35 Burst results for "The Times"

Israel’s Parliament Dissolves, Paving Way for Election in November

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 4 hrs ago

Israel’s Parliament Dissolves, Paving Way for Election in November

"Israel's parliament dissolves itself to set up another election Has voted to dissolve itself marking the end of a year old experimental coalition government and sending the country to the poles on November 1 for the 5th time in less than four years following the vote Israel's foreign minister and architect of the outgoing coalition government embraced Naftali Bennett Israel's shortest serving prime minister before they swapped chairs The government has collapsed just over a year after it was formed in a historic move to saw longtime leader Benjamin Netanyahu ousted after 12 years in power by a coalition of ideologically diverse parties the

Israel Naftali Bennett Benjamin Netanyahu Government
 Israel's parliament dissolves, sets 5th election in 4 years

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 4 hrs ago

Israel's parliament dissolves, sets 5th election in 4 years

"Israel's parliament dissolves itself to set up another election Has voted to dissolve itself marking the end of a year old experimental coalition government and sending the country to the poles on November 1 for the 5th time in less than four years following the vote Israel's foreign minister and architect of the outgoing coalition government embraced Naftali Bennett Israel's shortest serving prime minister before they swapped chairs The government has collapsed just over a year after it was formed in a historic move to saw longtime leader Benjamin Netanyahu ousted after 12 years in power by a coalition of ideologically diverse parties the

Israel Naftali Bennett Benjamin Netanyahu Government
Jackson to be sworn in as Breyer retires from Supreme Court

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 5 hrs ago

Jackson to be sworn in as Breyer retires from Supreme Court

"The Supreme Court will look historically different after its contentious term ends today The high court will issue its final opinions this morning in cases involving the EPA and a Trump era asylum program The big news came last week with its rulings on guns and abortion Stephen Breyer was in the three justice minority both times and he'll retire as the term ends today Breyer will then help swear in his replacement and his one time clerk Brown Jackson She will become the high court's first black female justice and for the first time four women will serve together on the 9 member court Sagar Meghani Washington

Supreme Court Stephen Breyer EPA Brown Jackson Breyer Sagar Meghani Washington
Elmo, 3, joins youngest Americans in getting vaccinated

AP News Radio

01:13 min | 6 hrs ago

Elmo, 3, joins youngest Americans in getting vaccinated

"Elmo was the latest Sesame Street character to roll up his fur to urge kids to get their COVID-19 vaccinations You were super duper today getting your COVID vaccine Elmo There was a little pinch but it was okay V is four vaccine following in the steps of big bird Elmo got the COVID shot to promote the new vaccines now available to children under 5 Almost creators pegged them up at characters eternal age at three and a half In a public service announcement Elmo's father Louis equally furry and red says he had questions but talked to a pediatrician I learned that Elmo getting vaccinated is the best way to keep himself our Friends neighbors and everyone else Healthy and enjoy them the things they love Have a question Can we have a hug Oh The CDC advises vaccination even for those who already had COVID-19 to protect against reinfection and says it's okay to get other vaccines at the same time Of course not everybody has liked the ad produced by the sesame workshop and the ad council when it featured big bird Republican senator Ted Cruz called it government propaganda I'm Ben Thomas

Elmo Louis CDC Ad Council Ted Cruz Ben Thomas
Why Drew Hernandez Is Becoming One of the Best Frontline Journalists

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:57 min | 8 hrs ago

Why Drew Hernandez Is Becoming One of the Best Frontline Journalists

"And this is why we're so excited to have you and partner with you and do things, which is this kind of grassroots you frontline journalism. Because it's hard, right? I mean, you get sweaty, you don't get to sit in an air conditioned office, right? And so just talk a little bit about that because you're kind of becoming known as kind of one of the, if not the best front lines journalist where, you know, when the sparks are flying and antifa comes out, drew Hernandez is there, but talk about the hours, talk about the Gritty, gritting the side of it, right? Yeah, I mean, you know, shout out to the team though. The front lines team, they really helped me with booking the flights and getting me where I need to be. The logistics. The logistics, right? But like the actual on the ground when you're on the ground, it's a lot of instincts. You have to know what's coming. You have to know what you need to film at the right time to kind of have to kind of have a feel of the crowd. I mean, it's a difference environment. I mean, I view it kind of like, I don't want it to put it this way, but every kind of arena is like a different level, like a video game. Like that's how I view it. I don't treat it that way because you could get really different challenges. Different challenges, you know what I mean? There's different levels. There's like expert hard, medium, easy. It really is. I mean, for instance, if you go to Portland, you go undercover with antifa. That is probably the hardest thing to do right now is going to cover and get that kind of footage with them. But you go to like a protest somewhere in Arizona where it's not that hard. So you kind of have to what I always encourage people is not everyone can do what I do. I think a lot of people try to. I mean, you can. You can just run out there with a camera and film something, but to consistently keep doing this on like a monthly, weekly basis, it does take an amount of skill. Precision has involved precision because you have to be able to see things. Like when you see people like Savannah Hernandez or Julio Rojas with town call Julio is great. Julio with town hall media or Jorge Ventura with daily college. There's also a lot of these people are extremely talented. They're very talented. They know what they're looking

Drew Hernandez Portland Arizona Savannah Hernandez Julio Rojas Julio Jorge Ventura
From the Frontlines to the Clandestine with Drew Hernandez

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:26 min | 8 hrs ago

From the Frontlines to the Clandestine with Drew Hernandez

"I'm joined with the great drew Hernandez, drew, welcome back, man. I want to brag on drew here. Drew flew out to Washington, D.C. and anticipation of the roe V wade ruling. Drew, you kind of camped out there waiting for it and drew got some of the most compelling footage right as the roe versus wade ruling was announced, both positive and negative footage. And you also got into that kind of altercation with one of the guys there in D.C. doing some great front lines reporting. Yeah, Charlie, I mean, I mean, it's a team effort. I know you and I were coordinating on when we should go. And I think the best decision was to just kind of like stake it out and wait because it's a monumental. This is American history. Yes. It's huge. This is something that we didn't want to miss if we did. I think we would have really regretted it. But I was kind of like running some of the numbers. And this is, this is grassroots type of stuff right here. This is definitely God's work moving through us and what we're doing being in the right place at the right time. That's always been my experience. God directs our steps. You always end up in the right place at the right time because God is real and he's leading you. And I think in totality, our entire front lines on the ground just my Twitter account alone, the viewership was 7.5 million crazy. That's just Twitter. Just Twitter, and if we add the Tucker hit that I did, which is obviously our row coverage. That's over 10 million views. And we don't even know the re postings on Instagram and other

Drew Hernandez Washington, D.C. Roe V Wade Drew Wade D.C. Charlie Twitter Tucker Instagram
If You Keep Your Mouth Shut, God Will Judge You

The Eric Metaxas Show

00:52 sec | 10 hrs ago

If You Keep Your Mouth Shut, God Will Judge You

"In my book about Dietrich bahnhof from the Holocaust. One of the figures in the story of that book is Martin nimoy. And Martin niemoller, who wrote that now famous poem first they came for the trade unionist, then they came for this. And then when they came for me, there was no one left to speak up for me. That is the story of our time that ladies and gentlemen, if you don't do your part now, honestly, you know, God is judging us for when we speak up and for when we keep our mouths shut. If you keep your mouth shut, I promise you, God is judging you for that because people depend on us having the courage to speak the truth. And we all get courage from others who have courage. And I've gotten encouraged from Simone gold and Brandon struck and others who have been persecuted, but it has made them stronger.

