38 Burst results for "The United Nations"

Fresh update on "the united nations" discussed on UN News

UN News

02:19 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "the united nations" discussed on UN News

"This is the news in brief from the united nations curve. Nineteen infections rose eight percent last week to more than three point. Eight million and the number of new deaths increase in all regions apart from europe according to the world health organization latest data from the u. n. Health agency pointed to substantial uptick in infections in the americas and the western pacific up thirty percent and twenty five percent respectively regionally southeast asia also reported a three percent increase in infections compared to the previous seven days of the four curve in nineteen mutations at the w eight shows designated variants of concern the alpha variant is now present in one hundred eighty two countries. The beater strain in one hundred. Thirty one gamma in eighty one and the delta variant is one hundred thirty two countries on the issue of vaccine effectiveness. The world health organization cited several of autry study showing corona virus transmission to household members was reduced by approximately half after at least one job the un independent expert on myanmar has called for a covert ceasefire on healthcare workers infections and deaths saw special reporter. Tom andrews alleged on tuesday. The hunter forces had committed two hundred and sixty attacks against medical personnel and facilities causing at least eighteen deaths. Meanwhile more than six hundred healthcare professionals are looting arrest warrants and at least sixty seven have been detained. Mr andrews said in a statement to many in and have needlessly perished in too many mobile die without action by the united nations he warned before urging the security council to demand that myanmar's military rulers stop all attacks particularly against healthcare professionals. Refugees have never needed more protection. Top you in refugee agency official filippo grandi said on wednesday marking the seventieth anniversary of the nineteen fifty one refugee convention in appeal to all countries to recommit to the spirit and fundamental principles of the treaty. U n high commissioner for refugees insisted that thanks to the convention. Millions of lives have been saved. Mr grant expressed alarm at recent attempts by unnamed governments to disregard or circumvent the conventions principles this included expulsions pushbacks of refugees and asylum seekers land and sea borders and proposals to forcibly transferred them for processing to third states. Without proper protection safeguards. The language of the convention is clear as to the rights of refugees and remains applicable in the context of contemporary an unprecedented challenges and emergencies such as the in nineteen pandemic the un refugee agency. Chief said the nineteen fifty. One refugee convention was born after twenty. Six states met in geneva to finalize text of the treaty convention and the nineteen sixty seven protocol which broadened its scope defined. Who is a refugee. And what protection assistance and rights they have katie dartford un news..

UN World Health Organization Tom Andrews Myanmar Mr Andrews Western Pacific Filippo Grandi Americas Asia Mr Grant Europe Security Council Geneva Katie Dartford
Borderline Disorder: The UNs Refugee Treaty at 70

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:59 min | 13 hrs ago

Borderline Disorder: The UNs Refugee Treaty at 70

"Today marks the seventieth anniversary of the united nations refugee convention a landmark treaty that established the obligations that countries have to people fleeing persecution. A core principle is nonrefoulement. That migrants should not be returned to a country where they faced serious threat of persecution. But in recent years the refugee convention has become perhaps the least popular treaty in the rich world in two thousand fifteen millions of asylum seekers many fleeing the civil war in syria tried to reach europe in any way they could men women and children. The beach is covered in life jackets and the remains of rubber boats relentless waves of people washing up on the shores of greece news reports were flooded with images of people making a desperate and often deadly journey arriving. It's a gateway to europe. Boats packed with migrants and refugees. Continue to land on the shores of the greek island of last balls oats packed with migrants and refugees. The law makes a sharp distinction between the two the difference between seeking shelter and simply seeking a better life. That's a hugely politicised question in america. Where president joe biden faced a slow burn crisis from his first day in office. Yesterday the biden administration said it would speed up. Its work through the backlog of asylum claims as well as its work deporting. Those who don't qualify and in britain where in the past week record numbers of migrants attempted to make the crossing from france. The home secretary spoke of patients that is thinning asylum systems that cost taxpayers over a billion pounds. A year enough of da's arriving illegally on our shores directed by organized crime gangs seventy years after the treaties founding the world is creating more and more refugees even as fewer and fewer governments have the appetite to protect them.

United Nations Europe Biden Administration Syria Greece Joe Biden America Britain France DA
Fresh update on "the united nations" discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:39 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "the united nations" discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"You hello magnum. So how closely. Intertwined are the stories of these residential and boarding schools in the cana in canada and the united states. They're inseparable what we hear in the heart. Wrenching stories are very similar to what we know. However the full extent of of the impact With the discovery of these unmarked Graves is not yet known But the reality of the stories that have been reflected over time over generations are very very similar and it is tragic. And i believe that is why the united nations and its declaration of indigenous right several years ago defined these kinds of acts upon our respective governments to be among the worst crimes against humanity when these are children imagine this kind of infliction and impositions an abuse upon innocent essence children as we mentioned before the united states was actually a model for the the schools when they opened up in canada. Can you give us a census to in the united states. How many indigenous children went through the system. Here and how many schools were we talking about if you could imagine that in eighteen sixty the first bureau of indian affairs Boarding school was established on the yakama indian reservation in the state of washington. And as you followed through this time line According to the national native american boarding school healing coalition who is focused on this kind of discovery of the facts related to this time and the impact by nineteen twenty six. They estimate that eighty three percent of all native children were in the system so with the hundreds of boarding schools across this country One like In at the albuquerque indian school that was established in eighteen eighty one by the presbyterian And transferred to federal control in eighteen. Eighty four the establishment of the sanofi school in eighteen ninety over the decades since that first school that was established in eighteen. Sixty hundreds were established throughout this country all built upon the mantra that the way you kill language and the way you kill culture is to remove children from their language and their culture and denied those children their language and their culture so the intent was the same then. It was that cultural genocide that we talked about absolutely did the boarding schools in the united states. Also see or exploited the children they're experienced similar abuses that that have been uncovered in in canada the neglect the abuses and death even in nineteen ninety the santa fe indian school which became the first of tribally controlled school under the self determination. Act It in nineteen to one thousand nine hundred. Seventy five did an interview with among the oldest two at that time or in their eighties nineties and close to a hundred in a commemoration of the reflection of their experiences and the one story that i think epitomizes. An answer to your question is a ninety almost one hundred year old grandma from hey miss pueblo. Who told about federal agents coming to the pueblo and the grandfather begging the federal agents not to take.

United States Bureau Of Indian Affairs Board National Native American Board Canada Albuquerque Indian School Sanofi School United Nations Santa Fe Indian School Washington
The Tower of Babel and Christian Nationalism With John Zmirak

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:28 min | 1 d ago

The Tower of Babel and Christian Nationalism With John Zmirak

"One of the episodes in the old testament. And it's very interesting to those of us. Who are we get cold things like your christian nationalists and of course you should take time to unpack bad. What is christian nationalist. What what isn't even me. Well if you actually look at what it's supposed to represent you realize. Oh it's the worldview of pretty much every us president before george h w bush and also that of donald trump. It is you you. You believe that christian mores should infuse the government that natural law should be the basis of positive law. That is what you could what you could know as good and evil based on reason that reaffirmed What's taught in divine revelation. But you're drawing it. At of reason. You know we hold these shoot to be self evident rational arguments based on human nature. That should be the basis of morality not tribal solidarity like black lives matter on new black or white lives matter or any other kind of tribalism and not class solidarity like marxism or socialism and not theocracy where you say divine revelation what it says in my sacred book must be imposed by no natural law which you know are reflecting on what mankind is and who we are what we are people that should be the basis of law but you don't wanna global dictatorship a global oligarchy like the united nations. Are you back to the tower of babel. I can see. I know. I can see you getting there but for second i was like wait a minute. Where's he going. But now i know joe so keep going keep going up. You don't want a global lists remote oligarchy like the un or the eu or napoleon's empire or the soviet union or the new world order. You don't want distant remote elite bureaucrats imposing their will on ordinary people. You want people to be elect governments in their own countries. You wanna have an independent hungary and independent poland an independent united states. That's the nationalism part. So nationalism sounds so scary what's the alternative marxist

George H W Bush Donald Trump United Nations Napoleon JOE Soviet Union EU Hungary Poland United States
Fresh update on "the united nations" discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

00:37 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "the united nations" discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Today marks the seventieth anniversary of the united nations refugee convention a landmark treaty that established the obligations that countries have to people fleeing persecution. A core principle is nonrefoulement. That migrants should not be returned to a country where they faced serious threat of persecution. But in recent years the refugee convention has become perhaps the least popular treaty in the rich world in two thousand fifteen millions of asylum seekers many fleeing the civil war in syria tried to reach europe in any way they could men women and children. The beach is covered in life jackets and the remains of rubber boats relentless waves of people washing up on the shores of greece news reports were flooded with images of people making a desperate and often deadly journey arriving. It's a gateway to europe. Boats packed with migrants and refugees. Continue to land on the shores of the greek island of last balls oats packed with migrants and refugees. The law makes a sharp distinction between the two the difference between seeking shelter and simply seeking a better life. That's a hugely politicised question in america. Where president joe biden faced a slow burn crisis from his first day in office. Yesterday the biden administration said it would speed up. Its work through the backlog of asylum claims as well as its work deporting. Those who don't qualify and in britain where in the past week record numbers of migrants attempted to make the crossing from france. The home secretary spoke of patients that is thinning asylum systems that cost taxpayers over a billion pounds. A year enough of da's arriving illegally on our shores directed by organized crime gangs seventy years after the treaties founding the world is creating more and more refugees even as fewer and fewer governments have the appetite to protect them.

Europe Biden Administration Brooke Unger United States Syria Joe Biden Greece Stalin DA Britain Turkey France Mexico Cova EU Nayed Italy Biden Donald Trump Turkish Coast Guard
As U.S. Withdraws, Civilian Casualties In Afghanistan Reach A Record High

John Batchelor

01:06 min | 1 d ago

As U.S. Withdraws, Civilian Casualties In Afghanistan Reach A Record High

"An explanation for what we're witnessing across the vast landscape of the Omar in the contest with the jihadists. At the same time, we're focusing on the battlefield of Afghanistan. The end of the U. S and NATO commitment to military affairs. Caveat Caveat. In Afghanistan, However, we have to cite what is apparent is that the collapse is leading to one. Casualties among the civilians. The U. N is reporting. Civilian casualties in Afghanistan reached record levels in the first half of 2021, the United Nations warned, noting that deaths and injuries spite markedly from May when the United States and its allies began withdrawing troops. Some 5183 casualties were recorded in the first six months of the year. The number of deaths and injuries recorded during May and June alone was 2300 and 92. Almost as high as the total for the preceding four months. Bill, I turn to the

Afghanistan Omar Nato U. United Nations United States Bill
UN: Women, Children Casualties on the Rise in Afghanistan

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 d ago

UN: Women, Children Casualties on the Rise in Afghanistan

"The United Nations says casualties among women and children are on the rise in Afghanistan then you you and report finds the more women and children were killed and wounded in Afghanistan in the first half of twenty twenty one then in the first six months of any year since the group began to systematically keeping counts in twenty oh nine the figure amounts to a forty seven percent increase compared to the period last year nearly seventeen hundred civilians killed and well over three thousand wounded the Taliban have swiftly captured significant territory in recent weeks sees the border controls with several neighboring countries and all threatening a number of provincial capitals I'm Charles collect as much

Afghanistan United Nations Taliban Charles
A Rallying Cry for Restoration

In Defense of Plants Podcast

02:12 min | 3 d ago

A Rallying Cry for Restoration

"All right. Tim christoffersen it is an honor to have you on the podcast. Welcome but before we jump into what you came on to talk about today. Let's start off by introducing yourself. Let's tell everyone a little bit about who you are and what it is you do. Thank you very much matt. And it's a great pleasure to be on this podcast in defense plants. That's great title. So i'm tim. Christopher i'm the father of two wonderful children happily married and i'm working for the united nations to make a difference for my kids. That basically sums it up. I'm a forest by training. Though i've left being an active forester in the field about twenty years ago to work at the national and international policy level. Because i felt that they were changes that we need most stem than those you can achieve at the ground level. I'm still on that journey and trying to aim for that. Systemic change. well it's wonderful to see someone with an actual background enforced going in the direction of policy. Because you kind of understand it on a level that if you just want the policy route you might not have that on the ground experience but what got you interested in forests and ecosystems. I mean you mentioned your children really being the main motivation about working towards a more sustainable in habitable future on this earth. But what got you interested in the environment in the first place. I think that also goes back to. When i was a child. I was spending a lot of time outdoors and in the forest. My grandfather was also forest. I t took me out a lot on his journeys and on replanting And the that has really shaped me. So i've i've known that i wanted to become a forester ever since i was twelve. Think so it's It's been it's been an interesting journey to leave that behind. Sometimes i wish i was still working directly with plans. I try to make up for it in by having bought a little farm that i'm trying to restore and my spat time so that i don't really talk about restoration but also also do it myself. otherwise you can lose that connection that you just described right in what is real and works on the ground and what other policy changes that we need.

