40 Burst results for "The Police Department"

Fresh update on "the police department" discussed on Garret Lewis

Garret Lewis

00:47 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "the police department" discussed on Garret Lewis

"One of his own employees that fixes the police cars. Acts like a cop pulls a guy over Pulls him over. This. This Muslim American just causes a trump supporter to harass. Um, they have the goods on this guy, and nothing happened. The guy keeps his job at the Tucson Police department is mechanic. That is disgusting. But I wouldn't expect anything less. From that horrific activist. Chief Magnus. I wouldn't expect anything less. We have a police chief. I mean, he would give more protection to a illegal alien. Then he would this Muslim American just because of his politics. Let me tell you something. It was a trump supporter that pulled over this Muslim American who was a big lib. You better believe that be some police action. You better believe heads would roll. You better believe that This is what we have to deal with. And then he's disgusting people. These tolerant liberals, you know, there's three and Trump is so mean. He said, I better these these these dopes, these neighbors. Anything. Trump is the meanest guy on the planet and what they're doing is okay in their mind. You want to know why Because liberalism is a mental disorder. They're jacked up in the head. I mean, they really are just jacked up and they had these people are crazy. You're nuts. The kinds of people that see Uncle Ben's rice to think it's racist again. Explain to me how taking a black man off a box..

Donald Trump Tucson Police Department Chief Magnus Uncle Ben
Updates from protests in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:54 sec | 2 hrs ago

Updates from protests in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood

"Hill again last night as demonstrators marched against the Briana Taylor decision. We get the update from comas, Corwin take protesters lit a fire outside the Seattle Police Department East Precinct, then shot fireworks at the precinct. Officers responded with flash bang grenades. It started as a peaceful march, Protesters left Cale Anderson Park, chanting the name of the African American woman killed by police in Louisville and calling on people in their homes to come out and join their march. Trouble began when some protesters sent fire to a pile of rubble outside the East Precinct and shot fireworks over the precinct. Wall. Officers responded by ordering the group to disperse. Then cops on bikes and on foot moved into the crowd. Deploying flash bang grenades. Way have no word of injuries or arrests for win. Hey HQ CO Moh news. If protesters air rioters start damaging your

Seattle Police Department East Briana Taylor Cale Anderson Park Corwin Hill Louisville
Fresh update on "the police department" discussed on Bill Handel

Bill Handel

01:06 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "the police department" discussed on Bill Handel

"Of people in the crowd. If you will, stopping the looting, actually getting in the way and trying to stop the bad guys. You ever see that that that happened at all here. Yeah, you did. Last night. Somebody broke a window at the local library in that city library right downtown, And then somebody tossed a flare into the road flare and it sat there. It's smoldering didn't catch the place on fire, but protesters were You know, angry about that, and pretty soon the Fire Department team put it out and began an arson investigation. That's what's led to some of these felony charges against people because other protesters who didn't want to see that happen. I identified them and tested and will testify against him in court. If he's come to charges when you think about it, I mean, there's I can see the anger of the police department overturning police cars. I mean, there's a logic to that, but torching a library. You know, it's kind of. Ah, that's tends to be really ridiculous. The police presence National Guard still out there and the numbers of police Yes, the National Guard about 500 troops there,.

National Guard Fire Department Arson
City Council Votes To Cut Dallas Police Overtime, While Increasing Overall Department Funding

Red Eye Radio

00:28 sec | 8 hrs ago

City Council Votes To Cut Dallas Police Overtime, While Increasing Overall Department Funding

"The city of Dallas has a newly approved $3.8 billion budget that cuts overtime costs for the police department but keeps funding largely intact. A compromise amendment Remove $7 Million from the DPD is total overtime budget of 24 million overall funding for the department totals 500 Million despite demands from local activist to defund police To effectively cut officer over time, The department plans on hiring civilian workers to replace officers that are currently on desk duty.

DPD Officer Dallas
Fresh update on "the police department" discussed on South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

01:30 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "the police department" discussed on South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

"Here's something pretty disturbing. I discovered while researching this podcast. This is what it actually says on the Los Angeles Police Department website. The site states that the adult missing Persons unit investigates 3200 cases a month and 70% of those missing people are founder returned voluntarily. Within two or three days. It goes on to explain, and I quote here since being a missing person is not a crime police. They're given a very limited role while conducting these types of investigations at the bottom of the Web page gets more disturbing. There's a section titled What if they never returned? And Here's the official police advice in such situations, you may want to enlist the services of a private investigator to assist in your search. If you can't afford a P I police elaborate quote. Another option would be to contact the Salvation Army, which has a missing person's locator program. There's not a single sentence on the LAPD website. It would lead a love one of a missing person to have any faith that the police could properly investigated. What the LAPD is basically saying is someone you love goes missing. Don't overreact. I'll probably turn up unless they don't know which case you should get someone. Besides, the police will look into it all. This is my life, saying if the police took missing persons cases is seriously as they do, say bank robberies went have had to do this podcast in the first place and end up chasing a violent criminal..

Lapd Salvation Army Founder Investigator Official
Louisville preparing for another night of protests after Breonna Taylor decision

All Things Considered

04:22 min | 14 hrs ago

Louisville preparing for another night of protests after Breonna Taylor decision

"Of Louisville is bracing for another night of protests after Kentucky's attorney general said he would not charge three officers in the death of Briana Taylor. She is the black woman shot and killed by police in her apartment in March. The decision not to charge the officers involved drove demonstrators into the streets around the country. But it's Louisville. That is the center of this story. And that is where NPR's Adrian Florido is now. Hey there, Adrian. I'm a really describe to us what you are seeing. What you're hearing is you're out and about reporting on the streets there in Louisville. So, so far today, things have been calm. That was not the case. Last night, however, the streets of downtown Louisville were really tense as police worked to enforce and nine PM curfew and disperse crowds or furious Attorney General Daniel Cameron's announcement just before curfew, two officers were shot. Their injuries were non my threatening and the suspect was arrested. But this morning, Mayor Greg Fischer pleaded for peace. We never had control over what attorney General of the grand jury would do. We do have control over what happens next in our city, So I'm asking everyone to reject violence and join me and committing Ourselves to the work of reform for justice and for equity and do that now. And Adrian. How our people out on the streets protesting. How are they hearing that? How are they responding to that? I think that there is a lot of skepticism that meaningful change that the mayor is calling for if they participate will actually happen, You know, people here in Louisville protested for 120 days. Demanding that the three police officers who participated in the raid on Briana Taylor's apartment be charged with her murder. Instead. What they got was a grand jury and the state attorney general deciding to charge just one of those officers not for Taylor's death, but because the bullets that this officer fired into her apartment, entered the apartment next door and endangered the lives of Taylor's neighbors. This morning, I spoke to a man named Marcus Reed. He runs a barbecue joint near where Taylor was killed wasn't what he said. If it was may 20 years, But you know, this is police and he's not my skin color. They Just a slap on the wrist. They keep doing it. He told me that his friends and family are deeply resentful of the decision not to charge and that he would not be surprised if tensions on the streets actually actually grow worse after this, Yeah, well, I was going to ask where where my things go because people out protesting many of them had some pretty specific goals in mind. They weren't just angry. They wanted all of the involved officers to be fired and charged with murder. Which, as of yesterday seems to be off the table. So so where do things go now? Rights of the local investigation into Taylor's killing is complete. There will be no more charges Theater New general has said that but the police Department is continuing an internal investigation on whether the officers followed department protocols on the night of the raid. There's also an ongoing federal investigation. The FBI is looking into whether police violated Briana Taylor's civil rights and they're looking at How they obtained that warrant raid Taylor's apartment to look for drugs drugs that they did not find, And aside from that Kentucky's governor Andy this year, he is calling on the attorney general to release the evidence from his investigation against the officers. Here's what the governor said just a little while ago. I know the attorney general talks about the truth, and I talk about the truth. I think we ought to let the people of Kentucky see all of that evaluate and come to the truth. I believe that it is fully appropriate to do at this point in time, Put it all on line. The attorney general has said that he won't do that for now, because of the charges brought yesterday against the one former officer Onda also that pending FBI investigation so briefly, Adrian, you're watching for more protests there in Louisville tonight. There will be more protests. You know, The police say that they're going to continue to enforce the curfew, which is still in effect. Police say that they will do the same thing they did yesterday. They have today arrested more than 100 protesters yesterday. I should also say Marie Louise that we're expecting to hear from Briana Taylor's family tomorrow. NPR's Adrian Florido reporting from Louisville tonight. Thanks, Adrien.

Briana Taylor Louisville Attorney Officer Adrian Florido Marcus Reed Kentucky Police Department NPR Murder Greg Fischer Daniel Cameron FBI Marie Louise Adrien Onda Andy
Fresh update on "the police department" discussed on Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:43 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "the police department" discussed on Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

"Hill again last night as demonstrators marched against the Briana Taylor decision. We get the update from comas, Corwin take protesters lit a fire outside the Seattle Police Department East Precinct, then shot fireworks at the precinct. Officers responded with flash bang grenades. It started as a peaceful march, Protesters left Cale Anderson Park, chanting the name of the African American woman killed by police in Louisville and calling on people in their homes to come out and join their march. Trouble began when some protesters sent fire to a pile of rubble outside the East Precinct and shot fireworks over the precinct. Wall. Officers responded by ordering the group to disperse. Then cops on bikes and on foot moved into the crowd. Deploying flash bang grenades. Way have no word of injuries or arrests for win. Hey HQ CO Moh news. If protesters air rioters start damaging your

Seattle Police Department East Seattle Abc News Cale Anderson Park Briana Taylor Herschel Corwin Louisville
Seattle Cop Runs Over Protester's Head

WBZ Afternoon News

00:55 sec | 16 hrs ago

Seattle Cop Runs Over Protester's Head

"Also extending condolences to the family of Briana Taylor after this week's decision from the grand jury in Kentucky, deciding against filing murder charges in connection with her death. One Louisville police officer was charged with wanton endangerment for firing bullets into a nearby home again to others not charged at all that touched off protests yesterday yesterday around the country, including in Louisville, or two police officers last night were shot and wounded. Cairo radios Miley Katie has more on an incident in Seattle video from protests in Seattle Wednesday shows a police officer rolling a bike over someone's head. As they lay on the ground person is on the ground. He just ran over his head. His head. It happened in the former chop zone during protests demanding justice for Briana Taylor. The Seattle Police Department says it's aware of the video and the matter will be referred to the Office of Police. Accountability for Investigation. Miley Katie

Briana Taylor Miley Katie Seattle Police Department Officer Office Of Police Seattle Louisville Endangerment Kentucky Murder Cairo
Fresh update on "the police department" discussed on Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:53 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "the police department" discussed on Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

"Count The end of the month. We'll likely aid to an inaccurate count ruled it must extend to the end of October. You're listening to ABC News, Stay connected. Stay informed the camo Morning news. Good morning, maybe a 602. We have rain in downtown Seattle. It's 56 right now. Herschel has the day off on Manda factor, and here are the top stories from the coma. 24 7 News center. Police and protestors clashed on Seattle's Capitol Hill again last night as demonstrators marched against the Briana Taylor decision. We get the update from comas, Corwin take protesters lit a fire outside the Seattle Police Department East Precinct, then shot fireworks at the precinct. Officers responded with flash bang grenades. It started as a peaceful march, Protesters left Cale Anderson Park, chanting the name of the African American woman killed by police in Louisville and calling on people in their homes to come out and join their march. Trouble began when some protesters sent fire to a pile of rubble outside the East Precinct and shot fireworks over the precinct. Wall. Officers responded by ordering the group to disperse. Then cops on bikes and on foot moved into the crowd. Deploying flash bang grenades. Way.

Seattle Police Department East Seattle Abc News Cale Anderson Park Briana Taylor Herschel Corwin Louisville
Kentucky grand jury decides against homicide charges for police in Breonna Taylor's death

Into America

03:03 min | 16 hrs ago

Kentucky grand jury decides against homicide charges for police in Breonna Taylor's death

"Good afternoon. Thank you for joining us today. I know that many. In Louisville and across the Commonwealth. In country have been anxiously awaiting the completion of our investigation. into the death of Miss Riana. Taylor? Six months at the Briana Taylor was shot and killed by police in her Louisville apartment. Kentucky grand jury decided that none of the officers involved would be held responsible for death. On Wednesday Attorney General Daniel Cameron announced the grand jury decision to charge one former officer Brent Hankinson with first degree wants an endangerment. He's accused of firing into nearby apartments and endangering tillers neighbors. But Attorney General. Cameron. said the other two officers involved Johnson mattingly and miles cosgrove would not face any charges. According to Kentucky Law. Use of force by mattingly and Cosgrove, was justified to protect themselves. This justification bars us from pursuing criminal charges. And Miss Brianna Taylor's death. Twenty six year old Briana Taylor was killed on March Thirteenth when officers from the Louisville Police Department burst into apartment with a battering ram during a botched drug raid. Policy announce themselves but according to her boyfriend they didn't So he fired a shot hitting officer in the leg. Then, officers returned fire and struck Taylor Multiple Times. Till his family had been hoping for a minimum charge of manslaughter. But Attorney General Cameron was a Republican and the states first black attorney general said, the outcome was appropriate. The decision before my office as the Special Prosecutor in this case was not to decide the loss of miss. Taylor's life was a tragedy. The answer to that question is unequivocally. Yes. In response, the city of Louisville rose up. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer had been bracing for this moment. When Tuesday a state of emergency was declared to prepare for potential unrest? Police barricades and the judge ordered federal courthouse closed this week in anticipation of a decision. On Wednesday, the mirror announced a nine pm curfew still protests spread through downtown Louisville, last night. In some moments, the scene turn violent to police. Officers were shot about one hundred people were arrested and protests spread throughout the country to to places like Denver, Portland, in Buffalo.

