20 Burst results for "The Paris Review"

Sabrina Orah Mark Writes Into Brokenness

Can We Talk?

08:26 min | 4 months ago

Sabrina Orah Mark Writes Into Brokenness

"Writer and poet. Sabrina or a mark likes to describe her stories as having little poems folded up inside of them. She publishes monthly essays loosely based on motherhood and fairytales in the literary journal the paris review. Here's the opening of her november essay. You break it. We fix it. I am inside. you break it. We fix it holding my son shattered. I-ipad hello i call out. No one answers. The counter glows white and the walls are empty. Hello hello. I wait a few minutes before calling out again. One minute says a raspy voice from the back of the store hopes swells in my chest. Here we comes. We will fix said i hold up the broken screen so we can see it on a little shard of glass. Trump's the floor with a plank. Yeah we says you know what i ask. We says the soldering work required would more than a new ipad. We says it would take weeks possibly months. Sabrina began writing this essay in the weeks leading up to the presidential election. She published it after the election when the sitting president and a large percentage of his allies still refused to accept the decisive results. Oh the next week. I returned. You break it. We fix it with a whole entire country. It's heavy but i managed to carry it through the parking lot leaving behind a trail of seeds in the crisp sent of democracy and something that smells like blood or dirt across. It is a growing crack. A trial too young to be alone is out in front holding a broken country to store is gone out of business as the child. I shift the country to one arm and tried appear in. But it's shuddered and dark. Told you says the child out of business. I text my husband. You break it we fix. It is closed. I've come here for nothing again. The texture of sabrina 's essays is a rich. We've of fairytales politics. The past and her children's voices. Sabrina joins us for the fourth. In our four part series on creativity in the global pandemic. We started off talking about how she's managing to find the time to write with two young kids. At home she drew parallels between the ways that motherhood and quarantine have shaped her creative process right now. we're home schooling. And so there's this. I mean it's it's it's a packed house like twenty four seven and there is like the endless ness of like of things everywhere and snacks and then trying to ride. And then you know I do feel like. I've been working harder than i've ever worked in my entire life like you know since march like because you just have to grab the pieces of time where you can find it. It was funny because i was homeschooling. You know all day long like all day and at one point i just it was like from four to five i just i climbed into my bed and just like sat there with like staring at a wall at five o'clock my signs come into my room and they're like you forgot about us like what do you mean i forgot about you like how could i forget like it was like a whole hour went by you know like where i wasn't just right i was. Yeah you write about your kids a lot and their voices creep into your writing sometimes in unexpected ways. Which is one of the things that i really love about your writing so just to back up a little bit. You've said that after you had children the form that you're writing took changed after. I had kids. Is i think in many ways like i became more porous like i allowed. I had to allow more of the world and and it was right around that time where In many ways my prose poems started sort of growing and growing and growing part of it was just time. Because i couldn't like live inside of a single poem. I used to write these prose poems. In the instance of lake hermetically sealed likes Boxes and spaces of time. And i couldn't do that anymore after i had kids. And so would sort of just keep returning and returning and returning to my writing and then it would kind of get bigger and longer and stranger and more porous and there was more interruptions and then in many ways my palm started turning into stories and then with these essays. Even more of the world's i think started coming in And i really believe in some crossing. John rouse and having things blurb because i do think that you know fiction will leak into reality and reality leaks into affection and i don't really believe in like you know the the strict border between between john or as For myself creatively lake. I need to sort of move back and forth in that fluid way. It's really interesting that you connect that with having children. Yeah i used to be able to like work in these. These of yeah on interrupted Spaces and then the interruptions actually ended up really feeling like like a gift you know. And that's sort of something. I've been thinking a lot lately. Just you know inside of a. You know these last seven months of That that in certain ways like a lot what we lose often. You know We gain in these other places Like i'm trying really hard to find those places where like the thing that feels like a loss is not really a loss. And i'll give you an example like i'm teaching A class in poland's on on zoom and one of my students is disabled and she was talking about how you know. Normally these students are all Brought onto a university campus in the states and in a millionaire. She never would have been able to participate in this program. And she said you know Your captivity like when the world's closed for you the world opened up for the first time for me. And i would never have been able to meet her otherwise i would never have been able to know her and know her writing and hear her voice and mike see her. You know and when i moved all of my classes that i teach online. I thought like oh god. I don't wanna teach these workshops online. I love sort of the intimacy of the classroom that i've created an ideal but i think that like i held onto this idea of how things are supposed to be all of the time like so intensely that had i not been forced into this like other space. I would never have known this. You know what. I wasn't seeing Like why did i ever offered classes online before thinking about like you know people who for a million different reasons like wouldn't be able to get semi to a classroom. It was like the perfect moment of like what we loses. What we gain

Sabrina Sabrina Joins The Paris Review Literary Journal Donald Trump John Rouse John Poland Mike
The Year Without a Summer

