35 Burst results for "The New Yorker"

Yemen government, Houthis agree to exchange over 1,000 prisoners

The New Yorker Radio Hour

00:14 sec | 1 d ago

Yemen government, Houthis agree to exchange over 1,000 prisoners

"The United Nations says Yemen's warring sides have agreed to exchange more than 1000 prisoners immediately. It marks the first phase of a peace plan between the internationally recognized government in exile and

United Nations Yemen
New York Reports More Than 1,000 COVID-19 Cases in a Single Day

Snap Judgment

00:43 sec | 2 d ago

New York Reports More Than 1,000 COVID-19 Cases in a Single Day

"New Yorkers logged more than 1000 positive coping 19 tests in a single day yesterday, marking the first time since June 5th. The state has seen a daily number that high Number of positive tests has been inching up steadily in recent weeks, a trend possibly related to increasing numbers of businesses and college campuses, reopening as well as Children returning to school. Cuomo announced today. There were 1005 positive cases tally Friday out of just under 100,000 tests or 1% positive rate, a much lower rate that in many other states And while the number of hospitalized covert cases in New York City was 264 yesterday, with 91 in the I C U That's up from a recent low August 30th of 181 hospitalized with 52 in the I C U

Cuomo New York City
Florida: The swingiest swing state in the U.S. election

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:08 min | 2 d ago

Florida: The swingiest swing state in the U.S. election

"I want to talk a bit about how we got here and why at least since the the famous near Tie of two thousand does just seem to be Florida or at least partially about Florida. Michael ask, you first win and why did floor to become the key battleground? Republican hasn't won the White House without Florida forever. So that's part of the reason that it's become. So you know everybody desperately wants it and it just seems to be the self-balancing State where it's about twenty percent immigrants. But you know the last the last fifty, million votes that have been cast for presidential candidates in. Florida. Republicans. Democrats, are separated by about twenty thousand and we've had just about every election. Every statewide election seems to come down to one percent and just seems like every time another white person. Republican moves down here from the Midwest another democratic leaning Immigrants May move into central Florida from the Global South and so it's a really seems to be self-balancing. Beyond those demographics that Monolithic is it a case of elderly white pensioners voting for Republicans, and more recent arrivals from elsewhere trading Democrat or is there some kind of overlap between spillage among those groups? As you can probably imagine it's a little bit more complex in that I think that there's didn't kind of increasing awareness for both Democrats and Republicans that some of the key demographics here you know the American immigrants but you know you have the first generation, the second generation you have the newer arrivals you have the. You have the Cubans you have the Puerto Ricans have the Haitians. There's such a mix of people and cultures and experiences, and when you add to that kind of the New Yorkers that are coming to Florida to retire, and you have all these different politics and ideologies of mixed together I think you really get. Such a representation of both the Conservatives and the liberals in both the US. But also in Latin America and I think that when you look at South Florida, you see a lot of those kind of play. You see you know from Columbia, you see the Conservatives from Columbia and you see the progressives from Columbia. So you have such a makes of. Of just these ideologies that really comes to shine like Michael said in the way that people vote. Michael is the a geographic split within Florida as well because it's the general tendency in the United States and elsewhere that cities tend to be more liberal more vaguely left-wing rural parts of a given state or given country tend to be more conservative. Is that clear cut in that respect in Florida? Well, again I think. Could certainly right that it's always a little more complicated but that's generally true I think you know you saw in two thousand sixteen that Hillary Clinton did even better than expected in a lot of the urban areas She Barack Obama won Florida and Hillary Clinton. Did even better in some of the particularly in south Florida in Miami and Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach and some of the more urbanized area. But Donald Trump there was an absolute revolution of essentially white people in the exurbs coming out and voting for trump in the rural and sort of farther away from the cities you don't want to over stereotype. But it certainly true that the Republican coalition has you know the heart of it is older white people who are very reliable voters and the Democratic Coalition relies on younger urban lots of immigrants, lots of minorities who in the past have not been turned out has not been as High Bianca. Those factors taken into consideration that I guess the Republican Party's and democratic parties in Florida will have an amount obviously in common with the National Party and parties elsewhere is there still a distinctive political culture within Florida like basically what I'm asking are Florida Republicans different from other Republicans, into Florida Democrats different from other States Democrats. I think when it gets down to it when you're thinking of. Our Florida Latinos for example, are they always kind of leaning Democrat or you know Florida South Florida Latinos are they always leaning Republican as people kind of think a lot of the time because of the cuban-american population I think that a lot of that is is changing. So at whether whether or not, you're going to see more cuban-americans still voting. Republican. In the way that they usually do a lot of that is kind of breaking and and being undone because of the younger generation, you know really having more of an experience in the. US and seeing the way that their families grew up in thinking about healthcare and climate change as more of priorities to them. So you know I would say that the main difference if there was one is here you can see a lot of distinctive kind of you see mixed political ideologies in families. So I've met even candidates who are you know Democrats were running now for public office in Florida and their families are different completely different ideology from them. So I think that that's what's interesting right and what makes Florida you know such. Unique and fascinating state is that it's changing all the time and it's changing not just because of the of the new kind of waves of immigrants that are coming in but also the new generations that are really having a different kind of awareness than the one their parents did. We'll talk more in the second half of the program about how Florida may have changed in the last four years and what it might be like in this election. But Michael just before we do that I don't like to tempt fate too much by talking about what happened in two thousand when basically an entire parallel history of the twentieth century got chalked off by a margin of a few hundred votes in Florida but. Still. Talk about that election much in Florida and Walton immense sliding doors moment that was not just for the United States. But as it turned out for the entire world, you know I think that's a great way. Great way of putting it because it certainly was I mean you know you wouldn't have an Iraq war if it wasn't for five hundred, thirty, seven votes the other way. And I think it's just a great example of. Of. You know the way these these elections and Florida are always one on the margins. Sort of every community matters again at the margins these things make a huge difference. I think. You know Republicans have been much better organized since two thousand and you saw in two thousand with that Brooks brothers riot But but everyone knows it's going to be close and and that really is a place where every vote counts.

