuomo Aides In Sexual Harassment Investigation

"Into sexual harassment allegations against Governor Andrew Cuomo. Wall Street Journal reports Laetitia James has subpoena dozens of officials in the Cuomo administration. Almost top aide Melissa Derosa is reportedly among those to be subpoenaed earlier this month. Was being summoned, are requested to provide documents in connection to the harassment and misconduct accusations. Ah pushes on in New York City to get all city workers

Governor Andrew Cuomo Laetitia James Cuomo Administration Melissa Derosa Wall Street Journal New York City
New York AG subpoenas Cuomo officials in harassment probe

Masters in Business

00:22 sec | 2 weeks ago

New York AG subpoenas Cuomo officials in harassment probe

"The New York attorney general is taking a major step in the investigation into sexual Harassment allegations against Governor Andrew Cuomo. The Wall Street Journal reports Letitia James has subpoenaed dozens of officials in the Cuomo administration. Cuomo's top aide, Melissa Derosa, is reportedly among those to be subpoenaed earlier this month. Those being summoned are requested to provide documents and connection to the misconduct

Governor Andrew Cuomo Letitia James Cuomo Administration Melissa Derosa The Wall Street Journal New York Cuomo
Cuomo aides subpoenaed in sexual-harassment probe

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 2 weeks ago

Cuomo aides subpoenaed in sexual-harassment probe

"Attorney general's office has now subpoenaed dozens of officials in Governor Andrew Cuomo's administration requesting that they produced documents as part of the investigation into sexual harassment allegations against the governor. That's what the Wall Street Journal is reporting this morning. Three former female aides and to current female aides have accused Cuomo of sexual harassment or inappropriate behavior. He denies he did anything wrong.

Andrew Cuomo Wall Street Journal Cuomo
Ship Stuck in Suez Canal Threatens More Supply-Chain Disruptions

WSJ What's News

02:01 min | 2 weeks ago

Ship Stuck in Suez Canal Threatens More Supply-Chain Disruptions

"There's a massive traffic jam in the suez canal. A giant container ship got stuck in one of the world's busiest trading routes tuesday blocking the canal and leaving dozens of ships. waiting experts. Say even if the stuck ship is dislodged quickly the ripple effects of the logjam could last for days. Blockage comes at a challenging time with global supply. Chains already stretched joining me now. With the latest on efforts to dislodge the vessel and the economic impacts is wall street journal business editor for europe. Chip cummins chip. Thanks for being here prior marie so up on what's been happening. What do we know about how this ship got stuck. Where are we right now. We're not exactly sure how it got stuck. There's reports of strong gusty winds which sometimes happens in the canal. It's highly unusual to have winds so strong that you would essentially push the ship out of the channel and onto the beach and once that happens it can easily jack knife. That's exactly what's happened so that you have the bow in one end of the canal and the stern and the other which means no other ships can go in and out of that canal for the time being. And what's the current estimate as to when they can on ground. The ship late today as the sun set in cairo they were able to partially refloat the vessel so essentially. What they're doing is digging it out from the bank upon which it stuck and then it will float on the water again once. There's water underneath the whole so. They've partially done that. They're going to have to finish that job tomorrow and that could take you know hours. Maybe another day. We're not exactly sure. Tell us what the impact has been so far on traffic since the ship has been stuck. Traffic has had to grind to a halt. It's a narrow channel. The ships that were already in the canal are pretty much halted not making way ships. That hadn't entered the canal will be hiding in front of the

Suez Canal Jack Knife Wall Street Journal Marie Europe Cairo
U.S. government to respond to SolarWinds hackers

Cyber Security Headlines

02:48 min | 2 weeks ago

U.S. government to respond to SolarWinds hackers

"Us government calls for better information sharing in wake of solar winds exchange attacks. The biden administration is seeking new methods for better early threat detection of sophisticated intrusions. Such as solar winds and the exploits of the microsoft exchange server vulnerabilities. Both of these were uncovered by private firms specifically fireeye and microsoft. Both attacks originated on servers within the us placing them out of reach of the national security agency's powerful detection capabilities which us law restricts to international activities the proposed new initiative is destined to meet substantial opposition especially among private sector firms which fear damage to reputation potential data loss in working closely with the government hospitals hide pricing data from search results. Hospitals said are published their previously confidential prices to comply with the new federal rule of also blocked that information from web searches with special coating embedded on their websites. According to a wall street journal examination the information must be disclosed under a federal rule aimed at making the one trillion dollar sector more consumer friendly but of hospitals have embedded the code in their websites to prevent google and other search engines from displaying pages with the price lists according to the wall street journal examination of more than thirty one hundred sites when confronted some hospitals claim the coding to have been a legacy issue and quickly removed it new android zero day. Vulnerability is under active attack. Google has disclosed that a now patch vulnerability affecting android devices that use qualcomm chipsets is being weaponized adversaries to launch targeted attacks. Tracked as see the twenty twenty dash eleven to sixty one with a cvs s of four. The flaw concerns and improper input validation in qualcomm's graphics components that could be exploited to trigger memory corruption when an attacker engineered app requests access to a large chunk of the device's memory. The access vector for vulnerability is local meaning. That exploitation does require local access to device to deliver malicious code and set off the attack. Chain ransomware bank tells customers it lost their social security numbers flagstar. They bank based in michigan. That was hacked in january of this year has now revealed that customers as well as people who never had an account with the bank had their social security numbers. Other personal information stolen this is a correction and update to their initial statements. In which they said only employees information had been stolen. One victim of the breach said he has never been a flagstar customer but had taken a mortgage with a different bank who then sold it to flagstar without his consent in two thousand

Biden Administration Fireeye Microsoft Wall Street Journal National Security Agency Qualcomm United States Google Flagstar CVS Michigan
"the wall street journal" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