Dietrich Bahnhof Martin Nimoy Martin Niemoller Simone Gold Brandon
Ann McElhinney and Eric Discuss K. Gosnell and the Horrors of Abortion

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:54 min | 10 hrs ago

Ann McElhinney and Eric Discuss K. Gosnell and the Horrors of Abortion

"To be clear because I know there are many new listeners to this program or to my podcast. They're not familiar because they haven't heard my conversations with you on the film that you made. But this is one of the stories of our time. It's one of the most gruesome and important stories of our time because there are many gruesome stories, but this story is extremely gruesome, but also extremely important because it highlights so many things at the heart of our broken culture. And so for people who know nothing about Kermit gazelle, let's talk about that. My understanding, the surface level is that this was a man who was operating one of the most, I mean, folks, this is like out of a novel, it's too horrific to imagine, but this is in a poor section of Philadelphia, praying on poor black women almost exclusively, and this is one of the most filthy evil abortion clinics you could ever imagine. It's like out of Dickens. Utterly horrifying. And this was going on year after year after year and the authorities did nothing. So that's one piece of the story, but Ann talk more, please for my audience who doesn't know what happened. No, but that's a great introduction, by the way. This guy was operating in plain sight. I mean, that's an incredibly important part of this piece. This guy operated for 30 years in plain sight. He did do legal abortions in a filthy, filthy, dirty place. However, he had a modus operandi of delivering bigger babies alive and then cutting the necks with scissors, and he did this according to the grand jury thousands of times.

Kermit Gazelle Dickens Philadelphia ANN
AP Sports SummaryBrief at 1:14 a.m. EDT

AP News Radio

02:00 min | 10 hrs ago

AP Sports SummaryBrief at 1:14 a.m. EDT

"GP sports I've checked Freeman They went back and forth in a scoreless duel in New York two teams that had visions of playing in October and the Houston Astros scored late to beat the New York mets to nothing Justin veranda was outstanding earning his tenth win after his return from Tommy John surgery I definitely feel different you know some of my pitches haven't felt as sharp some of them have felt better You know I think my curveball this year has been really good I feel largely the same but the stuff seems to be playing a little bit different He tossed 8 innings allowed two hits with 8 strikeouts Mike mancuso New York While in The Bronx the New York Yankees completed a three game sweep of the Oakland a's 5 to three Giancarlo Stanton hit a three run Homer His last 6 hits have been the long ball It's an interesting time right now We're not getting too many hits but when I am in the Homer The LA Dodgers avoided a three game sweep with an 8 four win at Colorado Boston held on for a 6 5 win in extra innings in Toronto Minnesota scored three in the tenth Cleveland scored four to win 7 to 6 the game winner a two run shot from Josh naylor Rowdy teles has hit 5 home runs since Sunday He hit a pair in leading Milwaukee to a 5 three win over Tampa Be more compact and not as aggressive in a swing Has helped me make more contact and be able to keep everything in the middle of the field Yeah you got a two run blast from Avi Garcia in the 9th four four three comeback win at St. Louis Atlanta down Philadelphia four to one Adam Duvall hit a 400 foot home run the braves now 21 in 5 in June Whoever we put in there right now is stepping up and doing the job and that's huge Oh the angels over the Chicago White Sox Pittsburgh Washington Kansas City down Texas San Diego Arizona Detroit one at San Francisco Seattle be Baltimore and the Chicago Cubs beat Cincinnati NBA James Harden will opt out of 47.7 million from Philadelphia as the team works a deal in hopes of using money saved to help build the roster Check Freeman AP sports

Justin Veranda Mike Mancuso Giancarlo Stanton La Dodgers Tommy John Houston Astros New York Mets New York Josh Naylor Freeman New York Yankees Avi Garcia Homer Teles Oakland Adam Duvall Cleveland Colorado Minnesota
 Naylor's 2-run HR in 10th gives Guardians 7-6 win over Twins

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 12 hrs ago

Naylor's 2-run HR in 10th gives Guardians 7-6 win over Twins

"The guardians pulled out a 7.6 win over the twins on Josh naylor's two out two run Homer in the bottom of the tenth Cleveland trailed 6 three before scoring four times in its final look bad Ahmed Rosario ignited the rally with an RBI double and Stephen Quan scored on a pass ball before naylor went deep off loser jarrell cotton The comeback followed max Kepler's two run Homer that put Minnesota ahead by three in the tenth The twins forced extra innings on 6th inning homers by Alex kirilloff and geo Rochelle Minnesota leads the AL central by two games over the guardians I'm Dave

Josh Naylor Ahmed Rosario Stephen Quan Homer Max Kepler Cleveland Naylor Jarrell Alex Kirilloff Minnesota Geo Rochelle Dave
 2-time Wimbledon champ Murray loses to Isner in 2nd round

AP News Radio

00:27 sec | 14 hrs ago

2-time Wimbledon champ Murray loses to Isner in 2nd round

"And Emma rata were eliminated in the second round of Wimbledon Murray disappointed the crowd by losing to American John Isner in four sets Isner had been zero and 8 versus the two time Wimbledon champion Radio can who was asked by Caroline Garcia in straight sets Three time defending champ Novak Djokovic and number 5 Carlos alcaraz won their second round matches while number three Casper Roode fell Women's second seat at net cultivate and number 9 gardenia muguruza were defeated I'm Dave

Emma Rata Wimbledon Murray Caroline Garcia John Isner Isner Carlos Alcaraz Novak Djokovic Casper Roode Gardenia Muguruza Dave
Rep. Gohmert Calls for Full Deposition of Cassidy Hutchinson

Mark Levin

01:05 min | 15 hrs ago

Rep. Gohmert Calls for Full Deposition of Cassidy Hutchinson

"Carry picket and Joseph Clark at the Washington times Representative Louie gohmert called January 6th select committee to release the full deposition A former White House say Cassidy hutchison The which she claimed that mister gohmert and other Republican lawmakers sought presidential pardons in late 2020 he flatly denied seeking a pardon for himself mister gohmert said he made several pardon requests for U.S. service members whom he says were wrongfully convicted of crimes while deployed in war zones but he never made a request for himself Why don't they release The full transcripts As a matter of fact Louis on to something As I keep saying she was forced to testify four times the 5th time being publicly Why Because there are pressuring her Why can't we see all these transcripts raw transcripts and see them now

Mister Gohmert Joseph Clark Washington Times Louie Gohmert Cassidy Hutchison White House U.S. Louis
Judge, Stanton homer to bail out Taillon, Yanks top A's 5-3

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 16 hrs ago

Judge, Stanton homer to bail out Taillon, Yanks top A's 5-3

"The New York Yankees completed a three game sweep of the Oakland athletics answering a three run first sending all James since I own with a two run Homer by Aaron judge and then pulling ahead with a three run Jack by John Carlos Stanton in the 5 three win Stanton's last 6 hits and 8 of his last ten have been home runs It's an interesting time right now or not getting too many hits but when I am of their Homer so yeah I don't think I've had one kind of like this My own gotta have a basis load of jam in the second with a pair of strikeouts and settle down over the next three innings to secure his 9th win against one loss Matt Mike which New

John Carlos Stanton Homer New York Yankees Athletics Oakland Aaron Stanton James Jack Matt Mike
Verlander dominates, Castro homers, Astros beat Mets 2-0

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 16 hrs ago

Verlander dominates, Castro homers, Astros beat Mets 2-0

"Jason Castro hit a two run Homer in the top of the 9th inning to lift the Astros to a two to zero win over the mets Justin Verlander was outstanding earning his tenth win after his return from Tommy John surgery I definitely feel different You know some of my pitches haven't felt as sharp Some of them have felt better you know I think my curveball this year has been really good You know I feel largely the same but the stuff seems to be playing a little bit different He tossed 8 innings allowed two hits with 8 strikeouts The Astros swept the four game season series with the mets who have dropped three straight for the first time this season Mike mancuso New York

Jason Castro Astros Justin Verlander Mets Tommy John Homer Mike Mancuso New York
Greinke sharp in 500th career start, Royals beat Rangers 2-1

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 17 hrs ago

Greinke sharp in 500th career start, Royals beat Rangers 2-1

"In his 500th career star 38 year old Zach Ricky picked up the win on the Kansas City Royals two one win over the Texas Rangers Not many numbers I've been interested in And I found out about that like last game So that was going to be 500 this time So I think that's pretty neat neat little number It gave up a solo Homer to leote tavera's leading off the 5th one of only four hits he gave up in 6 innings Kyle is Bill broke the one one tie with a solo Homer in the bottom of the 5th Greg eckland Kansas

Zach Ricky Kansas City Royals Texas Rangers Tavera Kyle Bill Greg Eckland Kansas
Why Is Cassidy Hutchinson Considered Credible?