Tim Christoffersen Christopher United Nations Matt TIM
Israeli Spyware Maker Is in Spotlight Amid Reports of Wide Abuses

the NewsWorthy

01:01 min | Last week

Israeli Spyware Maker Is in Spotlight Amid Reports of Wide Abuses

"New widespread investigation found hundreds of politicians. Journalists activists and lawyers around the world have been hacked. The politicians reportedly include francis president emmanuel macron and thirteen other heads of state the journalists worked for organizations like the ap reuters cnn wall street journal and more the washington post and sixteen other news organizations have been investigating the hack. They found evidence of prominent people's iphones were infected with military grade. Spyware from a private firm out of israel called. Nso group that software is able to activate cameras and microphones on phones. For real time surveillance it can also steal photos location records passwords end more however the firm that makes it has denied the reports. It says it spyware is only used to keep track of terrorists and other criminals locate missing children or find survivors of tragedies still the united nations human rights. Chief is calling the investigation. Extremely alarming and french prosecutors are now investigating the spyware for

Francis President Emmanuel Mac Nso Group The Washington Post Wall Street Journal Reuters CNN AP Israel United Nations
Haiti's Interim Leader Requests US Troops

The Newsroom

00:57 sec | 2 weeks ago

Haiti's Interim Leader Requests US Troops

"Has asked the United Nations and the United States for troops to protect key infrastructure as the country reels from Wednesday's as Wednesday's assassination of President Jovan Elmo Ease. Senior American officials said there was no plan to send military forces the U. S intelligence officers would assist the investigation. Adam Isaacson is from the Washington office on Latin America, a US based advocacy group. 80 really needs help in forming a legitimate government. And of course, the those who are claiming to be legitimate government. They barely have enough security forces to keep order right now in the country, So you know they've taken this rather Outrageously risky step of asking the United States to perform security duties for them, and I don't think the United States is at all interested in another occupation or troop presence in Haiti. I don't think the United States wants to put any of its own personnel in harm's way in Haiti.

Jovan Elmo Adam Isaacson Washington Office On Latin Ame United States United Nations U. Haiti
Haiti Asks U.S. For Troops After President's Assassination

BBC Assignment

00:52 sec | 2 weeks ago

Haiti Asks U.S. For Troops After President's Assassination

"Haiti has asked the United Nations and the United States for troops to protect key infrastructure as the country reels from Wednesday's assassination of president of now Elmo is the White House spokesperson Jen Psaki said there was no plan at present to send military forces but U. S intelligence officers would assist the investigation. In response to the Haitian government's request for security and investigative assistance. We will be sending senior FBI engage US officials to Port au Prince as soon as possible to assess the situation and how we may be able to assist Meanwhile, Haiti's Senate has named the speaker of the upper chamber Joseph Lambert, as interim president, deepening the political crisis. The country has both enacting interim Prime Minister Claude Joseph, who took over after the assassination. And a new appointee, Ariel Henry, who has yet to be sworn in. Both are claiming to be in

Jen Psaki Haitian Government Haiti United Nations White House United States U. Joseph Lambert Port Au Prince FBI Prime Minister Claude Joseph Senate Ariel Henry
Tigray Fighters in Ethiopia Reject Cease-Fire as 'Sick Joke'

Pacifica Evening News

02:08 min | Last month

Tigray Fighters in Ethiopia Reject Cease-Fire as 'Sick Joke'

"Now retaking parts of Ethiopia's Tigre region will pursue soldiers from neighbouring Eritrea back into their country and chase Ethiopian forces back to the capital Addis Ababa. If that's what it takes to weaken their military powers as a conflict that has killed thousands of civilians looks certain to continue. In an interview with the Associated Press spokesman Get it You read a says that the to gray enforces will stop at nothing. To deliberate every square inch of the Tigre region of six million people, nearly eight months after fighting erupted between the tea Great forces and Ethiopian soldiers backed by Eritrea. He rejected the unilateral ceasefire Ethiopia's government declared yesterday as a sick joke and accused Ethiopia of long denying humanitarian aid to the two grands that now pretends to care about. Ethiopia declared the unilateral ceasefire as its soldiers and handpicked regional interim administration fled the Tigre regional capital. Following some of the fiercest fighting of the war. The comments were sure to bring new alarm from the United States, United Nations and others who have pressed for an end of the fighting in Africa's second most populous country. It has sent hundreds of thousands of two grains into the world's worst famine crisis in a decade. Coletta Guangzhou be reports from Addis Ababa The Ethiopian government says it has decided to implement a ceasefire in its northern region to allow farmers to till their land and return life to normal. See after months of displacement. However, the two great defense forces says it has taken back control of the region. It says its forces have forced Ethiopian troops out of my Kelly and it has shown no interest in being part of the ceasefire declared by the government of Prime Minister A. B Ahmed. The United Nations says over four million people have been affected by the conflict and are in need of emergency assistance, of which one million Are internally

Ethiopia Eritrea Addis Ababa Tigre Tigre Regional Capital The Associated Press Ethiopian Government United Nations Guangzhou Africa United States Prime Minister A. B Ahmed Kelly
Citing Racism, UN Rights Chief Seeks Reparations for Blacks

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

Citing Racism, UN Rights Chief Seeks Reparations for Blacks

"A senior United Nations official is seeking reparations for people of color hi commissioner for human rights Michelle Bachelet is urging countries worldwide to do more to help end discrimination violence on systemic racism against people of African descent and make amends to them including through reparations the call comes in a landmark report launched after the killing of George Floyd the study largely hopes to build on momentum around at the recently intensified scrutiny worldwide about to the blight of racism and its impact on Africans and people of African descent I'm Charles collect as much

Michelle Bachelet United Nations George Floyd Charles
Former US Ambassador to Israel David Friedman Reflects on President Reagan Speaking at His Father's Synagogue

Mark Levin

01:10 min | Last month

Former US Ambassador to Israel David Friedman Reflects on President Reagan Speaking at His Father's Synagogue

"Reagan spoke at your father's synagogue. Briefly tell us about that. Well, you know, my father was not a political person. He was a rabbi whose spiritual leader and one day he got a call about two weeks before the second the You know, presidential election of Ronald Reagan 1984. And the president asked if he could come speak at my father is the synagogue and come to his house. And it was, of course, an incredibly uplifting moment. What I think about that day. Don't you know people can go on the Reagan library website and listen to the speech. He was in October of 84, a temple Hillel, and I think it was one of the seminal moments When the Republican Party really move closer to Israel, he said something that very improving Least to me, and this was when you know Israel is that it's low point in the United Nations, and he said, if Israel has ever voted out of the United Nations, the United States and Israel will walk out together. Hand in hand and It was. It was just, You know, it's something you don't hear in 1984, and I'll never forget it. Now, uh Tell the American people the Abraham accords, why

Reagan Ronald Reagan Israel United Nations Republican Party United States Abraham
Former Mauritanian President Aziz in Jail Over Corruption Charges

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:53 min | Last month

Former Mauritanian President Aziz in Jail Over Corruption Charges

"The former president of mauritania mohamed abdelaziz was jailed yesterday. He had been indicted in march accused of graft when he led the country between two thousand eight and two thousand nineteen allegations that he denies while under house arrest. He failed to report to police. Sparking is president. Mauritania is a large but sparsely populated west african country who society is deeply divided. Partly that's down to a long history of corruption but also suffers from a legacy stretches deep into its history so martina has actually a long history of slavery representing abolished in one thousand. Nine hundred one lead. That was any backed with criminal laws in two thousand seven. Kinley salmon is an africa correspondent for the economist. Martinez made up of morrish. Elitest can people and also black people of african origin but black mauritanians. Even those who have free of slavery of have been persecuted deported back in nineteen eighty-nine in particular an all. this history is created. Really quite deacon equalities in divisions that still very evident today the countries have been beset unfortunately by a number of coups and corruption so i. It's an a challenge in place and in currently for example stands one hundred and fifty seventh on the united nations human development index. It's a send a country that has had a troubled past and what about its future. Any of that changing Well the signs of change those a presidential election in two nineteen which led to the country's first ever peaceful transfer of power and the new president. Mohamed olga swanee. Many people thought he would follow the status quo but actually acted against the former president allowing parliament to investigate corruption and that's led to arrests of officials including of the former president himself

Mauritania Mohamed Abdelaziz Kinley Salmon Morrish Martina Martinez Africa Mohamed Olga Swanee United Nations Parliament
Biden Nominates Cindy McCain to UN Food and Agriculture Post

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | Last month

Biden Nominates Cindy McCain to UN Food and Agriculture Post

"The widow of senator John McCain has been nominated to a diplomatic post by the bite in administration Cindy McCain is been tapped by the president to be the U. S. representative to the United Nations agencies for food and agriculture McCain had endorsed by dean for president in twenty twenty after incumbent Donald Trump and spent years criticizing her late husband the Republican Arizona senator Cindy McCain currently chairs the Hensley beverage company in Phoenix the president also named former Delaware governor Jack Martel to represent the US at the organization for economic cooperation and development another of the seventeen nominees Fiona Whelan Prine the widow of John Prine to serve on the National Council on the arts Jackie Quinn Washington

Cindy Mccain Senator John Mccain Hensley Beverage Company U. Jack Martel Donald Trump United Nations Mccain Dean Organization For Economic Coop Arizona Phoenix Fiona Whelan Prine Delaware John Prine United States National Council On The Arts J
UN Experts Call on Holy See to Do More Against Child Abuse

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last month

UN Experts Call on Holy See to Do More Against Child Abuse

"Experts working with the United Nations are slamming the Vatican for not doing more to prevent violence and sexual abuse against children the independent human rights experts faulted the Roman Catholic Church for what they said our efforts to protect alleged abusers cover up crimes and obstruct the count ability the experts say there have been tens of thousands of alleged victims over decades in many countries they noted with great concern what they called the apparent pervasiveness of child sexual abuse cases and what appears to be the practice of covering up for alleged abusers within the church the Vatican's been heavily criticized by abuse victims in many countries over failing to discipline or remove bishops or others implicated in cover ups I'm Rita folate

United Nations Roman Catholic Church Vatican Rita Folate
The Youth Organization Spreading the Word About the Climate Crisis

UN News

01:14 min | Last month

The Youth Organization Spreading the Word About the Climate Crisis

"We are here in the city of the czech republic with two young professionals talking about the issue of our time. Climate change on rush and christina. Zakho china are behind a nonprofit and awareness. Raising project called fact on climate christina is a data designer and journalist and also a student at masaryk university in on rush is a physicist by education and lecture on non violent communication by profession mccown broza from the united nations information centre unique proc. Welcome afternoon christina. How engaged are young people in the whole idea of taking climate action. Are they getting more and more interested in the issue from your experience. What i can see around me in my like my peers. Sir and friends are. I think we are engaged a lot but quite often. We are not sure what to do. So i can see people being interested trying to read them. Article also get some more information but then we don't know what to do with that.

Christina Zakho Mccown Broza Masaryk University Czech Republic Rush China United Nations SIR
Humanitarian Crisis in Ethiopia's Tigray At "Tipping Point"

The World and Everything In It

01:28 min | Last month

Humanitarian Crisis in Ethiopia's Tigray At "Tipping Point"

"We start today here in africa. Tens of thousands of malnourished children are at risk of dying in ethiopia is to gray region. That's according to the united nations and humanitarian groups. Working in the area. Tommy thompson is emergency coordinator for the world food program. This is a crisis of certainly food security. But it's really a crisis of access protection issues preventing us from doing work it's rewire it's an incredibly dangerous environment for. I'll be working out. There have been mind. Humanitarian have been killed thus far on every day. We have our chain senses. The ngos partners everybody who's trying to operate north find themselves challenged checkpoints. They're increasingly hostile on in some of these checkpoints. We have our beneficiaries having the things that are given luton for men if opium prime minister abby amid sent government forces into tegray in november to disarm leaders of the tegray people's liberation front. He blamed the group for attacks on army camps but international watchdog groups accused government forces of widespread atrocities against civilians and now humanitarian agencies say ethiopian forces and troops from neighbouring area. Tra are keeping relief shipments out of the region the un estimates more than a quarter million people into gray now face famine conditions.