Brianna Taylor Louisville Officer Attorney General Cameron Louisville Police Department Attorney Johnson Mattingly Miss Riana Brent Hankinson Cosgrove Kentucky Commonwealth Kentucky Law Greg Fischer Endangerment Prosecutor Denver Cameron. Buffalo Portland
Just one officer indicted in Breonna Taylor case.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:36 min | 1 d ago

Just one officer indicted in Breonna Taylor case.

"Kentucky Grand Jury on Wednesday, indicted a single former police officer for shooting into neighbouring apartments but did not move forward with charges against any offices for their role in Briana Taylor's death. The jury announced that fired officer Brett Hankinson was charged with three counts of wanton endangerment in connection to the police raid of Thomas home on the night of March thirteen. Immediately. After the announcement people were expressing frustration that the grand jury did not do more justice has not been served tweeted, Linda, saceur of until freedom a group that has pushed for changes in the case, rise up all across this country everywhere rise up for Briana. Taylor, she said attorney Ben Crump who's representing Taylor's family tweeted that the chargers involved nothing for the murder of Brianna Taylor this is outrageous and offensive he said. A news conference State Attorney General Daniel Cameron said. And the two other officers who entered Taylor's apartment announce themselves before entering the apartment and did not use a no knock warrant according to Kentucky Law the use of force by the offices was justified to protect themselves this justification Baas from pursuing criminal charges and miss. Brianna Taylor's death. A Republican Cameron is the states first black state attorney general and protege of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell who has been tapped. By some as he's heir apparent, his was also one of twenty names on President Donald Trump's list to fill a few chess supreme court vacancy Brianna Taylor an emergency medical worker was shot multiple times by officers who entered her home using a no knock warrant during a narcotics investigation the warrants us to search her home was connected to a suspect who did not live there and no drugs were found inside. Protesters across the country have demanded justice for Taylor and other black people killed by police in recent months the release date in late May of nine one, one call by Taylor's boyfriend marked the beginning of days of protests fueled by her shooting and the violent death of George Floyd while in police custody in Minneapolis on May twenty fifth last night amid protests in major cities across the US. The Louisville Metro Police Department confirmed that two of their offices had been shot during the protests.

Brianna Taylor Louisville Metro Police Depart Attorney Officer Daniel Cameron Mitch Mcconnell Kentucky Brett Hankinson Briana Donald Trump Endangerment Ben Crump George Floyd Minneapolis Thomas Linda United States Baas Kentucky Law
Dallas City Council Votes To Cut Dallas Police Overtime Budget By $7M

Red Eye Radio

02:24 min | 1 d ago

Dallas City Council Votes To Cut Dallas Police Overtime Budget By $7M

"The L. A City Council voted 11 to 4 tonight, Tio cut seven million from the Dallas Police Department's 24 million overtime budget. Some called the move defending the police. Others say it's just the reallocation of buns. A vote tonight will amend the Dallas Police Department's portion of the budget by taking seven million from overtime and moving into of the public safety programs, including hiring expert conflict mediators and adding more civilian workers to allow more officers to go out. Uncontrolled

Dallas Police Department TIO L. A City Council
No officers charged directly for the killing of Breonna Taylor

All Things Considered

01:03 min | 1 d ago

No officers charged directly for the killing of Breonna Taylor

"Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. Louisville Mayor Greg Fisher says the grand jury decision in the police shooting of Bronek Taylor will not derail reforms being considered for that city's police department. One officer was charged with wanton endangerment for shooting into a neighbor's apartment while serving a warrant on Taylor's home owner Klibanoff with member station W F P L has more. Fisher acknowledges that today's announcement was not what many were hoping to hear, but says the case is far from over. There's an ongoing federal probe and a police department review to see if internal policies were violated. But it's clear that their policies and procedures that must be changed. Because Briana Taylor's still should be alive. Louisville has agreed to several policing reforms as part of a $12 million settlement with Taylor's family protesters have demanded the mayor fire the two officers who were not charged in the case. Fisher said decisions about those officers would have to wait until the internal investigation was complete for NPR news. I'm Eleanor

Bronek Taylor Greg Fisher NPR Louisville Jack Spear Endangerment Eleanor Officer Klibanoff
Ex-officer Brett Hankison indicted in connection with Breonna Taylor's death

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:59 sec | 1 d ago

Ex-officer Brett Hankison indicted in connection with Breonna Taylor's death

"News Special Report. A grand jury has indicted former police officer following the fatal shooting of 26 year old black woman, Briana Taylor in Louisville. Judge Anne O'Connor reading the grand jury's reports win under circumstances manifesting extreme indifference to human life he wanted Lee shot a gun, the jury says fired Officer Brett Hack Kison blindly opened fire into adjoining apartments when police burst into the home of Taylor during a Narcotics investigation in March. No drugs were found in her home. Taylor was shot multiple times during the No knock warrant search of her home connected to a suspect who did not live there. No other charges were announced. Even amid new investigations, reports CBS's Jurika Duncan this week, the Louisville Metro Police Department announced that they're investigating three additional officers and Taylor's case. Saying they may have potentially broken department policies. Taylor's death has sparked months of protests. CBS NEWS Special Report. I'm Steve Dorsey,

Briana Taylor Louisville Metro Police Depart CBS Officer Louisville Steve Dorsey Anne O'connor Brett Hack Jurika Duncan LEE
Seattle City Council overrides mayor's veto of partial reallocation of police funding

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:54 sec | 1 d ago

Seattle City Council overrides mayor's veto of partial reallocation of police funding

"City Council has overridden the mayor's veto of police budget cuts in the 2020 budget. Rebalance We get the update from comas, Jeff Poached by a vote of 72. The council has implemented seriously cuts to the Seattle Police Department. Councilmembers, Debra Juarez and Alex Peterson were the only no votes with Peterson saying it is the union contract and not the police budget. That is the problem. Every progressive and well intentioned move seems to be met by a brick wall that contract the budget rebalancing as council members have called it. Reduces the police budget by roughly 14% and could lead to the lay offs of up to 100. Officers. Jeff Pooja look come on news After the vote, Mayor Jenny Durkin's office issued a statement which says in part after previous promises of a 50% cut to SPD. The reductions to the SPD budget are almost exactly those proposed by the mayor and former chief best, But none of the other issues counsel admitted. Our problems have been addressed. A

Mayor Jenny Durkin City Council Seattle Police Department Alex Peterson Jeff Poached Jeff Pooja Debra Juarez
Seattle City Council votes to override Mayor Durkan's budget veto

KYW 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 2 d ago

Seattle City Council votes to override Mayor Durkan's budget veto

"The Seattle City Council voted 7 to 2 to override vetoes by the mayor and move forward with plans to reduce the police department's annual budget. Respondent Michael Spear. Maintaining public safety and reimagining policing are not mutually exclusive. Some council members butted heads council member so want no legally But in the end, the mayor's Vito is overwritten in King County Equity now that supports de funding, police said on Twitter. They are encouraged to see the City Council resist the mayor's anti black obstructionism the mayor's office telling us in a statement, while council members have publicly stated they wanted to work with Mayor Durkin to address Issues in the 2020 budget. They chose a different path. The reduction is expected to be about 1% of the police budget, nearly 1400 officers will be removed. In the city's police force, the

Seattle City Council Mayor Durkin Michael Spear Twitter Vito King County
Seattle City Council votes to override Mayor Durkan's budget veto

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:57 sec | 2 d ago

Seattle City Council votes to override Mayor Durkan's budget veto

"The Seattle City Council voted last night to override all three vetoes that Mayor Jenny jerkin announced last month related to cuts in the Seattle Police Department, the latest from comas. Carleen Johnson Back On August, 21st Mayor Jenny Dorking announced he'd veto the City Council's budget revisions that would have cut up to 100 police officers this year. Those who've been pushing for cuts of the department have since been urging counsel to override that veto. I'm calling on all counts of members over the mayor's shameful anti black Vito, Not all who spoke yesterday wanted counsel Cut police. This man in the tourism industry, said public safety has to be a priority industry's been debt made by the impact covered 19 in our road to recovery requires a safe Welcoming and vibrant city for visitors. And will. Ultimately the bill affecting the police budget was voted 72 Council members Alex Peterson and Deborah Laura's were the two who voted to sustain it. These cuts could mean layoffs for up to 100 officers as well. A salary cuts for command staff

Seattle Police Department Seattle City Council Mayor Jenny Jerkin Jenny Dorking Carleen Johnson Alex Peterson Deborah Laura
Louisville under state of emergency ahead of Breonna Taylor decision

Lance McAlister

00:42 sec | 2 d ago

Louisville under state of emergency ahead of Breonna Taylor decision

"The city of Louisville, declaring a state of emergency today ahead of a decision on whether or not charges will be brought against the officers involved in the shooting death of Rianna Taylor as police prepare for potential protests, the Louisville Metro Police Department has been preparing downtown barricades were placed around Jeff Airpark and the perimeter of the downtown area to its sure pedestrian safety. Interim police Chief Robert Schroeder says they've been in contact with the attorney general's office about a decision in the Briana Taylor case. We hope and hope to have some advance notice. But as we all know, in the reality of dealing with day to day situations, sometimes your plans go right. So we have to plan ahead of time Officer vacations and planned days off have been rejected. The federal courthouse will be closed through the end of the week.

Louisville Metro Police Depart Rianna Taylor Briana Taylor Louisville Jeff Airpark Robert Schroeder Time Officer Attorney
Dallas-Fort Worth PD Announces Arrest In 1974 Cold Case Murder Of Carla Walker

Jim Bohannon

00:42 sec | 2 d ago

Dallas-Fort Worth PD Announces Arrest In 1974 Cold Case Murder Of Carla Walker

"What worth police have made an arrest in the 45 year old Cold case murder of a 17 year old Western Hills student who was brutally attacked and killed in 1974. 77 Glenn McCarley is charged with capital murder in the death of Carla Walker. Walker's family told the Fort Worth Star Telegram that police concluded that McCurley was responsible for the attack on Carla and her boyfriend as they sat in his car outside Wrigley Bowling Alley. Carla had been beaten, tortured, raped and strangled before her body was dumped in a culvert near Lake Been Brooke. The Fort Worth Police Department will hold three o'clock news conference this afternoon concerning the

Carla Walker Fort Worth Police Department Wrigley Bowling Alley Murder Lake Been Brooke Glenn Mccarley Mccurley Western Hills
City restricts access before decision in Breonna Taylor case

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 d ago

City restricts access before decision in Breonna Taylor case

"Federal buildings in downtown Louisville Kentucky are closed and officers are standing by as a city awaits a possible decision about charges and Brianna Taylor's police shooting Louisville Kentucky is getting ready for the state attorney general's announcement about whether he'll charge police officers and Brianna Taylor's shooting death on Monday the Louisville metro police department canceled officers vacations police say for public safety the restricting vehicle traffic downtown and placing barricades around Jefferson square park where many previous protests have been held Brianna Taylor was shot eight times on March thirteenth by officers who entered her home using a no knock warrant during a narcotics investigation large protests over her death erupted in late may Taylor's family and many celebrities and activists have been pushing Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron to criminally charge officers involved in the raid I'm Jennifer king

Kentucky Brianna Taylor Jefferson Square Park Daniel Cameron Jennifer King Louisville Attorney Louisville Metro Police Depart
Seattle City Council to vote to overide mayor’s veto of cuts to police budget

News, Traffic and Weather

01:08 min | 3 d ago

Seattle City Council to vote to overide mayor’s veto of cuts to police budget

"The Seattle police Department tomorrow. The City Council will decide whether or not to override Mayor Jenny Durkin's veto of the council's budget cuts, so it takes seven votes to override. If that fails, Council president Lorena Gonzalez proposed to compromise with the mayor, scrapping plans to cut 100 police officers and plans to slash The salaries of the command staff. Also, instead of dismantling the navigation team that responds to homeless encampments, $500,000 will be spent to focus on mental health services rather than sweeps. They're still investments in community based reforms, but not at the level in the original proposal. It is significantly rolling back even small, progressive changes of the council made in the summer. This bill is an attempt to try to move us forward. It does memorialized certain council priorities that continue to be priorities. All along. The council has said the 2020 budget adjustment is just a starting point for bigger changes in the 2021 budget. You can download the camo news after get alerts about the outcome of votes tomorrow starts at three PM, will have live reports with reaction throughout the day. In just a few hours. Artists will start

City Council Seattle Police Department Jenny Durkin Lorena Gonzalez President Trump
Controversial facial-recognition software used 30,000 times by Los Angeles Police in last decade, records show

Geek News Central

00:57 sec | 3 d ago

Controversial facial-recognition software used 30,000 times by Los Angeles Police in last decade, records show

"The Los Angeles lease departments use facial recognition software thirty, thousand times since two, thousand, nine I thought that's a pretty low number. And Lapd is never given a clear answer whether it uses facial recognition his please working. On Money Agency told Los Angeles Times use a technology thirty thousand times. They have a database of more than nine million mugshots maintained by the La County. Sheriff's Department and one point more than five hundred LAPD personnel had access the system all the department claims of the numbers closer to three hundred recent months. A spokesperson for the LAPD said, he couldn't be sure how many arrests This has been The system they call Lazarus has helped the police department make how said no individuals rested by LAPD based on solely on facial recognition results So, They GONNA banned facial recognition in la like they are in Portland.