06:18 min | 3 months ago

"the wall street journal" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"A major de cluttering project that can be emotional as Ellen Byron of The Wall Street Journal tells us it's Not all that easy for some of us to get rid of unnecessary items. Ellen How is the pandemic affected our relationship with clutter? Well, I spoke with a de clutter expert who says that people tend to go into one of two categories. Either they started stockpiling and they have more clutter than ever in their homes or We've been at home more than usual looking at everything in their home and can't stand being around it anymore. And those people have seen the need for perhaps some more space, so they're clearing things out. Yes. In many ways, people are looking at their homes and trying to make it more functional. Ah, lot of families have to turn their homes in the schools and offices, places to exercise places to relax places to enjoy a leisurely meal that they might have otherwise head in a restaurant, for example. And so as we rethink how our homes are functioning, people are desperate to find more space. And so what? This expert just Marcie explained to our readers. Is that that process of de cluttering can actually be quite an emotional one. Why? Well, she called certain items de cluttering landmines, and that's because we can be clearing out. Let's say a garage or a closet. Suddenly find an object that stops the whole process. And that's because that object, it could be a piece of paper. It could be a shirt. It could be some sort of my mental, but it brings back a flood of memories It brings back and experience good or bad. That can suddenly make us district did and unable to make a decision about whether to keep it or topic. We're speaking with Ellen Byron of The Wall Street Journal, Ellen What does she suggest steps to take when tackling clutter? She has several picks, and some of the biggest ones are recognized The land mine when you come across it, If you do see something that is emotional, it has Some sort of big emotional reaction in you. Just put it aside. Put those boxes that might make you cry in the one spot and keep going. If you don't know where to start, she suggests to simply open in a closet with your eyes closed and grabbing the first thing If that is an emotionally easy thing to deal with You either keep or toss do that and then move on to the next thing and just try to start with emotionally easy objects and then eventually you'll strengthen what she calls your de cluttering muscle. And that's really your skill set of deciding whether to keep or let go of something and then Ultimately, at the end of your project, you'll be able to more easily deal with those emotional objects that are in your home. Ellen does. She then suggests that when you deal with something sentimental or things tied up with grief, you also approach the approach of the same way and set it aside till the end. Yeah, and when you know that you are going to be dealing with some of those A more emotional things like, for example, inherited items or someone you love has passed away and you're trying to clear their belongings. Plan ahead. If you know that you're going to need some support from a therapist plan a unum point mint for that time period or reach out to a friend or spouse and say This is my plan for the afternoon. I'm going to need some support. Order in dinner. If you meet you that they just do what you need to do The have support that you can count on ahead of time. And that makes this process Ah lot. Of you. No more efficient. Has it gotten worse? Because we sit at home now in order junk that we don't need online. Yes, there are so many easy ways to bring objects into the home. We don't even have to show a credit card any more. We can do it with some print on a phone. We don't have to leave the home and often when people are feeling nervous about their safety, those stockpile supplies that they might not actually need. Um In many ways, the whole skill of decluttering is a new skill set that we need to learn because our parents and grandparents didn't necessarily have to do this. Good are so much more inexpensive and they were a generation ago. And because of that, we simply have or stuff to contend with. So we have more belongings, more items flowing into our home and we have blowing out We get what Just Marcie calls a cause in our home. We have to fix that. And so she recommends, when people are working with her to stop bringing anything except the most essential items into your home for that decluttering period to really try to get Arm or belongings out of your home than in and then once you are now living fully and comfortably in your space, then you can decide whether more can come in. That's Wall Street Journal reporter Ellen Byron with this weekend's Jennifer Cash Enka 30 minutes now, after the hour On this weekend. Hey, everyone, you little stop what we're doing right now and take a moment. That felt good, huh? Just like that. We had a nice special sort of moment together. Of course, they don't all need to be quiet moments to be special that they could be loud moments. Goofy moments. Sporty moments, dorky moments, moments where we talked, or walk or just Hang out. It doesn't really matter. They all count because every time Dad's like us take a moment like that to spend with our kids. Well, it's pretty momentous. Sounds like somebody agrees..

cluttering Ellen Byron The Wall Street Journal Ellen Marcie Ellen What Jennifer Cash Enka reporter
"the wall street journal" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:41 min | 4 months ago

"the wall street journal" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Also I have been talking about the top of the hour. We talked about a woman. Same thing at a mass in the kidney, except their doctors and tower shot anything until she came here, and I was able to review her records. I could tell you that 90% of the patients who come here. I tell them information about their own body that they never knew before. Well, now we know from The Wall Street Journal. Past week that says a story written by Corinne Ram Me that the New Jersey governor film or if he's going to have surgery to remove cancer on his kidney, drew the kidney or part of the kidneys as a Left kidney cancer is gonna have surgery, he says. The prognosis is good. I'm grateful to my doctors to find it early was three centimeters. It's not that early. It's not that early because three centimeters you could find a winner's one centimeter or two centimeters. You can find it. Possibly when there's blood in the urine you confined to, possibly when there's AH Uh, bleeding or pain and well, he writes that Mr Murphy's can't doctors discovered three centimeter tumor during a routine checkup. And the fact of me removes the kidney and, well, he's 62 years old. He took office in 2018 succeeded the Republican governor, Chris Christie. He was a Goldman Sachs executive. He hadn't had office before he was U. S ambassador to Germany. Well, what they don't talk about is whether the doctors there told them about all the options because maybe he doesn't want to lose his kidney or part of his kidney. Maybe should learn about radio surgery. Maybe should learn about non invasive treatment..

kidney cancer Chris Christie Goldman Sachs Mr Murphy Corinne Ram The Wall Street Journal cancer New Jersey Germany
"the wall street journal" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