World Food Program Tommy Thompson Ethiopia UN Africa
Israel Responds To "Arson Balloons" With Airstrikes on Gaza

the NewsWorthy

01:08 min | Last month

Israel Responds To "Arson Balloons" With Airstrikes on Gaza

"Started up again in the gaza strip this morning for the first time. Since the end of last month's fighting it all started when the new israeli government allowed a far-right jewish march to pass through palestinian areas of jerusalem in response the palestinian militant group hamas sent arsim balloons into southern israel. They sparked several fires so israel's military says it then launched airstrikes in the gaza strip. Those strikes reportedly struck military compounds. palestinian news reports. Say one of the strike's did cause damage but so far there are no reports of any deaths still. It's concerning for a lot of people in the region since gaza has just barely begun to recover from last month's fighting that's when the united nations says at least two hundred. Fifty palestinians and thirteen israelis were killed and more than sixteen thousand homes in gaza. Were damaged now. This latest violence comes just three days into the new israeli government. Remember israeli prime minister bennett was just sworn into office on sunday. And he's reportedly under tremendous pressure from his party be tough on hamas however the u. n. is asking all sides to avoid any actions that might lead to more

Israeli Government Gaza Strip Israel Hamas Jerusalem Gaza United Nations Bennett
In Tigray, Food Is Often a Weapon of War as Famine Looms

BBC Newsday

01:15 min | Last month

In Tigray, Food Is Often a Weapon of War as Famine Looms

"Start with Ethiopia because a major news survey led by the United Nations says the 350,000 people in the Tigray region of Ethiopia are now living in a state of catastrophe with entire region and millions of people at risk of famine in the next few months if fighting escalates. Indeed, the UN's humanitarian chief, Mark Lo Kok, insists family is happening now already integrate. The BBC heard from some of those facing a dire situation funky with we were hiding and living in a cave for more than three months because of the war, we will only eating roasted barley. Six people died and we had to bury them during the evening as it was not possible to do it during the day. Um, shut down. There were about 20 of them. They gathered around my house and thrashed. All my crops have nightmares of my house from before it was burned and we had to flee to another area. They kept getting closer, burning all the harvested crops and straw. They burned everything I had No, my shoot. When are we doing? While the Ethiopian government has disputed the U. N led survey's findings, saying there are no food shortages, but some limited problems with

Ethiopia Mark Lo Kok United Nations Tigray BBC Ethiopian Government U.
"the united nations" Discussed on Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

05:44 min | 2 months ago

"the united nations" Discussed on Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

"You can go there sign up. You will get once a week. Get updates on terrible things that are happening things you need to know about. And when you add the information you're empowered but citizens should write to their congress person right to their senator right to secretary of state and say i just heard that the that china's running to the human rights council. Us gonna fight back and push them off. I heard that james chow is still at the world health organization as goodwill ambassador the biden administration rejoined the world health organization to engage. Well and good but use the engagement demand that w fire james childs in out and out chinese propagandists using this whol title to legitimize his lies about the corona virus. So i think citizens can push the us government. Republicans or democrats pushed the ministration to demand accountability transparency at the un and. I've seen it happen when the us ambassador to the un when congress person would senators demand action from the un seen I've seen changes reforms while you went body. So frankly it's it's only gonna come from the us that's where it's going to begin and your viewers should be the first ones to get the information and to demand action and reform from the un. Yes absolutely and how can they support you. How can they support you in watching that you gave the organization's website which we will put in the description of this episode. But can they follow you. Is there any monetary support that they can give sure. Thanks very question folks. Who want to help the work that we're doing which is to make the united nations live up to the original founding principles of its charter which are about upholding. Really human rights fighting genocidal dictators. Making sure that they don't corrupt you. Embodies day can follow us. I mentioned. www dot u. Watch the org can sign up there. They can follow us on twitter. Un watch on twitter. My name hillel neuer on twitter and follow us. Rawson facebook u. n. Watch run instagram. United nations watched can follow us on their like are boasts that will empower us. They can donate out. Our our funding comes entirely from private contributions. And we're a nonprofit organization in america at tax receipt foreign. They can go on our website. You unwashed other work and make a donation and make sure that we continue our important work to support really human rights victims one of the things that we do what you and watch as we bring human rights victims from china cuba russia venezuela pakistan iran to testify at the un so that actually the voice of the voiceless were being shut out by the un bodies as they're electing their oppressors and dictators we bring victims and those who just come out of prison political prisoners messing courageous people remain to testify to the united nations and folks support us will be supporting not just un reform and accountability. But we'll be supporting really rights worked help victims. Thank you so much..

hillel neuer james chow facebook instagram america twitter congress james Republicans first human rights council venezuela pakistan Rawson democrats cuba russia once a week china one
"the united nations" Discussed on Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

05:45 min | 2 months ago

"the united nations" Discussed on Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

"One thousand nine hundred and the pope in the vatican remain sometimes having legitimacy and influence and credibility and be more significant than having all the time the union had thousands of thousands of tanks nuclear warheads in a disappeared so moral power or the appearance of moral very significant united nations has incredible legitimacy around the world and so human rights council the reason that russia china venezuela struggle very hard in venezuela actually had to fight against costa rica which was a late candidate than the beat them the recently invest so many resources alleys because it's moral power perceived moral power international legitimacy is very significant among the world stage so i would say that u n decisions can't change everything in the world and if you want to stop genocide you need the us marines to do it you can't do it but you n stadiums un resolutions you reports un commissions of inquiry that could send to the international criminal. Court can be very influential and can change the way people think and thought is a thought and work our father to didi. Would you say that. China and the legitimacy of china through the un even through on the w. h. o. u. Would you say that is our biggest threat. The biggest threat to the western world. The domination that china seeks especially through these kinds of organizations. I think the un is becoming an arena for superpower conflict. China has identified. The united nations is a very important arena. They're now heading agencies in montreal the un's Came civil aviation agency headed by chinese representative in geneva telecommunications union which governs things like frequencies internet cellphones. There's a chinese represented heading that you can be sure. He gets his orders from beijing out. The food and agriculture organization enrolled another agency in vienna. They've they're taking over agencies. They are now members of the human rights council there on the five member group that i revealed in april consultation group named seventeen international human rights investigators of the human rights council the expert on disappearances when someone magically forcibly disappears when the expert on arbitrary detention does things that china is committing is the greatest perpetrator of china's now naming the individuals who will be the investigators so china is methodically systematically strategically taking over large parts of the united nations. They want the influence they want. Legitimacy you mentioned the world health organization china alley realizes much but there was a hong kong a woman from alcon margaret chan.

april vatican vienna alcon margaret chan five member group montreal thousands of thousands of tank hong kong seventeen international human Came civil aviation didi One thousand nine hundred beijing venezuela costa rica united nations China russia geneva telecommunications unio human rights council
"the united nations" Discussed on Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

05:44 min | 2 months ago

"the united nations" Discussed on Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

"Maybe they wanted saudi money. So it is routine at the un to have vote trade uncovered a letter where saudi arabia and russia. Russia is a rival to saudi arabia in the middle east and yet there was a letter. Russia saudi arabia saying russia. You vote for us onto the human rights council will vote for you. So i would say that it's cynical vote. Trading and as an excuse apologised for the un diplomats. Part of you and system will try to give you an ideology. They'll say no. We need all countries. And i agree. All countries all regions should be represented. But guess what in the middle east in africa and asia. There are many countries in latin america there many countries that could serve. That aren't the worst of the worst. Okay if you go in the middle east you can have you know. United arab emirates is far better than saudi arabia when it comes to women's rights and if you're talking in africa you don't need zimbabwe or somalia or libya on or many african countries that are not the worst of the worst. The same goes latin. America don't need venezuela and cuba. You can get many other countries rica and others so the un will tell you need to have the worst dictatorships there as part of an ideology with the reality is that many of these european countries who claim to care about international law or actually selling their soul alley because we know even the uk made a deal apparently with with saudi arabia to vote for them. They're selling their soul to do cynical though trading but then pretending it's some ideology that was also by question is is there any kind of cohesive ideology that drives these kinds of decisions or is it just cynicism like is it some. Is it some form moral relativistic progressivism. That says you know. We don't feel like we can get down. These countries is cultural relativism whatever. Let's just be progressive and inclusive or is it really just about you know what you can bargain for in what you can get for the reputation of your own country. I think it's primarily local trading because we've actually seen the vote trades documented in letters. I said we have a letter from saudi arabia to russia. Documenting the vote train and they'll sometimes announce it but it's true. There is an ideology that you mentioned of cultural relativism. And i would say that when you speak about organizations that are not voting at the un play very significant role groups like amnesty international which are rife with cultural relativism. They had a very hard time saying that..

asia latin america africa United arab emirates Russia libya zimbabwe human rights council somalia european cuba rica uk venezuela russia african latin saudi saudi arabia America
"the united nations" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

05:32 min | 6 months ago

"the united nations" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Says this week marks only the tip of the iceberg and what's needed to safeguard women's health beyond any one us administration or any one for the world. I'm alana gordon. Listen a year ago. When the pandemic i showed up lots of people busted out there sewing machines to make cloth face masks ella lambert college student at the university of bristol in the uk. Had another idea if you can so a cloth mask you can also a cloth sanitary napkin a menstrual pad her organization the pasha mama project recruits volunteers to so these pads then works with aid groups to distribute them to refugees in lebanon and greece l. Lambert joins us now from chelmsford essex in the uk. Where did this idea come from ella. Well i had a really bad episode of period pain during the lockdown and sitting that embed turning my laptop and shutting off the online university. Which i was hoping to attend every day felt very privileged that i was able to do that. And i was thinking about who the people in refugee camps or in situations where they can't afford sanitary products who are dealing with that kind of pain and how it must just be such an extra stress which they just don't need as he said people will busting out there signing machines making scrubs and things like that for the chess which is all uk health service. And i figured we could get with those people who were doing that to also make these and get them. Send out to those in need very practical question. A mask is fairly easy to so rectangular piece of cloth then pleaded what about minstrel ped-. I'd say just as easy you know i i learned to say back in march and say you know had to borrow saying machine how to lookout tours and how to say i figure if i can do than anyone can so the lack of access to period products and the stigma around menstruation it can lead to huge knock on effects health and economic was for women all around the world how can reusable pads like these fight period poverty as it's known their long term solution. You know i think so. Often organizations focused on providing disposable dogs which. I'm not saying it's a great thing. We've done ourselves when refugees don't have washing facilities these reusable pads on helpful. But i think the great thing about this. They lost up to three to five years. If you can give someone a set of as patron pads that sat. They don't have to worry about that any longer. You're working with a number of aid. Organizations to distribute these products in greece and lebanon who specifically will be receiving them. Yes working with is auto project. Veritas wasn't actually us oganization this. The based in d say we're sending them out that to the women that they work with in less false and that women in temporary accommodations. They have access to washing facilities. But they've been through the maury two point. Oh cam for example which is quite famous the you know having horrible conditions and then in lebanon were also working with women in the refugee settlement so that living intense but they have access to washing machines instead that able to use these products and in the drive to make this more sustainable project together. You're working with an organization that trains refugee women to so these Period products and sell them correct. Yes so we're doing that in lebanon. This is a really exciting project to which we are launching this new year so an organization wing women in lebanon. They already have a group of refugee women who were they provide the basic skills they teach them how to say they do other education projects with them to make them more employable and so we're working with them and we're gonna teach them how to make the pod sit and they can sell them generate extra income and use them themselves so one. Logistical thing that you've had to deal with is access to running water. It's hard to wash a reasonable pad. Obviously if you don't have that so some of the camps have worked with are now in the situation. How do you deal with that really fundamental problem. There is no one solution period publicity. Although organizations provide women with an cops for example and the great because they lost a lifetime but they don't work for everyone because in some coaches and this the virginity issue in the security issue with using them. And so i think the thing that we have to do is just target on distributions. For example with the moria camp will be able to send out the patch pads. We sent out disposables instead. And i think that's just what we have to do. We have to have a multifaceted approach as organizations dating with period poverty so the pacha mama project has been mobilizing volunteers in the uk including people who had been making masks or gowns early in the pandemic. What kind of response have you gotten from volunteers of the past year. It's been brilliant. Actually i mean. I really didn't expect it to grow this much. When i first started out. I just put a few messages on facebook. Group source. I was anybody that denies some fabric and grew so quickly. We've been reaching out to students schools. Everyone is a really hard time. Everyone and i think it's good for people to feel useful than just sitting around twiddling their thumbs that they've got a product to do and they know that the helping people and i think that's really good for them as well as it's good for the people that we oversleep distributing them to ella lambert the founder of the potomac project which is creating reusable menstrual pass to distribute to refugees. Thank you for being with us ila. Thank you so much for having me. I haven't checked the charts in the us lately. But i don't think we've got a trust the vaccine it yet. Brazil does the foundation for the song though that started four years ago and had nothing to do with covid.

alana gordon l. Lambert lebanon facebook uk a year ago four years ago greece first Veritas this week march chelmsford past year ila college five years ella lambert potomac covid
"the united nations" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