Lapd Los Angeles Los Angeles Times Sheriff's Department La County Money Agency Lazarus Portland
The Veronica Blumhorst Case

True Crime Garage

04:21 min | Last week

The Veronica Blumhorst Case

"Very fascinating case on our hands Veronica is missing. And pretty quickly, we have a very suspicious suspect and her boyfriend, Jeff well, where we left off, Veronica bloomers has been missing for fourteen years. By this point, the Mendota Police Department gave Veronica's family access to her case file, and in that file, it contained a report the Veronica's Boyfriend Jeff an interview made strange statements and throughout some concerning hypotheticals. That basically added up to Veronica was hurt and killed and placed somewhere that no, one would find her and there were reasons why jeff could be responsible for this. Again, this is Jeff statements after hours of being interviewed with no recording of any kind to back any of this up and all in a report written after the interview. And the case file report went on to state that according to people who knew Jeff. After Veronica vanished the Jeff Voice two theories he liked to share about what had happened to Veronica. The I was that he thought maybe she went to track down her birth parents. and. They were not happy about this and they did something to her. The second theory was that perhaps an ex boyfriend had her because he was jealous and the ex decided if he couldn't have her no one could. This is all a bit strange to me here captain because let's let's pretend for a second that jeff is. Perfectly innocent. The theories don't seem to be they don't seem to carry water very well do they like the first one of her tracking down her birth parents again, I'm getting the impression time and time again with Veronica that she is an open book her family knew what she was up to what she was into her coworkers were always told what her plans were. Yeah, and question. Who took her to find her parents? She left her car like if her car was gone maybe that somewhat of a plausible theory, but you also leave at one am in the morning. Go. Find your birth parents to doesn't make a lot of sense right? Poor timing and top that off. Maybe she didn't WanNa hurt her parents her adopted parents feelings. For whatever reason But again, this is unique situation where she has an older sister who's adopted as well. She could have bounced this idea off of her and they were close and I don't see why she wouldn't and then take it a step further. Why would the parents decide to hurt her and do something terrible to her? Makes no sense. Wouldn't you just say go away you know we don't. We don't have any life with you. you know that so that doesn't seem to carry much water, but then you do have the ex-boyfriend. Theory maybe that is something that. That Jeff was was right about on this. Okay. So the story goes that she dated this police officer, he became chief. And they only went on a few dates and he was kind of possessive and was also like saying, well, maybe you should. Wear this outfit or where these types of close. So. It ended as quickly as it began So and there's no evidence that after they broke up that this guy was in the picture anymore. Right. Right. So I do like that theory of an ex or something of that nature. But again, then you have to wonder is this just jeff coming up with alternative? Theories that do not involve him being the bad guy. But he also came up with some theories that he is the bad guy while maybe our thought she was pregnant maybe I pushed her maybe I hit her. So much so that they looked at his family's property they did not find anything. Now I believe that Jeff took a lie detector at some point.

Jeff Voice Veronica Bloomers Veronica Mendota Police Department Officer
"the police department" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

04:27 min | 2 weeks ago

"the police department" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

"According to the black information. Network Rochester New York police chief Laurent Single Terry. said in a statement that he was honored to serve the city and upstate New York for twenty years and commended his staff. However, he said the protests and criticism of his handling of the investigation into the March twenty third incident are an attempt to destroy his character and integrity. Now, this is in a video that you may have seen on social media Rochester police, officers, approached Daniel prude who was naked and he initially complied with the officer's orders. Mr Perroud. Was subsequently seen shouting and spitting, which prompted officers to place a spit bag over his head. It looked like a hood, the officers then seen pinning Daniel. PRU To the ground while the bag is still on his head and eventually goes lifeless. The medical examiner said that prude died from. Eight complications the mayor of Rochester Her name is a lovely Warren said the police, the mental haircare, the mental health care system, our society and She said, she have all failed Daniel proved. Another one and this happened back in March they just the way they was leaning on his head. Yeah. It was crew. It didn't make no sense man it looked inhumane. It looked just reminded. US of me of George Floyd and how he was killed and it was around the same you know in. March. We didn't even know about this and this is September yeah. Yeah Yeah now, the officers involved initially, they were suspended with pay right now I understand they all quit. They've all resigned while they resigned. Not just the officers their supervisors are the ones that really the chief and his officers in an ranking supervisors under underneath and they say more are coming with the department. I was reading an article in new. York Times about this. Situation as well. It is just sickening and the President says nothing about it and I'm telling Y'all man for president to be in this position and do nothing but divide. You can't allow this in it and just in in brazen's them in makes them feel more empowered to do what they wanna do they just do they've never felt more comfortable in spite of the black lives matter movement. Steel out here doing what they WanNa do and we still get this video footage late so they can build a case up and all this crap. just like they doing with the brother in In Wisconsin trying to come up with here. He had a guy and You had no idea. He was going to get a knife in a car now. What is we Dan Dancing around for? Killing his killing. If you kill somebody if you put a mask, ask anybody and they suffocate you go to jail. You me everybody else you mean, Jack Regular citizens just. Anybody killing anybody for any reason. Except the police. When it comes to killing black people, I'm giving example sadly, the thirteen year old White Kia. The autistic kid in Utah got shot by police. Watch what happened in this police. Watch watch what happened. I'LL BET is ask go to jail I. Promise you that you the shot a thirteen year old little white boy and he was autistic. Oh No sir no sir. Oh No sir yeah yeah. You you're not going to be able to had this sweep this under the rug they're not gonNA. Let you. Talented Child Yes are you kidding me kill this boy? What could you? What else could you have done to subdue him? Yeah and our prayers go out to that family for sure coming up we'll have more of today's trending stories on the Steve Harvey Morning Show.

Daniel Rochester Laurent Single Terry. New York George Floyd Mr Perroud President Steve Harvey York Times officer Wisconsin Dan Dancing Warren Utah
"the police department" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

04:32 min | Last month

"the police department" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Minneapolis panel stalls on plan to dismantle. Police Department by Amy for liberty of the Associated Press in Minneapolis. Minneapolis Commission decided Wednesday to take more time to review a city council amendment to dismantle the police department in the wake of George. Floyd's death ending the possibility of voters deciding the issue in November. The Charter Commission had expressed concern that the process to change the city's charter was being rushed after Floyd died following an encounter with the Minneapolis police officer. Some commissioners said they were more concerned with making the right changes rather than making them fast. The proposed amendment followed widespread criticism of law enforcement over Floyd. Steph it would've replaced the police department with a Department of community safety and violence prevention that backers said we'd take a more holistic approach that approach wasn't fully defined. The proposal would've allowed for some armed police officers. It called for a division of licensed peace officers who would answered to the new departments director. The Council says, trust US we'll figure it out after this is approved trust us well, I don't, and we shouldn't said, Berry Clegg Chairman of the Charter Commission Charter changes to important. The issue would likely have gone to voters if the commission had acted decisively either for or against the amendment that's because the city council was required only to consult the commission and was not bound by their action but the lack of a final decision means the proposal won't clear deadlines to make the ballot this November. A similar move by the commission effectively ended a proposed charter change in two thousand eighteen that would have given the city council more control over the department. The process has unfolded during a violent summer in. Minneapolis. After Floyd's death with shootings dramatically higher than last year many residents are worried about a proposal to abolish police officers. Some city council members promised a robust process to get public input on how a new department would look and work council members Steve Fletcher. One of the authors of the proposal said before the vote that even if the commission decided, it needed more time, the city would continue to move ahead with the community engagement process to build a collective vision of what we really want the future of public safety to look like. Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Fry told the Associated Press on Tuesday that he remains opposed to eliminating the department. We should not go down the route of simply abolishing the police department fry said what we need to see within this department and within many departments throughout the country is a full on culture shift. Floyd a black man who was handcuffed died may fifth after Derek Shaw Van who is white pressed his knee against floyd neck for nearly eight minutes as Floyd said, he couldn't breathe sheldon was charged with second degree murder and other counts and three other officers at the scene were charged with aiding and abetting all four officers were fired and Floyd's death sparked protests in Minneapolis and around the world. The mayor and Chief Madeira Dondo have moved ahead with their own changes since Floyd's death including requiring officers to document attempts to de escalate situations whether or not forces used. They also have expanded requirements for reporting use of force incidents, ordering officers to provide more detail. Arredondo also pulled the department out of negotiations for a union contract saying he wanted a review designed to change the grievance and arbitration process, which he said makes it hard to get rid of problem officers. According to draft language of the amendment posted online the new department proposed by the City Council will have responsibility for public safety services prioritizing a holistic public health oriented approach. The director of the new agency.

Floyd Police Department Minneapolis Charter Commission city council Minneapolis Commission Charter Commission Charter Associated Press director Department of community Jacob Fry Arredondo Steve Fletcher Amy Berry Clegg George Chief Madeira Dondo
"the police department" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

KUOW Newsroom

05:11 min | 2 months ago

"the police department" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

"This is Komo. W I'm Kim, Malcolm Seattle Mayor Jenny Durken and police chief Carmen best had a response today, too. City Councils majority support for fifty percent defunding of the police department. No way instead the mayor and police chief announced their own set of preliminary cuts and changes to the Seattle. Police Department in two thousand and twenty one in Kyw's Kate Walters is here now to tell us more, Kate. Hi, hi! So, tell us what did Mirror Durkan and chief best proposed today? So they've announced preliminary steps to move. Basically, some functions out of the police department also make some cuts to next year's budget in total. They're estimating that these steps will result in seventy. Six million dollar cut to the budget in two, thousand, twenty, one and most of that nearly fifty six million comes from moving the nine one one call center parking enforcement, the office of Emergency Management and the Office of Police Accountability Out of S. payday to civilian non law enforcement office side. It is important to note that these cuts to the budget on actually expected to free up money for use in things like community programs, it simply move the oversight in the funding for these services away from the police. The other thing they're planning to do is nicks a planned expansion of the police force next year, so they weren't hire extra offices and they said they're going to reduce the. The time as well so these proposals from mayor, Durkin chief best today, add up to about twenty percent or so of the police department's budget and that's not fifty percent. Yeah, that's right I mean. We're looking at a four hundred million dollars plus budget, and so not not even close to that line of fifty percent. So how much of a concession really is this to demands from advocates? So I haven't talked to any advocates today, but we've heard really strong Kohl's right from the beginning for a reduction of SPD's budget by fifty percent, and like we said that doesn't. This doesn't reach that bar. Doesn't satisfy those coils. Also, the majority of these cuts wouldn't result in reinvestment in community base safety solutions, which is something else that we've heard people calling for release. Strongly it does take nine one one out of the police department. Something that advocates say that they want, but it doesn't have a solid timeline or plan kind of when that would happen. The kyw newsroom East, talking to folks in the. The community today, so we will continue to bring us on the reactions from community, members and advocates have to say about this well, both and best say they're against this plan to fund The police department by fifty percent. In fact chief best was tweeting last week saying that if that were to happen, most of the officers lost would be people of color were. Why is she saying that? Essentially what we heard today is that because of labor contracts? The policy for Lang officers would basically be lost in first out so most rain recent highs would be the first to go. And a lot of the offices of color, and those representing the Lgbtq community have been hired in recent years, so basically could be some of the first on the chopping block. Council laser herbold has suggested that best is actually able to get around that and request permission to lay people off out of order. If that's in the benefit of the department, but best said today there's no precedent for lodge scale out of auto. Light off well. This current city council which leans progressive has been very vocal about their support for defunding the department. Department, a majority is supporting the plans from community groups to defend by fifty percent. What did the marriage best have to say about that? They both released slammed idea today. They said blunt cuts weren't work and would have a big impact on public safety and the ability for offices to respond in a timely manner when they needed He is Mad Durkin. Council's commitment to defend by fifty percent. This is simply not responsible. You can't govern by twitter or offer sticker. Community safety is too important. To? Not Have Awful. I think Seattle expects more of its government. So durken's basically saying. The council doesn't have a plan for what they do. After cutting the budget by fifty percent, some council members have pushed back during the the Monday morning meeting today, and said they not considering blunt cuts, but they looking at scalpel-like approaches to scale down what we use law enforcement to respond to and to scale up community based investments. That would work okay well. This budget discussion is going to continue. What should we expect to happen next? Next well best in Dirk and say that these are preliminary steps. They're still looking at analyses of nine one one, Kohl's and the SPCA workforce, and they're still looking at expansion of things like the health, one program, which sends mental health professionals to emergency calls with firefighters for instance, so they'll submit a final twenty one budget to the council, probably in September as what happens with this year's budget, the city council continuing their conversation about that later this week. KYW's Kate Walters with the latest on the discussions around the police. Department's budget. Thank you so much for this. You're welcome..