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

06:24 min | 9 months ago

The Year Without a Summer

"The heat of summer is well and truly here in the Northern Hemisphere, the hot humid days just won't let up and living in new. York City I continue to be frustrated that central air conditioning is not as ubiquitous in homes and businesses, as it is in most parts of the southern United States where I grew up. Then, of course, it's always been substantially hotter in those southern states, although with climate change, the northeast is heating up more and more, but that does make me think sometimes. How the heck did people survive before? Joining especially in those very hot climates, farmers ALMANAC A few insights nothing to mind blowing people would take day trips to swing holes or up. To cooler weather, they kept windows and doors shut at midday to keep out hot air and delayed cooking or baking. Until the evening they ate refreshing. Cool treats and was available in homes, blue fans across blocks of ice, the biggest factor most likely however was it simply wasn't as hot as it is now at least in terms of extremes, quoting farmers, Almanac, the extra ordinarily hot summers that are commonplace today were virtually unheard of fifty to one hundred years ago in fact, seven of the top ten coolest, US summers on record occurred nineteen, hundred and nineteen fifty and quotes. There was one year however over two centuries ago now that it was a lot cooler. Eighteen Sixteen Aka the year without a summer quoting farmers. ALMANAC referred to by many names, including the poverty year and eighteen hundred and froze to death, the year eighteen sixteen was literally a year without a summer across much of the northern hemisphere throughout not only North America, but also northern Europe and parts of Asia in exceptionally cold summer, featuring killing frosts in July in August crippled food production crop failures in food shortages were. Were so widespread that rioting and looting became common in the United Kingdom and France on this side of the Atlantic. Many residents of New England and the Canadian Maritimes froze to death, starved, or suffered from severe malnutrition, as storms, bringing foot, or more of snow, hit hard during May and June. Many others from the region pulled up stakes and move to western New York in the Mid West where the cold was less severe. In fact, the year without a summer is now believed to have been one major catalyst in the westward expansion of the United States and quotes Nicole may have been less severe in the southern and Western us, but it was still highly unusual on July fourth eighteen sixteen. It was forty six degrees Fahrenheit in Savannah Georgia. For the record this year on July fourth and Savannah, it was ninety degrees. So. Why did this happen? It was due to one of the largest volcanic eruptions in recorded history Indonesia's Tamboura. The volcano erupted on April Fifth Eighteen fifteen, continuing to up for a week and killing nearly all of the twelve thousand residents of Tim, Bora as well as almost all plants in animal life on the island, quoting the Paris review, countless tons of volcanic. Volcanic ash circulated in the upper atmosphere for years after the events blocked out sunlight and lowering average surface temperatures globally in parts, of North, America Europe temperatures dropped by more than eighteen degrees. Fahrenheit there was snow in New England July and dark rain clouds swept over Europe throughout the summer months in Hungary reports of Brown snowfall, tainted by volcanic ash and quotes. Understandably many thought the world was ending that the sun was dying. It's really fascinating. Though is some of the cultural ripples that this massive event caused. You may be familiar with the story of how Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was inspired to write Frankenstein as part of a spooky storytelling challenge when she percy shelley and Lord Byron and friends were holed up in a villa in Geneva. One stormy summer turns out. It was this dark, thunderous apocalyptic. Apocalyptic summer of eighteen sixteen. The crew had gone to Geneva, both to ride out the unusually rainy summer, but also to escape their various dramas in England, being stuck indoors for so much of their trip Lord. Byron challenged them all to write ghost stories to entertain one. Another Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein which would set the stage for all of science fiction to come? Also among the Geneva Villa guests was Lord Byron's personal physician Dr John Polidori. Who wrote short story for the challenge called the vampire, and this story is often credited with the birth of the Modern Vampire Romance. But those genre defining publications aren't the only cultural institutions to come out of the summer last year of Eighteen, sixteen among the mini shortages across Europe was a crucial shortage of oats which led to the starvation and deaths of countless humans and livestock, including at least ten thousand horses, not counting how many were also slaughtered to save money or become dinner German? Baron Carl Dreyer's and inventor in student of mathematics started trying to design a man powered form of transportation, while historians agree that he was inspired by the weather based os shortage. He also saw a need for an alternative to horses as crucial for war. Quoting the Paris review his first designs for human powered transportation involved complex conveyor belt, driven four wheeled vehicles, but raises breakthrough came when he turned his thoughts to balance drawing on his experiences, skating on ice ponds drains, put his faith in the power momentum and front wheel, steering to keep a two wheel vehicle rate. This idea became his love, machine or running machine and quotes, and this running machine would become the modern day bicycle. All of this makes me think about how many things will change or be invented from this moment that we're living through. And of course there's a lot of things we're already seen, and we're likely to continue to see some big cultural shift, but like who, out there is writing the next genre defining novel that people will still be reading two centuries later. Who's inventing something that will be innovated on for decades before becoming a ubiquitous ordinary mode of transportation. Maybe won't be those types of things specifically, but there are surely ideas happening and things being created that we won't realize the impact of for decades

Europe United States Lord Byron Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Paris Review Geneva New England Frankenstein Savannah Savannah Georgia Baron Carl Dreyer New York Geneva Villa Mid West Indonesia North America Atlantic United Kingdom
Louisa Thomas on Writing About Tennis