15:22 min | 1 year ago

"the united nations" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Understand how the United Nations is responding to the krona virus crisis. And why I spoke with two people know it like few others. Un resident correspondent and CBS News Analyst. Pamela Falk and you and director for the International Crisis Group Richard Gallon. It's the law fair podcast episode. Five thirty one the United Nations and the Krona virus crisis him. Oh let me start with you. Give us a sense of what it's like at U. N. headquarters in New York right now in the middle of the crow virus prices. How is it impacting the organization's day-to-day operations? Well Scott the. Un is virtually all remote at this point. It's virtual They U. N. Secretary General's press conferences. Then he's had quite a few. We really has stepped up to the plate on a lot of these issues to cease. Fire the new bonds. All of it have been remote. So the there's the daily news briefing and that is remote and Security Council. Interestingly he tried to stay as long as they could the building is still open for essential services but they have now gone remote so ironically China's the president of the Security Council for the month of April and they have put all of the meetings troops the end of April Video Conference and so. That's really what's going on nonetheless There was the could these launch of these two funds by the secretary general and they called for ten percent of the global GDP or almost nine trillion dollars. There's been other calls for other things than and humanitarian she Marco has also been very active. So there's additional issues on the finances of the UN but it really got quiet and then it became almost totally remote the only essential services right now. Are you when TV to coordinate the remote calls and from time to time the secretary-general does go in to take something from the UN studio but all of the meetings have become remote and that is because there have been several diplomats who tested positive several of the seven eighty in the organization altogether. It's not broken down to New York but there have been diplomatic stamp and you went press corps all testing positive for quote of ours so they basically said staying home. How sustainable is this sort of arrangement in the long run for the United Nations are their essential functions that they are going to have to be able to do in person at some point in the near future perhaps more importantly of course we have? I think it's the seventy fifth general assembly coming up in September which usually is a huge event where people come from all around the world not just the representatives themselves Bush advocates diplomats politicians to descend on New York for really a week or two of its often called UN week. Has there been any thinking about what how that's going to be handled in light of grenadiers. Well the many many things have been canceled but the UN General Assembly takes place at the end of September. And so to this day. They have said they haven't cancelled that yet. And of course as you say it is the seventy fifth anniversary and the idea you're in the. Un is as vital if not more than ever so part of the question is how is the UN functioning and being able to do all these things to unite the international community and also the humanitarian chief Mark Lowcock talked about this boomerang effect and his idea would after the developed countries are able to get past their searches of corona virus or covert nineteen? Then it will hit the poorer countries and it will bounce back fat ruling the country in the north the developed countries that. I'm taking such care so there's also all of this is taking a lot of money. So the expenses related to corona virus and the inability of pay had US president and the new crisis. I say the number that I was see this week that said the UN is facing dire liquidity crisis and that even peacekeeping forces around the world current cash position of about one point four billion dollars. He's barely sufficient to maintain operations around the globe. Slow until June and the cash balance of the home organization to off from two hundred million to fifty million in three months. So they're spending a lot of money to make sure that countries are getting the kind of nutrition aid in children's made in education aid all the there that that existed before that corona virus pandemic. But they're worried that pandemic will outsource then take away some of the resources. Richard let me come to you and ask you about the UN Security Council specifically the Security Council is really a lot of ways the heart of the United Nations organizations the body that's empowered to address threats to international security in a way that is binding on member states to abide by their directives. But you've described recently an article the New York Times. I noted that it's been really struck around the corona virus crisis by what you described to believe shambolic disunity specifically between China and the United States in the way that they are framing the current virus itself in the response to it gives us a sense of how the Security Council has operated in this current. Oh buyers era and how? These political debates may be impacting. Its effectiveness as an institution at a technical level as saying the council has done okay. It has worked out how to hold meetings. Virtually and it's not perfect but I think pretty much everyone on the planet is struggling with virtual meetings at the moment. So I don't think we should criticise the council's touch that on the other hand. It's being a political map. Makers the majority of council members sink the body should at least make some sort of declaration about the need for cooperation around this crisis and I think more specifically about the potential security risks associated with nineteen if for example it stops to underline governments in fragile states. The problem is the while the majority of council members want to see some sort of action and fronts actually tabled a resolution failure in March the US and China have really fallen out over how to approach the problem the US American diplomats are under instruction to get references to this being the Wu Han virus into any multilateral tax and not something that has come from Washington and is really poisoning debate because the Chinese simply went except that sort of language so when the French tables resolution or when Estonia tried to pull together a council statement on the pandemic it was impossible to get a product this this week. There's another push to get a Security Council resolution looking at what cave it means. The peace and security of Tunisia is leading that. But it's still not clear the the Americans and the Chinese again to put aside this throughout the silly blame game. There's also a bit of an issue with the Russians. The Russians have seen that they have an opportunity here to attack a UN sanctions on their arguing that on humanitarian grounds. The should suspend sanctions on countries like Iran and DPRK. Now I think there's a substantial argument in fact sanctions relief at this time. But I fear that the Russians are using this as a spoiling tactic to complicate gladness. In the council so all in all at least three of the five permanent members of behaving very badly and that means that the council as basically a nullity in discussions about Kobe to the moment that these proposals that have been floated the French post resolution that Tunisian resolution. That's being debated these are primarily symbolic dockings. Their calls for a sort of response a collective response but not necessarily laying out specific programmatic or policy addresses. Is that correct any? So are there discussions beyond the sanctions? Relief that you mentioned regrets Russia about a specific policy response Security Council could or should be pursuing. I think it's correct to say that most of the tax that have been discussed so far a largely symbolic and I think it is worth emphasizing. One thing I've seen quite a few pieces in the US media in the European Media Rex last month suggesting that the Security Council could take a major coordinating role in the global public health response to this crisis and the council could use its Chapter Seven Palace to direct trade in medicine for example. I mean that is simply not on the agenda here. Neil and I don't think it should be on the agenda but you know the council is a diplomatic body that struggles to direct peacekeeping operations. There is no way that it can replace the w eight show in terms of directing Bible public health operations so the council is really playing more of a political role and I think the most important political message it could send is that firstly p five United in a common desire to seek cooperation around on the disease and then most specifically that they're gonNA focus on the challenges the peace operations facing the challenges that U N mediators facing results of the disease. And the you know the big piles of the world often thinking about peace and security issues even if the vast majority of that attention is suddenly on health. I mean this was saying addition to the problems. Peacekeepers effacing witch time mentioned that U N mediators count even fly around the Middle East. The moment they can't get into places like Yemen. I'm because of code base travel restrictions. That means that a lot of the peace process that the Security Council has been backing up again to falter. And so you won't the council to just just send a clear message that it wants to support a stability insecurity wherever it can. That's something which secretaries has been talking about quite a bit in the context of his call for a global humanitarian ceasefire fire. And it's depressing that the council isn't even able to come up with a The S. Jeez proposal. At least so far. Let's move the conversation over to talk about Secretary General Gutierrez because we have seen other parts of the United Nations. Be More engaged on Rotavirus issues than the Security Council has been thus far We did see. It's worth to the General Assembly adopts another primarily symbolic Resolution Several weeks ago now. Urgent Coordinator responsible buyers in effort to sort of tee up some of these issues for the Security Council and for the Secretary General's that's my understanding but Secretary General Gutierrez. Himself has really played a notable role particularly the last few weeks. Last week we saw him roll out a major report on the likely social impact of the cove nineteen crisis along with an associated response and Recovery Fund kind of mechanism. That they're putting in place with the notable already alluded to Pamela that he believes and his advisors believe that ten percent of global GDP about nine trillion dollars will be needed to address the fallout from Kofi Nineteen. How has that proposal been received? How has it been acted upon or does it project to be acted upon and it is intended really lay a blueprint for UN action or is it more of either a symbolic actors strategic step by the Secretary General to shape the diplomatic conversation around these sorts of issues? You'd have been seeded. Great Deal and positive support. This is the ceasefire and the idea of getting fun. So the foundation was tapped by the World Health Organization In two weeks came up with one hundred million dollars and they're still fundraising and so money coming in and it's coming in from nations ended coming in from the private sector and it's coming from individuals by where this is something that clearly each country cannot deal with by itself now countries can close borders. But when you go to look at what the UN was founded for seventy five years ago it was for was to create the nation states. That would coordinate and see each other. So the era of diplomacy Is Not over and it's necessary for a leader to try to bring that back when corona virus. Obviously any kind of virus doesn't have a border and there have been calls in the past and the UN does take four coordinated effort send the UN does have experience with ours with HIV. With with the flu. They've had experience with other major health. Crises and pandemics. Now what's happened is the World Health Organization has done with the world. Health Organization has usually and that study did uptake coordinates with other countries but it has come under so much justified criticism for some of the delay. Then we can get back to that in declaring pandemic in way they dealt.

UN Security Council United Nations UN General Assembly US UN China response Security Council New York Pamela Falk CBS Richard Gallon World Health Organization president New York Times Scott Secretary General Gutierrez Analyst Middle East
"the united nations" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

11:11 min | 1 year ago

"the united nations" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"Whatever else happens that the need up to including food will in the modern era. All of that crude oil is exported. Three specific point called car. Guyland deepened the Persian Gulf than it sales the ocean blue to wherever it's going if you remove the Americans from the equation. Oil shipments on the wider world aren't going to be safe will have to be convoyed well. Iran doesn't have a navy and Iran is completely dependent upon a single export point all of which sets crew through the Strait of Hormuz so Iran has traditionally threatened oil shipments specifically the straight of Hormuz in order to get what wants out of the international community. And it's been up to the United States to figure out how to contain Iran and Biram removing Americans the equation and something happens to her moves or oil in general the Iranians lose all capacity to export and they don't have an industrial base and they don't have agricultural plant and they are completely dependent upon those export sales to fuel their system and keep population fed their competitors in the region the United Arab Emirates Saudi Arabia Iraq. They all have alternate option to bypass the straight of Hormuz completely so in any sort of conflict scenario that threaten the Gulf oil the other countries the Arab countries do take hit. I don't mean to suggest they'll get off scot-free but Iran's exports go to zero and in that environment we might actually be facing the eighth regime change in Persian history. Only have seven thirty five hundred years we might be on the verge of new bridge. What other implications does your world you have for activity in the Middle East more. Generally speaking and obviously intricately tied to that would be sort of the future of oil and the many intricacies there. What do you think of the other key points from your research in the Middle East row? There is no part of the Middle East. That is going to escape this but I think the best way to frame that discussion is to look at the country that is most likely to be countering. Iran's doing so here in the United States we've got some fairly strong opinions about the Iranian Republic. But if you look back historically right up until nineteen seventy nine. Iran was one of our best partners in the region. They were relatively culturally sophisticated. They partnered well with our intelligence and military services. We went on the on the same side versus things like Russia. For example but since the seventy nine revolution relations have gone from bad to worse horrible. And I don't see that in getting repaired anytime soon but you remove the Americans from the equation and when the Iranians really realize the situation or they're likely to get a little bit more aggressive now the country that matters the most here Saudi Arabia the Saudis see them the natural leader of the Islamic world because they control the holy cities but they utterly whack the military capacity that Iran Harris and in a straight up fight between the two powers. I mean it's it's no contest at all a bunch of high school kids could probably take military so the Saudis different tools they use checkbook diplomacy in order to underwrite militant groups throughout the region. And then they used their command of holy cities in order to motivate people based on ideological and religious grounds and they have a complete disdain for the sort of morality the drives decision making in the West. So it's difficult for Americans to accept groups like Isis and Al Qaeda these are direct Saudi creations and these are Saudi creations in a time where Saudi Arabia faced no direct military threat. So if you fast forward to a world where the United States is not protecting the Saudis and everything that they do more the Iranians are getting nervous and belligerent. The Saudis are going to really let loose they're going to be spawning groups left right and center in order to attack a running proxies around allies maybe people in Iran themselves keep in mind that the Syrian civil war has been so nasty because every couple of months the Saudis form a new militant group right in the heart of it and try to kill as many people as possible and so if you've got the Iranians trying to fight a more conventional war and the Saudis fighting unconventional war with groups like Isis. You're talking about something that is actually designed to burn most of the region to the ground from the Saudi point of view. They've actually got a pretty secure. Northern border several hundred miles of desert. They're thinking that if they can just lob militant groups across that in places like Iraq and Syria and just cause problems Iranians. They're Iranians will never have the bandwidth necessary the capacity that's necessary to punch through that desert buffer in order to get the oilfields. It's not a dumb strategy. It's just kind of evil. I've to hear your thoughts on maybe almost advice for those operating here. The United States especially business people a lot of those listening. There's a great little description at one point in the book where you say that Americans in the future as it pertains to sort of their interesting global affairs will be distant uninterested but strategically unfettered an armed to the teeth. Really interesting combination of adjectives or characteristics of a country with the power that we have. How would you translate that concept into sort of advice for how to think about the future of business for those operating in the United States? Well something to keep in mind. Is that the United States. Government has never been good at economic policy and its foreign affairs in recent decades since World War Two. That's by design. We specifically subsidized the rest of the world. So it could fight the Soviets which meant that American corporate interests to distant distant second place when it came to American policy planning so any free trade agreements that we did were made with the concept of global security in mind and supporting the economies of our allies was far more important than supporting American economic interests. Now if you go back to the time before World War Two there is this kind of inter into reading period when we came out of reconstruction we fought the Spanish American war. That was kind of are coming back to the World Party. And in the aftermath we had finally reunited the country we had finally made the military and inclusive institution had northerners and southerners represented but it was fragile and the United States did not want to take any positions in foreign affairs. The BET would disrupt that balance so what happened was American business. Leaders had already reintegrated. The North South West area had been a significant success and they were looking for greener pastures so the United States was now part of the world again but the military and the diplomatic corps really wasn't so American business leaders in American missionaries would actually go out and interface with the world. Establish import export facilities starting to start selling and if something went wrong because remember they're intervening in or affairs then the US diplomatic corn the US military corps would come in and back up in the air it was called dollar diplomacy. It got a little messy. You had the American government via business leaders sometimes sponsoring the your cube sometimes. We invaded countries in order to make sure that they repaid their on payments. Sometimes it was a more naked mercantilists. We're probably going to see some version of that coming up again except for this time. Instead of the United States being one of a dozen major powers states is GonNa have global reach and never really know global interests so the capacity for this to go completely overboard is pretty significant. So if you're looking for advice be very careful. The decisions that American business leaders making the next twenty five years are going to set the tone for American relations with the rest of the world for at least the next century. And if we become seved as gun toting greed monsters. That is something that is going to haunt us for generations to come. We are still trying to undo some of the damage from the last period of dollar diplomacy in places like Latin America and were probably about to get involved in something similar. So the trick. This time around is to remember that the countries at the United States is going to be integrating with and trading within the future are already industrialized. They may not be as advanced. But we're not talking about this quantum leap in development terms that we had back in the nineteen ten. It's best to build. Partners is best to build capacity locally. It's best to make sure that you've got local business leaders and local politicians on your side when you're making decisions. Some American business leaders will heed that advice. Probably do very well and build a cooperative relationship others not so much now. The country that we are likely to do this the most with is the country that were already most economically close to and that's Mexico. Mexico became a top trading partner. Last year. It's a position they will not give up in our lives and the real thing to keep in mind with. Mexico is that they are the only country that has any leverage versus Washington and versus American business because of the degree of integration because of the proximity. So if you're going to cut your teeth and foreign trade that's the country to do it on and that's the one that will probably protect us from some of our worst impulses. Do you imagine that in the future? Mexico and perhaps other countries will replace say China's manufacturing partner of the US. One of the most important or interesting things. I've seen come out of this. Corona virus issue is how much exposed supply chains and over-concentration of risk in a single country for manufacturers specifically what do you make the future of manufacturing partnerships in Mexico? A viable partner. There as well sure to explain how Mexico's GonNa Roll in the future we've got to kind of dissect the Chinese system a little bit. The Chinese system geographically disaster. You've got a flat area. In the north which Chinese a fought over throughout history two thousand years of ethnic cleansing in a war and you gotta southern region which is dominated by coastal city states. That actually do farewell and have a history of integrating with the wider world and the Chinese have always had a problem holding this all together and so basically what they do. Is THEY BRIBE EVERYBODY? So they take the sum total of all the citizens savings and they apply to any product. Possibly do it doesn't matter if it's cost effective. It doesn't matter sufficient if it's employing everybody then they're not writing. They're not resisting the government and what's happened since World War. Two as the Americans have admitted the turning these into there global structures and so the first time China has been able to access the world on someone's terms that is not a colonial occupier so we broke the Japanese Empire in World War. Two Europeans got sent packing and all of a sudden China could be country could never find it could trade. It could develop but all of this is an outcome of the American security position. Globally and of the goal order very little of. It is because of what the Chinese did. So if you remove the Americans. The Chinese lose those links so the entire Chinese model whether it's energy imports finished good. Exports LOCAL FINANCING SYSTEM. The manufacturing supply chain.