Mark Levin

01:44 min | 17 hrs ago

Why Is Cassidy Hutchinson Considered Credible?

"Why is this witness cast hutchison considered credible She's seen as credible I keep hearing that Mick Mulvaney the former failed acting chief of staff to Donald Trump He's all in That many faces admit He wasn't an eyewitness to anything but don't worry He knows everything that took place Old Mick Mulvaney That's fine Saw wisenheimer former assistant independent counsel working for Ken Starr He was convinced Convinced that we now have absolute evidence of culpability culpability That Donald Trump has committed seditious conspiracy Wow Based on the testimony of one person Whose testimony was never challenged Or was it This young lady's 25 years old some say 26 years old She's young She was not a senior assistant to the president of the United States She testified before this committee in secret four different times You saw those of you who watched or listened her 5th time Why would they need to talk to her 5 times Why Ask any real lawyer why Because they were wearing her down pressing her pressing or pressing her Many hours each time

Mick Mulvaney Donald Trump Hutchison Ken Starr United States
Amanda Milius Tells Us About Her Latest Film Projects

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:30 min | 18 hrs ago

Amanda Milius Tells Us About Her Latest Film Projects

"Hey folks, happy to be here. We're having fun doing America first. We are talking with my good friend Amanda milius, film maker, extraordinaire, who has an interesting project that I'm dying to see because John McAfee is one of the world's wild men. And his whole tail end demise and all of that, you've got some interesting stuff going on about that. Tell us where the projects it's now. Well, so the company is building a handful of docs at one time. We've got the Doc fund, and then we've got the scripts. And what I'm trying to do instead of doing one movie at a time, I'm trying to create a machine and a company. And we all are trying to create an industry, right? So these things take a little bit longer than just shooting out one movie after another, but I feel like that's my kind of, I hate to say this really my gift to the movement is that I know how to do these things. It's not just about me. It's not just about me making a movie after a movie. I want other directors to be able to make quality movies that can stay on big platforms that can make a huge difference. And that's kind of boring skill that I have. But it's something that I can lend to the movement. So the bigger picture is the company and we have such loyal humans working with us that it's like it's a blessing. I love your crew. You know, my guys. Yeah, they're fun. For a while. And they're great. And I love them. And so we've got, you know, we've got our work cut out for us.

Amanda Milius John Mcafee America
Jim Hanson and Amanda Milius Discuss the J6 Show Trial

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:00 min | 18 hrs ago

Jim Hanson and Amanda Milius Discuss the J6 Show Trial

"Hey folks, it's Jim Hansen. I have sitting here in studio. Oblivious to the fact that we just went live because I was talking to my good friend amazing filmmaker and one of the most culturally elite members of the America first crowd, Amanda milius. Welcome. Thank you. I'm so glad to be on in the new spot. Isn't this cool? This is like a crazy show. It is the coolest thing. I know. No, I almost am like not worthy. I would like like I said, I almost wore sweats. I know. You got to do that. On the bottom. You have to have the top here. Yeah, I'm used to just being able to pull it together on the top, and then everything else is like yoga pants, and I'm like, maybe I'll get dressed today. Yeah. Yeah, well, we did it. And we're on the late night TV talk thing. Now, I want to talk kind of production value. Because I don't know if you notice, there is a giant show trial propaganda fest for the invented insurrection going on. That was pretty, I mean, yesterday was, there are some really good memes created out of yesterday. Like if a day creates good memes. It's a good day. So yeah, it's us. It's our team winning. Yeah, there was this one where like, I think they had like shots from one of those White House down or something movies or and then they had, I mean, it was so with the beast. The grass, like, that's basically what she was describing. I mean, it was absolutely insane. And good on them. But I want to kind of get into your area of expertise because the left decided when they were going to have these show trials that they were going to hire a TV news executive to stage them. Tell us super cool. It tells you a lot. And then you've got legs zelensky going on like every meeting with every celebrity he possibly can. You're like, man, this guy's got a lot of time on his hands 'cause I'm just trying to run a production company, like not run a war. I don't even have time to do that. That's amazing.

Amanda Milius Jim Hansen America White House
"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

01:34 min | Last week

"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"And launched a whole new legal philosophy in the United States. Tell me why textualism and originalism are important to you. I interpret the constitution as a law, and I understand it to have the meaning that it had at the time people ratified it. But could one seemingly arbitrary switch in the ruling? Have changed the outcome? The roe V wade decision in 1973 made abortions legal until quote viability. Or somewhere around 28 weeks in a pregnancy. And that timetable sparked years of litigation and a full on culture war. Rowdy way to find out okay. I'm Gustav ariano. You're listening to the times, daily news from the LA times. It's Tuesday, June 21st, 2022. A Mississippi case that the Supreme Court will decide any day now. It might strike down roe versus wade altogether. Before the court announces its final opinion, the times is looking at abortion from a number of perspectives..

Gustav ariano United States LA times Mississippi Supreme Court wade the times
"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

05:24 min | Last month

"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"And how they can convince workers to come back. Samantha matsunaga as a business reporter and she writes about who's being left behind in the pandemic economic recovery. Samantha, welcome to the times. Thanks for having me. So what's the current state of the restaurant industry right now when it comes to employment?.

Samantha matsunaga Samantha the times
"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

04:37 min | 3 months ago

"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"I'm Erin Logan, and you're listening to the times, a daily news podcast from the LA times, it's Thursday, March 31st, 2022. Today, we are going to talk about the aftermath of one of the most viral moments in Oscar history. Richard..

Erin Logan LA times the times Oscar Richard
"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

03:02 min | 5 months ago

"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"So, talking with Jessica got us thinking, what more can we learn from even earlier pandemics? We covered 20th century ones with Jessica, but what about the Black Death, smallpox, cholera? All the other ones that ravaged the world in earlier centuries. Those arguably even left bigger pockmarks on society. What can those pandemics from the past teach us about how we live today? Frank's note and knows he's professor emeritus of history at Yale and has spent the last 40 years looking at how pandemics have changed society. Frank, welcome to the times. Thank you very much. It's a pleasure to be with you. You've said before that each pandemic had its own personality and its own time and place. What do you mean by that? I mean that, first of all, microbes have no agency. They don't have a design to infect us. And they reach us only through ways that we ourselves create. Something that we often forgot. A good example would be you mentioned asiatic cholera, which is the most dreaded disease of the 19th century. It was the perfect disease spread by the oral fecal route for the era of the industrial revolution in its takeoff with massive urbanization that was unplanned and had an infrastructure that was overwhelmed by people moving to cities working in factories and workshops and all the rest of it. And this led to catastrophic sanitary conditions, but the establishment of the sanitary revolution in the 19th century transformed that. We don't any longer experience asiatic cholera as a major problem..