No Challenges Remaining

08:31 min | 1 year ago

Louisa Thomas on Writing About Tennis

"I'm delighted to be joined here by a longtime listener first-time guests overdue guests. Really I think Lewis Thomas. I'm so excited to be here. I am a very long time listener. And Longtime Meyer so bucket lists for me for us. We're very excited. Why would we see? Fairmount is third like I remember. You said to me couple years ago like why almost like why am I not on and I had no answer your only people. I didn't think whatever like stooped our level. Pretty much. But now that you are here. I am delighted that you here and we're GONNA do a pretty male baggy centric type show with you here. We got a bunch listener questions on twitter on e Mail on our patron on. And we'll go through these. I JUST WANNA start against with how you got into tennis. Bitten what your tenants sort of writing. Arc has been leading all the way up to we can skip speed ahead to this version of the most recent story did which I think was on Kim. Clijsters must recent tennis centered leader for the New Yorker Short version of your of how you got here. A short version is that I was a pretty mediocre high school tennis player but absolutely loved it and stop playing pretty much when I got to college and a little bit after and then picked up a racquet again. A few years after college started playing With a friend of mine and I just loved it and it was like the greatest procrastination thing ever. I had actually had a book coming out and I was like filled with anxiety. And so I dealt with this by playing tennis for like it took like four hours. I don't like several times because we would I would go to Brooklyn. You know like an hour span telling you basically I was avoiding work and everything else and out of that. are as us to rate For the Paris Review blog about. Us Open that year. And I had so much fun doing it and it was actually a really kind of a revelation for me. I really felt in some ways that I found kind of voice that I hadn't really been able to. Yes it was it was. It was both new and felt so much like me and there was something about tennis about sports in particular. I'm sorry something about sports in general but tennis in particular that really kind of sports sports so tennis is really kind of my like my origin. Story I'd I'd worked at the sports section actually in high school but that was a both a long time before and I wasn't a writer in the same way so this was really kind of and it felt experimental felt fresh felt new felt it was none of those things really but I felt like I was doing something that no one else is doing and that this was like me. You know that this was something that I I sort of was bringing into the world and It was really exciting and if it was in the sense that Alaska was my voice after that I did a little bit more for them and then this great land the sports website owned by ESPN started by. Bill Simmons started up right before Wimbledon. Actually and they asked me to do. A couple of stories not became kind of became contributor. Really just writing about tennis. I and then I started Raymond other sports and then I started working for them fulltime and became an editor there and then by the end of doing all sports not all sports but many sports tennis was still kind of my Mitra. Love unless you're gonna Cap Cross country skiing by to write that your first term it was was. Us openwork clijsters one. That's as good as well ahead into the future. So since then. Yeah you're right. The New Yorker now seeing Kim Clijsters come back. What did you think I think permits? Everyone who I've talked to WHO watch. It was super impressed by her ball striking. Which is like in even though she lost the match and was almost off it badly. I mean she was down six to four or three or four zero. In the second set fought back have a tie-break so in some ways you could be like that close but she's playing Mugabe's who just made Australian Open final had really nothing to lose in this match and played really well and just had a lot of a lot of things may people go. Whoa Mabel we'll realize why she was a special player for so long. I think I mean I actually even from the start of the match is one of those matches where the scoreline wasn't necessarily reflective of what was going on in the individual games sort of competitive and a lot of games that she was losing she obviously has big weakness. Game. She's not as in shape as she probably wants to beach. Her Serb was kind of a disaster at times by Yeah her boss. Striking was just thrilling. I mean it was so pure it was so I mean I like completely fell in love with her and fell in love with the sport. All over again it actually I mean. Even her announcement had summoned a lot of these. Kinda had made me think about my own kind of start in tennis writing sports writing in general and it became even more intense while I was watching her and I was just. I was just happy in a way that was really uncomplicated. And which was really interesting too because I actually had a lot of complicated feelings about her coming back and it was just so it was like such a pleasure to watch her and just to see someone kind of seize the moment and some sort of Lia really kind of. Yeah uncomplicated right. What are your complicated feelings about her back? Then I generally think that coming back when he said this. Mike feelings aren't really about her coming back. I mean she should do whatever she wants to do in. This is clearly what she wants to be doing. And that's like got on her. You know my complicated feelings are only insofar as like you know. I'm also trying to negotiate my own kind of ambition versus raising a small child. How and the expectations are being placed upon me you know from various sides and trying to figure out what what is it that. I really want to be doing and how do I WANNA be privatizing my life and and in some ways one of the things I find really kind of inspiring about her is that she's actually. Her story is more complicated than a normal kind of like. It's always an Serena Williams story where she knew she was gonna WanNa come back and it was just about making that work in a way that worked for her. I mean she. She left the game she came back. She left the game again. She came back. And I find the idea that you could have. You could sort of take a long view of your career even in a career that is necessarily short like sports that you can sort of view it as a kind of multidimensional thing where you can have different ambitions at different times and have different ways of judging success and have different kind of approaches to be to be really inspiring. Also hard you know. I mean because that's not how we normally talk about successor. How's how's IT philosopher clijsters? I think we'll have one question about her but this my last question her. How's it influenced you being a relatively new mom. In this sort of era women's tennis where motherhood has been a big sugar running storyline. From as Aranka to Serena to clijsters now like what is how. How does that? Because you've written about all three of those women I'm guessing sent in this time. What is that been like? Having your own personal life and of it informs how you see these stories and see the narratives rally stories for better or worse by life always informs. Whatever I'm writing about but I'm also not a person who's injecting my life story into I mean. I did a little bit in the classrooms piece. But I don't usually do that and I have a little bit ready. Mutt Serena but usually I try and step back from that. But certainly there's always like an undercurrent a kind of is to think of it as a secret story. There's something sort of like some You know wellspring of feeling or some motivation that I have to bring into a story. Otherwise it's just a it's not mine. You know that thing. I was talking about my voice like I need to be tapping into whatever that is to take that voice And for some of these stories about mothers obviously it is a little bit closer to what I've been going through but it's also again more complicated because I think we have a tendency to generalize a lot when especially we're talking about something like motherhood would it's such a particularly unique experience. I mean at least to prove my point house at least in my experience has been particularly in unique but of course it's one of these things that is on the one hand like is obviously not universal. But it's something Millions and millions of billions of people go through like trying to figure out how to balance these different things and that's just how to balance them. But how you know embrace them in different ways but at the same time like what Serena wants is different than what clijsters wants. And that's different than what as wrinkle on. And how do you do sort of justice to those stories without kind of flattening them or distorting them or you know assuming one thing for one and a different thing for another and I think can be really challenging. But that's also part of the important thing about being a writer in some ways as sort of realizing the variety of human experience for sure. Very nice to