04:49 min | 7 months ago

"the wall street journal" Discussed on WTVN

"Is typically a season of revival. Right Is people return to work Children had to school sports seasons Launch and cultural life awakens this year, with the Corona virus pandemic still spreading in much of the U. S. It is a season off deeper adaptation. It's a story by ARI on Campo Flores, reporter at the Wall Street Journal, Ari on what's happening? You think of fall a cz this time. That's kind of like a pivot point for people, right? You're coming out of Summer. You maybe had a vacation. You're getting back into work getting re energized for for the last quarter of the year. They're going back to school. Cultural life picks back up Cities come backto life. There's all these sort of markers that people normally associate with a fall and That's just Not the case, And I think that there's this kind of generalized sense among people that You know this all of these, um this kind of scrambling that people did in the spring and the summer. To adjust their lives to this reality, um, is now something that needs to become more permanent or at least more long term. I think there's this realization that were in this four months more to come. And so they're you know, whatever those adjustments were that you were making Maybe thinking, like, okay, maybe, but it's on fall comes around. Things will be sort of still be some more semblance of normal normalcy. That's not the case. And so there's more. There's um or a deeper adjustment that's underway. Alright, explain what this couple in Seattle is doing that you talk to there both software developers for Amazon with their story. Right. So this is a young couple. They live in Seattle. They're both software developers of they had been working remotely, you know, through the spring in the summer. But again kind of doing it in this sort of temporary basis, right, so she was working at the kitchen table. Doing sometimes three hour online tutorials because she does instruction ATT. The company Ah, And so that would prevent her husband for being able to like, move into that space of the house. When she was doing that he couldn't make himself lunch. It was toward the end of the day, and she was having a late session. You want to be able to, like, Get in tow Turn on the TV. Her back was starting to hurt because of the dining chair that she was working on. And so they had this kind of realization that like, Look, we're Clearly nothing is changing any time soon. We're in this for the long haul. And so they're now doing, you know, a more, uh, sort of substantive makeover in their house. She's creating a home office in a guest room. He's creating a home office in the den. And now they've got carved out there, You know different work spaces with more comfortable chairs and appropriately appointed desks and the like, Speak with Ari on Campo Flores, reporter at The Wall Street Journal. He's written a piece about Americans reinventing the fall during the pandemics. It's normally it's ah, time of revival on the other coast here. You also talk to this commercial real estate firm in Tampa, Florida. What are they doing? So. So this is the the Florida offices of Jll Big commercial real estate company. And you know fall for them is You know the period after Labor Day is a real significant reset for them in normal years. You know again, People come back re energized. This is typically the busiest quarter. For them of their clients kind of re engage their workforce comes back to, you know, nearly 100% on DH. That's a different picture thiss time around. So even though their offices they have eight offices across Florida. Even though those have been open since June. There's still only at about a quarter occupancy in those offices. A lot of people still Working remotely and so The Florida market director, whom I spoke to said that you know he's having to go through different sort of exercise is to make sure that his workforce Is engaged and energized. Sorry on Wall Street Journal reporter Ari on Campo Flores 21 minutes now in front of the hour on this weekend. A CZ. You get back to business. Small things can make a big difference. Like marking safe distances of floor tape and posting reminders to wash hands. As always, Granger is here to help.

Campo Flores Florida The Wall Street Journal reporter Ari Seattle Amazon Granger Tampa director Jll Big
"the wall street journal" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

05:51 min | 7 months ago

"the wall street journal" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"People have more free time on their hands and are taking on these home projects of Installing their own pool for the time being plans a Disney world or canceled their community pool. Their neighborhood pool is out of commission this summer because of the virus. So there You gotta distract kids some way. Patrick Thomas of the Wall Street Journal on trending above ground pools and why some owners are getting into hot water. Scientists have warned of a pandemic for decades. Yet when Covad 19 arrived, the world had few resource is and little understanding. Betsy McKay, senior writer at The Wall Street Journal, has done a deep dive on the reasons why Let's see. What did you do here? Well, we went back. You know more than 20 years to look at basically how the threat of a pandemic and certainly the threat of epidemics. Has grown over the years and you know they were there had been warnings going back for decades. Now ever since. You know some of these new viruses, most of which come from animals. Charitably emerging. But we kept going from epidemic epidemic and making a few changes along the way, but not really taking a comprehensive approach and doing everything you need to do to prevent situation like the one we're in. So why is it that we wind up being reactive all the time? It seems and not proactive. Well, that's a philosophical and a psychological Christians. In addition, feel policy questions in a part of it is human nature, right? It You know, it's hard to imagine what could happen, but but on a policy level, um it's it's very hard to get government. And how political leaders scientifically there's to commit. Um, money and time to a high consequence, low probability events as they call it, You know that will happen is likely to happen sometime. You just don't know when and the likelihood of that happening is at any given time is low, so people it's something you can push off until tomorrow. Signified. See McKay, senior writer at The Wall Street Journal. She's written a piece entitled A Deadly Corona virus was inevitable. Why was no one ready? Some of the other factors you put together here to about funding warning systems, the role of the World Health Organization, China's communication, I'd explain some of that. Well, you know, One problem is that as a globe, we never has really figured out how to go on an international level, prevent and Um Uh, respond to epidemics. The world for Health organization is the organization that does that, But they're way underfunded. I mean, like Wayne hunted and most of the money in their budget. Is earmarked for specific project. Polio eradication is a big one. And a lot of the polio work does help build helps the stones, which also help you, you know, detect other other passages, so there's crossover but essentially Has never been a union nations coming together and working together and also, you know. Ah. A lot of this prepared just has to be done by the national government. But again, they're all individually under pressure. You know, they have budgets to manage a lot of needs. You know if you've got a big Ah, hurricane disaster to respond to right now. Versus the the threat of Ah sort of nebulous of a pandemic happening sometime with your money going to go, and that just keeps happening over and over. She's Yeah. All right, so a cz we all know and believe at this point. I believe this won't be our last pandemic. So what about next time? I know there are lessons learned here. But do we put them to use and try to somehow prepare What's the big question, isn't it? I mean, some people say you know what Now the world has learned if he will never make this mistake again. As, uh, as a partial sceptic or sometimes skeptic. I wonder, you know, when push comes to show way certainly will be more than we've done. But what we do enough You know it. It really takes changing the mind said a lot of people I have spoken with who were in government and leave these efforts have said, you really need to start Viewing. Um, epidemic emerging disease as as akin to a military sweat and you need to prepare. For them in that way, so not for addicts. Funding really need to invest in this as a nd wit of a national security issue, not kind of a side scientific issue, and things will come along as they come along. It's really like war. So when you look at it that way, you know we certainly have a long way. Go. The other thing is month of the the world of Pandemic Preparedness has been focused on a flu pandemic, preparing for a flu pandemic. And again much of that work. Those prepare you for any kind of pandemic, so so this is actually happening right under our nose work. We weren't Putting the money into it that we needed to put into to fully understand the extent of the problem. Thanks. Betsy. Betsy McKay, senior writer at the Wall Street Journal. 13. Minutes now, after the hour on this morning, America's first news Mystery.