Jessica cholera Frank smallpox Yale the times
"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

06:38 min | 5 months ago

"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Hey, what's up? It's me Gustav ariano. As you know, the times podcast is dedicated to bringing you fascinating stories from entertainment news to climate change developments to the random tales we should care about. With your support, you make shows like the times possible and help independent journalism keep you informed. If you haven't already, consider subscribing at just $1 for 6 months. So go to LA times dot com slash exclusive to subscribe today. Gracias. The 1619 Project began as a work of journalism. Still is. It's still in us, but did you have grander plans from the beginning that you see what it could become? Hell no. No. The original project was a grand plan. Never in the history of the times has a single issue of the magazine, a special section and a podcast series been dedicated to one thing. So even just pitching that was extremely ambitious and it also then came with a great risk. I talk a lot about how in the week before publication I was like sick. I couldn't sleep. I was worried because I had commanded all of these resources from the times as a black woman on a project about slavery. And if no one read it, if no one cared, you know this. That is a long time. It closes the door. So we bear responsibility. If a white journalist teaches something ambitious and it doesn't work out, that reflects on that journalist. But if a black journalist teaches something ambitious and it doesn't work out, it reflects on all of us. The day we laid printed out the entire magazine and put it up on the wall in the room so that we could see it in its entirety in a Wesley Morris and I who wrote the music essay, he was at work that day, and I called him in. And we just embrace each other and started sobbing. I think it's a really powerful message that you don't have to be in some exalted position to start something. And I think that's an example, bleeding from where you are, but still the scope, the resources, all of what went into it, how did you make that happen inside a place like The New York Times? Ancestral intervention? I say that kind of jokingly and kind of not, because I'm agnostic, I'm not. I'm not a religious person, but it's been so strange on this project because I have just felt something like some act of intervention in so many times because there's no reason this project should exist as it does. Knowing everything that we know about the industry to have really unprecedented amount of resources to put into a project about slavery that, by the way, it was like, you know, what made the project powerful was we were unflinching. We were not telling a story that we were worried about. How does the typical New York Times reader respond to this? Will the typical New York Times reader feel comfortable? Which is so often news decisions get driven by who are the consumers of news. And we just didn't do that. It was in response to that question we've all gotten, which is, for everyone's a long time ago, why don't you get over it? Black people are constantly having to answer that question in a country that can't get over slavery. And we were trying to force an acknowledgment of this thing we've treated as an asterisk that has never been asterix, right? Like people are like, oh, everybody knows slavery happened. Yeah, but we act like slavery was like two paragraphs in the story. Over there somewhere. And that the constitution is so divine that we can't even mess with it. It's shapes so much of our policy, our law, you know, you have originalists who think it was like the tablets, the stone tablets. And yet somehow slavery were told has nothing to do with our society today. And that just doesn't, it's not logical. So this project was trying to do that. But I also had to be in a certain place in my career to brightness forth. So you have to work as hard as you can to make yourself undeniable. They might still deny you in the end, but you have to put yourself in a position to be undeniable. And by the time I picked the 1619 Project, I had a track record of showing you could do these long form investigative pieces about racial inequality that infuse a lot of history and people would actually care and read them. So we take the project to book form. 7 new essays, more than a thousand in notes. A list long list, very impressive list of peer reviewers. Yes. What was revised? What was in hand and how did you go about constructing the book? So the beauty of the book is having faith, two years of scrutiny, two years of critique, some of it, much of a bad faith, but some of it good critique, legitimate critique. We were able to use that to really strengthen perfect the project and show our work. So every essay, if you read the original project, every single essay has been expanded significantly. And then we have new essays that go into different areas that we weren't able to talk about in the original project. So for instance, we didn't deal with settler colonialism or India removal in the original project, which I always knew was a gaping hole. You can't talk about slavery without talking about the first people who were enslaved by the colonists, which were indigenous people. And then the fact that you can't expand slavery unless you steal the land. So that was necessary. We have an amazing piece, which I actually think of all the pieces in the book will probably be most surprising to kind of your more casual reader. Because it also talks about the 5 so called civilized tribes who engage in chattel slavery, which we also don't learn about. That there were black folks on the trail of tears, but they were enslaved. We don't talk about that. So there's an essay about that. We have an essay that talks about the patient revolution. And how it impacts the United States as well. The first project, I was very intentional that we weren't dealing with the Diaspora. I always feel like black Americans are asked to hold the weight of the entire black Diaspora and we can never just have our own story. And this was a story about us. But having done that, now in the book form, we were able to expand it out. One thing about me is I do care deeply about the work, the research, my credibility as a journalist. So when all of these people were trying to attack the project and especially that couple paragraphs about the American Revolution, I was like, okay, you don't know me because I would just read more and study more and sharpen and now that section which was a couple paragraphs is.

Gustav ariano Wesley Morris New York Times LA times India United States
"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

04:04 min | 6 months ago

"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Social.

"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

06:05 min | 6 months ago

"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"And I know it's important to a lot of families. And it's an idea that we have taken and we're going to do something with. It's just one representation of getting closer to community. And I think there are lots of ideas that people have of how we can bridge the gap between us as journalists and those who we want to consume our journalism. Sometimes before you get people to subscribe to you. You have to have them understand you and you understand them. And them to see you. And to know you. And so I think a lot of it even before you get to subscriptions sometimes it's like you have to do that groundwork. You have to lay the groundwork for the subscriptions. Yeah, if we're going to do portraits, let's make sure not to go through Kmart because those portraits get yellow like 20 years later. We have some of the best photographers in the country. So I think we'll be all right. You know it? So what kind of journalism do you want people to come to the LA times four? We're in a time where people seem to want more bias and news, not less. And younger reporters are questioning the very idea of objectivity and journalism. Historically, columns and opinion pieces were about feelings and the rest of the paper was about facts, but some want those walls completely torn down. You know, I think the newspaper, it's really a smorgasbord, a storytelling. You have the opportunity to hit people with a lot of different a range of storytelling. You know, for some people, it's utility. If they want to have the world explain to them, they want to also know where the best hikes are, the best burritos are. They want to know where the wildfires are. They want to know when and how to spot earthquakes. There's a lot you do there. And others, they want really strong local accountability journalism. When you get to opinion, I'm a big fan, I'm a big proponent of extending opinion. More first person essays more commentary in different forms and video and audio, opinion is a catalyst for understanding and to stir debate. And so I think if anything I want the journalists to be even more ambitious, I want us to be more ambitious on the biggest topics that people are paying attention to. And so you have to build a big edifice where you have ambitious journalism and you have a lot of other ways for people to come at storytelling. We could have the most ambition and the best stories around, but it doesn't matter if we're not making money and thank God we have a benevolent billionaire owner, but how are we doing financially right now? We certainly was a tough year, a lot of people have had tough years. $50 million lost in 2020 before you came on. In COVID, a lot of businesses have struggle. That's the reality of it. You have to figure out how to make money and sometimes in the challenging industry. And we have both a mission, you know, we're a civic institution. It's also a business, right? It's not a nonprofit. So we balance that with our civic responsibilities, the sense that we should be there for people to be a place where you can get really good informative information to hold institutions accountable and all of the other things that newspapers traditionally have been. And yet we have to continue to try to build revenue. Last year, The New Yorker did a profile in our owner, doctor Patrick soon, and in it, you said that you and doctor soon still hadn't found a quote cadence, have the two of you at least found a common melody so far? The question I was simply asked was just do I have a regularly scheduled meeting? I see him. I talk to him or text him, communicate with him, as often as I like and him with me. He's a very accessible owner. In my experience, you know, never had one who owned a company and has as many business interests more accessible to him. You know, and I worked with Jeff Bezos, too. So I'm not worried about that. Okay, so what are we going to do in 2022? What are the things that you could tell our listeners to watch out for the times that we're going to do this year to just dominate? We're going to continue to build our podcast slate. We're going to do more to use the term with our IP. We're going to do a lot of ambitious journalism. One of the most undercover topics that we have that cuts across a lot of lines is mental health. You know, I think there'll be a lot more attention to that topic. In terms of ambition, you'll see some new exciting storytelling and some other surprises that I don't want to spoil. Are we sacrificing our journalism, though in this quest to make ourselves more relevant? Not all. I haven't seen any sacrificing of journalism. I think the journalist has really been strong. You know, we have a lot of award winning journalism that we've done, right? I mean, California medical board reporting about that. You know, our coverage of the rust shooting involving Alec Baldwin on set. We've been dominant there. We essentially are reporting pretty much change the whole architecture and how the Golden Globes would perceive. So I see no sacrifice in the journalism and no let down in the journalism. Yeah, I think the reason I ask because I think I see the news of us hiring 15 people for a meme team and expanding events and outsiders will think, well, that's not really journalism. That's just like, you know, trying to boost up our Cred for the youngsters or something. Well, I don't see it that way. I think one of the things that you have to have in today's world. Everybody has a strong social presence. Social media is the way that so many people consume what we do and how our work gets amplified. And you have to create social content. You have to take your journalism and sometimes create work to bring people to it in the platforms where they are. And so it's a big driver. It's a very competitive space. How people come to you is really important. And so investing in.