Tennis Kim Clijsters Mutt Serena Writer Lewis Thomas Twitter Paris Review Meyer Serena Williams Bill Simmons Alaska Espn Brooklyn Mugabe Cap Cross Editor LIA Wanna Mike
"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

The Paris Review

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

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Williams <Speech_Music_Female> from issue <Advertisement> eighty <Speech_Music_Female> one fall <Speech_Music_Female> nineteen <Advertisement> eighty-one <Speech_Music_Female> a <Speech_Music_Female> very special. <Advertisement> Thanks <Speech_Music_Female> to the Morgan Library <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and Museum <Speech_Music_Female> Homa B. <Speech_Music_Female> Archive about about <Advertisement> the Paris <Speech_Music_Female> review. which <Speech_Music_Female> includes <Advertisement> the Tennessee <Speech_Music_Female> Williams recordings <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> this <Speech_Music_Female> podcast cast is <Speech_Music_Female> a co production <Speech_Music_Female> of the Paris review <Speech_Music_Female> and stitcher? <Speech_Music_Female> Our <Advertisement> production <Speech_Music_Female> team includes <Speech_Music_Male> John <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> Galore. <Speech_Music_Male> Brendan Francis <Speech_Male> Newnham. <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> A public address <Speech_Music_Male> media. 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"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

The Paris Review

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

"The conversion of the Jews fiction by Philip Roth yeah real for opening your mouth in the first place it's he said what are you open your mouth all the time for I didn't it up it's I didn't as he said what do you care about Jesus Christ for anyway I didn't bring up Jesus Christ he did I didn't even know he was talking about Jesus is historical he kept saying Jesus historical as mimic the money mental voice of Rabbi Bender Jesus was a person that lived like you and me Ozzie continued that's been descent yeah what what do I give to sense whether you lived on that and what are you open your mouth it's Lieberman favored closed mouth inness especially when it came to Ozzy Friedman's questions Mrs Friedman had to see Rabbi Bender twice before about Ozzy's questions and this Wednesday at four thirty would be the third time itsy preferred to keep his mother in the kitchen he settled for behind the back subtleties such as gestures faces Charles and other less delicate barnyard noises he was a real person Jesus but he wasn't like God and we don't believe he it is God slowly Ozzy was explaining Rabbi benders position to see who had been absent from Hebrew school the previous afternoon the Catholics itsy said helpfully they believe in Jesus Christ that he's God it's Lieberman used the Catholics in its broadest sense to include the Protestants Ozzy received its he's remark with a tiny head Bob as though it were a footnote and went on his mother was Mary and his father probably was Joseph Ozzie said but the New Testament says his real father was God he's real father yeah as he said that's the big thing his father is supposed to be God bull that's intercourse a little curled smile shaped itself in the lower half of its face like a pink mustache what do you guys do you laugh or something I raised my hand yeah would you say that's when I asked the question it's his face lit up like a firefly's making fish and animals that's pretty good that's damn good it's he's appreciation was honest but un-imaginative it was as though God had just pitched you said intercourse us to Bender Yeah Writing Class Yeah Ghezzi smack the side of his head no kidding around Ozzie said that would really be nothing after all that other stuff that had practically nothing itsy considered.