Betsy McKay World Health Organization The Wall Street Journal writer Covad Disney Wayne polio Patrick Thomas Wall Street Journal. China America flu
"the wall street journal" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

05:10 min | 9 months ago

"the wall street journal" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"A recent nationwide study found that 78% of fifth through eighth grade girls Feel more lonely and isolated since the pandemic began. The same is true of older teens. The study, conducted in May by the Rocks Institute also found that off the younger girls in that study ages 10 to 14 a third or spending four or more hours a day on social media. An in depth look at their loneliness from Julie Jargon who writes a column for The Wall Street Journal called Family and Tech. Julie. What are we learning? So there's an organization that works with with a girl, and they did a nationwide survey in May to ask the question. Have you felt more lonely or isolated school closed in March, and what they found is that 79% of the total group 78% of slightly younger subset of girls said that they do feel a lot lonelier than they did before the pandemic. She's our girls more sensitive, sensitive to this, the boys You know, it's hard to know there just haven't been a lot of research on the lowing of the boys there. There have been more on girls. There was a big day in the Wall Street Journal actually, a year ago. By the author of Reviving Ophelia, which was a book about adolescent girls. And I think it was a 20 to 25 year old book that they were updating for the current age and in their research a year ago, they found that girls were experiencing Record high level the loneliness, anxiety and depression. You know, well before the pandemic and so looking at the results Now it looks like this is really worsened for The girls who have been in some degree of lock down the school. Shut down. All right. So you open the story talking about this 10 year old girl named Emerson Chrisman. What's What's her story? What you're going through. So she and her family have been pretty strictly isolating ever since school shutdown in March, they they quarantined with one set of grand parents for a while and then with another. On and in particular one set of grandparents. The grandmother is from Italy and were particularly sensitive to the situation in Italy with that parents spend part of their time is here. Um and so to protect the grand parents in particular they they really tried to limit their interactions with others and also being out of state for a few months visiting the different relatives. Emerson with away from her friends and feeling lonely and the situation really was exacerbated when she found out that many of her friends family, we're being a bit more permissive as some of the state regulations. Restrictions lifted, Um friends started to get together and she was in a different group text with them and thought them talking about their plans of getting together and doing things that she normally would have done during the summer with her friends, So that really just magnified her feeling of being like I'm the only one stuck at home. That was really you know, that's really hard for her. We're speaking with Julie Jargon, she writes the family and tech column for The Wall Street Journal. Her pieces called Lonely Girls, How the Pandemic has deepened the isolation. Of adolescence. There was somebody in your story, too, or a stat that said more time on social media can be harmful. But even now, even when one of the kids need to see friends and talk to them, yeah, sort of a double dared, you know, On the one hand, it's allowed people to stay connected during this time. But and the experts I spoke with said that it also can make people feel more isolated because the pictures they're seeing of, you know, the friends going out and getting, you know, going out together can make them feel Like they're the only ones who aren't able to go out on day. Also, you know they're together, but they're little not, um, You know, it's kind of there this kind of situation where you know kids texting each other the communicating over social media, But they're not having actual conversations with each other, even just over the phone and that you know nothing really. The places that in person contact where he really developed the social skills and bonds, and especially for the younger girl kind of the 10 to 14 year old Uh, maybe there first, you know time dabbling in social media. Obviously, there's no playbook for this. But is there any kind of general guidance that the experts are offering here with some of the guidance has been foreign credit look, crisis of loneliness. Um, you know, recommending to go spend more time with other girl face to face, so they spend more time outside of the home and try to game more independence from their parents. Take more list in order to develop skills on their own. Makes Julie Julie jargon. She writes the family and tech column for The Wall Street Journal. 30 minutes now, after the hour on this weekend. Hey away news. Radio Time is 5 30 Police are looking for a suspect in the killing of a nine year old boy in Chicago. A child was playing.