Kmart LA times The New Yorker Jeff Bezos Patrick Alec Baldwin Golden Globes California
"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

02:03 min | 7 months ago

"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Thank you <SpeakerChange> all. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you. Thank you. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> And that's it <Speech_Music_Male> for this episode of the times. <Speech_Music_Male> Daily news <Speech_Music_Male> from the LA times. <Speech_Music_Male> Tomorrow, <Speech_Music_Male> the hundred year history <Speech_Music_Male> of see's candies, <Speech_Music_Male> and yep, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm doing a whole <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> taste test for it. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Our show is produced by <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Shannon Lynn, Denis <Speech_Music_Male> kerra, kasia <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> basale and Melissa Kaplan. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Our engineers <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Mario Diaz are <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> editors Lauren rap, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our executive producers <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are Shawnee Hilton <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and has been agile <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and our theme music <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is by Andrew epe. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Like what <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you're listening to, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> then make sure to follow the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> times on whatever platform <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you use. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Don't make us to Gucci a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> podcast. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm Gustavo <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Rihanna. We'll <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> be back tomorrow

"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

04:05 min | 7 months ago

"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Is spreading. So I think that's a sign of hope, just that, you know, there's a lot more cities that need to do the right thing. We'll be back after this break..

"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

07:41 min | 7 months ago

"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"The city, but it's also only times lingo for our annual list of the best restaurants in the region. So whether you live here are coming to visit over the holidays or dreaming of a future trip because everyone should come to LA. This is your eating homework. The latest one O one list is now online and an awesome print package is coming out this Sunday. And it also comes at a crucial time in food journalism because the genre, it's a change in. I'm Gustavo, you're listening to the times, daily views from the LA times. It's Friday, December 10th, 2021. We're not going to read all the restaurants in the LA times one on one list today. But we're definitely going to offer some highlights, high end spots, mom and pop places, Middle Eastern Mexican Korean and beyond. I'll be honest, I haven't eaten out that much during the pandemic, so this LA times one on one list is exciting for me, because it's time to go out and eat. And let's hope there's no more shutdowns with ami Kron, you know? But as a food writer, I'm also going out there thinking about how I should write about these places, how I should consider them. Such conversations have been happening in food journalism for years, but in the COVID times the issue is more urgent than ever. My colleague Bill Addison is the author of the LA times one O one list. All by himself. He's our food critic and also helped to shape last year's list, which came out at a time where all restaurants in Los Angeles County were shut down for in person dining. Bill, welcome to the times. Good to be here Gustavo. Thank you so much. So part of me just wants you and I to have this whole episode to just read the whole one on one list like performance art. I'm a tole. Holy basil, crossroads. Benefit. We could go on forever. And what's interesting is that this year's edition is appearing while COVID-19 is still real, but people can now actually go out and eat in restaurants indoors. So compare that to earlier in the pandemic where indoor dining at restaurants and Nelly county wasn't allowed for the better part of a year. The 2020 edition of the one O one list acknowledged that and specifically celebrated quote resilience. So how do you define resilience last year and how does that spirit continue with this year's list? Yeah, great question. I mean, resilience last year meant finding ways to literally survive, right? Or even miraculously thrive in a time of tragedy like nothing the modern restaurant industry had seen before or been prepared to face. Feeding people and doing it well with such heart during spikes and dips and cases and adopting to constantly changing government mandates. That was 2020. This year is about celebrating excellence in the new normal. And there's obviously still a lot of turbulence, right? That includes supply disruptions and especially labor shortages because people are frankly disheartened by the standard restaurant business model and they've turned away from the sometimes low wages and what can be abusive work situations, including uncaring customers, so it's waiting through all that to also acknowledge and celebrate that angelinos, southern Californians, very much want to be back in restaurants. I see a lot of packed dining rooms. I'm booking reservations a month or more out in the most popular places. Are there any newcomers to the one on one list? Almost a quarter of the list is new. It's always a challenge to narrow down the longer I do this list, the shorter the number one O one feels. Just to throw out some off the top of my head that come to mind that I really loved moose, craft barbecue in Lincoln heights. Have you been there yet? Yeah, that's great. Chicano style barbecue. Exactly. Andrew and Michelle munoz really bringing this cool melding of central Texas barbecue traditions to Southern California and their own aesthetics so great. I love on the high end, more a hero, the new sushi bar from LA sushi legend mori hero on adira, who hasn't had his own place in almost a decade and he's back in incredible form. I am a deep lover of Lebanese cuisine. It's one of my abiding personal and professional interests and this year I really loved scoffs and Glendale which does some kind of deeper Lebanese cuts, if you will, like, kip naive. It's the ground meat, often lamb, I think, in this case, beef needed together with bulgur into this kind of silky, shiny mix that you drizzle generously with olive oil and eat with pita and pickled vegetables and it's delicious. And you also mention for Al Hara and Anaheim, which is a spot that I reviewed like over a decade ago. Yes, I still, I'm obsessed with that place. That's been there for a few years. Yeah, that whole area that they dub little Arabia and Anaheim is a treasure that I feel like more people should know about. What about some old school spots like favorites for locals? I'm thinking Hawkins House of burgers. It's a watts icon that's been owned by the same family for 5 generations and just make these awesome awesome cheeseburgers. They're so huge. Yeah. It never gets old eating those. It's like eating in someone's backyard. It's such a community vibe. Korea town has these restaurants that I can not let go of on this list parks barbecue. So bond for the incredible banchan spread song dong for the galbi gym that hulking beef stew that gets finished with a glaze of cheese that a server uses a blowtorch to melt over top. I mean, yeah, so many great places. Rape oblique, an all day restaurant that's kind of a modern classic favorite of mine. Sonora town in downtown still, you know, you know tortillas, man, so some of the best. Yeah. What about to get a little bit controversial? Put you on the spot. Restaurants that you loved, but just didn't make it into the one on one. Maybe finished one O 5 or one O three. I hate this question, 'cause I never want people to feel like, wait, I was one O two. I was this close, like, why? But I'll throw out a few places. La casita mexicana in Belgium. I love that place such gorgeous and vibrant food and it's been on the list forever. And so I just wanted to make room for some new, cool places. I'm gonna flip back to little Arabia and Anaheim. There's a restaurant there called House of Mandy, that's in the same shopping center as foreign Al Hara, and it's Yemeni food. They make these hulking platters of race and long, roasted meats that I love and I just couldn't find a place in the valley there's a cade which is Sri Lankan food that I love and that's been on all this before and so please go try these restaurants too. Yeah, I see the one O one list, it's homework, but it's also meant to inspire you to try other places. So you say Sri Lankan food. I love Sri Lankan food. There's still one Sri Lankan restaurant left in Anaheim. So now and I haven't thought of it since a pandemic. And I'm like, hey, I want to go check it out again. See, good, then I've done my job. That's exactly what.