Florida South Florida Michael United States Republican Party Republican Coalition White House Hillary Clinton Columbia Donald Trump Democratic Coalition Puerto Ricans Midwest Latin America Barack Obama Iraq Global South Brooks
Florida: The swingiest swing state in the U.S. election

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:07 min | 2 d ago

Florida: The swingiest swing state in the U.S. election

"Want to talk a bit about how we got here and why at least since the the famous near Tie of two thousand does just seem to be Florida or at least partially about Florida Michael Ask, you first win and why did floor to become the key battleground Republican hasn't won the White House without Florida forever. So that's part of the reason that it's become. So you know everybody desperately wants it and it just seems to be the self-balancing State where it's about twenty percent immigrants. But you know the last the last fifty, million votes that have been cast for presidential candidates in Florida Republicans, Democrats are separated by about twenty thousand and we've had just about every election. Every statewide election seems to come down to one percent and just seems like every time another white person Republican moves down here from the Midwest. Another democratic leaning immigrants may move into central Florida from the global south, and so it's a really seems to be self-balancing. Beyond those demographics that Monolithic is it a case of elderly white pensioners voting for Republicans and more recent arrivals from elsewhere trading Democrat or is there some kind of overlap between spillage among those groups? As you can probably imagine it's a little bit more complex in that I think that there's didn't kind of increasing awareness for both Democrats and Republicans that some of the key demographics here you know the American immigrants but you know you have the first generation, the second generation, you have the newer arrivals you have the. You have the Cubans you have the Puerto Ricans, have the Haitians. There's such a mix of people and cultures and experiences, and when you add to that kind of the new. Yorkers. That are coming to Florida to retire and you have all these different politics and ideologies kind of mixed together. I. Think you really get. Such a representation of both the Conservatives and the liberals in both the US. But also in Latin America and I think that when you look at South Florida, you see a lot of those kind of play. You see you know from Columbia from Columbia and you see the progressives from Columbia. So you have such a makes of. Of just these ideologies that really comes to shine like Michael said in the way that people vote. Michael is the a geographic split within Florida as well because it's the general tendency in the United, states and elsewhere that cities tend to be more liberal more vaguely left-wing rural parts of a given state or given country tend to be more conservative. Is that clear? Cut In that respect in Florida? Well, again I think. Could certainly right that it's always a little more complicated but that's generally true I think you know you saw in two thousand sixteen that Hillary Clinton did even better than expected in a lot of the urban areas she. Barack. Obama won Florida and Hillary Clinton did even better in some of the particularly in south Florida in Miami and Fort Lauderdale and West, Palm Beach and some of the more urbanized area. But Donald Trump, there was an absolute revolution of essentially white people in the exurbs coming out and voting for trump in the rural and sort of farther away from the cities you don't want to over stereotype. But it certainly true that the Republican coalition has you know the heart of it is older white people who are very reliable voters and the Democratic Coalition relies on younger urban lots of immigrants, lots of minorities who in the past have not been turned out has not been as High Bianca. Those factors taken into consideration that I guess the Republican Party's and democratic parties in Florida will have an amount obviously in common with the National Party and parties elsewhere. Is there still a distinctive political culture within Florida like basically what I'm asking are Florida Republicans different from other Republicans into Florida Democrats different from other States Democrats? I think when it gets down to it when you're thinking of. Our Florida Latinos for example, are they always kind of leaning? Democrat. Or you know Florida South Florida Latinos are they always leaning Republican as people kind of think a lot of the time because of the cuban-american population I think that a lot of that is changing so at whether whether or not, you're going to see more cuban-americans still voting Republican in the way that they usually do a lot of that is kind of breaking and and being undone because of the younger generation you know really having more of an experience in the US. and seeing the way that their families grew up in thinking about healthcare and climate change as more of priorities to them. So you know I would say that the main difference if there was one is here you can see a lot of distinctive kind of you see mixed political ideologies in families. So I've met even candidates who are you know? Democrats were running now for public office in Florida and their families are different completely different ideology from them. So i. think that that's what's interesting. Right and what makes Florida you know such. Unique and fascinating state is that it's changing all the time and it's changing not just because of the of the new kind of waves of immigrants that are coming in. But also the new generations that are really having a different kind of awareness than the one their parents did. We'll talk more in the second half of the program about how Florida may have changed in the last four years and what it might be like in this election. But Michael just before we do that I, don't like to tempt fate too much by talking about what happened in two thousand when basically an entire parallel history of the twentieth century got chopped off by a margin of a few hundred votes in Florida but. People still talk about that election much in Florida and Walton immense sliding doors moment that was not just for the United States but as it turned out for the entire world, you know, I think that's a great way. Great way of putting it because it certainly was i. mean you know you wouldn't have an Iraq war if it wasn't for five hundred, thirty, seven votes the other way. And I think it's just a great example of. Of you know the way, these these elections and Florida are always one on the margins. Sort of every community matters again at the margins, these things make a huge difference I think. You know Republicans have been much better organized since two thousand and you saw in two thousand with that Brooks brothers riot But but everyone knows it's going to be close and and that really is a place where every vote counts.