Emerson Chrisman Julie Julie Julie Jargon The Wall Street Journal Rocks Institute Italy Chicago The Wall Street Journal.
"the wall street journal" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:26 min | 9 months ago

"the wall street journal" Discussed on KOMO

"The Wall Street Journal reports the work from home phase could last until next July. Target will stay closed on Thanksgiving this year. The Minneapolis based retail chain said today. It will stay closed on Turkey Day, adding, this isn't the year for crowds. Target's decision follows Walmarts announcement that will keep its doors closed on the holiday as well. Starting this week. Those on unemployment will be getting smaller checks. The extra $600 weekly federal unemployment benefit has expired. Congress is working to extend it. Congressman Henry Cuellar, who's a Democrat, says they're in negotiations with Republicans according to plan We should have an agreement that will hopefully send unemployment benefits. Send money also for small businesses. This is part of the so called Heroes Act, which Republicans currently oppose. The package also includes extending the moratorium on many evictions. Wall Street stocks or higher this morning. The Dow up 133 S and P is up about 20. NASDAQ up 121. We'll get to your traffic and weather Next. Come on news time. 7 50 What do your status updates? Say? You're learning a new language going all organic instead of typing your feelings. What if you could put them into action by creating a network to help keep kids off the streets in a country like our media or in Honduras, bringing See into the classroom or on a farm in Tanzania, helping stem the world's food crisis by creating a sustainable agricultural program. What if every ounce of your being helped update the status of a person and in turn, they did the same for you? Would this be enough social interaction is that's only the beginning of something larger life is calling. How far will you go? Peace Corps Get in Active at peace corps dot gov slash game. My husband, Alex has C was hit by an IED in Afghanistan. I was playing man on foot patrol on the bomb legs left hand explosion and he suffered a severe traumatic brain injury. A zm Erica's Veterans Face Challenges D a There are so many mountains to climb, and we do it together. With the right support More veterans Khun.

Target Congressman Henry Cuellar Peace Corps The Wall Street Journal Minneapolis Congress Alex Tanzania Afghanistan Honduras
"the wall street journal" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:06 min | 11 months ago

"the wall street journal" Discussed on KCRW

"The Wall Street journal's automotive critic it was very popular to imagine is a ranch vehicle as a as an alternative to the horse what was the the radio and later TV shows Roger show starring Roger king of the cowboys some king of the cowboys have a comic sidekick who drove and talked to his jeep name Nellie bell well at least you can boil down the hill then in the nineteen eighties the military got the home fee the wide distinctive looking Hummer had a high profile role in the first Gulf War end got a star turn on the American highway after a certain actors lobbied the manufacturer to sell it to civilians hostilities the baby the terminator himself Arnold Schwarzenegger again automotive critic Dan Neil was war brought home it was a war making machine available to ordinary drivers a jeep as a cultural object people I self identify with the independence the freedom all of the the meanings that are associated with jeep and Homer Humvee also as a different set of banks a different set of association some love the civilian version some hated it was hard to drive and park in Dalzell fuel the military version has a harsh ride and cramped interior the air conditioning often feels worse it's vulnerable to roadside bombs Neil the automotive critic spent time in Humvees and rack in the U. S. the Humvee drove like badly designed agricultural equipment if I were a farmer and I bought a tractor that drove like Bambi I would have taken it back to the tractor company and said I want my money back now though the military has started to replace Humphries with the J. L. T. V. or joint light tactical vehicle just before the pandemic struck in US special operations command took delivery of some including this one the specialist name Gerrit just first names for special operations.

The Wall Street journal Roger king Nellie bell Hummer Arnold Schwarzenegger Humphries J. L. T. V. US Dalzell Gerrit
"the wall street journal" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"the wall street journal" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"The Wall Street journal has a look at this sub culture of subtext if he calls it John this is about a lot of people are familiar with closed captioning because they see it on the bottom of the screen when they're at the gym working out order at the bar watching the game did you know that the transcription of what's being said on the screen of course that's there for deaf or hard of hearing hearing audiences and it's been there for a long time but I am writing about the kind of lifestyle choice but a lot of people are choosing to use closed captions just as a way to enhance their viewing experience these are people who don't need it we are just fine but really sort of pushed her to have that kind of text crawl across their screen because they they just kind of had to the viewing experience without understanding what's happening on screen that's funny you wrote about this because I I want my daughter was watching TV the other day I think she was watching Netflix program and she had the subtitles the closed captioning is a wiry white when you turn that off that distracting signal light to help me understand like what some people are saying like if they're mumbling or don't have an accent or something like that I thought that and how old is how old is your daughter so she's fifteen size school sophomore I thought this was my question to you is is this a young people thing I believe it is that and that my theory I mean the story is not really about this but it kind of became about this for me and reporting it because it really does seem like it could become a generational change and you would think it would be both the order already in half possibly some hearing loss that are relying on this stuff but what I'm finding and I found story almost everyone I interviewed for this story you know in their twenties or you know TV then and I've found that it's really become a shift in the way that young people are doing that I think they're picking up from each other but there's also just this this complete format change for the way we interact with stuff interactive media especially on the internet for like about being online we're we're on social media we see these names pop up there's always little captioned photo the watching clips online a lot of those clips are captured because they know people watching with the sound off at the school through their Twitter feed on your Instagram feed or what have you sell captioned images have just become part of the landscape and for officially young viewers just a part of the way they interpret the world also a lot of young viewers I talked to say that it just helps with their attention issues you know they may not be diagnosed with ADHD or something like that but they feel that they're just kind of always processing lots of different things the same time whether they're getting the phone while watching TV or just wanted to get a better grasp what they were your viewing so it's become kind of standard among young people as far as I found out that John Jorgenson reporter at the Wall Street journal it is six minutes now in front of the hour on this weekend coming up next what tattoo artists are doing for front line medical professionals during the pandemic.