United States Iran Mexico partner United Arab Emirates Saudi Ara Middle East Saudi Arabia Strait of Hormuz Persian Gulf World Party American government Guyland Iran Harris China navy Russia Iraq Isis
"the united nations" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

12:02 min | 1 year ago

"the united nations" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"A little bit different from our first one giving you got a new book out today called this United Nations that goes into all sorts of interesting detail on countries around the world. Thought a fun place to start would be for you to bridge our last conversation and just describe again for the audience how you think about what makes for a successful country one of the things that had to really focus on heavily or to produce. This book was dark. About what makes things work? Why things are the way they are widely become used to them in the way that they are and what it means when the changes in the post Cold War or the United States is basically created this global structure that his told everybody that they can play and everyone can be successful. You don't have to worry about wars or invasions or supply routes food or energy or anything the global system will take care of it in the. Us will make sure the ghost works. Well you're moving the Americans from that system and we go back to a world where countries more or less have to look out for themselves in most of them. Don't have the capacity to do. So if you're going to have a chance of taking care of yourself there's a few things you need first of all you've got a certain degree of territorial viability seems kind of like a candy strategy. Where you kind of want to do inside the crunchy exterior so that you can do what you need to in your own territory. You want it to be easy to move around. Plains rivers Kinda perfect combination but then you want a hard crunchy exterior. People can't get you so mountains of great oceans are better too great if you're in the temperate zone because it means you can take care of your own agricultural supply and it means you actually have a chance to develop with a reasonable cost you any money that you don't have to use for overcoming internal geographic problems. You can use for infrastructure or education or defense just a cost-benefit second if you can grow your own food. That is absolutely preferred. We've come to think of. Agriculture is remarkably unsexy in the modern era. Because we're not used to having to fight for it but if you go back throughout history more far more countries have collapsed because of food distribution famine than ever died because of disease or war and once again the temperate zone flat areas. Kind of what your answer third. You want a sustainable relation structure when he just the right number of young people versus mature workers versus retirees. One of the things that's Industrialization. Kinda bequeathed us is when we started off farms into the cities. We went from thinking children's Free Labor. To thinking of children is kind of really expensive pets and so people had fewer of them. Well four generations on this preference for smaller and smaller families has left most of the world with a distressed an unsustainable demographic structure and most countries in the world are on the cusp of having more retirees than mature workers and more mature workers than young workers and more young workers children. That's a recipe for national self-destruction drilling only a handful of countries around. That have something. That's a little bit more sustainable. And if you can manage all that you're next bet is to whether or not you can turn the lights on. It's about energy access whether you use solar or coal or wind or nuclear. Whatever it happens to be if you can't guarantee sufficient energy supplies to make their system run. You can't industrialize. You can't modernize you're GONNA be living in the neo. Primitive sort of state or even worse. You're going to be completely dependent upon countries far beyond you and if you look at these four factors and Kinda stack them up. There's really only about five countries in the world right now. Who can kind of do this well? And that I hear of countries is honestly what the book is mostly about if you go down from that if you look at the countries that we think of as being very successful they really don't measure up very well. These four categories so most of the book is dedicated to kind of an if this then that we think of this country is being successful but in reality. It's the neighbor over here but it's going to be able to dominate in the future. Could you name those five countries now than I wanNA talk about the kind of different models for ruling the world that you lay out the American and the British Model? But before we go there. I'd love to just hear what those first year countries are so that we can return to them in a bit sure. All the United States comes in at the top of the list. It's got the best internal territory. It's got the best order system. It's got a population structure that is while starting to thin out a little bit still at replacement number. Two is Japan. Japan's country whose demographics are trying to bat and it doesn't seem like it's got a good energy situation because it doesn't but it has the capacity go out and take everything that needs interface with friendly countries in order to get what it wants. Third Up is Turkey. It's the most powerful country within a thousand miles and there's no one who can really hold a candle to it within its own neighborhood. Fourth is France which is really the only significant European country that can take care of itself once states leaves and then the final one is kind of a surprise entrance. Argentina. It is a country that has absolutely everything needs within. Its own borders faces no security threats and in a world that Kinda breaks down. Argentina has huge amounts of everything that the rest of the world whether it's energy or raw materials or foodstuffs so before we go into some of those individual countries there's a second early framework like the what makes us successful country framework that you just laid out that I found really interesting and probably important for understanding your model of the world and the chapter title was something. Like how to rule the world and compares the American kind of Care Model to the British stick model of large influence in the world. Could you briefly lay out the distinction between those and talk about why they might be important in the future? Sure it a key thing to remember about how the United States is managed the global system. Is that it. Did something very different? From how every empire before had worked the American Empire can be summed up as a bribe. We basically paid everyone to be on our sides Soviets to do that. We guaranteed absolutely every country physical security we guaranteed the security of all of their civilian trade on the ocean. Nobody had the convoy anything anymore. Countries that could never flow to maybe in the first place. That was kind of a big deal. We provided a global system. That would work for everyone. And we provided a currency that. We really didn't care manipulate if you want to have. The global currency makes the most important detail. Is You just have to care what happens to it in any given day? So it's really difficult from that and say the Chinese having global currency because it's the most manipulated currency in the world. They set the peg every single day based on what they're trying to achieve with policy where the United States has only intervene in the currency markets. A HALF A dozen times thirty years even at the height of the two thousand seven crisis when countries were begging of the United States to intervene in currency markets the. Us really didn't do now. The British model is one of sticks. The British model requires a technological advantage. So Britain was the first country in the world industrialized and they basically went around the world. Beating up everybody and taking what they want because they would be bringing guns to knife fights and they were the only country who could do that for about a century so Britain was able to establish this massive global position based in large part upon a technical acumen particularly as regards. Aby You were the most industrials country in the world by large margin and you started ships end. You were isolated from land attack because you were an island basically meant that your core territories could reach out and touch anyone anywhere at any time and do so at time and place of your choosing play that writ large round the world we got the Empire The sun never set upon so talk about why these models are important. I think a key central part of the book is that the Americans have done what they've done over the last however many decades but that their interest in all of this in the future around the globe is just GonNa Wayne. So I'm curious how you think this carrot-and-stick model will be tried or applied by other non-american would be powers in the coming decades. I central point is to understand why the United States as we created the global order in order to build up an ALLIANCE BRIBE UP ATLANTA. Fight the Cold War and so once the Cold War ended. We had the opportunity to recast the world towards a new goal and neglected to do that. The president we had at the time George Walker. Bush was voted out of office. When he was in the process of figuring out that plan and in seven straight elections we went with the candidate who was just not interested in foreign affairs and even Donald Trump where we are today so the United States has been leading this system atrophy and fall apart bit by bit and now Donald Trump is kind of going around with a sledgehammer breaking whatever's left so the US has done because be system was a bribe the US never really invested bits economy in the network. The United States is the least involved country in the world as a percentage of GDP in terms of trade exposure. And that leaves it to everybody else to kind of pick up the Tools themselves if they can now. Most countries don't have the geography to do this in a sustainable mayor. Most countries have kind of subcontracted out. All the defense needs to the United States now for seventy years and even if they hit the ground running it takes generation to put that back together. The Germans for example don't have a functional tank force Air Force or navy right now honestly aside from a few special forces teams that have proven their worth in Afghanistan. They really don't have a ground force at all. Learning this takes time a decade two decades three decades forty seconds. It took us a long time to get to the degree of military skilled at the Americans. Have today you're not gonNA manifest that overnight so if the Americans just kind of walk away and been pillars of civilization has collapsed. There is no global power. The Chinese can't reach beyond the first island chain. The Brits are out of practice. The French are regionally obsessed the Japanese or don't want to go beyond specific so you got a lot of regional powers that can duke it out but no one can go global which means we go back to something that existed back. During THE AGE OF EMPIRES. Were you have a handful of powers that have good geography at home and a limited ability to influence their regions? We have a series of regional powers that Terai to make sense of their own areas and I say that Argentina Turkey France and Japan are the four that are gonNA emerge on topics. But that doesn't mean it will be a bloodless transition. There are a lot of countries that have been trying to challenge the United States on a regional basis that have ironically become more dependent upon the United States. Never thought possible when the US leaves some of these regional competitors of the United States thinks of his problem countries China Russia Iran. All of sudden. They're going to discover that what makes their systems. Work is American engagement and so all the United States has to really do wants to record these places for decades if not generations is go home and that's exactly what we're doing. I'm curious the China example. I'd like to talk in depth about China in a bit but the examples you gave Russia and Iran as being largely dependent on America. I'm just curious exactly what that means. So maybe take ran as an example. How does that manifest? That's surprising thought Iran actually pretty straightforward. Here's a country that back in to quit was a superpower by any definition of the word but in the process of the world figuring out how to sail the ocean blue they were able to bypass around completely so it just fell into disrepair and WanNa destroy or evolution came along the Iranians basically imported goods and use mind output in a few other things like the statues and carpets to kind of pay for it. All oil comes along and just completely wreck the Iranian economy because they produce the crew to get cash and then they import. Whatever else happens that the need up to including food will in the modern era. All of that crude oil is exported. Three specific point called car..

United States United Nations Japan Argentina Turkey Iran Donald Trump China ATLANTA Britain France president Afghanistan Bush America George Walker Russia
"the united nations" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