Florida South Florida Michael Ask Hillary Clinton Republican Party United States Barack Republican Coalition Midwest White House Republicans Donald Trump Democratic Coalition Columbia Puerto Ricans Iraq Latin America Brooks Palm Beach
The relationship between Justice Scalia and RBG

Fox News Rundown

10:42 min | 3 d ago

The relationship between Justice Scalia and RBG

"Lies in state in the Capitol today, the first woman ever given that honor in the first Supreme Court justice since William Howard Taft and he'd also been the president. Justice. Ginsburg's casket was at the court for two days for people to pay their respects, including President Trump, and the first lady booed when they got there. The president has had nice things to say about Justice Ginsburg since her death, you may agree. You may not disagree with her, but he was an inspiration to a tremendous number of people. I say all Americans, and now, he says, it's his job to fill that seat on the court. I think it's very important that we have nine justices. And I think the system is going to go very quickly. The president plans to announce his nominee tomorrow. Joe Biden, and a lot of other Democrats say he should fill that seat if he wins the election in light of Republicans blocking President Obama from filling a seat in an election year, the seat President Obama would have filled incident. Scalia's went to Neil Gorsuch instead of Merrick Garland. For all the fighting. There's been over Justices Scalia and Ginsburg in life. They were very good friends. People always find it surprising that they were such good friends, Christopher Scully's the Eighth of Incident. Scalia's nine Children. There's a new collection published of his father's writing called The Essential Scalia. Their friendship went back. Really to the early eighties, when they were judges together on the D C circuit Court of Appeals, which is kind of like the second most important court in the country, and they they had a good working relationship that which really started back then they would help each other revised their drafts and their opinions. Apparently, the other judges on that court really didn't like getting advice about their writing and how to improve the clarity of what they're writing in the force of their arguments. But Justice Ginsburg liked getting and receiving that kind of advice, and so did my dad, and they formed what he called a mutual improvement society during their time on the court there. And And they had other things in common. They were they had similar backgrounds and that they were both New Yorkers grew up in New York around the same time, different boroughs but around the same time and shared a love of opera. Good wine eating good food. Both of their thousands were excellent cooks. Marty Ginsburg, in particular, is kind of a legendary cook, who would put together wonderful meals every New Year's Eve and they would celebrate New Year's Every every year is well. So you know, despite all their differences, and all the many things they disagreed about, including a number of opinions in this collection. They had a wonderful friendship were able to kind of focus on the things they had in common. Your dad in Justice Ginsburg, I don't know the statistics on how often they concurred or dissented on cases. But I imagine that they disagreed. Maybe as much as any two Recent justices have my right. Yeah, I think that that sounds right. I don't know the statistics, either. I think people would be surprised by how often they agreed with each other. But on the real hot button cultural cases, they often disagreed one of her most important, most famous opinions. Was Virginia Military Institute case from the mid nineties. And my My father wrote a dissent to that case, which is in this collection, the essentials, Scalia and it was hey actually gave her the draft of that descent a little bit earlier than one usually does just so that she would have more time to kind of Deal with it and grapple grapple with his arguments. And and, yeah, some of his most staying the sense we're in response to opinions. She didn't necessarily right but but joined, And I think that's probably true. Vice versa. Tell us very about the big bouquet of roses she got from him. My dad would get her roses for her birthday and I guess the Ah, I think the last time he did that. So the year before he died, one of the editors of the Essential Scalia Judge Jeffrey Sutton was visiting my father in chambers on on Justice Ginsburg's birthday. And he saw that my dad had two dozen roses for Justice Ginsburg and Judge Sutton started teasing Dad saying, You know, I haven't even gotten my wife two dozen roses over the course of our entire marriage. Why would you do this? And besides, When was the last time she cited with you on a really important 54 decision? You know, he's poking fun, You know, not not really being serious, but My dad gave a serious answer, which was some things are more important than votes. As I think I just kind of a great encapsulation of their of their relationship of their friendship they had they had Very different opinions of politics and of their jobs as a zoo judges and of what laws, men and with the Constitution, man. But, uh, how they voted wasn't the biggest factor in their relationship. It wasn't that those opinions didn't