The Wall Street journal John
"the wall street journal" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"the wall street journal" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"The Wall Street journal it was stunning to realize how easy it was to find people who weren't very quietly mourning the loss of some personal milestones no one was complaining per se because they realize that all of these cancellations are for the greater good but there is some quiet heartbreak happening I spoke with a high school senior one of the captains of the basketball team her name is Morgan able and she had helped her basketball team in Farmington Minnesota get into the state championship for the first time in the school's history and on a Thursday night he received she said the biggest thrill over life which was winning the semi final and then Friday morning championship final was canceled so she won't ever feel what that would have been like being in a state championship game with teammates who have been her friends into the fourth grader held that was just a quiet moment of heartbreak for her and her teammates another one that was interesting that you mention in your article funerals talk about how that one is affecting people I spoke with a man who lives in a New York area and his father was in hospice care and he and his family were trying to figure out what channel arrangements made the most sense his father what he described as a larger than life kind of guy and had tons of friends and was a lifelong New Yorker you knew so many people and your regionally worried about overflow crowd at the funeral home and then as alarm grows over the corona virus in Nigeria the downside to our rooms for just a hundred and then they finally realized that they wouldn't be able to hold a gathering and when they called to cancel and after some painful deliberations the funeral home told them we had to stop offering any services and so yesterday they were planning to hold a burial for the father just went down we never and rather than gather after the burials are on lunch they decided to do it virtually and certainly they hope to plan a memorial lunch at a later date but all of that immediate sense of community that you get in the morning process isn't happening this time around at the very drastically cancel their plans and I will say and I talked to lots of different people in different moments being disrupted all of them expressed how complicated it is to figure out how you do you feel about this because you realize that there's far bigger tragedies unfolding and that all of this is indeed for the greater good but yet you do still have some sense of disappointment that plans you thought you had in place more very much destructive another one pregnancies and births I have a friend who I think she's due early mid April so she has to give birth in this time right now practicing social distancing and how do you operate when your whole family wants to come over and celebrate that new life I agree and you have a very limited moment in time where your baby is a newborn and so often you want to gather those closest to you around to share some of that and also probably get a little help and certainly any kind of gatherings are really avoided right now I did talk to a woman who lives in Miami and she had her first baby on March tenth and she had to rely on a facetime call to tell her father about it and also about naming her daughter after her father's mother and so a moment that would have been quite treasured by both of them in person instead happens over a phone call and plans for a naming ceremony for the daughter and a newborn photo session and as well as some close family coming by to visit all of those plans have been changed again because of that and all these things will eventually take place but the baby won't be fifty years old anymore Ellen Byron reporter at the Wall Street journal thank you very much for joining us thanks for having me you're listening to the daily died this weekend edition I'm Oscar Mayers and we'll be right back your four oh one K. could be a wild ride as for writing it out to retirement it may not.

The Wall Street journal
"the wall street journal" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"the wall street journal" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"The Wall Street journal says the bad conditions forced resorts to cancel reservations ask for low interest state loans and call on every bit of ingenuity at their disposal to salvage what they could he visited lake Winnebago Ashish Jonah defined yeah this terrible year up in the northern Minnesota they icing of the huge business up there and they just got too much now it did it blanketed the ice early on the ends of the ice wouldn't grow because of the cold air couldn't get to it and eventually they got a huge storm right after Christmas and that cracked the ice which allowed the water to seep in and you basically had about two feet a splash out there so it's just a disaster at the start of the busiest time of the year for these ice fishing resorts while arts you've visited this link will be gosh in in Minnesota yeah click on the link Winnie some of the things that are going on there well at the resort you know where we're really stuck they had to cancel some reservations they had to tell the people that normally would come and drive out on the ice in the pay like a date see that they just couldn't do it because there wasn't enough enough ice out there normally by January you'd have like two feet of beautiful eyes and then any snow that came along they would use like a regular snow plow cleared off and they would you know each resort would create about twenty or thirty miles of networks of roads for people to drive around to check different sleep positions by us and you know set up there set up their equipment but this year you know right at the right when everybody was coming in to catch walleye and northern pike you know they they just really couldn't get on the ice because of the because of all the snow eventually there would be like a frozen layer on top of the flash and you could get like a tracked vehicle out there but not like a car some of the resorts were like shuttling people out to to the fish houses on the on the little tracked vehicles and they were calling brought me ice just to you know to give it a catchy name but you know they weren't getting the big numbers of people just because the the ice couldn't support it he's speaking with Joe Barrett senior mid west correspondent at the Wall Street journal his pieces called on thin ice too much slush makes ice fishing a risky business he visited northern Minnesota specifically a lake called lake Winnebago Ashish reading your report it made it seem like a part of the business during this winter was trucks having to pull other trucks out of the cracked icers service giving way so these guys were really you know still trying to put the roads and and and you know they would go sometimes with just one or two trucks like truck lengths and then break into the ice the death to get pulled out and then then wait a couple days for that that soft spot to harden up again and then they drive over that hard spot to go as far as they could and crashed so you know it was tough I mean there there were trucks going down to the bottom of the lake there was you know enough sort of floating material out there to keep them up on the surface but you know they they would keep getting stuck because of so much slash Jo Jo Barrett senior Midwest correspondent at the Wall Street journal visiting lake Winnebago Ashish I just want to say that again six.

The Wall Street journal
"the wall street journal" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"the wall street journal" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"The Wall Street journal this piece is called the bumps in the road leaving the airports are to this is gotten very confusing I guess in many places very congested as well with like that yeah ride hailing what's going on yeah well there's a lot of things going on it is interesting one of the things are going on in the burden lifted sort of made peace with hertz and avis and and so are the neighbors are now renting cars on the cheap uber lift drivers puts puts more drivers out there in you know decent cars and and and for the driver there on the wear and tear down their car or the capital expense of buying a car things like that so that that's put more drivers on the road airport in in you know a lot of their businesses at the airport obviously the room for the rental car guys but also for the ride hailing firms very important to them and often the first place somebody start using uber or left and then you have the the airport who are trying to figure out what the things one is the congestion you mentioned and so we've seen several big airport move them to a remote a lot sometimes where you have to write a bot the rental car guys have kind of been pushing for that because they're in a remote widen native almost always our airports looking to hammer uber lift or or to create some sort of favoritism for the rental car companies well you know there are any hammering the rental car companies with huge charges and it's not just for their consolidated rental car facility to use the you know if they have one of those is a separate charge for that but there is a concession fees and they you know all kinds the name form and certainly local cities and communities have seen rental car people as a piggy bank for years I mean some and you know sometimes the record you're paying for the local sports stadium so that's always been a source of revenue I think they're looking at this do you burn let's say they're looking headed to hammer hammer on there but I think they would say they're really trying to level the playing field there you work there is a there is a cost to this and the cost is growing in the car you know and what they can do it for example when you you dedicate a large space to burn lifting you're providing bus service to get people there and a lot of labor in attendance to move traffic and control button and you are dedicating real estate to this there's a cost to all that and so the airport would say well we were less want to do business here they gotta pay just like everybody else Scott McCartney of the Wall Street journal with this morning's Gordon deal it's coming up on thirty minutes after the hour on this morning America's first news from the critics decided Minnesota weather center today partly cloudy this morning becoming mostly cloudy this afternoon we'll get about thirty six in Minneapolis St Paul today.