LA times Gustavo ami Kron Bill Addison Nelly county Michelle munoz Al Hara LA adira Los Angeles County Anaheim Lincoln heights the times Hawkins House of burgers mori Bill kip Southern California Glendale Arabia
"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

05:16 min | 9 months ago

"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Syphilis cases were already surging nationwide before the arrival of COVID-19. Then the pandemic hit. Clinics at screen people for sexually transmitted diseases closed. Health workers who focused on syphilis cases were reassigned to COVID-19 duties. It's a maelstrom that allowed syphilis to explode. There's a way out of this epidemic. Syphilis is curable. And if we can get more pregnant people tested and treated in time, that'll protect their babies, too. So are we going to do it? Emily Albert ray is covers public health for the Los Angeles Times and has covered this issue. Emily, welcome to the times. Thanks so much for having me. Remind us of what syphilis is and why it's so dangerous. So syphilis is a bacterial infection. It's usually sexually transmitted. It can cause sores. And if it's not treated, it can become much more serious. It can eventually affect your internal organs and your nervous system. And it can be extremely serious for babies who can be infected with it in the womb if the pregnant person has syphilis. So it increases the risk of stillbirth as well as neurological problems, bone deformities, blindness potentially. And it can also make it more.

Syphilis COVID Emily Albert ray sexually transmitted diseases Los Angeles Times Emily the times bone deformities blindness potentially
"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

05:59 min | 11 months ago

"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"M j rodriguez welcome to the times. Thank you you are an emmy nominee. And you've had some time now to process it. What is surprise you about being on this journey. You know what. I think most surprised me about being on this journey and being nominated as an. It's kinda crazy to hear myself say but an outstanding leading actress in a drama series. I think the most surprising thing was being received as an actress being taken seriously within my craft and actually being accepted in the awareness of myself as a afro latina trans woman it's kind of astounding to me because for so long i have my own insecurities but i was also subjected to a lot of discrimination obviously as a trans woman about even two years and even farther back so to see the change happen over time in quicker than i expected. I've just been so flabbergasted by and i'm really proud of myself but i'm also proud of the human race and them actually getting together and knowing that we as trans women are humans too and that we walked this earth just by how they do and that we love like how they do we have hearts how they do. We believe like any other human. Does they're starting to see it and understand it. And it's going to show by receiving a nomination like this. It feels good just to let our audience know you've made history as the first transgender performer to receive an emmy nomination for best actress in a drama series for your performance as blanca. How what do you want the trans community to take away from this moment. And what would you like the cis- community to take away from this moment. What i was specifically like the trans community to take away from this moment is that it's possible. It's even more possible now to really chase your dream as an artist. Whether you're a singer and actress a dancer now. The lane is completely opened. The doors bus down completely. And it's time for you to take your space. It's time to take the space like how you deserve because it's open and the only way that it's going to happen is if you actually take it and you go about it with dignity and grace and humility but you go in with confidence knowing what you want and what i can say to this community. Specifically you know the females community is that you know we're here to uplift each other. Though where different types of women we still identify in the same bracket which is woman whether we'd be trans horses and we're here for each other and now's the time to come together and share space together like how we should have been for a long time and you know. I don't think that's going to be hard for any of this. This woman out there because naturally women were nurturing were carrying. We make it happen so i have no doubt in my mind that women across the world translates the like will open up and become a little bit more collective and knowing that we're here to change the dynamic. I mean woman when the world we run the world assist men out there. I would say start opening up and being our allies and understanding that. There's no agenda for trans women to infiltrate your space to make you feel uncomfortable to the list can go on. This is not a time for your feelings in your masculinity your fragile masculinity and also some toxic masculinity to be forced upon us so that it can make us feel lesser than or be little less instead use your strength in your masculinity to actually uplift us and be comfortable in yourself so that it's not so toxic so i would say that to office people around the world but yeah where here and i don't think we're going anywhere anytime soon and i think a lot of people more than i thought are here for us. I wanna rewind a bit to your early years pursuing acting and i know rent was such a formative production for you. I mean you made your off broadway debut playing angel in the two thousand eleven revival. Talk to me about what rent meant to you in how you look back on that chapter of your life rent was the best love story soliloquy. I could have ever received when. I was eleven years old until i was fourteen and then until i was nineteen. That's show not only gave me a true understanding a full explanation of what it was like dealing with. Hiv and aids on top of being homeless. But it also showed me what a chosen family looks like when every single last one of them have been ostracized these will all people who were displaced. Because of the lives that they lived and not all of them were lgbtq. I it was a mixed group of misfits. That's what rent taught me in amid so much to me. Because of that. Because i was a misfit and i still a misfit. I'm sitting misfit. You know out claim that now and when you are part of that crowd of people who are different you not only get a glimpse of how the world is outside and how they see you but you start to see how you fit in the world sue. And if you're gonna choose to keep being misfit in defy gravity or you try to fit in for me. Rent taught me not to fit in instead to stand out. Be even louder and it doesn't have to even be with your words. It could be which presence it could be. What you walking down the street and holding your head up high no matter if you're getting derogatory slurs thrown at you from people on the street. Because i had that all my life. I had so.

emmy rodriguez the times blanca Hiv aids
"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

08:12 min | 11 months ago

"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Let's back up back before the protests before silva's stood on those steps. Gus screamed at to beginning silva's beginning. When he was a baby he was found by lapd. Officers near sixth and san pedro streets in skid row less than a mile from that spot where the young protesters screamed in his face last year. My mom was a crack addict and a prostitute so she was working I was found on top of a dumpster in a car seat Officers had observed me. They contacted a the social services. I was taken immediately What not sure if my mother was arrested but You know further moving. I was put in to a foster home. Because of his biological mother's addiction silva battled with developmental delays from the exposure. I in foster care later. He was adopted in raising a blended family. His mom's white his dad's latino. He grew up in baldwin park and west covina in the nineties and early two thousands and have a lot of latino neighbors and friends but few black ones and as a teenager he says he was racially profiled on multiple occasions by police. I remember certain occasions when i will be walking. And officers would see me and they probably see a black male and they they slow down they look and i kind of like get that uncomfortable feeling like oh crap. I already knew what was going on. I'm being profiled and i kind of my heartbeat would go mar. It's get sweaty just the whole Shebang and i kind of look over. And i kind of wave and what i get back was just a dirty look. And you're kinda like okay. What's going on. And then they pulled over on the street and then you continue walking and then they slowly follow you. That was not on a day to day basis but the happened frequently after high school. Civil was not thinking about becoming a police officer. I you worked at a pizza place. Then at best buy then. He started working as a case manager with homeless clients trying to find them housing that last job he really liked. It seemed important him and it was on the job when silva met. Lapd officer who also worked with people experiencing homelessness that officer told silva he'd make a great cop at first civil wasn't so sure he knew some people and his family would be very skeptical but the more he thought about it the more. It seemed like something he'd like so he took the lead he joined the police department and graduated from the police academy in twenty thousand nineteen and after a probationary period and rampart division. He requested a permanent placement. In the central division the central division is home to some of la's poorest neighborhoods and poorest residents it's also home to skid row where officer silva was found as a baby. He wanted to be there to give back. So let's fast forward now back to the night where that viral video was captured silva normally worked patrol downtown. But that night had been given protests duty. A grand jury in louisville kentucky had declined to charge police officers there in the fatal shooting of a black woman named brianna taylor and some big crowds had gathered downtown. La civil was stationed outside of lapd headquarters. I remember Gearing up Going right there in front of a police headquarters standing on the steps holding my post. I remember all the protesters kind of Walking by the first time and they weren't as rowdy they walked through. They went all the way down spring street and at once they started working their way back. That's when we heard over the radio that hey things are kind of getting out of hand. They were starting to kind of vandalize businesses as the crowd grew in front of headquarters silva moved up and stood near the line of gates. A few young protesters in horror masks came up and they started taunting him tossing out racial slurs and flashing the middle finger and his face. By that time. I've been. I was well trained and i was kind of used to it. But i'm not gonna lie in the beginning i was. Shell shocked because that's something that black individuals don't really use towards each other and especially the way that they said. It was with medicine their voice. So we'll said he watched. The protesters is enhanced for threats but didn't see any from his perspective. They were just venting frustration and anger in an immature way. It was one of a lot of encounters in the past year. And a half in which silva's dual identity as a black man and a police officer has left him straddling one of the nation's most volatile cultural faultlines and feeling criticized for not landing solidly on either side so said he's also had difficult encounters with fellow police officers last year. He was involved in a situation. Where a black man being questioned on the street by an aggressive white officer asked to speak with silva instead and the white officer hit so vaughan arm and referred to the color of his skin. Smacks me on the arm. Here's a black skin officer. Civil said he felt that other officers had said black skinned with disgust. And he said he's had other officers. Tell him to never show any solidarity or compassion or understanding for black lives matter protesters or other activists in the street. He said a lot of activists and a lot of his fellow officers seem to have drawn battle. Lines separating the two groups but he doesn't really see it that way silva doesn't think the lapd should be refunded because he thinks police play an important role in public safety in that l. a. Needs good cops but he also thinks that social service providers people doing work with the homeless he used to do are also incredibly important. Should be funded as well. He doesn't like the way protests turned violent and spurred property damage across the city but he also doesn't dismiss the black lives matter movement wholesale. The message that i get from them when things aren't burning and when it's not as hectic as hey our lives matter to retired we want the same amount equal rights. We want the same amount equal pay. What the same amount of equal opportunities whether it be within school or workplace and our everyday regular lives we want equal and we want it now silva told me that he truly believes that the way to achieve better police community relationships is for police officers and community members to start getting to know each other better to start seeing each other as human beings not just badges or crime statistics. He knows it won't be easy but he remains optimistic about being a police officer. Do we have a long way ahead of us. Yes we do Especially with the protests that we go through day to day on a day to day basis But like. I said it's all about sitting down with black lives matter and kind of reaching a resolution. We can do it old school. Where we hey. Nobody leaves until each side is heard out But at the end of the day were police officers. Who do our job. And we got to serve the community. And we've got to do what's best for everyone Do wanna go home safely and see our family. Yes but We'll we put our life on the line to serve our community. Yes we will. That's what we signed up for the lapd like other agencies. I've covered doesn't always allow individual officers to speak with the media and that can make it hard for journalists like me to capture the perspective of those officers in our coverage. It's also difficult for officers to talk about problems lake racism within their own department because their colleagues don't always have the best reaction at a time. When everyone is trying to figure out a better path forward in american policing i think officers perspectives are worth hearing covering the lapd can be an intense job. People have really strong opinions on issues. I write about and they let me know it. Readers have accused me of blindly loving and defending the police. They've accused me of hating the police and tearing them down unfairly..