matter. And it wasn't that they compromised their beliefs for each other. But they didn't let those very strongly held beliefs undermine their very deep friendship collection of Supreme Court. Justice Antonin Scalia is writing sort of like a greatest hits album. It's opinions and other writing about the law and the Constitution again called the Essential Scalia. This is really just a collection of his greatest Legal writings, opinions, speeches, essays and they collected together give a really good sense of white. Exactly. He was such a significant Supreme Court justice on it. They're having in one collection really makes it tangible for anybody understand that we'll just as a legal reference work. You've got to think it's going to end up being bought by or four A lot of lawyers and judges know absolutely in law students. I hope you know that he he wrote. Clearly, he wrote, Hey, had so many memorable phrases and his opinions. His logic was so strong and convincing that people just kind of they often went to his opinions first. And so it's good for people to kind of have that as a resource to keep going to those opinions. Even you know, even after His passing is also besides the legal community. It's also like you said. It's very readable, even for non lawyers for just a general interest audience who might, but he was just simply a very, very good writer. Yeah, it's exactly right. He hey, wrote. For? I guess we would now call it out of transparency. You know, Even when he was writing Supreme court opinions, he understood that they should be understood themselves by everyday citizens, not just legal eagles and people with legal degrees. He kind of a recurring theme of his opinions. Is that people should know what the court courts are doing and people that the court should not usurp power that properly belongs to the people. And I think that kind of reverence for the Democratic order is is kind of manifest in his in the clarity of his writing a lot of times if he had a vote, a personal vote on how a case would turn out it may or may not a lot of times did a line with how he ruled, But sometimes it probably wouldn't have right. Yeah, I think that's true. And that's especially true in one example is when he sided with the majority in a flag burning case. The majority ruled that, um, it was constitutional sorry from burning the flag was constitutionally protected speech under the First Amendment so prohibiting that in the state law was unconstitutional. My father often explained that he did not like Three idea of flag burning. If he were a king, he would ban it. But clearly to him falls under the protection of the protection of the First Amendment, and a lot of conservatives to this day do not like that opinion. My father thought the Constitution was clear about that. There are many examples in this collection, the essential Scalia of instances in which he stands up for the rights of the accused defendant's rights. There's a famous case in here where search and seizure cases as well there a couple of those in here where he just thought, you know the police do not have authority, for example, to use Scans of houses, Tio identify Marilou who was growing marijuana without that was an illegal search examples like that s so if he could just pass a law That was one thing, but actually sorry, there couldn't be even be lost for that because they so clearly violated the Constitution, even though obviously he wouldn't have approved of those particular actions. Sure. Hey, was also notice the talker during oral arguments. He has asked a lot of questions and clearly sometimes, though, they weren't really questions. They were just arguments he was making to his fellow justices. Do you think he went into most cases with his mind made up based on the briefs, and the president is a bad thing, but not usually the case. I think that the justices, you know, I can't say for certain, but my hunch is that they often have to go in with a pretty good idea, but I think for the most part, they do ask questions, not just Not just to be heard or not just to make arguments, but because they want to really engage with the arguments that the lawyers are making in the forward to this collection, Justice Kegan first of all, very happy that she agreed to write this beautiful forward, But she she says that she says just that, you know, Dad would ask these questions because he loved argument and kind of loved mixing it up. It wasn't just kind of wasn't just for show though he did. I think you're right. He was very kind of an engaging speaker and There was some study years ago that that found he was. He was the funniest justice by the standards of he drew the most laughter from the courtroom during oral arguments, which obviously isn't the most important thing to do, but just shows how much he he enjoyed that process that love for debate. Did it? Was it a two way street was? Was he persuadable? Absolutely. That's something justice Kagan mentions in her forward. She doesn't say when she ever changed his mind, but says They change each other's minds at times. Well, Christopher Scalia, It was great to talk, Teo, The book is called The Essential Scalia on the Constitution, the courts and the rule of law. Chris Scalia. Really good to talk to you. Thanks so much, Thanks so much appreciate your time.