Rabbi Bender Jesus Lieberman Ozzy Friedman Rabbi Bender Charles Mary Joseph Ozzie Philip Roth Bob Bender
"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

The Paris Review

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

"After the plumpton lunch i return to chicago and greatly impressed my young faculty colleagues with my new york literary adventure fired up i wrote a story called epstein a little comedy about a middle aged jewish adulterer drawn from the plight of a colorful next door neighbor who misbehaved on our street when i was a kid this time i sent my story not to the paris review slush pile from which i've been plucked first time around by none other than rose styron the right to the top not only was it accepted for publication but it subsequently received the paris review's aga khan prize for fiction that summer i booked third class passage on the holland america line and for the first time sale to europe to travel around england and france and also to receive the con prize in paris from prince ali colin celebrity diplomat a horseman an acclaimed internationally as quite the collector of ladies prince ali was the son of august con the third the staggeringly rich leader of the smiley muslims most intriguing to me was that the prince had formerly been married to the movie star rita hayworth you ward ceremony and reception were held ali khan's luxuriance while the bologna bill i had befriended vibrant if scruffy french student at the cafe odiaun the night before and invited her to the shinde she showed up late clad in leftback black on her fearsomely noisy motorbike and was refused entrance by the butler.

paris review holland america line england paris rita hayworth ali khan chicago new york epstein aga khan europe france prince ali
"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

The Paris Review

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

"He looked at her she did not return is look nor was she's smiling i'm going to bangkok she said well hongkong first have you ever stayed at the peninsula hotel i have never been to hong kong he said they say it's the greatest hotel anywhere berlin peres tokyo well i would know he said he's been to hotels remember venison that that little hotel by the fia twer the water in the street up to your knees i have a lot of work to do carrow oh come on i have a business then how much is this e coming this she said of by you can take a few minutes off it's already sold he said still has the price on it he shrugged a little answer me about venice she said i remember the hotel now let's say goodbye i'm going to bangkok with a friend he failed a phantom skip of the heart however slight good he said molly you'd lacquer ma were travelling together you know daddy died i didn't know that yes a year ago he died so my words are over said nice feeling i suppose he said i liked your father he'd been a man in the oil business sociable with certain freely admitted prejudices he wore expensive suits and had been divorced twice but managed to avoid loneliness we're going to stay in bangkok for a couple of months perhaps come back through europe girl said mali has a lot of style she was a dancer move was pam wasn't shia teacher or something well you love pam you'd love ma you don't know or but you would she paused.

venice bangkok mali pam hongkong fia molly europe
"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

The Paris Review

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

"And you see both of us were right though nothing has some have come to nothing the avatars of our conforming to the rules and living around the home have made well in a sense good citizens of us rushing the teeth and all at and learning to accept the charity of the hard moments is they are doled out for this is action this not being sure this careless preparing sowing the seeds crooked in the for o making ready to forget and always coming back to the mooring of starting out that day so long ago thank you i wonder why at concludes the pariser view podcast episode ten the occasional dream the pieces that you heard in this episode are a true account of talking to the sun had fire of island by frank o'hara it appeared in the paris review issue 45 winter 1968 and as part of the collective poems of francoera the poem was read by david sedarat special thanks to prop into marine grand bill smith and ministry tricks of the estate frank o'hara when lisa told me by roberto bologna the poem appeared in the paris review issue to oon summer two thousand twelve it was read by dakota johnson making friends by joy williams which appeared in the paris review issue 82 winter 1980 one it was read by mary louise marker the paris review will honor joy williams with the two thousand eighteen dot award for lifetime achievement but our annual gala the spring revel.

frank o'hara david sedarat bill smith lisa dakota johnson joy williams lifetime achievement paris roberto bologna
"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

The Paris Review

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

"I'm now these dion long that is the paris reviews southern editor john jeremiah sullivan singing from four till late in the song written by robert johnson after this quick break making friends short story by joy williams read by mary louise parker this is the pera sergei podcast from the paris review and stitcher gone long story to tell stories move emotionally move us to act and if you ask will swabi they can change our lives to will is the best selling author of the end of your life book club and books for living in his new podcast but that's another story he talks to everyone from artists to writers athletes to politicians about the one book the change them here from folks leg minjin lee sam sanders josh men and katie couric above the stories and characters that help them find their way in the world each episode will push you to consider the great impact reading has on all of us you can listen and subscribe on apple podcast stitcher or wherever you listen just search but that's another story laura dern making friends a story by joy williams dortha willy in liberty broke into a house on crab key in lived there for a week crab key was tiny and exclusive belonging to an association which had armed security patrol the houses on crab key were owned by people so wealthy that they were hardly ever there they were elsewhere.

dion paris john jeremiah sullivan robert johnson joy williams mary louise parker editor katie couric laura dern
"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

The Paris Review

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

"Team the selection from letter from williamsburg written and read by christon don back which appeared an issue to five summer two thousand thirteen you can find the full essay online at the paris or view dot org our thanks to the morgan library and museum home of the archive of the paris review and special thanks this week to chris porch in ski who recorded jesse eisenberg this podcast as a coproduction of the pair's review and stitcher far executive producers are chris bannon brendan francis newnham the reverend john bollore and we nickel redick our production team includes lorry door caitlyn young quiz jeff leaves and matt levin our advisory board members or tony toniann fernandez lien chapdelaine ngoma's oda and sadie sign this episode was mixed and sound design by john delor featuring original music composed by david siri who plays piano organs and water phone with mike brown on base shehzada ishmaeli and of maasboulevard on drums and rob schwimmer on the hacking continuing additional composition and sequencing by casey horford if you liked when you heard be sure to subscribe to this podcast in stitcher or apple podcast don't forget to rate and review the show as always if you want to read any of the pieces in this episode subscribe at the paris rude dot org you'll get access to our full digital archive an four print issues a year featuring the very best new poetry fiction and interviews delivered straight to your door and good old fashioned ink and paper thanks for listening.