Police Department Kate Walters Seattle Office of Police Kohl Carmen best Jenny Durken Komo KYW Mirror Durkan office of Emergency Management Durkin Kyw Mad Durkin Kim twitter Dirk Malcolm Seattle
"the police department" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

09:01 min | 3 months ago

"the police department" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"And I mean I, think the last couple of years we've seen. We've seen the press sort of have to weather. Verbal attacks from the highest rungs a government and I think that's been a wide range, a conversation that has been happening in the press and in our newspapers and our airwaves for the last couple of years and so there's certainly a heightened attention being paid to that in terms of freedoms of the press in what our constitutional rights are with this escalating to physical violence This is not the first time. I think that there are reporters working particular beat here and abroad who have always been subject to violence to physical violence peeing. It happened domestically, and in such a widespread way I think has been jarring for some folks, readers and the public and reporters alight. In terms of changing attitudes. I think you made the point that the safety of journalists is not more important than the safety. Of anybody walking down the street, but I think that the. I think what we're likely to see you. What we are seeing is that. Folks are sort of using physical attacks on the press as a means by which they can get four people who previously didn't care about similar attacks on general members of the public particularly people from certain marginalized communities. She sort of get them to care to wake them up. It's the sort of is the argument that if it's happening, you know two reporters while they're live on CNN. Then think about what might be happening to people when there are no cameras around or to people who don't enjoy the prominence of being a national reporter and so I. think that there's a sort of awareness reading that it's not just about what it means. When the police are physically violent with the press when they're outside trying to do, their jobs would also went at suggests about the larger institution of saying and the violence that people in communities all over the country experience every day. And this piece goes in soon, really immune very extended history of this relationship between basically. The US almost being like a PR. Department for release. Which I want us to get into the? Can you start by telling us the story in site in your piece of Josh Lucille? Share so Joshua Bill the man from Indianapolis, who, in the fall of twenty, sixteen was in Chicago for a relative's funeral and there was a procession, a car procession, leaving cemetery in a neighborhood amount greenland in Chicago, in Mount Greenwood is a neighborhood that is a predominantly white in a city. In which the majority of the population are people of Color An, it's in particular notable because it's home to many of the city's cops and firefighters. And there's a cemetery there. They were leaving the cemetery after having buried a relative, and there was this sort of altercation on the street And basically. A car cut off some of the vehicles that were in the funeral a concession. And an argument began. People got out of their cars. And what happened was that to narratives quickly emerged Joshua beal guy out of his car, and they were two men who later found out. Were police officers off duty? Police officers, and there was there was sort of alive chaos. There is loud music. There is a lot of yelling. And this argument very quickly escalated and there were dozens of nine one one calls made from the scene, in which spice standards were describing two white men, waving guns around and Joshua beal, who is legally licensed to carry a firearm retrieved. A firearm from his car, and minutes later, he was dead in the street. And very quickly to separate narratives emerged from this scene. There is the police narrative and then there is voice. His family said what bystanders said. The police said that what had happened were two officers. Joseph Tracy and Thomas Heroin. I'm off duty and sort of happened upon this. HAPPENED UPON THIS Joseph Teresi got into an argument there was you know the police said that on someone had been walking a fire lane at. That's how the argument began. and. Notably. The police said that Joseph Sees Me Joshua. Beal had fired his weapon I and that they had returned fire on, and they also said that both Darwin Andruzzi were in uniform and obviously law enforcement. This was not reflected in any of the nine one one polls that came from bystanders and the family. Who's there insisted that it was not clear at all, but they were law, enforcement and so what you had. Is the police saying that they were justified in shooting and killing him because it was obvious that they were police in that he made the decision not to lower his weapon and everyone else saying that these were just too angry. White guys in the street, waving guns and that Joshua Bill. Br his firearm out in self defense. In response to them, having pulled a I and what happened is that. Reporters get to the scene and they start to write these stories, and they start to speak to the communications representatives on Who Represent the Chicago Police Department? And those details about The officers being uniform about. Having pulled his weapon I they start to leak into the stories that are written and that appear in local news media, and imports. You know the detail about the cops having been in uniform in particular release spread on sort of started with Anthony, the WHO's the chief communications off surfaces Chicago Police, department telling that to reporters on the police chief also repeated this to reporters. It appears on the nightly news in local newspapers. It was also many autopsy report. And you know guy and then months later nine one one calls are released and the family sort of from the first from day one had always insisted that no, they weren't in uniform and nobody had any idea who. These people were. And so you started to see this spread and spread and spread and it wasn't challenged you know by reporters until months and months and months later. This came you know just. Two years after the city of Chicago had erupted in protest over the murderer climate, donald, and so it was a familiar scene where you know, black man is killed by police and the police say happened in. Everyone else's that something else happened. who is a local reporter for the Chicago reader wrote a piece eighteen months later examining the misinformation particularly that the officers were in uniform and sort of detail. Why that hadn't been challenged I reporters even as through the course of the investigation of a this incident. Sort of began to reveal more and more. That, this was a blatant lie. The Look on with Donald case they put out of a fleet misrepresentation of his murder, and the only reason i. mean that was. That was feared because. Videotaped state suppressed actually got released the public. Right and so that you know with Quantum McDonald. The story was that. The officer was justified in Shooting and killing him because he had been holding a knife in at lunch. That reporters and then you know report a reporter style you know over a dozen freedom of information requests to release the tate that would show what actually happened and the all of them were denied the police departments line was that releasing it would interfere with their ability to conduct a proper investigation and so an investigative report the only reason it was released. Released, was because an investigative reporter sued the city and the department and a judge sided with the reporter, and so this ape was released, and what we know now. Is that what the police said? Happen Justin just never happened, and in fact that officer Jason Van Dyke. was later arrested and convicted.

reporter Joshua beal Chicago Chicago Police Department officer Joshua Bill investigative reporter donald US CNN Joseph Tracy Joseph Teresi Josh Lucille Quantum McDonald Joseph Indianapolis Mount Greenwood Justin
"the police department" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

03:45 min | 3 months ago

"the police department" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Mason. Writer were among other publications the Columbia Journalism Review. Discussing her piece from two thousand nineteen officials say. Chicago and elsewhere police departments plant misinformation to the press. We're talking about this relationship between policing beliefs, abuses and the press. In light of This ongoing story, but also the fact that police have chosen. To. Viciously attack multiple members of the press over the past. Over Week of demonstrations across the United States. Jobless claims another one point five one hundred one point five. Million Americans file for unemployment benefits. The Federal Reserve is predicting a slow recovery. With unemployment. At nine point three percent the end of twenty twenty. and. Macroeconomic moves in response even as Nothing has been done on rent freezes or Direct fronting. The People Corona infections climb. Even as Washington moves on. The other business. And state governors are rejecting new lockdown measures as the virus spikes. Mayor of Washington DC. excited. Said ops and brands the movement with black. Lives, matter, plaza. Force is not considering anything to do. Refunding and redeployment revenue. Washington DC. New Video of a two thousand nineteen incident. Lack men and Oklahoma to officers breeze. Once said he didn't care the other side. I don't believe you. He died. Jefferson Davis statue was torn down West Virginia. As statues come down as well Louisville beliefs finally released report. On the murder of Brianna Taylor incident. Is Essentially Ansi as reported by the police. Congress! Is Voice Together. It's first few believer. A man claimed that George Floyd Derek Chavan bumped heads changes story. And Joe Biden. Hears you loud and clear. Technical fixes. Nothing systemic on the economy and more money were released the farmers. Never fear. So I'd miss. Absolutely listening trump campaign freaking out. As poll numbers. Look really bad swing states like Michigan where Joe Biden's opened up a double. Shut him for getting new P- accompany. IBM has banned the facial recognition. SAW has ended a facial recognition software division. Good News, not for altruistic reasons. They were losing money. Amazon! Lease USA facial recognition technology for one year..

Joe Biden Washington United States Columbia Journalism Review George Floyd Derek Chavan Chicago Federal Reserve Brianna Taylor Jefferson Davis Writer IBM Louisville Oklahoma Mason. Congress Amazon West Virginia murder DC. Michigan
"the police department" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:32 min | 3 months ago

"the police department" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Be right back. This is on point. Protests over racial injustice are spreading across the country. Mullah pandemic continues to take its toll. The next weeks and months are leading to a consequential election. This November and every day the NPR politics podcast is here to discuss how it could reshape your world. This is on point. I'm Meghna Chakrabarti this hour were trying to understand the real story of what happened in Camden New Jersey when back in two thousand thirteen, the Camden city police was dismantled, and a countywide police force was put into its place because. Back in two thousand fifteen, and especially now once again Camden is being held up as an example of how you successfully reimagining reimagined policing. But of course, the truth is far more complicated, so we're trying to understand that complexity this hour for example in the year after that first big dismantling of the Camden police former New Jersey. Governor Chris Christie really celebrated the progress that was made by the Police Department so here's Chris Christie in two thousand fourteen. Let me just say that. All of US Republicans and Democrats alike have supported better stronger and more effective crimefighting here in Camden, and by all accounts, the groundbreaking action and the commitment of the mayor, the freeholder director and the police chief are improving police services.

"the police department" Discussed on Coronavirus

Coronavirus

05:33 min | 3 months ago

"the police department" Discussed on Coronavirus

"Minneapolis City Council members pledged to dismantle the city's police department. President trump would cross national guard troops, and a tropical storm hits Southeast Louisiana. Hello everyone and welcome to today in America daily Roundup of today's top new stories. Here's your latest nine members of the Minneapolis City Council at pledge to dismantle the city's police department, promising to create a new system of public safety. The council members stood before hundreds of people on Sunday evening were they committed to work with the community on making changes and adopting those changes in the coming weeks through budget and Policy Actions Council members did not have any specific plans for a new public safety system would look like, but said they would draw on past studies consent decrees and reforms to policing across the nation. The city council's decision follows in the footsteps of Minneapolis Public Schools the University of Minnesota and Minneapolis Parks and recreation limiting longstanding ties with the PD Minneapolis mayor. Jacob Fray has since opposed the move by the city council members President Trump has ordered national guard troops to begin withdrawing from the nation's capital, following a week of protests over the death of George, Floyd and police violence in America president trump. I made the announcement on twitter, claiming that troops will be withdrawn because everything is now on the. MISSISSIPPI UTAH and Indiana National Guard will leave by five PM Monday Maryland in New Jersey National. Guard already left DC on Saturday. Army Secretary, Ryan McCarthy confirmed the announcement, stating that five thousand out of state National Guard while be withdrawn from DC within the next forty eight to seventy two hours, president trump came under fire last week after riot police dispersed crowds out of Lafayette Square, using pepper balls and smoke canisters before the president walked to neighboring church and posed for photos. The National Guard had point forty three thousand car troops across thirty four states and DC to assist law enforcement. What civil unrest thirty seven thousand guard soldiers continued to assist with cove in nineteen response in California the national. Guard began to depart the city of Los Angeles on Sunday evening. New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio has pledged to cut the budget for the NYPD and spend more money on social services in the city. It was the first time Mayor De. BLASIO has promised to the department's budget. The move came as calls have intensified across the country to. The police, a broad term that has included similar proposals to trim police budgets, and we distribute the money to social programs. The move was a reversal. The mayor who on Friday expressed scepticism about cutting police funding. He has not yet specified which social services the funding will be redirected to the NYPD has an annual budget of six billion dollars, which represents more than six percent of the city's proposed ninety billion dollar budget. The NYPD is under public scrutiny for using violent tactics to enforce the city's curfew, which began last Monday and it was lifted on Sunday. The FDA is now discouraging the reuse of certain and ninety five mass made in China shortages of and ninety five mass amid pandemic have prompted the FDA to loosen rules in the form of emergency use authorizations. The FDA had allowed for the use of some mass, not yet approved by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and health, but we're in use in other countries. Also allowed for the reuse of ninety five mass after decontamination. The agency changed its policy on Sunday regarding decontamination of certain and ninety five mass, discouraging the use of certain mass made in China and not approved by the. H The list of mass that are authorized, but may not be reused includes a number of models from three am. That are manufactured in China. And I o S. H, which is part of the CDC has found that respirators manufactured in China vary in their design and performance, and lastly a tropical storm hit southeast Louisiana. Hours after pouring several inches of rain on the New Orleans area. According to the weather service, the storm brought three to five feet of flooding across the Louisiana coastline. Louisiana was already hard hit by the coronavirus pandemic with at least forty two thousand confirmed cases and nearly three thousand deaths. The State's Health Department announced that the storm had forced the closure of drive through and mobile testing sites throughout the week. The health department says testing will resume on Saturday June thirteenth, pending recovery efforts adding that. that. Tests conducted through other programs at fixed facilities will not be affected. The storm known as storm. crystal-ball has forced evacuations and killed many people in El Salvador Guatemala and Mexico the storm stronger wind gusts are mainly over the coastal waters and range from fifty to sixty miles per hour. The land base winds are at about thirty five to forty five miles per hour, causing significant road closures, meteorologists are watching for persistent bands of rain that can cause prolonged rainfall.