06:35 min | 1 year ago

"the united nations" Discussed on Future Tense

"War is never inevitable. It is always a matter of choice choice to exclude to discriminate to marginalize to resort to violence but peace to is never inevitable. It is the result of difficult decisions artwork and compromise. We should never take it for granted. Now what what about. The future of the very position secretary general as we mentioned earlier Antonio Guiterrez with selected back in two thousand seventeen hundred new system but he still owes his position to the five permanent members of the Security Council who are veto rights which means the secretary general has to constantly try placate the big five on the one hand while also being seeing to serve the interests of all one hundred ninety three member nations on the other. Simon Chesterman has speculated that one positive reform would be to allow the General Assembly rather than the much smaller Security Council to determine the duration of tenure for incoming secretaries-general. So the thought experiment. Is that if you had a secretary. General whose leadership and whose success is dependent not on avoiding one of five countries dependent members of the Security Council saying no but rather on the endorsement of logic group of of countries that would change the dynamic. So you would try and do the best thing for the largest number of countries rather than just avoiding irritating essentially the United States Russia or China And so the hope that that ideas you would you would really do two things one you take away the idea that the secretary general is beholden to the paid five in particular particular for reappointment. Once she has been appointed but also you would empower the member states of the UN who would then have much stake in supporting the secretary general having elected someone you would then hopefully want them to succeed. What striking is the? That's actually possible. Under China this would not require a charter amendment but one of the very first resolutions of the General Assembly back in Nineteen forty-six essentially said No. We don't want that. We want this to be a consensus candidate. Essentially proposed by by the Security Council and we only want one candidate. We will merely endorse that candidate. And that's essentially what's happened throughout history the UN. Even though you're absolutely right the s she has to navigate that fine line between keeping the pay five happy and trying to do a job on behalf of the United Nations just the nature of some of the challenges ages facing in particular climate change is probably the clearest the climate emergency agreements governance vacuum because there is clearly a need for global action action on climate. Change no one st can lead on climate change some of tried some of actively not tried and so what that means is there's almost a vacuum at the international level that we need someone who can speak on behalf not just an individual country but on behalf of the collectively of humanity and I think the terrorists much much like Kofi Annan. Perhaps before him has been experimenting with doing just that and so what Kofi Annan did on things like responsibility to protect Millennium Development Goals. I I think Gutierrez is doing on Sustainable Development Goals and in particular on climate change really speaking four and creating a platform for civil society people who come from outside traditional government representative networks people like the sixteen year old tune back then have a platform to try and motivate states but also reach reach beyond states to individual citizens groups of communities in the hope of bringing about change Simon Chesterman. We started today's program by pointing to the fact that the United Nations has many critics but despite its flaws it's also true to say that it has many admirers. The Pew Research Center says its International. Standing among ordinary citizens remains high. Jacob poster looked at thirty two countries and we asked them the question of whether they have a favorable or unfavorable opinion of the United Nations and across those thirty two countries. I'm meeting sixty one. Percents that they had a favorable view of the United Nations nations and twenty six percent had unfavorable views so relatively popular across the country in which we surveyed. And how has that changed over time from passive that you've done. Oh it's interesting. It hasn't changed much in many of the countries which we survey there are exceptions. Poland is more favorable to the UN than they were about twelve of years ago up. Ten percentage points and Russia in particular is a country where views of the UN have fallen pretty sharply over the last twelve years. We have data from two thousand seven when fifty eight percent of Russians had a favorable view of the UN. But that's down to thirty four percent in two thousand nineteen and what's the situation in the United Awesome sites in the United States. Fifty nine percent have a favorable view. The United Nations in thirty three percent have a negative view but over time while that number has it's been fairly steady there's a much bigger divide among Democrats and Republicans and there was around eight and ten Democrats have a positive view of the United Nations but only about a third. The Republicans have a positive view of the United Nations. So as with many things in American political opinion there's a very big gap between Democrats and Republicans. I'm and use the UN and just finally looking at the survey of role what's the takeaway message think. Well when you look at it overall across the countries that we surveyed and looking looking at past data have used the UN or fairly positive. And it's not the only international institution that gets positive ratings. Generally we find people have positive views of if the European Union and among most NATO members we actually find positive use of NATO as well but when it comes to the UN we generally see positive use across the world which is not always the case with international views of China the US Russia and other countries that we surveyed asked about in the past Susa Source Jacob posted to their from the Pew Research Center. We also heard today from Michael Fully Love at the Lowy Institute Sarah Percy from Quinlan University some Chesterman at the National Oh University of Singapore dovid killiadts a senior adviser to the president of Georgia and Markle new and from the Ustralian Institute of International Affairs. Thanks as always to co produce a current event of its. You've been listening to future teams. I'm Anthony Fano. You've been listening to ABC podcast. You can discover more every say podcasts. Live radio exclusives on A._B._C.. Listen Up..

United Nations United States Security Council UN General Assembly Simon Chesterman Democrats Pew Research Center Kofi Annan China Susa Source Jacob secretary Poland ABC Antonio Guiterrez Anthony Fano Russia
"the united nations" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"the united nations" Discussed on Future Tense

"S at the top of the political affairs and Department of Peacekeeping Operations? And those two were very separate department of political affairs just advise on political no questions and peacekeeping going implement peacekeeping solutions but clearly in the intervening years what we've seen is that the old model of peacekeeping which is really built on the idea of to standing armies of states that had a conflict. Then you would go and place the border between those two states much as you had maybe a recent example as cutrier Nathan via you had the UN sitting on the border. Those days are gone. Most conflicts these days within states. And so you see a much more complicated picture that it's not just the UN going in having blue helmets it oh blue beret. Peacekeepers monitoring ceasefire line the UN is routinely routinely getting much more deeply involved in complex situations whether Tin Congo or Voire Libya where. You're not just keeping peace in the sense ends of maintaining a border. You're trying to stop multiple armed groups from destablizing a political situation. And you're looking at political reform. So that in meshing of politics in peacekeeping I think is why was saying the proposal to move towards linking up political assessment peacekeeping and peace building but the one area Maria where analysts believe. The guitarist reforms may come unstuck relates to funding. So it's important to stress that the peace and security as well as the management reforms. uh-huh both cost-neutral meaning no new financial boat into undertaken either for the development or for the operation and that wasn't the case with the development reforms And that's where the problem lies. The revitalized OSCE system required individual eighty million dollars and so that had to be sourced from either voluntary soft pledges cost sharing in between a lot of the UN agencies and a one percent levy applied to non-core contributions. Now the most interesting one and the one that's most important was the voluntary contributions. Because that precariously premised on the expectation or robbed. The hope I should say that entities make contributions consistently and timely. That hasn't happened in two thousand seventeen countries like Norway and China. As well as the g seventy seven all expressed concerns that these funding obligations wouldn't be met China's specifically and they said this not so subtly. China urged all traditional donors namely the United States meet their voluntary funding obligations. And that's where this complex relationship between the UN in the US comes to the full because it's important to recognize that the US is the largest contributor to the UN it supplies or a fifth of its entire budget. So that's twenty two percent of its regular budget twenty eight percent of its peacekeeping budget and two thousand eighteen that was approximately three report. Three billion dollars but yet the US still falls short of its funding obligations and this is because back in two thousand. When the General Assembly reformed how contributions worked looked they considered the relative wealth and power country and because the US is so wealthy in so powerful it's contributions a significantly higher than what it contribute mute as a result the US is buying for the UN's lodged at owing proximate one billion dollars of the one point? Three Billion Dollars owed by all U N members in October and two in a guitar is actually announced that the UN was effectively running out of cash and would be unable to meet its payroll commitments on this money. Saad flowing concern and so two thousand. Nineteen was the second year that they had exhausted. All budget reserves and had to use funds from left of a peacekeeping missions and the the. US actually admitted that a lot of its decisions are about managing liquidity Robin fulfilling its development mission goals. So in my opinion the system is actually potentially attention asked too much too quickly particularly in an environment where it's lodged dona easing that favorable to the institution itself into funding that institution with more money the difficulties around funding a historic essentially the UN continues to lack a truly independent. Funding base. Suggestions have been thrown up to address. Yes this is Simon Chesterman but there are no easy solutions so there are innovative ideas on the Tobin tax very very modest transactions on on sort of things that are only made possible through a world order by law so some of the ideas that have been proposed things like a fraction of a percent on capital transfers around the world I- miniscule tax on email if you pay a cent a day to send emails onto the Internet ed regulated the net would provide actually fairly significant funding for the UN. But any time these things are suggested as a lot of pushback from industry or from countries because often it's the states themselves that recognize that lays financial contributions are a form of leverage over what the UN does and that. There are a significant a number of member states who actually don't want the UN to be independent Aldermen nights they want to obey the servant of amendment rights and as result is not a huge amount of energy to give the UN and an independent funding by any more than there is to give the UN independent Amin even though the the charter does provide the states to put troops at the disposal of the United Nations Security Council under agreements that you could sign but the UN in the history of the UN notice date has contributed even single soldier on that basis instead soldiers Zahn loaned to the UN or. Just have blueberries put on the technically. They're still fighting on behalf of their individual contributing countries. And that's why. When the first I secretary general tricks lead welcomed the second secretary general? He said welcome to the most impossible job on the planet. Simon Chesterman David Give leads believes one way to deal with future. Financial constraints is for the UN to look beyond its iron ranks to not always try to do things in house. He advocates for a greater involvement with the private sector but he acknowledges there are suspicions about entering into private public partnerships. I heard this question question. Many Times that the price has its own interests and they have its own interest and it's good that they have it's only the essence of UN is just channel this interesting interesting. The way that the benefits the ultimate site. Second be that they do not understand how operates and here I Caesar Role of the leader just to help them to get to better understand the private sector as a partner parts. After competitor to developing organization organizations. We can do these important together. We can really do because during my campaign. I met a group of people with different opinions one. We're really reluctant to bring them. In and other they've been very much eager to work together to achieve food security worldwide and I. I'm from my personal experience. I have spent on the six years since his business. Private secretaries having motivation real motivation to go faster and quickly and they are profit-oriented so they understand that they need to contribute a lot and be active. Of course purseful awful. They're looking for personal corporate profit. But I don't see any bad on this. One could be both the big negatives on having a corporate profit and the rich people but giving private individuals freedom and initiative to go and do the business. I believe that's the right way to move to the past to educate hundreds.

UN United States Department of Peacekeeping Ope Nathan OSCE Simon Chesterman China Tin Congo General Assembly Maria Simon Chesterman David Saad United Nations Security Counci partner Norway Zahn
"the united nations" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

09:35 min | 1 year ago

"the united nations" Discussed on Future Tense

"For more than seventy years the United Nations has helped to keep the peace Uphold human rights and advance the economic and social well-being of millions a new management paradigm mistaking halls with an emphasis on. Transparency Accountability onto -bility and improved mandate implementation. Today our work is needed more than ever Antonia India guitarist mocking his place as United Nations reform up. He's the first secretary-general to have once been hit of government for several years. He was the Prime Minister of Portugal. Ogle he's also the first chosen under new selection system where aspiring candidates were allowed to publicly campaign for the role this time last year guitarist announced a reform package one that would sit the UN secretary on a path to modernisation in. This program will look at what that package gentiles and what it might achieve and we'll also examine the powerful role of the UN Security Council. Many believe it no longer reflects the realities sees of willpower so Kennedy reformed. Hello Antony Fennell here. Welcome to future. Taints the eight thousand six hundred ridden seventieth. Meeting of the Security Council is called to order the provisional agenda for. This meeting is peace and security in Africa. I think there's value in having initials in the century full stop. I think we must never lose. Sight of what the world looks like when it doesn't have something like the UN is. Is it a perfect system. Now it's a long way from perfect. Is it better than nothing. Is a whole lot better than nothing doctor therapists from the University of Queensland and one of the reasons is why it's a whole lot better than nothing is in the agencies and the oversight that we have for example if thinking of health as a worldwide issue of concern. We we think that way because of the United Nations we think that way because of the World Health Organization. Now that's really important for states. We have people paying attention to an Ebola outbreak in west Africa cricket recognizing that that has regional consequences and potentially world consequences and we need an international body. That's capable of doing those sorts of things you know we are so critical article of the UN but if you're a little tiny country and you can't maintain diplomatic relations very easily because that's expensive having embassies in other countries is expensive. You can have an embassy bassy in New York and you can go to the and you can talk to all the people that you need to talk to. Otherwise were withdrawing that from small states. And we're withdrawing their ability to act on the the international stage and that helps keep the world safer that helps us keep alert to problems helps us keep alert to any potential conflicts that are brewing any potential health health crises if we lose the UN we lose all of that capability sell on set up more than seventy years ago with fine ideals. The United Nations has often been criticized sized as ineffectual. The new Secretary General Antonio Gutierrez brings to that difficult job ten years experience as the UN's High Commission for Refugees. The guitarist reform plan is focused onto Jek gives raining in bureaucracy and making the UN's infield operations more efficient and effective. But he's not the. I walk this path as the National University of Singapore. Simon Chesterman explains so I remember previous round of reforms about twenty years ago when then coffey Hanan came in and was trying to bring about reforms and Sergei Lavrov then the Russian ambassador to the UN now foreign minister came to Annan. and Dan said it's taken you six months and you have really achieved anything. The Lord created the world in six days. What's taking you so long and coffee and and who wasn't always very funny? Did respond to time. The the Lord didn't have to deal with one hundred ninety three member states and so that is a real barrier to reform one of the things that I think could terrace. Terrace has been trying to do which is actually quite clever is focused on just getting the UN to function better does a tendency when people think about reforming the UN and to think in terms of grand changes so what Guiterrez focused on is really trying to just make the UN function more effectively and to do some of the bureaucratic radic creep that has taken place over the past several decades really since the early nineteen ninety s with the expansion of peacekeeping for analyst. Finalists Michael Noonan. The reforms certainly modest but nonetheless necessary. So there were three reform pillars that Gutierrez focus on the the first piece insecurity the second was management and the third and arguably the most important was development so with regards to peace and security. The reforms combine the responsibilities of form offices to create two new departments. The I was the Department of Political and peacebuilding affairs which provided a global responsibility responsibility on conflict mediation and preventative diplomacy. The second bomb was the department of peace operations which would organize the peacekeeping operations of the UN and and managing both these departments. The reforms introduced the standing principles group. which chaired by the secretary-general himself would work? Alongside UN entities and meet birth quarterly an on an ad hoc basis to respond to crises and facilitate effective coordination with regards conflicts and development and human rights. So the second pillar management also focused on reorganizing existing department to create two new offices the Department of Management Strategy Policy and compliance and the Department of operational support and the INFO gets areas. Here was to introduce assistant that was easy to use and understand. He tried to eliminate duplication work outlined clear roles and responsibilities and introduce checks and balances and so author of massive internal review. The reform abolished a significant. Number number redundant issuances and match nearly two thousand stuff to new positions providing training introducing improved performance evaluation systems for senior personnel. Oh and actually achieving agenda balance full senior staff and simply put Gutierrez wanted to or he hoped more likely to develop a culture of results and processes but the third reform pillow the one relating to the UN's in-country development activities that markel new and believes could prove the most important at the heart of the UN when development strategy are united country teams these UN country teams encompass all of the UN entities that the system might have within a specific country. These can can include effectively any in agencies under the United Nations Sustainable Development Group so because the UN Country Team can involve any number of agencies UN required assist awesome to coordinate and lead the country teams. And that's where the resident coordinator system. The system was introduced however in its previous configuration. The resident coordinator system was actually managed by the UNDP. That's one of the very agencies that it's meant to oversee and so you can start to see how this convoluted hierarchy. He made it difficult for resonant coins to have any official authority over the UN agency heads at them and to manage so the reforms in this particular case move the Aussie awesome to instead report directly to the UN Secretary General providing an independent office that had designated in official authority over over the UN country. Teams one vocal supporter of the restructuring of the Resin Coordinator will see system is former Georgia. In Agriculture Minister. David Kiva leads. Who recently made an unsuccessful run to become the UN's head of Food and agriculture? He believes Antonio Qatar is on the right path. This reform generally about this centralization to giving more power to the regional offices in dollars there two sub-regional ordination offices. This is one of those basic impediment. Slowest that sometimes respecting protocols. They are very complicated. Eh for instance one inside the NFL the district approval for his travel. Week ahead not just to get it but sometimes you eunuch just departs the next morning so this is really important. Nobody knows Becker what is needed in Georgia local experts. Nobody knows what these needed in Australia Australia. Better than your local experts on the ground so you must be granted to make decision over there. Not The way instructions from Rome New York from any any headwork when you delegate these and make sure that right people are walking their this reform will be successful so any large bureaucracy tends is be quite good at fighting change but I think the compelling argument that he's making is that if the UN is going to be taken seriously in any area It's GONNA deliver results. The UN can't simply measured development by dollars spent development activities have to be measured by achievements. Realized realized we now have much sense of how to measure impact the Human Development Report the Human Development Index the rule of law indices. We have much a sense of how to actually evaluate how effective the UN is rather than just supply of of resources on the peace and security side. I think there is also a realization is Asian that the long held separation between politics and peacekeeping not longer makes any sense in the past. There was a separate body. What set up in the early nineteen ninety.