david siri apple rob schwimmer mike brown sadie tony toniann fernandez advisory board brendan francis chris bannon executive casey horford williamsburg john delor oda chapdelaine ngoma matt levin jeff john bollore jesse eisenberg paris review morgan library and museum paris
"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

The Paris Review

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

"I always woke up earlier than anyone else in the house the morning after a party because i was protective of my apps and therefore drank less beer that morning i descend into the kitchen to make breakfast and there was fivehour with the shades drawn and the song from last night's dance with god tinkling from his phone he poured hard cider on his cereal no matter what happened last night i said some chocolate chip pancakes will taste better than that i took the bottle from his hand and poured the citre and the cereal in the almost full garbage bags sitting on the floor by the sink i mixed battering chocolate chips helped me i said slumps in butter and a pen soon there was the crackling and the smell big night i tried fuck you said five if you ever tell anyone else what i'm about to tell you went down i told him i wouldn't as long as he held the ball so i could skip the better right and he talked once they were upstairs he said god asked him please not call her god and call her melanie instead she hooked our phone to a speakers and asked him to take down the eskimo themed poster from the swimsuit issue in all of this he obliged when he tried to slide off her arm tights with his teeth she said funny not sexy which threw him a little once her bra was off she put a yarn shopped simon garfunkle song on repeat and kissed him on the lips it occurred to him that this girl had been new tell us breaker betting her was for a delta's eight aci brother what betting should i etween would be for a southerner or what betting natalie portman would be for jewish person he was belly too belly with the most major figure in the deltas eight aci culture he thought of how natella the least spastic person in the world a man.

the house natalie portman melanie simon garfunkle fivehour
"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

The Paris Review

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

"When the pizza emerged on the other side of the self timing of and i saw that i had neglected to sprinkle on the cheese i used american slices intended for subs room temperature in the hope that they would melt on the freshly heated pizza in the course of delivery that night smash read the poem allowed in a living room as the tele covered his face and grinned like you all have never detonated early he said as if it was a dashing crime as if this thing that we had all most likely done and been ashamed of was the least shameful thing in the world i felt that all the brothers would have stormed north korea for new taliban with a battering ram of wood and stone that girl is a god said buck hunter though said five hour that girl is god and that was how it started we spite her at the dining hall the next day at lunch by the tray carousel god shouted hour and then we all shouted it she stopped and squinted her friends took up defensive positions on her flanks smash kok moved his arms up and down you are god for writing that poem he said god we all said and moved our arms she looked at new tela who was smiling yeah that's me she said she kicked at stacks who was on his knees i guess you guys can worship me that nights she came to the house with new tell other hang out with us it didn't know the nomenclature for her clothing she wore black tights that went on her arms green tights that came to our knees and a headband with tiny teeth that made the hair that pass through it koufi when it emerged on the other side a risk tattoo peaked from the lace at the end of her left arm tight it was a picture of an old mill direct tanggula brick building at representative level she said the venice of massachusetts said buck hunter his tone was that of an englishman enough paisley monogrammed bathrobe smoking a pipe but scott canals she agreed but counter cracked his knuckles and made an assertive sniffing sound.

north korea taliban buck hunter kok the house venice massachusetts representative five hour mill
"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

The Paris Review

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

"The following episode contains mature content parental discretion is advised for any listeners under the age of eighteen i remember the day my mother took me to the boston planetarium when i was seven how the constellations may polled around voyage the soft voice of god saying you name same come to them to me come to me in the ocean who's oh very sad dirty with might go way where does this and waited title swings long miles sad you were there you are not looking at yourself from afar change tell me your big you slipped down into the region donors speech what are the chances of such an act come to come to me uh uh uh the paris review podcast episode nine god etcetera featuring an excerpt of christon dombaxi essay letter from williamsburg a poem by ruin ricardo phillips and we begin with a short story by benjamin nugent bet by jesse eisenberg oh god a short story by benjamin nugent and we called her god because she wrote a poem about how caleb newton ejaculated prematurely the night she slept with him and because she shared the poem with her friends caleb was the president of our fraternity when he worked our booth and the dining hall he fund raised two hundred dollars in an hour he had the plaintive eyes and button knows of a child in a life insurance commercial the carriage of an armored soldier.

boston planetarium president life insurance paris review ricardo phillips benjamin nugent jesse eisenberg caleb newton two hundred dollars
"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

The Paris Review

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

"With mike brown on base she's irish malian sam ask of our and drums and robbed schwimmer on the heck and continuing additional composition and sequencing by casey holford if you liked what you heard be sure to subscribe to this podcast in stitcher or apple podcast don't forget to rate in review the show as always if you want to read any of the pieces in this episode subscribe at the paris review dot org who get access to our full digital archive and four print issues a year featuring the very best new poetry fiction and interviews delivered straight to your door and good oldfashioned ink and paper thanks for listening that's all there is to say it's not the tragedies that kill us if some messes i can't stand masses i'm not being smart cracker he know i'm not when you meet me donja honey blooming stitcher here's a preview of what's coming up in the next episode of the her view podcast give me a beer she said and we all screamed god god god god the short story by benjamin nugent read by actor jesse eisenberg once they were upstairs god asked him please not call her god and call her melanie instead plus a poem by ruin ricardo phillips not knowing the difference between heaven and paradise he called them both ever that's next time on the paris view podcast mm.