Minneapolis City Council president trump China NYPD National Guard FDA Indiana National Guard DC Louisiana America Mayor Bill De Blasio Minneapolis Southeast Louisiana Minneapolis Public Schools National Institute for Occupat twitter New Jersey National Health Department
"the police department" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

04:36 min | 3 months ago

"the police department" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

"With Katie and foes on the iheartradio. APP APPLE PODCASTS or wherever you get your favorite shows. Members of the Minneapolis City councils their overruling mayor Jacob FRY and will commit to dismantling their police department meaning. Get rid of it. Completely The stunning announcement was made on Sunday with nine out of thirteen members coming out in support of that idea, which gives them a majority. That can't be vetoed by mayor. Fried so now. What does this mean exactly okay? The council members admit it won't be an immediate change, but make no mistake they say when the Dust Settles Minneapolis will not have a traditional police department What the alternative according to them is community based safety a term? They've yet to explain. Well. I don't know what that means. I need. Police in the city I'm living. Yeah. I mean you want the good police there to serve out what they have to do though is. They have to go in and totally revamp the hiring policies and the training policies. They have to ban Cho- Kohl's. They have to ban shooting in the back. and. They have to ban knees on your neck. Seat Dot. That's because look man, if a guy here and it has to be consequences for murder. If you kill a person who is unarmed under no circumstances that allowed you going to do some jail time. If you're murder. You cannot murder person for resisting arrest. That's not a killer offense, and you're not judging. Jury you the police. Your job is to protect and serve, and so far that's not been. What are some of the police? Officers have done especially in the black community, so I think they have to change policies and I. Think they have to have a directive. Come down and just let it be known. If you shoot an unarmed person, you're going to do time. Have you seen that movie the purge? You guys have seen that movie where it's just. Lawlessness after certain time at night. People are saying that's what it would be like if we didn't have the police. The you know the good cops to protect if you don't have police, you gotTA. Have Law and order you have to. The low. But the law and order has to be fair and just across the board. And the most law and order that needs to be put into place right now because we have law and order for regular people we don't have law and order for police is what we don't have. They're the ones right now. We have to police the police. Because they cannot continued, be able to continue to get away with these crimes against people of Color. Again. And our notes concert if you shoot an unarmed person, that's that's a crime. If you kill a black person, that's a crime. Bro How did is simple as change. Not a crime Dale Yeah All Right Steve Coming up at the top of the hour. We're GONNA talk about voting on Tuesday right after this you're listening to. Morning Show. Forgotten is a new podcast about hundreds of young women who disappeared and turned up dead in Juarez Mexico. Right across the border from El Paso. There were not just random victims. The women were picked. They were selected. I mean there could be an abduction in broad daylight. No one saw it leaves her like ghosts. They were killed for a reason. The burning question is. Why isn't not a major emphasis of investigation? These crimes have been unsolved for nearly thirty years. We talked victims, families FBI agents and a psychologist who claims to know one of the culprits to understand why. and. We reveal how these women's deaths force us to think more deeply about borders, migration, trade and corruption. Listen to Forgotten Women of Juarez on the iheartradio APP or wherever you put costs. Young World the world's Asia. It is I.

murder Minneapolis Jacob FRY Katie Juarez Cho- Kohl Juarez Mexico FBI Asia El Paso TA Steve
"the police department" Discussed on The Daily Dive

The Daily Dive

08:08 min | 4 months ago

"the police department" Discussed on The Daily Dive

"It's Wednesday June third I'm Oscar. Ramirez in Los Angeles and this is the daily dive. The Minnesota Department of human. Rights will launch an investigation to the Minneapolis Police Department after filing a civil rights charge because of the death of George Void. As that plays out. Protests continue in Minneapolis around the country. Lamb, twee vo, senior reporter at Buzzfeed. News is on the ground with protesters and tells us about the change they want to see. Next, continued unrest and protests are derailing the plans of some restaurants and businesses to reopen. After being shut down for months because of the coronavirus, pandemic businesses have had to ship their focus to protecting staff and starting themselves in the moment hand. Had reporter at the Wall Street. Journal joins US for more. Finally there have been over forty thousand deaths it US nursing homes because of covid nineteen, according to a USA Today analysis. It is about forty percent of the nation's corona virus debt. Limit testing lack of personal protective equipment and poor infection control at these facilities as hit his vulnerable population hard. Marissa's quick cousy investigative reporter at USA Today joins us now. There's growing concern of more infection. Estate's real. News without the noise. That's divy. As a step towards that deconstruction of Democrat says the Minnesota Department of human. Rights is filing a commissioners charge of discrimination to launch a civil rights investigation into the Minneapolis Police Department joining us now. Is Lamb tweet vo senior reporter at Buzzfeed News? Thanks for joining us, lamb. He. Wanted to start off by talking about some of the latest developments the Minnesota Department of Human Rights will launch an investigation into the Minneapolis police. Department they filed this civil rights charge obviously related to the death of George Floyd. The governor there tim walls had said that they want to establish peace on the streets. They WANNA address the systemic issues and that this is the first time that the human rights department has launched a systemic investigation into the largest police department there in the state. They're also asking the police department to implement immediate measures to address these issues of discrimination. Discrimination so hopefully the ball is rolling in the discussion will keep going, and things will start to change their but lamb. You've been on the ground talking to protesters, demonstrators everybody there. Give us your sense of what's going on. It seems to me that things have started to turn tight a little bit early. The first few days there was a lot of rioting and looting, a lot of anger and frustration, but it seems that the more peaceful protests have started to take center stage now tell us about the people that you're talking to and how they're feeling in these moments. Right. We've talked to a number of different protests. Yesterday we went along marched alongside some or walk along a march that went from the governor's residence. All the way to the capital and I think by talking to various people. We got the feeding that they were very intense. A making this protest about the systemic issues that have played the twin cities for quite some time for many years, but they casey even and even though there was confusion about intruders from outside, and even though there have been other reports about violence and looting in downtown. For example, a lot of the buildings have been boarded up. I think it is very clear that they are all still very dedicated to issues around. And issues around in equities and other inequalities that are race elated in Minneapolis and Saint Paul what are some of the ultimate goals that people wanna accomplish there I. Know One of the big things we've seen been seeing. Is they definitely do want charges for all the officers that were involve when Jordan Lloyd was pinned down by by the cops there. What are you hearing beyond that? What I've heard is that people wanted to vote out. The DA in many ways of the district attorney has not been prosecuting police a long time and I think one of the most powerful things that I heard yesterday during a protest was one person taking the megaphone, and saying yes, voting for the president is important, but what's even more important is voting for the people who are in charge of your town and charge if If your city, and so, what's been re really interesting to see that? There was really a big franz on rule changes on activating civic engagement in a way that I think is also food something that scenes reminiscent in like the march for our lives, young people are coming together. They have all this technology and information that the fingertips, and really going into issues that are largest stomach, not just byrol at the moment. We're a little over a week. Since all of this started happening with the death of George Floyd on Memorial Day do you get the sense that protesters are starting to feel heard beyond that? I was talking about Minnesota filing the civil rights charge against the police. Department and launching that investigation. Do you think that they will take these? At least small wins? The the overall thing we'll take a long time to change obviously but. Do you think that they will take. These are small wins. Do you think they're being heard now? I think I still feel like they. They are skeptical because they have every right to be right. It's like in many ways based seen their parents and their grandparents go through all kinds of inequities through time. and I think for a lot of folks. This is still like a wait and see okay. You're doing something but wait and see kind of moment and one of the things that I think speaks. Speaks to that is that I spoke to a sixteen year old girl who was telling me that her mother went through very similar things and one of the things that she really wants to continue to make sure that this is not just something that has lows with the viral social web and I think one of the things that really her she said, was that the president even call some of the practices. And I think when it comes very high from a twitter on that which is also one of the ways in which a lot of teams seem to get. The information can be like. Maybe you're hurt somehow on the local level, but it still hurts to. She said hear that from a public official all the way, the top. You're obviously there on the ground with all the people and talking to them, but you know some of these marches are taking place at. You know places of government You said they marched to the governor's mansion. Will that? Are there any officials that are out there at least acknowledging the people interacting with them at all. I think we saw a few. We heard from protesters at the governor. came out to sea, but may not have been listening to the stories of folks and then we saw you. Public officials at the Capitol sort of standing on the balcony from afar. Looking at the protests is, but we did see that was interesting was that there was a sergeant from the National Guard? He is also an African American and he is also someone who he said. Works in diversity issues for the National Guard he came in and actually talk to the protesters directly. This man came into. Into the circle hugged a bunch of protesters. And then also let's start a prayer circle, and then talk about how this is a difficult time and sort of like addressing the maybe generational issues about wanting change immediately and wanting to see change over time. That's exactly what I mean. Actually some acknowledgement that they're being heard. You know and we're seeing some of this. Across the country police chiefs, other police that are taking a knee with protesters showing them that they're being heard as I said, the bigger issues will take time, but at least we're getting these moments in between of solidarity, their. Lamb tweet, VO, senior reporter at Buzzfeed, News, thank you very much for joining us you. A career in application development, it means owning the opportunity to impact the preparation of our nation for the future. Join DD IT for challenging work that advances your career apply now at Gd. Dot Com slash careers. Is An equal opportunity employer disability veteran. This.

reporter Minneapolis Police Department Minneapolis Buzzfeed Minnesota Department of human Lamb George Floyd Minnesota Department of Human president official US Los Angeles USA Today Ramirez George Void National Guard investigative reporter
"the police department" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

06:14 min | 4 months ago

"the police department" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"When do we focus on the community? You know I. I didn't hear anything about Why is it that the community does? Why is their distrust from our community. We have. We're not talking about that. I guess right. We just go at like that doesn't exist. We just don't talk about us. I don't have a whole lot of hope about this commission personally and you know we weren't invited as an organization the prize about that. We're we're generally not invited to these conversations. Some of our peers and other organizations are because I think they. They realized that those those people know they'll come with a different point of view. And if you don't want to hear the truth then you ain't GonNa bite the truth bearers. You know we we. We don't get invited. We get invited to other conversations and that's fine So no I don't I you know I'm hopeful but I just don't see this solving any issues with the community. At least not right now. It has taken a lot of hits in some of the hits or criticisms. I should say are what you just mentioned and that. There's a one of the biggest problems that people are having with. It is that it's filled all sixteen persons on the panel or members of the Commission. they're all law enforcement rights. He won't talk about mental health issues in homeless issues e you should have experts or they should have experts from those those backgrounds on the panel talked about it and also. I agree with you one hundred percent. You WanNa talk about you know the issues the community talk to whether it's Black Authors Hispanic officers talked to Black lives matter right. I know that they wanted designate them as a terrorist organization or doesn't However they want but they should at least reach out and see. Hey listen what's the problem? You know what? Why are you all doing this? And why what is the issue? What's The promise? I agree with you. That's why I said it's a half of a step in a right direction it. We're trying to go the right way but you got to go the full way right. Get other people besides law enforcement asking. You know law enforcement officers. What the problem is is not going to solve the problems. I hope that the law enforcement persons on the panel will reach out themselves and ask other experts in other disciplines their opinion like I l does but just from my own blasts when he said you don't really hold out a whole lot of that. Don't you know I've seen so many smoke and mirrors In my career with these panel the commissions and things I you know if you don't start off by saying you know we're GonNa talk to archimedes. Know what would it have been like to have the The bar say you know I get that people don't care for us in these communities. So why don't we just be brave and have a round table and find out what the issues are? That would have gone a long way towards building. Trust you cannot police they people without entrusting you not successfully. Because let's you're going to end up. Having is what we have now. Is that The black community in particular. See the police as an occupying force coming into our communities and arrest enough or whatever you know for whatever reason they want to And that's not that's what we don't want and that's really not why we exist so you know with the Commission I'm going to be following closely while you and I both thank you so much so thank you so much for coming on. I really really enjoyed the conversation. I don't want to hold you up too much longer. what do you have going on? As far as what's what's going on for yourself or your commitment to Leap into the National Black Police Officers Association. What do you have gone on future? So the mainly we have gone on. We'LL BE IN CONFERENCE AND CLEVELAND This year Cleveland had one of my first chapters in nineteen seventy two and They fell by the wayside. You know who knows why. But they're coming back. Cleveland has a a group called the Black Shield. There's three or four hundred strong. They are interested in coming back to the in. Bpa and being a member chapter the WE'RE GOING TO CLEVELAND. Cleveland has a lot of issues with policing and the and the community. And so we're going there hoping we can have some conversations to solve and address those issues That those days are July the fifteenth to the nineteenth with the coughing and self being sixteen seventeen and eighteen and the fifteenth and the nineteenth of travel. They so Be Looking for to for that information that'll be on our website. You can reach our website at. Www dot lack police that work calm and visit us. Join US Registations there'll be ultra cheap? Come to Cleveland and hang out with us at the do that. They could major dining seriously. I really have once. I want to see that really nice place if people you know if you like Cleveland on my Cleveland is nice you should. You should visit Cleveland. Yes I definitely think I'm GONNA make that happen. Great right so Thank you so much for being a cat to hunters podcast. A really really enjoyed the conversations very enlightening and talk to you again and I love that. I really would love to have you on to talk specifically about breast cancer My wife is a breast cancer survivor. one of her whatever. Good friends is a former new haven. Police officer she did twenty years in New Haven Police Department here in Connecticut New Haven police and she's also a breast cancer survivor. So maybe I do a show on all three of you all just law enforcement and what. It's like to go through breast cancer particularly the young. Yeah Yeah My. My wife was thirty two when she went through it. So you know so I the matter of fact I will make that happen. I'll make that happen right. So thank you again and look forward to talking again. Thank you so much.