United Nations UN Security Council UN Country Team Secretary General Antonio Guti secretary-general New York Prime Minister Africa Portugal Antonia India Human Development Index Kennedy Ogle secretary University of Queensland Georgia World Health Organization Antony Fennell National University of Singapo
"the united nations" Discussed on Akimbo: A Podcast from Seth Godin

Akimbo: A Podcast from Seth Godin

09:04 min | 1 year ago

"the united nations" Discussed on Akimbo: A Podcast from Seth Godin

"But it's fairly universal seth. My name is Bruce from planet earth. Recently one of my favorite podcasts. Making sense with Sam Harris went behind a paywall. He did this to avoid the perception that he is being influenced by his sponsors. I respect that but I can't see myself paying the monthly subscription to have access to his work by question question is how consumed continued to provide his podcast free to me but still make a profit. Thanks for all you do. Thank you Bruce. Here's the the deal for twenty or thirty years. People have been talking about the idea that some kind of information wants to be free that information in that spreads changes the culture. How is it then that once we eliminate the scarcity of the container? I used to hold the information. For example books are scarce. Because you have to chop down trees you have to storm you have to ship them. For example music was scarce because you had to put it on vinyl vinyl or a CD for example wine is scarce because it needs to come from a great Bingo on a bottle so leaving wine aside for minute what what are we gonNA do about. The industries built around information. Because the very thing that they depend on the ideas spreading are somehow related to the container that they come in and so when we take words take them out of a book put them into an e book or put them into a podcast. We are starting to eliminate scarcity. Radio had scarcity built right in there. Were only only a few stations in every town spectrum create scarcity so there's only a few stations since there's only a few stations more people listen to each one since more or people listened to each one attention also scarce becomes valuable because you're heaping it in huge piles and you can sell some of that attention to a sponsor but what happens when. There's a million podcasts. When there's a million podcast the average podcast only has twenty listeners? Twenty listeners his not enough to interrupt them and turn around and make a profit so you've outlined the problem. You don't WanNa pay Sam. Sam is worried about the perception that his opinion will be changed by sponsors. I'm not totally sure that that's true. I don't think my opinion about how to brush. Your teeth is changed by the fact that without my knowledge toothbrush. Ads appeared on this podcast but leaving that aside for a second we have more universal problem. Here which is you used to be able to get paid for making content because content was scarce. But more and more. You'RE NOT GONNA get paid for for making content particularly for making generic content if there's content associated only with you as we've seen on Patrie on you can hold your content hostage you can go to your fans and say unless enough of you pony up on like Bruce. I won't make it but you have to mean in it and over time. You may run into a problem because as Tim O'Reilly coined the problem isn't piracy. The problem isn't that your your ideas are spreading without you getting paid. The problem is obscurity. Your ideas aren't getting heard if your ideas are getting hurt then you're are not known and if you're not known then you're not trusted and if you're not trusted you can't change the culture if you can't change the culture you can't create value and so if you're a creator of ideas you need your ideas to spread to how to get paid because we live in a society and culture built on free market and industrial oh capitalism two different things and in both cases we sort of expect people are GonNa get paid for their work toward noting that for more than one hundred thousand years ears. Humans did not get paid for their ideas did not get paid for their song. Did Not get paid for their words. That was your hobby. You got paid for hunting or gathering or farming he got paid for doctoring beating. Get paid 'cause you said something funny. You didn't get paid 'cause you wrote amazing using grace. Just imagine what the world would be like on that one A. Z.. We no how is your hobby. And it's only in the last hundred or two hundred years we turn this into a profession. Some you could expect to get paid for but going forward forward people with ideas are going to get paid and are getting paid for something else. Something scarce they're getting paid for organizing the others they're getting paid for creating places and opportunities for connection. They're getting paid for souvenirs of their ideas. Not The ideas. Themselves chiefs and trumpeters cycle of creative destruction is going faster and faster and faster because now that we can fake someone's voice now so that we can fix someone's video. You're not even sure who the source of the idea is an so chaos will ensue. We are on the cusp of a lot of chaos us and so people who create ideas people create ideas that want to reach people. Like Bruce who don't want to pay for them. It's not clear it to me. We can get paid for our ideas. It's not clear to me that we can create sufficient scarcity to at large scale repeatedly. Make a living so I am doing this podcast. Not because I am getting paid to do it. I am doing this podcast because I can. Because it's a privilege. This is the end of the fifth season of Akimbo. And to those of you who have listened to more than one hundred episodes or just this one. Thank you because because you are offering me something really valuable. You're offering me your attention and that attention implies a level of trust that attention gives us a chance to share ideas and make things better. If you share this podcast I would really appreciate it. It might be good for you as well because if you share this podcast the people around around you might be willing to have an interesting conversation with you. This is the last podcast. I'll be doing with mid roll. Mid Roll are the folks who first showed showed up and provoked me into launching Akimbo. But we're moving on and going forward. This podcast is going to be sponsored by AKIMBO DOT com the platform. We've built that. His trained nearly twenty thousand people in more than one hundred countries using workshops to connect the others creating something scarce in a world filled with plenty of opportunities but not enough chances to find the others. I'm looking forward to twenty twenty because it's a chance another chance once again to make things better. I hope you'll join me. I'm looking forward to making a Ruckus with you. Thank you for listening listening. And here's to a happy and healthy. Twenty twenty go. Make your rockets. I just don't think it's possible or probable in in today's world to distinguish yourself as an educational institution or as a success seeker at the level of information gathering or information formation distribution. I mean this is the information age and you can get a great book a great essay. A great idea anywhere in none of us can do that better than the Internet right There is no oh great thought leader. WHO can out think the Internet like? We have data what all NBA gets right. Is it puts you in a context where you're part of a community that says. Yeah that's good. You got access to ideas you got access to information that's awesome but when you're gonNA show up when you gonNA face blink page when you're going to face the possibilities within you when you got to face those fears I'm not GonNa let you gotTa show up and that's the hardest part and it sounds simple. It sounds very commonsensical. But it's the number one reason why we don't write that book. It's the number one reason why we don't ask that question. It's not because we don't know where we don't have the information. We don't have an environment and can we don't have a support network that makes it feel like showing up as possible for me not just possible for the success stories out there but I Consider the ALT- NBA more than three thousand alumni in seventy four countries around the world find out more at Ault M._B._A. dot com..

Bruce Sam Harris NBA Twenty twenty Tim O'Reilly Patrie chiefs
"the united nations" Discussed on Akimbo: A Podcast from Seth Godin

Akimbo: A Podcast from Seth Godin

10:37 min | 1 year ago

"the united nations" Discussed on Akimbo: A Podcast from Seth Godin

"Moment avoidance of loss was so much more important Erdman desire for gain that it was not disrespectful to take away people's choice it was actually respectful all to see the other person for who they were. And here's the Homerun. Here's the big idea. The people you are seeking to persuade. Whatever they are currently doing their right they are right to deny certain people dignity they are right to deny certain ideas of science? They are right to defend the status quo because of who they are and where they are and what they believe. In this moment that we we have to develop the empathy to say as the Yemeni expression goes. You're right in front of my face so bona I see you and I see your grandparents before you and your great grandparents before them. I see you and I see your fear and I see the tension and I see the pressure and I see how you were raised and I see what you don't have enough of and the surplus and the scarcity. I see so it doesn't matter that I'm rights based on the glasses. You're wearing your right to tell a story to people is to begin by saying I don't believe can you believe and that's okay because if we can't add and that's okay then we don't have any chance at all to go. Oh beyond the facts of where we are in this moment and where we are in this moment is. You've seen the facts. I've seen the facts. You're wrong okay. We at that part. But you're not doing anything. You have the power to stay where we are so this gets back to people like us do things like this and this is why this institution is so important so the next door. I WanNa tell you happened in my little town so New York state where we all right now. the school board rules are fairly clear. The budget goes up and everyone in town gets vote on whether the school will get the money they asked for for if the budget fails they get one more try and if it fails the second time then draconian cuts are put into place. No one gets a say over them so my town is great public schools. That's why we lived there and year after year. The taxes went up your after year that the neighborhood started to shift and at the key here. Twenty to twenty five percent of the households in my town had a household income of under twenty five thousand dollars. It's not a lot of money. They were either senior citizens. They were inherited their homes from their parents. They were people who had been in town town for a long time and they organized and defeated the budget and so it was time for it to come up again. Well I have to put in a little aside in the schools in the town are great. In fact they won a national award called the Blue Ribbon School award where you get a little seal in front of your school For excellence so it's only a week to go before the second election and everybody's right and everyone's calling each other names and everyone everyone is wondering about near value well. Three people went to a stationery store and bought a hundred bridge yards a blue ribbon and on the big tree in front of the big school that everyone drives by every day. They hung fifty blue ribbons from the tree and over the next six days without those three people doing anything else. Blue Ribbons started showing up everywhere and the day before the election. You couldn't drive down a blocked in my town without seeing people celebrating what they were proud. Crowd celebrating their kids celebrating. Excellence and it wasn't about us in them. It was about what we could become and so when the vote happened the budget one two to one and it has never lost since because people like us us do things like this. What does it mean to be part of a tribe to be part of a group to be part of a community that sees each other because even in this fractious time the fractiousness multiplied by the media? Because that's what they make a living doing. We're still ninety eight percent the same. We're still ninety eight percent in agreement and yet it's so much easier to say I am. I'm not part of you when the opportunity we have when we tell our story is to figure out how to do the hard work of people like us and things like this and on how to tell our story our narrative in a way that doesn't get to the point of. Oh well McKenzie did a study and I can prove we're right but instead gets to the words and divisions and the pictures that others have in their head so that without losing they can help all of us win so I've made it sound super simple and it's not simple. It's the hardest work you can do and you are doing it. And I'm not minimizing. How hard it is what I am tried to challenge? And now we're going to have a conversation about it is when we get pushed into a corner what we often do is bring out our spreadsheet what we often do is bring out our proof what we often do is try to argue to higher ideals but mostly what we're trying trying to say is we're right in your Vaughn. Can't you see it and the people who were wrong. The people who are wrong no that they are wrong but they are holding attention and that tension is not making them happy it is the tension that keeps them with the status quo. It is the fear of change. It is the fear of losing losing what they have. It is the fear of. What will I tell the others that we need to learn to see attention? If we hope nope to find a path forward and at the same time we need to be able to give up our satisfaction and what it is to be right. I like being right. I like the fact that Newtonian mechanics makes sense. And I'm not here imagining the gravity could go away just because I will it but if it helps us all move forward for me to be temporarily not right in the service of telling a story that resonates resonates with people so that we can figure out how together to get in sync that is effective storytelling and I finish with a couple of things before we get into the Q.. And A. in the discussion. The first one is. How do we get like people to know our idea? How do we get the word out? And what marketers have done in the last fifty years persuade swayed us that. That's the hard part. If everyone knew that I have a kickstarter. It would do great if everyone knew that I was running for parliament. I would win that. We want awareness but awareness is only one third of what we need the second thing we need which is so so much harder than awareness which awareness undermines and Balazs is trust. Because you can run down the street naked and get awareness. But you're not going to get anyone to sign up to be getting heart surgery from you because awareness doesn't always lead to trust trust is in short supply. Trust is even more scarce than attention. Trust is what happens when we show up we show up and let me show up when we make promises and we keep them when we present ourselves in a way that reminds people of someone. They've trusted before but those two alone are not sufficient to third one is tension. What will happen if I don't say yes? Fear of missing out fear of being left behind fear of being ostracized that without tension. It's easier to stay where we we are. And so if you walk down the street seven blocks that way to the hospital you will see people doing ridiculous things to their bodies at the end of their lives because they are filled with tension about. What's going to happen next? And if you go seven blocks that way you will see healthy. People slowly killing themselves to one bad habit or another because they feel no tension at all to stop doing so what we do if we are marketers. If we're storytellers is yes. We have to occasionally get attention. Mostly we have to earn trust but then the thing that scares us that we don't want to have to do. We must willingly inflict tension then when you show up and say I have a new idea when you show up and say we have to change. You don't have to like the fact that you create attention but you just did and it could we the tension. That bus driver inflicts when he makes that noise with the air brakes. Oh the buses about to pull out. I better hurry that causes tension when you hear the voice coming coming out of the speaker. JFK that person who's calling the last gate she is creating tension and that is what each of you has to figure out how to do because your story is not gonNa work. 'cause you told it it's GonNa work because you told it in a way that resonated with people thanks your attention to go go.