schwimmer casey holford benjamin nugent jesse eisenberg melanie ricardo phillips mike brown apple paris
"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

The Paris Review

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

"Joe i had in fact belong to the same club at harvard but now salinger began talking of something else i i didn't immediately grasp subject buddhism is studies in that religion and his his wish to go further in those studies he said i'd be surprised if many of you say give yourselves as buddhists we talked about the discipline of meditation of what might be reached through its practice of of a book that had helped them to appreciate its benefits of levels what did he say stages of enlightenment he spoke more quickly as he went along perhaps it was simply impatience with our ignorance i was not keeping all the information straight he said something about his own achievement level of siddhartha i say that you he pointed joe than at me our at any he mentioned and low level he said he would put jail at a higher level some sounders subtle movement on jills part made me glance at her her face was shiny with cheers she did not move at all or make any sound but when i looked up both joe and salinger was staring silently jill joe stood up he stooped over jill saying something that got nowhere to then said to the room that we would have to go now yes i got to my fee we we really have to go join i fetched our coats and jails while she and salinger stood silently as we headed for the door salojee came alive and and spoke up no no he said please don't go please stay and have another drake don't go now he was shaking his head really we must go i said i'm sorry and i was i i certainly was i did not understand exactly white jail had broken down but it was impossible to think that we could staying.

"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

The Paris Review

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

"Pasko said happiness was the motive behind every action of every man whether he recognized it or not which is why although it left me delirious i continued staying up later and later until i finished the novel and as ill as i've got in the last time i went back for another berido after every bite appeared at the beans and rice inside it as if i were verner herzog gazing at the cave drawings of prehistoric man trying to grasp the primary questions of our species but for all i searched i couldn't find any more letters of the alphabet to ingest three months later the sanitation department shut down the restaurant too bad my neighbor said after it closed their food made me happy after the break bad behaviour a short story by alexia arthurs read by helga davis this is the pariser view podcast from the paris review and stitcher bad behaviour a story by alexia arthurs pam incurred is brought stacy to jamaica because they didn't know what else to do with her they believed that her old time granny would straighten her out in brooklyn stacy cut her classes often and she was caught giving a boy a blow job in an empty classroom they looked at the sweet little face on the body of a woman and they were terrified of her and for her it seemed that her breasts and asks were getting bigger every day often pam would pull down stacey shirt to give harass better coverage and stacy would grown in laugh tucking her shirt back into her dean's pam wondered aloud to curtis whether stacy's curvy body was because of all the chicken wings she enjoyed eating from the chinese food restaurant in america pam argued chickens were injected with hormones which could explain all too little black girls with breasts and asses before their time stacy refused to eat breakfast because she was never hungry in the mornings because the school lunch was nasty she was ravenous by the end of the school day she would come home with a take box fried rice with pork and fried chicken wings.

Pasko verner herzog alexia arthurs helga davis stacy curtis shut down paris alexia arthurs pam jamaica stacey america three months
"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

The Paris Review

03:04 min | 3 years ago

"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

"Even goings porous possessions would have been a trophy to some a relic to others a calm with a few strands of hair his i tosses his boots his wristwatch any of these might have supplied him the death toll but i don't think so a big men like that as heavy is growing you must understand would have definitely had his neck broken by the american method by dint of having his head torn off by the rope decapitated think of that ham ongoing huge round head balanced on the rim of the news toppling off falling within bounce bop witted role so i think it was the british major needs perhaps who escaped from called its and handed us our indictments neave who understood the need for escape the british thin who sawtooth at going got the pill new when to use it the british were their bashful sympathy for our ends in respect to the jews look at palestine near fiery contend for how means the british that godlike disdain of fierce for seen two british that concludes the paris or view podcast episode 6 the beadle and the butterfly the pieces that you heard in this episode our letter from emerald isle britain and red for us by david sideroads it first appeared in issue to twenty two four two thousand seventeen the ends by peter ho davies which first appeared in issue 162 summer two thousand two it was red for us by philip soldier the beadle by sharon olds which appeared an issue 101 winter 1980 six he was read by nausea spiegelman online editor of the paris review you also heard excerpts of george clinton's interview with eudora welty in her home in jackson mississippi it was recorded october fourteen 1994 and parts of the conversation appeared in issue one 34 spring 1995 especial thanks to the morgan library and museum home of the archive of the paris review which includes the utar welti recordings will hear a little more of that interview in the next episode.

palestine paris david sideroads peter ho davies sharon olds editor george clinton eudora welty jackson mississippi morgan library and museum emerald isle britain philip
"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