CLEVELAND National Black Police Officers New Haven Police Department breast cancer Black cancer Black Shield Connecticut New Haven officer
"the police department" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

14:38 min | 4 months ago

"the police department" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"Have. I love all people then. I was raised to be of all but I was also raised to not take no mess. Okay and especially when it came to race. Okay you don't you don't let people just run over you because you're black So I don't I don't I don't I'm not comfortable around other people who are not black or who are not women. I'm a comfortable around. Everybody I give loved everybody And so I but I don't believe that anyone should be treated unfairly so when I see. I don't care who you are what your race is. What's your gender is if I said I'm probably going to say something if I'm in a position to do so I just so happen. I see a lot of things that affect black Officers that I feel like someone should say something about What's what is the promotional process for your agency Is it a written test is or board test is based on merit? Your your your arrest record. How does one get promoted in your particular agency? I'm asking that because he said you got passed over I mean we had a rating system or a system where it was just a ranking system. You we had an oral test. We had written test than an oral test. And wherever you ranked on that is where you were placed and eventually we have what we call the rule of three where you would get passed over but they had to pass you over or a reason for specific reason I eat some type of performance issue or maybe used too many sick days or something like that. So what is that? What was your process for your agency. pretty much the same Once you get to the rank Well it depends on what what level Sergeant there is a An oral assessment. But you're ranked by by your score. And they have to go down the list. Once you become lieutenant we want you. Test to become lieutenant or captain There's a rule of five. We talked about the rule of so the rule of five You can you can be children from the top by okay if you are if your score is tied with somebody. Let's say the rule of five goes down to eighty five and there's three people who made eighty five off. Your those people are also considered okay and I won't go into any details about that but just to say that once. You're in the defy that number that you that score that's only ten percent of what you should be which is what's your. What's your final assessments? Should be based on so. Let's just say at out. You made an eighty. That's only really eight points towards your score. The ninety percent of that is your resume your skill set your education and all the other things that you have done. Yeah so that's where the issue comes in because my resume is really long and fool. I And so when it came down to it Because I I considered myself pass over because the person who was chosen we are one point apart. Let's say I don't know where the scores were? But let's say that this person had eighty nine. I had eight and it was an another a female female and we're hurting for female and we never had a black female but she was chosen and I would have put my resume up against hers anytime and I'm like well. What about all these other things that I am? They just ignore those things And I would say yes and that's when I went to one of my superiors who was knowledgeable and ask them was. I not chosen because of my house and he said yes so I you know I. It was one of those times I really wanted to give up But my girlfriend's were hit me upside s guys got girlfriends out there and they love you. You know what I'm talking about. They were relentless. They were like you will take this test and two are two years apart. You will take this test and it took a lot for me to have you know to put my mind around. I had I had. I went through breast cancer again. You know that was hitting me aside here too and I. I really don't WanNa do this. I really just you know. Want to just step back and just different or you know. Just I won't even try again. I'll be okay and But I did take testing and this time I made ninety eight which is kind of hard to ignore so I was promoted and It's been an interesting journey system I'm thankful For the promotion. I don't think that I think I got a lot of acknowledged from the community that can receive with very please and I appreciate them too But I opened up a whole different way of looking at or receiving how I pursued by my peers and by my superiors I don't WANNA sound You Know I. It's not a big secret. It's just that It is a whole another set of of of became clear. Obviously.

"the police department" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

11:10 min | 4 months ago

"the police department" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"We were doing it. Well and people trusted US and people wanted to see us coming you know. We had these relationships with the people in our community. We protected our community. And they in turn you know reached out to us so we are the original committee police officers and we still are community police options. We do it really well. Because you know that's how we were raised. It's a cultural piece and so I think it's really necessary to have an communities. We don't have enough of out there doing this thing that we do I at work. I am In charge of the school resource officers and there is some controversy surrounding having officers in the schools. Of course I remember when the program first came about that people were like oh no. There's no way we want police officers in schools and now that we've had them in school for a while they have become increasingly popular. Because you know we got some s are that are really good at it and when I think of my best one they are officers of color. They do a good job because they have a vested interest in the all the community's entire school community and they do things that are really outside of I think our expectation of them and they go out of their way to make sure that the kids are are safe. They make sure that they have a contact that they wanna tell something that's happening in their homes that's harming them And so yeah. It's important that we have black officers and We need to have more of them and we need to make sure that that happened and Female officers what is your I mean. Obviously you are a female and a so what is your what is your I mean obviously the same thing would go towards them right Young Ladies Need. See old ladies being police officers in. Yes yes So I'm the first African American captain while I'm the only like to say 'cause ain't nobody coming for me so I'm the only one that's ever been promoted in Leigh's department And I've seen the effect that it has had on the community I get a lot Requests to speak on that particular issue. What my journey has been like. You know I try very hard to be respectful of both My position but also be respectful of Mike Experience because it was not easy to attain that rank. There are all kinds of roadblocks that I know other people do not have in attaining the recap. It's important that young ladies see that there are women at the top. There are very few of us. I think in my department I think may have about fourteen hundred sworn officers that doesn't include. All the employees have Three female character In a sworn police department fourteen hundred. So that's that's that's not saying a whole lot right that we need more than that But women tend to be a little more Measure in response to police issues. We come with a thought process. That's a little bit different from the men. So of course our our our point of view is really really important. And let me tell you need you need people of Color and you women at the top at the very top ranks of the police department because that's where policy is made that's very important. Decisions are being made. You want them to have that kind of input to represent that communities and so Yeah definitely important as offices. They'll call her are women at a very very good. I in I agree very much. Did an episode that was dedicated to to women in law enforcement. So I appreciate your response. Can you talk a little bit about? Are you free? Talk a little bit about Any type of the obstacles that you had to overcome because of your ethnicity and or your your agenda. Yeah sure because it's my it's my true and I choke is that Racism is a huge roadblocks for And particular black. I'M GONNA I need to say it. And this is the caveat I throw in here luck. Women in law enforcement are placed in one of two categories replaced in black category or replacing. The women category which I found two convenient should have our own category but women. We're at the bottom of the food. Chain in terms of being in law enforcement okay When when affirmative action? And that's kind of old fashioned term but it kinda still applies if you're looking to diversify your police. Department issues of affirmative action are raised if a woman is promoted. They're like okay or black man is promoted. They're like okay but if there's a qualified black woman and she looked over nobody blinks in is because she's in the black category she's into one credit or different the woman and we did promote blackmail and it's a convenient way to look past the black woman speaking to other. You know I meant or some of the sisters in our agency and have some really great relationships with a couple of them very close relationships and we share stories and to a female black female. We have the same story ways that we felt like. We have been overlooked Ways that we felt like we've been ignored How you know things that have have harm does Mentally or psychologically emotionally in the Police Department. Same stories just different woman in maybe maybe a different person who was evolve on the other end and so. I have decided that okay yeah. We need to highlight our experiences as black women And I'm pretty sure they're black women out in the audience who are maybe in companies that are not police departments and maybe they are You know in public service or they might be in private industry and can probably mirror our stories in their industries as well. Because I think this is something that's and then in being a black woman in America We have marginalized voices are tant down when we decided to speak up for ourselves recalled aggressive. Or You know. She's not being cooperative or You know she's hard to work with or she's got you better not talk about. How qualified your because then you have a chip on your shoulder. Those are the types of things that I have encountered in my career. And if you're not very careful you can get You can absorb that and really think that those things are true about yourself so you have to have a strong base You have to have some support and your support might not be within the police department. It might be outside of the Police Department as my was. My mentors were Men and women who did not work for my police department. Some of them were in law enforcement. Some of them law enforcement worse than executives and some of them are just regular old folks and my girlfriend is great. Have a group of girlfriends because they're going to blow you up So yeah it it. It has been a long and terribly stressful road. I am a two time breast cancer survivor. I don't like to use the worst. I usually use the word driver. Because you gotta drive past breast cancer. And you can't justify you gotta you gotTa make it make Your Life Work. And so during those those time periods in a whole `nother show talking about how that was to have breast cancer in the police department. But what I will say for you to you is that I have watched my peers and other people who have had various types of cancers people you know put their arms around them and you know make sure they had everything they want. My experience was not always like that during my breast cancer journey with the police department. But that's another story I can't do it yes I I learned what I had to learn but saying all of that is that is it was very very hard row ahead to be very consistent persistent and what to make captor now. Did you as far as your persistence. I mean did you. It passed over protests. I mean you talked about when you stood up for yourself and talked about how qualified you were You know you got pushback called angry or had a chip on your shoulder The you dealt with all that where people actually saying this to you or did you. Have you find riding in a bathroom walls? Or how did you but I well I most of the time it was You know something when you when you black in America. You can count. I guess what's going on if you experienced it enough but there have been times when people actually told me. I I hear stuff like you're not you're not you're not You won't do what I say. That one right there really got me won't do what you say. I didn't realize you know and it was from someone who was a superior but it wasn't like wasn't from a place of let me help you so when I make suggestions to you You know this is what I need for you to to to try it was. It was more a do what I was a blackmail by the way. Do what I say and it was like A. It just didn't feel right. You know it wasn't. It didn't come from a place of support and respect I've had a another person who was a care. Say to me. You need to put your fist down. Angela Davis Yeah I I was I've been known to bring up inequities that I see. Not just for myself or things I see happening to other people and I've been accused of calling people racist. I haven't called anyone a racist and my police department at least not to their face off thought it okay but I never accused anybody of being a racist because I feel like people should have an opportunity to say actually. Is You know if this isn't a race base issue. What is it so I've never never used anyone You know vocally say you're racist. I've never done that And I also ask a superior if I was passed over for promotion because of my My outspokenness and they told me yes. So you know it's pretty clear was going on I don't.