The Wall Street journal
"the wall street journal" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"the wall street journal" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"They're all facing disconnects in large numbers for pay TV. The Wall Street Journal has an investigative article about what happens if you are a customer of AT and T is direct TV how they will lie and cheat you nine every case. But you gotta have your ear wariness fully there when you try to cancel direct TV the employee specifically are incentivized. That they make more money for keeps. And keep when somebody calls to disconnect, and they convince you to stay, and so employees will apparently why do you offer you things to stay that aren't real? They will tell you. You're disconnected when they're not or if they can tell that, you're not gonna take no for an answer. And you are gonna disconnect or they got it backwards take. Yes. For an answer that they will drop your call. So you won't be able to disconnect. The problem is reported by many insiders at AT and T that they are under this intense pressure AT and T says well, there may be a few people doing that. But we're not gonna let anybody do that to you. And that's not really going to be a problem. Well. What I want you to know is that when you were dumping pay-tv from any source because you're going to streaming or cutting the cord, whatever you wanna call it. You want an Email confirming? That you have in fact properly cancelled if they tell you they don't do that you want to tell them they're on a recorded line. And you record them saying that you in fact are disconnected as such and such date. Should you have to do all this? Why is it you can sign up online? But you have to talk to a human who will do everything they can to not let you quit a service because companies lack that moral and ethical compass and are trying to keep customers. So if you're going to let people sign up online, you should cancel online periods. Simple. But you want proof if they if they offer you something good enough that you think? Well, okay. We'll stay another year. You need something in writing confirming that. Because remember if employees are under so much pressure.

AT The Wall Street Journal
"the wall street journal" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"the wall street journal" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"I will you come. We'll we'll give you a school and that school will determine what your experience will be and what kind of things go into that propensity score. What what what impacts it? Yes, broadly, speaking, this is about sixty five variables are in the metal through all of them. You'll be the night. But I mean, it's broadly speaking this fast party in third party, data the first party data. Not surprisingly, the most powerful, you know, you'll visitation count of plays plays a big role, and the device type that you're on you know, you on desktop or your mobile are you on I s or you on Android? They player they play a role the types of content that you consume can. Can play a role. And then when you start thinking about third party signals, you know, where you live, right? So we'll see we can we invite your location, and actually where you live has a huge bearing on whether you're going to subscribe on because then you can infer educational attainment. I'm you can infer household income, etc. Etc. And actually areas what the densely populated have a we'll score highly. So there's not there's not one signal that because if it was just one signal, then you wouldn't need a propensity model that one signal right? So it is a broad range. And they're not a not all of those signals going to be relevant for everyone, which is the suppose the complex nature of the model is the it is designed to be a individual skull people in individual. So why why does this model work best for the journal versus say a meter model? A lot. People now are are new to the to the subscriptions, and they're going with some version of a meter because the hard paywall was thought to be too blunt and the meter is you know, it's like the in between choice. Yeah. I'm always the metoo still assumes that everybody needs the same amount of exposure to that content still setting a rule based on the content and not necessarily on the on the customer. Right. So basically, this is just a lot more flexible and targeted and sort of more nuance to the user right in well confusing as far as like to the user like, I'm not sure what I get you know, as a non subscriber. And what I don't get because the product is different based on who I am. And who who someone else's or what device I'm on? And I mean the lottery the the products the same the experience. Inexperienced will. Yeah. I'm. And listen, we of course, when we subscription I so that's like it's like, well, this is our business. I don't think it will be a surprise to people to run into a paywall. The Wall Street Journal Reich is running around for a while. And actually the experience the customer experience present Phil when he different to what it was right? Because when you came to the Street Journal, though, still some content Peyton some content. You know, free an away doing now is being more selective with with how. And where we do that sampling. Do you find an I know they're it depends. There's there's so many signals, but it would seem to me that someone has to hit the the the wall a certain number of times generally before they're like, okay. Here's my credit card. Got me a frequency frequency is..

Phil The Wall Street Journal Street Journal Peyton Reich
"the wall street journal" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"the wall street journal" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"The Wall Street Journal recently disclosed on their opinion page that the securities and Exchange Commission while trying to regulate risk on Wall Street is actually making matters worse and stock markets more risky new liquidity rule. Make the next financial crisis. Even worse. Whether a mutual fund full stocks bonds or something more exotic it is an investment product, not a Bank account, but financial regulators are again trying to create an illusion of safety around Wall Street. The government has also synthetically misled investors into thinking money market mutual funds as safe as Bank deposits by incorrectly. Suggesting values of the underlying securities never fluctuate. Now, the plans to repeat these catastrophic mistakes like creating a new liquidity regimen that is bound to full some investors into thinking. There are no liquidity risk mutual funds. The SEC one provided general guidelines on liquidity issues and its new proposed rules could be destructive. Will require mutual funds to classify its underlying securities into one of six liquidity categories that would be convertible to cash within a number of days ranging from one business day to more than thirty calendar days. Market more and more mutual fund. Investments could land into the illiquid category and become insolvent market rout. Pick celery as the proposed guidelines prevents falling assets from being sold funds carry risks, including liquidity risks misleading. People into thinking risk can be controlled by regulation would be another SEC disservice to investors the rescinded existing guidelines and advise investors that mutual funds are inherently risky, mom and pop shoot avoid risky mutual funds until the unbridled risk taking on Wall Street is eliminated main street..