silva brianna taylor baldwin park west covina san pedro Gus louisville kentucky la vaughan Civil
"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"When california voters approved the ballot initiative in two thousand eighteen to legalize marijuana backers predicted a simultaneous boom for the state's economy and a clampdown on the violence long associated with growing and selling drugs instead the opposite has happened. The state legislature recently approved the hundred million dollar plan to help. Struggling legal vendors and growers studies have shown illegal dispensaries continue to outnumber legal ones and all sorts of crimes murders human trafficking. Outright slavery are happening at illegal pot farms as more continuing to sprout up. Jacqueline cosgrove covers los angeles county government for the los angeles times. They along with our colleague. Louis sagan recently did a deep dive into the matter. Jacqueline welcome to the times. Thank you so much for having me. I describe the area where all these illegal grows are happening. Joshua tree antelope valley lake los angeles. What's the landscape out there. Look like i mean essentially once you can spot one of these grows. You can spot any of them. So you're just driving along in the desert the two lane highway near pear bossom or knee nak or really anywhere in the allah valley. And you look out into the desert and you'll see a greenhouse that is probably illegal marijuana grow and so you'll just see like this expensive desert and then like boop boop they're like all the gross one resident describes him as little caterpillars on the foothills though us like the topography also to like hide the grows and so i think they also kind of scout locations where they can use a dip in the desert to hide within they also will dig out these huge mounds of earth to also hide the grows behind these big berms. It's.

Jacqueline cosgrove Louis sagan Joshua tree antelope valley la legislature allah valley los angeles county los angeles times california Jacqueline the times boop boop los angeles
"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"We'll have more after this break. Frank carson was a criminal defense attorney who spent years accusing police and prosecutors of corruption. Then they charged him with murder. I'm christopher gothard writer and host of the l. a. times podcasts. Dirty john and detective trap. I'm inviting you to follow and listen to my new podcast. That trials of frank carson. This eight episodes series is a story of power politics and the law. In california's central valley new episodes of the trials of frank carson are available to find them search for the trials of frank carson. Wherever you get your podcasts. Thank you trey who took a smallest role in blood in blood out an experienced that allowed him to return to san quentin for the first time since he was an inmate. There this time as an actor during filming he was able to roam almost freely inside a facility that for him was the site of so many horrors early passages in the book describe mortal dangers lurking around every corner at san quentin and in a state of full circle. He even got to shoot a few scenes inside c. five five zero his actual former cell in the prisons south block. I consider my life a complete gift from god. cut remember nineteen sixty eight. I made a deal. I said you know what if you let me die with dignity. I'll say your name every day. And i'll do whatever i can for my fellow inmate. I said inmate. Because i never thought i was getting out of jail a year later. He left prison for good. And despite many bumps along the road tranquil transformed into a dedicated recovery counselor and sponsor recovery ultimately is the driving force of the memoir. Trae who has more than four hundred credits to his name. Now a remarkable achievement for someone who could hardly have imagined a film career as he prayed at soledad prison and nineteen sixty eight today he recognizes how far hollywood has to go to expand opportunities and roles beyond tough prisoner number one on the topic of latino representation the subject of a recent series of stories in the times trae who says he welcomes the growing advocacy. But what's needed to move the needle. He argued is more direct investment from high powered producers of latin american descent specifically. Everybody we were were not represented were not represented not represent you know. I have to say the reason. We're not represented. Is that people on top not caucasian. Latin american people do not want to produce phil but your point about the the representations issue that we just don't have enough latino financiers of films producers is what you're saying exactly you know and it's stop clients.