Police Department US America cancer Angela Davis Mike Experience Leigh
"the police department" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

07:06 min | 4 months ago

"the police department" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"They they got together of Thirteen groups of officers from when say thirteen thirteen city came together in? Saint Louis In nineteen seventy two had our first meeting And organize the The National Black Police Association as Maryland entity. And we've been rolling ever since and the fight has not changed. We are still fighting and expertise in our police department but our mission also includes that we stand for our community for the black community. We will stand for any community but primarily the black community because we are the community that has the most issue with law enforcement. So that's what we do in a nutshell and we do that. In a variety of ways we have a huge community service base. All of our. We have chapters all across the country in the UK and Canada. And we all do a lot of community service community outreach But we sometimes they also have to take on issues and the way we take on issues now well back. In the day they took issues by filing lawsuits which is not out of the real possibility. Now but with social media the way that is we can get a message out there across the country and across the world By just going on twitter going on facebook and then letting people know what's going on and then there's that pushback on the community like wait a minute. You know you can't you can't do this. You can't do that. Do this. To these black officers so by highlighting issues that we have in our police department is the way that we that we Mostly address issues now and then. Of course there's some conversations that we have that maybe not privy to public consumption to try to move along issues when we when we come across so There's a recent problem or that happened. I'm sure that you heard about this believers in Maryland. Dc area where the this black police officer Shot someone who was posing handcuffed and his car. Seven times and You many people have been talked to me about the speed at which to this officer was Arrested and they feel as if there was some type of inequity in the process Many people decide to me. Maybe this is you know anecdotal. Maybe we're just reading into this way too much but they're saying that If would have been a white officer. Took months for him to be released days to for him to be arrested So is that the type of inequity that you're addressing. Or how do you feel about that particular situation? Well here's the thing I might so things. It's hard to prove things. Even though we have enough evidence to prove it that black and we talk about it we know. No black officers will be taken to task very quickly very quickly. No braff they. They're under arrest where why office let him in. How about this for a moment and let them on pay? Yes that does happen. However here's what you can't justify if authors wrong it's hard to come to his defense because he really is wrong And so I actually live in county. Prince George's County Maryland. And we all have some difficulties with How long is being In Prince George's County Maryland. For instance. There are no body worn cameras that well. There's some officers who have them but it's not something that is a requirement at this time and the with the with the county executive and the police department has been well. We don't have enough money. Well Prince George's County is one of the richest counties in Maryland along with Gummy County Maryland. And all the county of surrounding Chris Georges County especially in Virginia on Gummy County. Maryland Washington DC. They have made it a priority for officers to have body worn cameras. And we're trying to figure out why doesn't press Georgia's county which is having a number of questionable shootings issues with police officers. Why it's not a priority that they have body worn camera. That is a huge question. Yes we are questioning that They Push County. Police has a LAWSUIT PENDING AGAINST FEDERAL LAWSUIT. That was brought about by Officers of Color Latino and and black officers in the police department about Racism and discrimination. So there are some of the Prince George's County Police Department. Had that officer been wearing a body worn camera. We might have been able to see what happened right so we can't we can't we can't stand for him if he did something wrong. And it looks you know. It looks pretty bad when you have. You have shot a handcuffed man. Seven-time handcuffed and stacked into Europe police. Cruiser we're not come stand you for that. I mean even if you know we want you to get due process and there's nothing that says that he's not getting due process but yes he was he was he was arrested. Fair fairly quickly And so we do know the you know the irony when a black officer. Nothing s compared to a white officer. Gotcha. Let's talk about the importance of black officers. Are Black officers even really necessary? I mean From from the perspective of the Community. is important for young kids in the community to see officers who look like them. Portola ministries or or is that something. That really is not necessary. A white officers can do just as good of a job Is that or or we can. Was We as black horses making a big deal out of nothing no. I don't think we're making a big deal out of nothing. I think it's extremely important especially that young people not just young for the whole entire black communities. See doing what we do because we do it really well and that thing is no committee has become this really I. You know. It's like a buzz phrase but it actually should mean more than maybe it means now as the used overly use you know you know. Some people think community policing is having coffee with a cop but it's really not that You is deeper than that. Actually building relationships that Bill Trust and an intern we become legitimized and is of the community. So we'd like the original community police officer back in the day when you know. It was hard for us to be hired and finally. They hired us. They didn't put us in a car with a partner. They've had US walking the beat and I own neighbor and.

officer black community The National Black Police Asso Prince George's County Police Maryland Prince George Gummy County Maryland County Maryland Officers of Color Latino Push County Chris Georges County Saint Louis Gummy County US UK braff twitter
"the police department" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

13:56 min | 4 months ago

"the police department" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"Investigative sergeant in a supervisor of the School Resource Program in Twenty Nineteen. Pruitt was promoted to captain. She currently serves as a deputy. Commander Supervising Calls for service. Countywide PRUITT is a past president of the coalition of black police officers among only Maryland. In since two thousand eighteen has serves as the chairperson of the National Black Police Association chills. Bs In criminal justice from University of Maryland University College and an Ma in front of psychology from argosy university. She's an adjunct professor of Criminal Justice Administration at the Montgomery College and teaches courses including introduction to policing criminal investigation in Police Organization and administration. She's also a member of law enforcement action partnership otherwise known as leap as well as myself so without further. Doing Ladies Gentlemen we are going to be discussing the importance of diversity within police department so I. WanNa thank once again my special guest Captain Sonia Pruitt to Captain Hunters podcast. Here is the interview all right so once again. We're talking to Captain Sonia Pruitt and thank you so much for being on Captain Hunters podcast. Thanks for inviting me. Your member of Law Enforcement Action Partnership as M. I in so just tell us a little bit about yourself and what you do for that organization just yourself in general okay Well I I call myself a transplant from north. Carolina ended up in the Washington metropolitan area as a student at how university Undergrad In nineteen eighty one. I've been here for a while now and I feel like I'm a a member of DMV as we call it the district Maryland. Virginia Became a police officer after deciding that being a doctor was not for me. I knew I was NOCCO. Stay up all night long doing any kind of internship or residency or anything like that. So they're not because I'm a science geek. I tried to go into Research so worked at the National Institutes of helpful. I don't like the repetitiveness of research This is no not for me so I became a police officer because as I was working for the US Postal Service Inspection Service. Which is their law. Enforcement Ranch I decided I wanted to go into law enforcement so I became a police officer as a yeah could be outside like being outside. I like being around people. This'll be fun and exciting. I did not know what I was getting myself into. Actually but I was ready for it. So that's how I became a police officer. I've been a police officer for twenty seven years. I'm currently a captain in charge of community engagement for the Montgomery County Police Department and I am also the chair woman The National Black Police Association and I got my my hat and various other incendiary rings of law enforcement and speaking and things like that. Very good awesome. Awesome my cousin. A currently works for the inspectional services. I'm hoping saying that right for the post office. He works service. He'd probably kill me tells me so many times but he actually is Located in Tampa Florida. So he's got a actually fairly wide range of territories. He's gotTa deal. With as far as his responsibilities e e installs Even saying he's installs a security surveillance equipment. Try to catch the postal workers. Stealing or yeah. Yeah yeah he's got some really cool guests. Can I wanted to have you on because I had a previous conversation with another person Leader of a black national black police officers of Association of America and So I wanted to have you on to talk about the importance of black police officers. And you know we're having a problem right now with the recruitment overawe police officer people do not want to be companies. Police officers overall but particularly. It's it's problematic within the black community. I want to have you on his to kind of talk about that and what we can do to fix this problem. Are you seeing A problem with getting more young people or more people particularly people colored black people to become police officer I'm not sure whether that is that. An urban legend or not Let me tell you why so in my career. I have worked in background investigation and we did. We were having that same dialogue always so hard to find particularly black people to become the police but I contend that there are plenty of black applicants out there. You just have to hire them. You cannot Find excuses not to hire them because of your implicit biases or your Your your overt biases. You cannot put them into a are you you. Can't you can't measure them by measurements? That are not the same measurements that you measure all the Atkins by meaning once they pass the basic parameters you don't get to add extra parameters for and I'm going to use this as a as a true example once you pass the parameters you can't say well they well. They have to have a bachelor's degree which they have but they didn't pass a class when they were in Undergrad. There's no such parameter. They have a bachelor's degree which is what the with the parameter is so I have seen that happen and you know question that and you know I had argued about it and that person was not hired so I'm going to say that if you're not doing everything you can to diversify your police department in a fair and impartial way that I'm going to throw out the window. That argument there are not enough Black Africans not enough women applicants not enough. Latino applicant is whatever the you know the category is. I'm going to say unless you're doing. They're fairly at across the board. And then I'm going to also add if you going out of your way to bypass the parameters in order to get certain hype of applicant or a certain category. Then you're not. You're still not playing fairly okay. So I am not clear Sir. Captain that that is really an issue. I think Anecdotally that it doesn't excuse because what I see is okay the black community. They have an issue with us so we can always say that they don't want to become the please I'm just not. I'm not convinced that when we had a black cat who was the director of our Personnel Division for instance with my police department. We didn't seem to have that issue. You one has to wonder what the issues really are. Okay that's that's a very fair very fair point. I too But I here's here's Mike attention and I too was a member of our background team in on all that kind of stuff recruit team and so. I went to colleges the schools Two Barber shops churches etc tried to get many applicants to sign up and many You know when you go to colleges we were heading You know some universities here in You Know Yukon Wiscon- Western Connecticut State University and other other schools. Rama stated Connecticut and even our home city and the people that were taking. The applications are showed some type of interest generally were white and many black applicants or or potential black applicants. Were would tell us straight out that they weren't interested in Assam down that saying that any didn't but those who dead Show some interest. Obviously you know they. They came on the Chicago Tribune. Awhile ago maybe I read. This article may be back in October or so September October. They did a really good article. I I can send it to if I can find it and it was talking about this whole problem that they were having in Chicago with all the problems. That Chicago Police Department has and they want more black people To to apply in their head of their personnel division for the city now as the police officers but for the city was talking about. How come there were no Not Enough Black applicants and one of the things that the that the personnel director was talking about was was similar to what you were just mentioning about about Going through with with this selection process many people are being weeded out for silly things that others others were not being weeded out as on on. And she was saying that. There's the legacy groups particularly Latino legacy groups right so so we have you. You remember the National Black Police Officers Association right so their legacy groups so a Latino groups Were actually staying with their applicants throughout the process right. So they're helping them back. Prepare for the physical prepare for the written. Prepare oral. And that was the difference. In why the Latino Applicants were doing better on the test whereas black people black officers or black applicants were taking a test and then that was it next time you see them was for their physical prison for the physical portion and they couldn't pass it will one of the reasons is obviously because you groups were not doing enough to make sure that they passed it so that was one of the critiques that the Personnel Director Had. I'd seen know and I liked the idea of Following the applicants so when I first apply My blue background. She was my and not in the background investigator Recruiter I missed my first test. I exit show up. I'll be lazy. You know that happens a lot with the cruise black white brown. You know because we are young and we're not Dedicated yet and and you know we're young. So she called me and she said. I'm a need you to come to this test and I said yes Ma'am I showed up so when I was in background I I remember having a conversation with one of the The executive that was there at the time and I said hey you know I had this idea. Why don't we make sure that we follow up with our African because we're having a problem with adversity A problem there's somebody says they have not sure really had one but anyway. Why don't we call advocate? Who we think things not to want to come and take the test to make sure they come in and take the test and she said well. We can't do that and I said why not. She said because that's against federal loss will turn we tell me see that we can understand it. Can we find that in the federal wreck so that we can read it and she never answered because there is no such thing so I suggested then because I got the impression that she was still some kind of way about calling black Africans? Why don't we just call? The Africans have to just call the black Africa's we can call them all and make sure that you know. They know that they need to come and take the test because they are most of them are young and we probably need to give them a little nudge ono that we can't do that. That's the guest federal rigs. That was like okay. So it's it's stuff like that they keep us from being able to hire qualified Women and Black and Latino Asian and so forth advocate in my opinion so my small vantage point and I and I take that unaccept- that I think that that's I think that what you're saying is absolutely valid and I and I'm not pushing back against that I'm trying to add to it and say that It is a it is a problem we do need to. Give people a nudge and we also have noticed. Where as you mentioned as you sat in your I out so meetings. Whatever and talked about okay. Wh why are we mountains personally because when they were? Fourteen smoke weed. Wh what are we talking about here So why are we? Why are we doing that? And we we had to have the same conversations with. Wait a minute okay. This guy got a ticket when he was eighteen. These these thirty three. Now what are you talking about? You know so so. Sometimes I think that the that the rules if not a fairly across the board can bounce people who could be potentially good applicants. I completely agree with that. So just tell us a little bit about The Organization the National Black Police Officers. Tell us a little about them. And what you do and as you are the chair woman and what. Your responsibilities.

National Black Police Associat officer National Black Police Officers National Black Police Officers black community Captain Sonia Pruitt Montgomery County Police Depar Law Enforcement Action Partner Police Organization Chicago Police Department Maryland personnel director University of Maryland Univers argosy university supervisor Personnel Division Commander Captain Hunters president
"the police department" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"the police department" Discussed on Science Friday

"Why is this so appealing then I mean why why do companies like Amazon WanNa get in on and even though it doesn't align with what we know uh-huh about facial expressions well. I think that there is a persistent belief that everybody around the world smiles when they're happy and frowns is when they're sad and scouse when they're angry and everyone around the world can recognize smiles and frowns and scowls as expressions of emotion and so companies think God this is a really great way to be able to read someone's emotions in an objective way and then capitalize on that for for selling products or for determining guilt or whatever people wanna use it for but the fact of the matter is that as I said facial movements hence can mean many different things depending on the context and they're not universal. That's one thing that we know pretty pretty clearly. I think at this point the agreed. Do you think these companies are aware of. The issues with their technology is not being quite ready. I don't think they're necessarily aware that they're making claims. Sweeping weeping claims that are incorrect. I think a couple of companies are becoming aware based on this paper that we published in the press that it's getting but it's it's really interesting. Some companies are super interested in trying to figure out how to do what they want to do. which is to you know gas? what someone's emotion is in an accurate way. Other companies are maybe being a little more defensive and really WanNa defend what they have because you know they've invested a lot of money in it Jennifer. What do you think about all of this emotion detection technology well. I'm really worried about it because I think as your other guest mentioned in the best of circumstances the technology might be able to identify a frown or a Smile L. But it can't identify what that means however when we see this technology sold to law enforcement agencies or schools which is where it's being sold quite a lot now. All the companies really claimed that they can tell if somebody is going to do something they can predict with this emotion detection technology analogy and it's just not there. It's just not accurate and I think it will be used to to target people especially people who are from from different cultures different races or ethnicity and it will be used to make assumptions about people who is going to be the bad kid in the school who we need to pull out of a school or who is going to be the person who is lying about whether they committed a crime. That's how emotion detection will be used in the near future. You're not ready for prime time but still moving ahead. I think we have run out of time. I'd like to thank both of you. Lisa Feldman Barrett professor of psychology at northeastern Eastern University Jennifer Lynch Surveillance Litigation Director at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Thank you both for taking time to be with us today. We're GONNA take a break and when we come back. We're going to continue our theme here. We're GONNA talk about how bias shows up in a I am. I replied Oh. This is science. It's Friday from WNYC studios science Friday. It supported by married hotels. Researchers have proven that travel challenges the mind into thinking in new and and more complex ways. It's amazing what disrupting your routine with a simple change of scenery can.