Blue Ribbons Blue Ribbon School Erdman New York JFK McKenzie Vaughn Balazs
"the united nations" Discussed on Akimbo: A Podcast from Seth Godin

Akimbo: A Podcast from Seth Godin

15:55 min | 1 year ago

"the united nations" Discussed on Akimbo: A Podcast from Seth Godin

"A TV show from my youth. That doesn't hold up very well on reviewing is the man from uncle but one thing that does hold up was the logo that they had. It looked a lot like the logo for their parent organization which I assumed was the United Nations. Hey It's and and this is Akimbo. We'll be back in a second. After this message from our sponsor some people are better at changing the culture than others. Hey It seth and I'm here to talk to you about what it means to bring intent to bring care and effort to changing things to do work that matters for people who care. I call that marketing getting and I'd like to invite you to check out the marketing seminar. Where back for our ninth session? More than eight thousand graduates so far. That's because it works. WCHS CHECK OUT THE MARKETING SEMINAR DOT COM. Hope to see you there. Come make a Ruckus. The.

United Nations seth
"the united nations" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

07:20 min | 1 year ago

"the united nations" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"Five five two to five well ambassador Nikki. Haley just dropped in. We're going to have her on the air here in a few minutes for a little bit of this hour as we talk about her new book. Look that's coming out called with all due respect defending America with Grit and grace. I'm be a great conversation and We don't do that coming having very often. But I'm buster. Haley is a Definitely a very interesting lady and I thought it'd be fun to talk to her and fun for you to listen in so so she's GonNa join us here for a little while this hour Phone number in the meantime for you and Oughta talk triple eight eight two five five two two five life. Jill starts off this hour Missouri. Hey Jill how are you dave. I'm fine thanks for taking my call and thanks for all you do Mine situation here it is. I'm forty eight. I've never married and I don't have kids. I may fulltime music. Director for a church Make forty-six thousand. So when I we started up to you I realized there's no way I'm going to be able to take care of all my bills And get ahead with that so I I actually started teaching high school school band and choir and so that added another ten thousand A year now. The problem is is that they're requiring me to get certified To go back to school and that's going to cost the program that I ha- I am going to be taking is GonNa be like twelve thousand Route ten thousand dollar job. Yeah but it's over over a number of years they're allowing me five years to do it okay But I don't know I don't know what else I mean is if it's feasible Right now I have My houses ninety eight thousand. I have a ten thousand dollar car payment or car Forty six thousand on student loan and fourteen on a credit card but I'm paying on You said your I said you're forty eight. I am forty eight. Yes okay so I think there's a bigger question okay. The bigger question is What do you want to be doing eh for the next ten years and let's invest in that I would not go to all this angst and trouble over a part time job? Okay now if you want a full time music teacher and make your career and you're going to go in and become a member of. Aw that county. And they're gonNA pay you fifty sixty thousand overtime seventy thousand dollars to work for them. And that's the return and you get to live your dream and hand you get to smile while you're doing it and you get to make money and it's a full-time Gig then. Twelve thousand dollar investment makes sense short. It doesn't investment for a ten thousand dollar part time job does not make any sense at all because you'll be the first thing on the chopping block if there's a budget problem sure it's it's a Pretty new schools that started up so right. Now it's part time but The attendance is tripling. Every I mean doubling every year and so we in Providence. Well it is a private school and I I they are anticipating that it will be full time. you're churning music director say Christian school. It is yes all right. Well there's two I'd WanNa do then one is. I would want to discuss with them. The idea that they pay for this pay which they can afford it and Be where it's GonNa take me after I go to this trouble okay. And based on the growth of students. We think we're GONNA make you full time in two years if you finish your certification. Then let's get her done yet but if our if they I think well you know I don't know and it might be twenty years and we all know and then you don't invest in Muno on I'm not gonNA put my life on the line for that but but it is a certification transferable then to public. Yes it is absolutely yeah ask them to pay for it. It's only twelve grand and in return you'll promise to work there you know and you go in and go ahead and settle on your future salary and stuff okay. So let's it's not. Let's make this a part of a tenure game plan not a way to keep my part time job. Sure okay then it makes sense all right. Thank you so much call. We appreciate you joining us. Quinn is next. Quinn is in New York. Hi Glenn how are you. Hi Dave thanks for taking my call. Sure what's up. Okay so my husband and I are twenty three and just got married in September. I've been work. Thank you so much so. I've been working fulltime for a little over a year. And he has six more months before he graduated from Undergrad and I grew up listening to you. Thanks to my mom and I the following principles we followed your principles to achieve Before I got married I was on baby. Step four My question comes in so my husband has fourteen. Fourteen thousand nine hundred twenty one dollars in student loans should we just and we've obviously combined bank accounts and everything so should we empty our -mergency fund Down to a thousand thousand dollars to pay about half of the loan you were on baby step four when you got married. He took you back to baby. Step two right now we. We are one purchases and now you are one and you. You combine your back accounts but you. You know it's just hard for you and I don't blame you because you were route along pretty good and I'm sure he's worth it but you married into some debt right now. I think the main thing is just like since we're only on one on paycheck right now the next six months so same thing. So what does he does is. He's working undergrad right yet. We're GONNA Graduate Studies uh-huh degree in Cybersecurity. And so. What's she studying Sabra? Oh that's wonderful. What a great career field and so what what him from working while he's getting his degree so he's actually rotc right now he's going to be going to the army reserve so that takes a lot of time and they do pay him like a stipend every two weeks and he has awesome sauce? It's coming in anymore loan. It's just been before so you do have to do is creating some income and he is working not just going to school so That's good all right. Good Yeah let's just let's roll up actually put our budget together with our current situation. You know the great news is in twelve months from today. Your world's going to be completely different front with both of you kicked into gear. And he's got a great career field. y'All are GONNA be making bank. Okay thank you so much. You're heading in the right direction. Very very well-done open phones at triple eight eight two five five two two five Pablo is on Youtube. Says Dave what's your opinion on using the ACORNS APP after baby A. B. Step three not as a primary but little spare change investing well the only downside of acres. There's no downside anytime you save. Save money so good thing the only downside is you feel like you did something because let me tell you how the math works if you save a very small amount of money you know what you're going to end up with a.

Jill Haley Dave Quinn Nikki America Missouri Youtube Providence Christian school Pablo Glenn Sabra army New York
"the united nations" Discussed on 5 Things

5 Things

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"the united nations" Discussed on 5 Things

"Good morning. I'm Taylor Wilson and this is five things you need to know Tuesday. The Twenty Fourth of September Twenty nineteen get assorted president trump is set to address the United Nations would they focus on Iran in speech to world leaders. The president is expected to continue to try and gauge interest the idea of an international coalition to oppose a Rod a recent attack on a Saudi oil facility by Iran backed Yemeni hootie rebels has stirred the pot between the US and Iran but critics wonder if he has enough support among allies to team up against the country and did not helping matters trump has been pressed this week with questions surrounding a scandal obey conversation he had with Ukrainian President Vladimir's Alinsky and whether he threatened to withhold aid to the country unless officials launched an investigation into Democratic presidential residential candidate Joe Biden trump's personal attorney. Rudy Giuliani has raised questions about whether Biden as vice president pushed for former Ukrainian Prosecutor General Viktor Shokhin Shokhin to be ousted shokhin investigated a private Ukrainian gas company Barista group that Biden's son Hunter Biden was a board member of but Biden said that he wanted shokhin out because he wasn't doing enough to investigate corruption not because of anything to do with his son trump. Meanwhile says he never pressured the Ukrainian government when it came to who investigating Biden. There was no pressure. Put on them whatsoever. I put no pressure on them whatsoever. I think it would probably possibly have been okay if I did but I didn't. I didn't put any pressure on them. Whatsoever Biden tweeted on Monday for trump to release transcripts of his call with Ukraine a second Perrin faces sentencing in the so-called Varsity Blues College Admission Scandal in Los Angeles executive on Tuesday will become the latest parents sentence after actress. Felicity Huffman received fourteen days is in prison earlier this month. Devon Sloan who's the founder and CEO of a water treatment company has admitted to paying two hundred fifty thousand dollars for his.

Hunter Biden Joe Biden president Iran Viktor Shokhin Shokhin Taylor Wilson Felicity Huffman vice president Devon Sloan Rudy Giuliani United Nations Barista group Rod Ukraine founder and CEO Alinsky Los Angeles Perrin US
"the united nations" Discussed on 5 Things

5 Things

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"the united nations" Discussed on 5 Things

"True on Monday as far north as a gag Alaska and as far South as Wellington New Zealand you win the world's southernmost capital city just one difference south of the equator. It's the spring equinox tropical storm. Karen is on its way toward Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands. It's still not clear what Karen's exact path will be but the storm will gradually intensify early this week bringing downpours and gusty winds wins as it approaches the islands likely on Tuesday Puerto Rico is still recovering from the devastation of Hurricane Maria in twenty seventeen as the island's power grid remains unstable able and hundreds of thousands of Puerto Ricans live in housing still in disrepair and while Karen won't be anything compared to the one hundred seventy five mile an hour winds of Maria Governor Governor Wanda Vazquez said that an emergency plan has been activated across the island of three point two million people and last Princess Diana has been gone for more within two decades bought the late royals memory will surely be at the forefront when Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan begin their trip to Africa on Monday. The roles are scheduled scheduled to visit South Africa together with Harry also visiting Angola Malawi and Botswana Harry's Solo trip to Angola will be particularly significant bringing memories as for many of his mom Diana. They're just eight months before her death you can catch new episodes of five things Monday through Saturday on apple podcasts and wherever relegate your pods including the Google home and Amazon Echo you can also subscribe for free and if you'd like you can leave us a rating and review plus be sure to follow and tweet lead at USA Today podcast on twitter five things as part of the USA Today podcast network hiring can be a slow process cafe eldora or a COO Dylan Moskowitz needed to hire a director of coffee for his organic coffee company but was having trouble.

Puerto Rico Virgin Islands Karen Maria Governor Governor Wanda Prince Harry Diana Puerto Ricans Angola Malawi South Africa Angola Alaska Wellington New Zealand USA Today Hurricane Maria Dylan Moskowitz apple Duchess Meghan US COO
"the united nations" Discussed on 5 Things

5 Things

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"the united nations" Discussed on 5 Things

"Good morning. I'm Taylor Wilson and this is five things you need to know Monday. The twenty third of September two thousand nineteen to get you distorted President Donald Trump kicks off another United Nations meeting on Monday as world leaders gather in New York for the UN General Assembly trump's meeting comes amid increased tensions aginst between the US and Iran among other issues a recent attack on oil facilities in Saudi Arabia will be at the top of the agenda and a senior administration official speaking anonymously missiles said that the president will try to use the UN to look for a consensus about what to do with Iran the country was largely blamed within the trump White House for having something to do with the attack and trump said last week that new sanctions are set to go against the country. We have just sanctioned the Iranian national bank that is Zehr central banking system and it's going to be at the highest level of sanctions. Meanwhile the hottest ticket in New York will be at the climate climate action summit where world leaders plan to address increasing climate change trump who wants to pull the US out of the two thousand fifteen Paris agreement to cut emissions will not participate associate but China and other countries may make big announcements allies have also been on sixteen year old Swedish activists Gril Tune Berg last week millions of people around the world marched arch-foe climate change awareness something to Enberg told the UN youth climate summit was driven by the youth. We showed that we we are united and that that we young people are unstoppable to Enberg will speak at the General Assembly on Monday. Testimony is set to begin on Monday in the trial trial of a former Dallas police officer who shot and killed an unarmed black man in his own home last year amber geiger a white officer said she mistook her neighbors apartment for her own last year and thought both John was a burglar according to a nine one one recording geiger can be heard apologizing to John a native of the Caribbean and island of Saint Lucia who worked for an accounting and consulting firm in Dallas. She said that after a long shift she returned home exhausted and mistakenly parked on the wrong floor before heading to the wrong apartment because of it the Dallas Police Department fired Geiger after the shooting and many in the community protested calling for justice while vigils were held for John. Including one at Harding University John was twenty six years old next up so long flip-flop. San Hello Pumpkin spice. Monday marks the tunnel equinoxes in the northern hemisphere meaning. The official first day of fall is here though they are technically isn't any administrative or political organization that makes it official on the equinoxes the amount of daylight daylight and night are both roughly twelve hours long across most of the world that'll be true on Monday as far north as a gag Alaska and as far South as Wellington New Zealand you win the world's southernmost capital city just one difference south of the equator..

amber geiger Donald Trump UN Enberg John official New York US Taylor Wilson Dallas Iran Dallas Police Department president Harding University John General Assembly Zehr United Nations Wellington New Zealand officer