frank carson christopher gothard Dirty john san quentin trey soledad prison california Trae trae hollywood phil
"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Get it for hugs. Get it for date nights for live. Music home games and haircuts. Get it for eating at your favorite restaurant for grandma's birthday for graduations. Get it for your loved. Ones and the essential workers. Get it for all of us when it's available to you. Blue shield of california encourages you to get the cove in nineteen vaccination. Get it for california. The world is built on relationships from building wealth to building a business. It takes a dedicated team working together. And the only difference between success and failure is who you have in your corner when the going gets tough at city national bank. We aim to be the people you rely on when it really counts. That's why your relationship manager will take the time to get to know you after all it's only by knowing your goals that we can help you achieve them see what personal can do for you at c. n. b. dot com city national bank member. Fdic staying up to date on. The latest news can work up an appetite. Well grubs got you covered. grub hub. Works hard to serve restaurants so they can work hard to serve you today. Grab hubs doing a little extra to serve pinera. Get a free delivery perk on your first order from pinera of fifteen dollars. Or more order through the grub hub app or online grub hub. We serve restaurants. Excuse me is this seat open. There are no assigned seats on a southwest airlines flight. And that means your net seat mate could be chest about anyone. Hi i'm quentin jenkins. I league community outreach. At southwest airlines and welcome to is this seat open on this podcast. We'll hear twenty stories from south west history from people like chief marketing officer ryan green. Leave it to southwest airlines to save the company by offered a bunch of free booze. Managing director of culture and engagement whitney ike inger. All of it coming together was probably the greatest piece of humor. I've ever seen at southwest and retired vice president of cargo and charter matt. Luckily i look back on it. I get goosebumps. So sit back. Relax and enjoy stories of south west fifty years of flying. Because you never know who. You'll meet the next time you hear. Is this seat open trae. Who grew up in the bario culture of the san fernando valley in the nineteen fifties and nineteen sixty s from an early age. He understood the true distance between the glitter of nearby hollywood and his world of drug dealing and bare knuckle. Violence grabbed you by the throat and threaten threatening to break every bone in. Your body was abused. I didn't know giving marijuana when you were eight. Was sharing it stuff like this. Trae hall writes that eventually got him hauled into a police station for the first time at the age of ten from that point on. He spent years engaging in criminal mayhem in the san fernando valley and up and down the state cycling through juvenile and state prisons and never expecting to come out alive but over the course of trails life. His experience with criminality would collide with hollywood one. Crystallizing episode came when trump. Who was wayne offers to appear in two films in the early nineteen ninety s one was american me to be directed by edward james olmos. The other was blood in out by taylor. Halford both sought to tell the story of the founding of the mexican mafia trae ho with his chest of tattoos and years of time served would have been a great fit in eater film. There was a problem though. The mexican mafia or ma is highly secretive and torius for its ruthless. Executions word was already getting around the penitentiary system. That the american meese script took some offensive narrative liberties related to prison rate into the ms fraternal codes. In order that we're upsetting real world. Gang leaders the proposed film would also explicitly use the term. Na which is another big no-no you ever. Jeans is great actors. Unbelievable actor but you gotta. We walked into into jerry's deli in encino okay. He walks in worrying county jail shirt but to the opening and do look like like an easterly. Chiloe and so. I'm trying to figure out dow's doing this to be my friend or i didn't. I didn't understand that kind of getting into character. The first question we asked was. Hey did you get permission from joe to do. The job organ was the leader of the mexican mafia and the mexican mafia l- was was not like the john gotti who wanted to be in the papers. Okay just before a second meeting with almost tranquil. Got a message. Joe morgan the guy trae who warned about wanted to talk to him the infamous joe quote unquote. Peg-leg morgan incarcerated at the time at county jail was then the living dawn of the according to traco. Joe morgan doesn't call people unless he saying you're dead. Who took the call the home phone of his friend eddie. Bunker an old industry insider who he met in prison. Joe morgan got right down to business on. Never forget it. He had to be the age old. What's up and he goes down. You know what medicine serious owns understand. Europe for that movie of american me and yeah. I'm up for both of them up for a month for blood in blood out do. He's which are you gonna do. I says you gonna do blood in blood out on. Never forget joe morgan's oh yeah oh. That's a cute one this movie about about mexican killers and said quinton. That's the cute one so we talked needs to even to daddy you. Don't you could do the other one. you could do. American me of you want nothing would happen. But i know i wouldn't israel. I wouldn't disrespect the people that i know almost not respond to a request for comment about the passage in the book or about trucco statements for this story in the book trek. Oh emphasizes again. His admiration for almost and his advocacy for latinos and people of color in hollywood almost made american me as a morality. Play to warn you about the dangers of prison life. Yet the stories ripple effects in the real world were unmistakable to consultants. Who worked on the film were killed including a beloved gang intervention worker named anna lisa. I think four people got killed out here directly because that movie and about eight or nine killed in prison directly behind that move..

pinera national bank quentin jenkins ryan green whitney ike inger san fernando valley south west Trae hall trae california Joe morgan hollywood grandma southwest airlines Fdic jerry's deli Chiloe edward james olmos Halford
"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"the times" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"One of the most fascinating and honestly bad ass figures in hollywood today. Danny trae ho. What i had was this look of a criminal. I had the look of a bad guy. You know guys that bad guys. Tell me well. You really look like a pack. We spoke over. Zoom treacle wore a cap and he and of seventy seven. He's one of the most beloved genre actors around even over the pandemic distance trae who's fierceness onscreen as the perpetual prisoner or inmate is evident in conversation. He spoke with emotion and sometimes snorted a rubbed his face with both hands. It was as if he was bracing himself against the pain of experience in the state penitentiary system. That took up half his life. I was doing a film. With mickey rourke and we were doing in new mexico and i played this insane killer and and it was strange. The direct route say okay. Let's do that we do it. And he's a danny hon. You do it. It's like you go to this maniac and then all of us. I watch you and you go what i say. Cut you immediately. Go over and play with your kids. And he says most accurate they get into that zone and they want to stay there. When i'm playing that insane crazy person. It's like i been there. I've seen that. I've lived that you know i don't i don't want to be there. There's times that. I've been acting. And then i stop and i'm gonna throw up because that place that you can go to is is very very real. It's like i love working with like all the wanna be tough guys and convy killer in hollywood because you look at a menu. No as tough as you are you would be paying protection to some little five foot six mexican. That's how tall danny trae. Ho really is by the way. But it's his face that captures people's attention. It's famously mangled. By the years. He spent in prison offering an ideal expressive palette for the actor he became he can convey rage and humor like few other villains on screen. Some of these stories have been told. The many have informed his wildly prolific word and the most important are collected in his new memoir. Trae ho my life of crime. Redemption and hollywood he co authored with his longtime friend and fellow. Actor donal lobe. You know if there was a group of us standing on a corner. When i was young the cops into lovey with a you compare always just i just had the phaser the body that stuck out but as far as hollywood. I don't think i ever been discriminated against. I work all the time. And i was a inmate number one bad guy and i didn't know that i was being stereotype. I just do. I was working in fact the young lady probably fresh out an interview school. You know she asked me a danny. Don't you think you're being typecast. And i didn't know what that was about. What what do you mean. Well you're always playing the mean. Chicano dude with tattoos and thought about as i am the means chicano due to adapt dues trae who got his break in the business after visiting a film shoot in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. He was there to help someone onset. Who's battling through addiction addiction recovery. Then his career took off at first quietly with a string of tiny rolls as prisoner inmate or tuck inmate run but by nineteen ninety-five pray ho shared a riveting death scene with robert deniro in michael mann's movie heat one of my all time favorites and one of many displaying trae skill at portraying someone on the brink of death he says even deniro wasn't crises death of the century so funny when i was doing that to get a compliment from robert deniro and he helped me up off the ground. There's a lot of talk in the hollywood community about the constant use of the gangster. Trowell kind of bob ewell stories but at the same time some actors will say well. That's giving us work. We're training in our craft were reflecting the streets. Where do you lie on that argument. And how do you some of these films. You know that you were under leader career in today's mindset days as long as the bad guy dies or goes to prison. I don't care okay. You know what i mean. It's like i won't do a movie or the best guy lives in. I got ninety six deaths. Now i think and i got the record for death in film you know just. I worked a lot for me. Is i like yeah. Let's tell those stories. Yeah let's let's get them right you. Let's get right. it's you know what. Why do you. Why or why are prisons full of african american and mexican. Because you know jobs aren't available. There's a lot of things going on that. They're putting us in prison right now. I honestly believed that. Probably fifteen percent of the people that are in prison belong in prison. You know what i mean. We could do other things with with with the other. Fifteen percent you said percentage fifteen hundred eighty five percent of people in prison. Don't don't need to be there. Yeah i honestly believe that we could do something else. Non-violent drug addicts do not belong in prison most of the dealers they got in prison. Were dealing to support their habits. You don't mean it was like you got a i got a quarter. I'm going to cut it up. And i'm going to sell this. I'm going to use this. You know don you know it's like i. I know some of the big dealers that were in prison. Why do you think people still want to see these kinds of films and love. Even american people still watch it. People watch blending dow On your in withdraw. Their people want identify with violence. First of all secondly they wanna see heroic characters and like. I said as long as the bad guy loses. I'll do it in one thousand nine hundred five legendary filmmaker robert rodriguez gave trae a ho a signature role in desperado. He played a colombian assassin. Contract to kill antonio banderas is character and in two thousand one. Rodriguez specifically created four trae. Ho the role of marceca in spy kids a role that eventually became a franchise on its own that established perhaps the only character in film history to straddle the genres of children's adventure and grind house horror trickles role as much as iconic but his tough guy movie roles seemed to be just a fraction.

trae hollywood Danny trae robert deniro danny trae donal lobe mickey rourke Trae Trowell bob ewell new mexico Ho michael mann deniro don robert rodriguez