Jennifer Lynch Amazon Wan WNYC Lisa Feldman Barrett professor of psychology Director
"the police department" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

14:21 min | 1 year ago

"the police department" Discussed on Science Friday

"Protect new podcast from WNYC studios in Dublin Acuity saw in which people share stories about the classical music that gets them through their lives. The people like threat to San Mendez Musicians GIANBATTISTA and Wynton Marsalis Koyo girlfriends. I'm not so and are very Alec Baldwin. It's pop mix tape part sonic. Love let a Connecticut daily musical journey of the human lives. Listen for free wherever you get your podcast and sign up at openings protect. This is science. It's Friday. I'm Plato Three. US cities I'm talking about Oakland. San Francisco and Somerville Massachusetts have banned their police departments from mm using a form of artificial intelligence called facial recognition it analyzes a person's facial features and checks its database of faces and and comes up within identity match the idea that your face is now being recorded and stored can be upsetting presidential candidate. Bernie Sanders is demanding. A national ban on this technology and other candidates are calling for greater scrutiny of how it's being used this hour worth. We're going to be talking about it. Ourselves salves taking our own look at how police departments law enforcement agencies and courtrooms are using facial recognition and other forms of Ai from emotion motion detection algorithms to risk assessments and asking whether these technologies I really accurate and fair and that's what I'm going to be asking you. What do you think about using facial recognition and other forms of a in the criminal justice system. Give us a call our number eight four four seven two four eight eight two five five eight four four seven two four eight two five five or you can tweet US tweet us at Sei fry. Let me start out with the facial recognition and technology I Jennifer Lynch is the Surveillance Litigation Director at the Electric Frontier Foundation. Welcome to science Friday. Thank you well. We'll just just to start off giving me. Give me a definition of what facial recognition is sure. Facial recognition face recognition is a technology that allows you you to identify or verify the identity of somebody based on specific features of their face usually that's performed on digital images but it can also be performed performed on video and when a law enforcement law enforcement is using facial recognition we are these photos coming from well for the most part if law enforcement is using face recognition the photographs are coming from mugshot databases so about fourteen different states partner with the FBI and share their mugshot photographs with the FBI and then they have access to the FBI's photos but what we also know is that many states also include face recognition in their driver's license databases so about forty three states in the United States include face recognition and their driver's license databases databases and of those twenty to thirty states are sharing that information with the cops as well. That's really very interesting could it. Could I find down. If I'm in a database. Well you know I think that if you live in one of the forty three states that has face recognition in their driver's license database then you're likely in that database of you have a driver's license. If you have a passport you could also be in the State Department's face recognition database and if you've ever been arrested for a crime there's a good chance that you're in the FBI's mugshot database so but there's no central place on the Internet then I can look up my name and see if I'm in a database implant nope. There's no central place on the Internet and so I think that's really challenging for Americans right now because based on a study out of Georgetown we learned a couple years ago that pretty much fifty percent of Americans are already in a government face recognition database but it's hard to figure out which database you're in who has access access to that information and whether you can actually get yourself out of that face recognition database does law enforcement have to disclose how they're using your day year facial recognition commissioner of the UN the database well. I think there's a good argument that under public records laws they should have to disclose that we have a right to WHO information about what data the government has on us under the Privacy Act which is a federal law but you know we should also be able to contact contact our local and state police departments and ask them whether they have information on us as well and that includes face recognition. Do we have a sense of what could be next and how it's used news well. We do have a sense of that and so for the most part what we're seeing now with face recognition is that law enforcement is trying to use face recognition finish non static images so that might be trying to identify somebody in a facebook post or instagram post or trying to identify somebody who refuses to identify themselves against the mugshot database but what we're seeing on the near horizon is the the use of face recognition on the back and of cameras surveillance cameras embody cameras so I think we will start to see that very soon and in cities across the country unless we see cities start to pass bands or Moratoria like we've seen in San Francisco Disco Oakland and Somerville. What about facial recognition for example used in the public by commercial uses like if you walk into a mall and you're going to a store they did they take a picture of your face and going to a database or possibly figure out what you're shopping for yeah well. We don't have any federal privacy. Laws is right now that require stores or malls to disclose that information to you we do know that there are companies that are selling face recognition and technology to stores and malls and and these companies are claiming that stores can use it to identify shoplifters or even to identify people who you're a longtime customers who might be willing to pay a lot of money for that next shoe or piece of jewelry and sorry go ahead. I'm sorry oh I was going to say what we don't know is. How do people get into these databases in order to have face recognition identification. You have to match somebody's somebody's image against an existing database of photos so our stores responsible for putting people in a database. We don't know that and stores could be basing that AH on discriminatory practices that I think that's even more of a threat from government database because we don't have access to public records laws that can let us know whether stores have us in a database so that's one of the biggest worries. If this thing just gets totally surge flooding right everybody sooner or later database yeah. I think we're on the cusp of that right now and that's why it's so important for communities to have conversations nations about what they really want to have happen in their communities. we're seeing this happening California. I mentioned the two cities that have already banned government use of face recognition but we also have a bill that just passed the Senate yesterday our state Senate that would put a moratorium on face recognition use on mobile cameras for three years. So how can how concerned should we be about the I'm going to call universal face recognition coming coming our way. I think we should be very concerned learned. We can look at what's happening in China right now where there are multiple cameras on every street corner and those cameras aren't just using face recognition but they're also using other other kinds of technologies like gait recognition to identify people as they're walking away from the camera object recognition and character recognition to recognize license plates and cars all sorts of different technologies like that and and I think that we already have existing networks of cameras in the United United States. It wouldn't take much to add face recognition onto the back end of those cameras. What about the possibility of mismatch. How accurate is face MM facial recognition well? It really depends on several factors so lighting and angle of you are huge but we also know based on some research studies. Eddie's face recognition is much less accurate at identifying people of Color Women and children or young people a lot of people that is a lot of people and if you consider that our criminal justice system is disproportionately made up of people of color that means that the USA face recognition in the criminal justice system what have an even more disproportionate impact on people of color. We we got a comment from a listener through science Friday vox poppy Robert from Holly Springs. Georgia facial recognition is already in use with passports and other security devices so why should should the criminal justice system night used facial recognition. Yeah you know you you you get your phone open right by facial recognition. Mike and you were already being recognized there well. There's different ways to use face recognition so if you're using face recognition on your phone in general dot doc biometric is just stored on your phone and your phone is the only source for that and the only place where there is access to that but there are also these vast government databases now the question is should the government have access to photographs that were taken not for criminal purpose but for a purely civil purpose to be able to drive a car to be able to travel outside the country and I think there's a strong argument that we have never allowed the government to have fast access to those databases unrestricted access and we shouldn't allow that now and I guess they have the difference would be when you use your phone for facial recognition. You've given on your phone permission to look exactly have yeah I want to move on a little bit and believe it or not there is also emotion and detection and this technology that claims to assess facial movements and expressions and make conclusions about whether someone is frayed or nervous Jason Angry. It's just interesting to think about and if you follow the money this is a twenty billion dollar industry companies like Amazon and Microsoft and IBM are developing and and selling this technology to police departments among others so how accurate how accurate could these emotion detection systems be here to fill us in on this is Lisa Feldman Barrett a professor of psychology at Northeastern University. She joins us in via skype. Dr Barrett Welcome to the program. Thanks for having me on your show. You're welcome. Let's start with how good are humans at detecting emotions from facial expressions. Well humans don't detect emotions humans infer emotions so if you and I were in the same room right now we our brains would be processing not only are facial movements but our vocal sounds is our body postures. There's a whole broad context that your brain takes advantage of to make a guess about what the raise an eyebrow means what the curl of a lip means and so on but so can we tell with any shirty. How if someone is happy or angry or we're not well? I think it depends hands on how well we know each other and whether or not we come from the same context so same cultural context so I think the research shows pretty clearly that humans are guessing you're to you. It feels feels like you're reading. Someone's face like you would read words on a page but that's actually not what your brain is doing. It's making an inference and if someone comes from the same culture as you and you've known on them for a long time you've learned a lot about the patterns of their facial movements and what they means so you can guess pretty well but if you and I come from a different culture then we're probably going to have some you know mistakes and our guests is because the data are really clear that people in Western cultures like ours scowl more often than chance when they're angry but only about thirty percent of the time which means that seventy seventy percent of the time when you scowl on average you know you're feeling something else and you scowl at a lot of times when you're not angry like when you're concentrating or when you're confused about something so we're using not just the face but a whole ensemble of signals and so face reading and is is really limited. I would say that's from what my question was. If we are not good as humans in knowing what you know these expressions I mean how do we teach that to one to recommend so. It's so first of all. I think it's really important to understand what a I can do and what it can't. I have four senior colleagues. Colleagues in the five of us just published a paper where we reviewed over a thousand scientific studies some of which are a studies where we reviewed all the I studies that we could get our hands on and it's really clear that what I can do pretty well is it can detect a smile but not what to smile means. It can detect a frown not what a frown means and that's under perfect recording conditions so when the face isn't included and when the lake conditions are are good and so on so you know hey I can it doesn't make inferences about what official movement means it just text the facial movements. She'll bins are are. I would say you know reasonably good at guessing under some circumstances and really bad at other circumstances and scientists study. You know what makes a good perceiver. When do people make mistakes and so on so you know. It's it's a complicated question. That's not just about the movement of the face. It's also also about what that movement means in a psychological way on my replace this is science. Friday from WNYC studios talking about artificial artificial intelligence and facial recognition so so.

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"the police department" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"the police department" Discussed on 1A

"And when you say that it they were thrown away to clear up space in an evidence room. I'm that sounds very callous on its face. But you know, I'm not in law enforcement. I don't know how much evidence law enforcement agencies have to go through. What did you make of that rationale? Yeah. Obviously that's something all on forcing agencies have to take into account. We we have a limited space for evidence collection and evidence submission evidence stored. So it is something that has to be taken into account. But there comes a time where certain pieces of evidence probably need to be given more of a priority. Over other pieces talk about the culture of the Fayetteville police department at the time, particularly as it relates to the way that rape and sexual assault were investigated were treated compared to other crimes like robbery. Or homicide or a non sexual assault. Yeah. Back then we just didn't really do that great a job. And I had this conversation recent with that recently with Ashley, and I told her I don't really wanna come across like, I'm pointing fingers like I'm this high and mighty great detective because I was there I investigated rapes in the nineties and night. I did not do that great job with a lot of the rapes I investigated. So just the culture was and I'm sure this wasn't, you know, unique to the fabled police departments just they weren't always a priority, rapes weren't always a priority. The you know, I was crimes against persons detective, and you know, homicides were the priority business armed robberies after that aggravated assaults after that. And usually after that is where the rapes fell into line. And we just didn't have quite an understanding. I think of the dynamics of rapes investigations, or why victims might not always make sense, you know, when we're interviewing and so they they weren't always a priority. And I think just over the years we've made some significant movements. Definitely want to talk about that as we continue our conversation. And we're starting to get some comments from you, particularly your stories of dealing with this firsthand. Laurie wrote on our Facebook page hearing things like this make me feel certain. I did the right thing for me by not reporting. My rape. This is proof that women's lives. Don't matter and undoubtably women of color experience this more than white women. Actually, I'd like you to respond to that last comments. I read that's heartbreaking. But it's understandable. And I can certainly. I can certainly see where she's coming from having reviewed along with my colleagues sonum Bashan Sergio Hernandez who are the other reporters on this investigation reviewing more than fourteen hundred rape investigations. This is certainly a a widespread problem we found that law enforcement agencies.

rape Sergio Hernandez assault Facebook Fayetteville Laurie Ashley robbery