The Paris Review

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

"Get dot com slash p a r i s if you're an entrepreneur a small business owner or even if you have a side gig talking into a microphone let me introduce you to grasshopper the entrepreneur's phone system grasshopper lets you run your business from your cell phone while keeping your business and personal lives separate never been more important choose from their huge inventory of local toll free or vanity tollfree numbers simply forward your new number to your mobile phone and start taking calls immediately whether you're in an office in your car or out shopping for the holidays grasshoppers iphone and android apps help you stay connected to your customers not to mention you can send and receive calls and text from your business phone number set up multiple extensions for everyone on your team extending you have a team worked from anywhere with call forwarding and maybe best of all grasshopper offers an easy an instant set up and 247 customer support all without any longterm contracts grasshopper sign up today go to grasshopper dot com slash paris to get twenty dollars off your first month that's grasshopper dot com slash p a r i s the paris review podcast continues with david sideroads reading the second half of his essay letter from emerald island from time to not often when signing books i'll pretend to have powers well look get the scorpio i'll say when someone approaches my table i'm just guessing wouldn't know or scorpio from a doublesided you terry and the key i learned is to speak with authority it's never are you will libra but rather its about time i had a labour up in here every now and then i'll be right and the person will be shocked how did you know my sign they'll ask.

mobile phone customer support paris david sideroads emerald island business owner android paris review twenty dollars
"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

The Paris Review

03:23 min | 3 years ago

"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

"How late it was for pleasures like nicotine in music but how i had loved them and how i had left my grandfather i began to cry and what a new is probably a shabby way telling myself that i was crying for him when i stopped it wasn't because i was afraid of with the woman with the camino cut might think i understood the she wasn't coming i understood to that i wasn't ever going to see her again she had picked me up so gently because she had been saying goodbye that concludes the pariser view podcast episode five to see you again the pieces that you heard in this episode arm be fn me by lucy berlin which appeared an issue to thirteen summer 2015 it was read by allison frazier voyage in the dark a memory piece written and read by brian coleman it first appeared on line on the paris few daily on july twenty first two thousand seventeen sweetheart written and red by eileen miles from issue to twenty one summer two thousand seventeen on voy written and red by caleb cream also for an issue to 21 summer two thousand seventeen special thanks to the ninety seconds streetwise unterberg poetry center and to the morgan library and museum home of the archive of the paris review this podcast is a coproduction of the pariser view and stitcher our executive producer is our chris bannon brendan francis newnham the reverend john galore and me nicole roddick are production team includes lorry door kaitlan young quizzed jeff leaves and matt leaden our advisory board members for tony and fernandez plan shopped him ejiofor mas oto and sadie stein this episode was mixed and sound design by john delor featuring original music composed by david cieri who please piano organs and water phone with mike brown on base shas amish malay and sam moskva on drums and rob schwimmer on the hack and continuum special shut out this week to michael kohlmann the engineer at figure eight studios in brooklyn who captured all this great original scoring additional com.

brooklyn michael kohlmann rob schwimmer sam moskva mike brown sadie stein fernandez tony advisory board brendan francis chris bannon paris allison frazier nicotine lucy berlin engineer david cieri john delor jeff leaves nicole roddick executive producer paris review morgan library and museum unterberg poetry center caleb cream eileen miles brian coleman ninety seconds
"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

The Paris Review

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"the paris review" Discussed on The Paris Review

"Heard in this episode my wife in converse by shelby area which appeared an issue to own eye summer two thousand fourteen it was read by donatella video grains pause at the edge of the country by erica aaron bird from issue 216 spree in two thousand sixteen it was read by keighley gates this episode also includes excerpts of archival tape from the paris reviews interview with jack kerouac at his home in lowell massachusetts the interview was conducted by arabs arroyo and ted berrigan the edited version of that interview appeared as part of our artificial series an issue 43 summer 1968 special thanks to jim sampras and the literary state of jack kerouac enter the morgan library and museum palm the archive of the paris review which houses the cadillac reloads thanks also to the ninety seconds streetwise unterberg poetry center this podcast is a coproduction of the paris review and stitcher our executive producer is our chris bannon brendan francis noonan the reverend john galore than me lawrence stein our production team includes lorry door caitlyn young quest in that levin with a special shut out this week to our digital gurus jeff believes jeff gross and bill irwin our advisory board members are tony and fernandez lien chapped and did jomaa's soda and cds time we got a little casting help on this episode from winter miller we also wanted to thank greta cohn who helped shape the pilots of this podcast low these many many months ago this episode was mixed in sam designed by john delor featuring original music composed by david cieri who plays piano organs and water from with mike brandon bass shas odd ishmaeli and sam asked about on drums and robbed schwimmer on the hack and continuing additional composition synthesizers and sequencing by casey holford if you like what you heard these sure to subscribe to this podcast in stitcher for apple podcast or wherever you get your audio fix and if you want to read any of the pieces in lethem's episode subscribe at the paris review dot org g they'll get access to our tyre digital archive going all the way back to to fifty three and four.

erica aaron apple mike brandon bass fernandez tony advisory board jeff gross brendan francis noonan chris bannon morgan library and museum jim sampras ted berrigan lowell paris casey holford schwimmer sam david cieri john delor greta cohn jomaa levin executive producer paris review jack kerouac ninety seconds