The Wall Street Journal SEC Exchange Commission government
"the wall street journal" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"the wall street journal" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Us in helping food for. The. Poor, eight five five three three o h p, okay, meanwhile back to this issue on pulling security clearances look The Wall Street. Journal. Had, a an editorial where they didn't like the, idea The headline for, the the the editorials lead. Editorial today it says dumb idea of the week and the week is young come on Says revoking clearances. As petty Here's here's the. Way they write about it they, say someone should have. Said that's a dumb idea we'll make us look petty and it won't accomplish anything and and. That is, the real question and honestly this does to a lot of what this very. Energetic president chooses to, do you have to? Ask how do we gain? How does the nation gain how does our side? In, the political struggles gain now does anyone really believe that now that President Trump is saying he's going. To pull their security clearance that means that people like Clapper and Brennan and Komi Early gonna shut up They're gonna stop criticizing him that they're gonna stop featuring these people on CNN and. MSNBC of course not it's only emboldens then it gives them. A, whole other round oh. Now we're martyrs somehow and the truth of the matter is that there are a few people that have consultancy businesses where having some kind of security, clearance after you've left the. Government can be valuable I think that's dubious I think they. Ought to get rid if you're. Not involved in, working for the government if you have no governmental purpose to maintaining security clearance he shouldn't. Get one but now that it's been introduced this way where. He, just wants to single. Out these people who've been most critical of and they said terrible things as ridiculous Brennan saying that President Trump had committed actions that were treasonous it's, wildly overstated and utterly irresponsible But for goodness sake let him be punished and castigated in the court of public opinion the idea that. You're going to remove securities here you're going to publicize this. Whole process is very dubious idea The Wall Street Journal says the The stripping of. Security clearance won't stop their criticism it's. Merely an act of political retribution And I don't think it. Makes the administration. Look good or strong one eight hundred nine five five, seventeen seventy six our phone number here's what Senator Bob corker. Who is leaving the Senate but he. Is the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations committee. What he had to.

President Trump Senator Bob corker president Brennan Senate Senate Foreign Relations commi MSNBC CNN chairman Clapper The Wall Street Journal
"the wall street journal" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"the wall street journal" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"In helping food for the poor. Eight five five three. Three o. h. o. p. e. okay meanwhile back to this issue on pulling security clearances look it The Wall Street. Journal, had a an editorial where they didn't like, the, idea The headline for, the the the editorials lead. To'real today it says dumb idea of the week and the week is young come on Says revoking clearances. As petty Here's here's the. Way they write about it they, say someone should have. Said that's a dumb idea we'll make us look petty and it won't accomplish anything and and. That is, the real question and honestly this goes to a lot of what this very. Energetic president chooses to, do you have to? Ask how do we gain? How does the nation gain how does our side? In, the political struggles gain now does anyone really believe that now that President Trump is saying he's going. To pull their security clearance that means that people like Clapper and Brennan and Komi Are all going to shut up They're going to stop criticizing that they're gonna stop featuring these people on. CNN and MSNBC of course not it's only emboldens then it. Gives, them a whole other. Round oh now we're martyrs somehow and the truth of the matter is that there are a few people that have consultancy businesses where having some kind, of security clearance after you've. Left the government can. Be valuable I think that's dubious I think they ought to get rid of if you're not. Involved in working for the government if you have no governmental, purpose to maintain the. Security clearance he shouldn't get one but now that it's been introduced this way where, he just wants to single out these people have been most critical of and. They said terrible things as ridiculous Brennan saying that President Trump. Had committed actions that were treasonous, it's wildly overstated and, utterly irresponsible but for goodness sake let him be punished and castigated in the court of public opinion The idea that, you're going to remove, security you're going to publicize this whole process is very dubious idea The Wall Street Journal says the The stripping of. Security clearance won't stop their criticism it's. Merely an act of political retribution And I don't think it. Makes the administration. Look good or strong one eight.

President Trump Clapper government Brennan president CNN MSNBC The Wall Street Journal Komi
"the wall street journal" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"the wall street journal" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

"The wall street journal listen ambitiously from the opinion pages of the wall street journal this is the thomann welcome back i'm poetry go here with for kim strauss and we're talking about the politics of goodwill in silicon valley after the engineer was dismissed for writing a what was deemed to be an offensive sao about gender roles and the freedom of thought at uh at gool this feeds into the larger issue cam about two things one is of course guber was a political favorite in the obama administration wellknown for its progressive short support of progressive politics and also gould's increasingly dominant role as an arbiter of uh of journalistic content through its search engine uh it does uh use algharib them's to discriminate against uh uh against paid content for example it wants all of its information to be free that hurts publication's like the wall street journal uh also uh uh prager you and it's youtube prager youtube is a google subsidiary in as you know you've run some some ma videos on prager you that youtube uh downgraded in its listing because they thought they could be offensive to some people yeah this is the ultimate how funny in that i actually get up prager you video on free speech and youtube censored it would not allow children to watch it because apparently it was offensive in some way so they censored my video on free speech andy ho heavily laced up let me stipulate you are no threat to children affected shoulder i have three let them watch might prager youtube video we had a conversation about this but it's just you are a threat of certain adults i can see i can say words would not children allies i've out a threat to you.

The wall street journal kim strauss engineer obama administration search engine youtube andy ho gould google