Justice Antonin Scalia Justice Ginsburg Supreme Court President Trump Christopher Scalia Chris Scalia Marty Ginsburg Scalia D C Circuit Court Of Appeals Barack Obama William Howard Taft Joe Biden Ginsburg Justice Kegan Virginia Military Institute Merrick Garland Christopher Scully Neil Gorsuch
Demonstrators take to the streets for the second night to protest Breonna Taylor grand jury decision

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:39 sec | 3 d ago

Demonstrators take to the streets for the second night to protest Breonna Taylor grand jury decision

"Hundreds of New Yorkers were back on the streets last night marching in Manhattan. In protest of Wednesday's Kentucky Grand jury decision in the Briana Taylor case, CBS two's Ali Bellman tracked some marching in Chinatown Thursday brought another night of protests in Manhattan over the decision by a Kentucky grand jury not to charge any police officers for killing Briana Taylor that thought it was a crazy joke. It's something and then I was like Wait a minute. That's Sammy Desu brought his two year old dollar to a rally in Union Square. It makes sense for me to involve early on in a fight she's going to go grew up to inherit.

Briana Taylor Sammy Desu Manhattan Kentucky Ali Bellman Union Square CBS
Protesters March Across New York City Following Decision in Breonna Taylor's Killing by Cops

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:49 sec | 3 d ago

Protesters March Across New York City Following Decision in Breonna Taylor's Killing by Cops

"New New Yorkers Yorkers were were back back on on the the streets streets late late last last night night marching marching in in protest protest of of Wednesday's Wednesday's Kentucky Kentucky Grand Grand jury jury decision decision in in the the Briana Briana Taylor Taylor case. CBS two's Alabaman tracked some marching in Chinatown Thursday brought another night of protests in Manhattan over the decision by a Kentucky grand jury not to charge any police officers for killing Briana Taylor. First I thought it was a crazy joke or something. And then I was like, Wait a minute. That's it. Sammy Desu brought his two two year year old old daughter daughter to to a a rally rally in in Union Union Square Square makes makes sense sense for for me me to to involved involved early early on on in in a a fight fight she's she's going going to to go go grew grew up up to to inherit inherit around around 9 30. Protesters marched across the Williamsburg Bridge, blocking traffic for about 20 minutes to a half hour. Have been several rallies from Manhattan to Brooklyn.

Briana Briana Taylor Taylor Briana Taylor Kentucky Kentucky Grand Grand Union Union Square Square Manhattan Sammy Desu Kentucky Williamsburg Bridge Alabaman CBS Brooklyn
Undercutting Scientists, Trump Says Tightening Covid-19 Vaccine Guidelines ‘Sounds Like a Political Move’

World News Tonight with David Muir

02:40 min | 4 d ago

Undercutting Scientists, Trump Says Tightening Covid-19 Vaccine Guidelines ‘Sounds Like a Political Move’

"Tonight President Trump is now threatening to overrule the FDA if he doesn't approve of the FDA's tougher guidelines potential vaccine Dr Anthony Fauci saying tonight I would back scientists and now the state's this evening where they say they'll have their own review of the vaccine. Here's Mary Bruce. After Touting Corona virus vaccine by election day president trump is now threatening to reject stricter safety standards that could slow down. It's release once again, undermining his own help officials. We're looking at that that has to be approved by the white has we may or may not approve it That sounds like a political move tonight, four vaccines are in their final trials, but new rules from the FDA would reportedly require drug makers to monitor trial volunteers for an additional two months. Dr Anthony Fauci coming to the FDA's defense they look at it and say, we really feel strongly we should go this way I would back the scientists. We'd have to do that as a scientist Xiaojie said they may not need the additional monitoring if the vaccine is overwhelmingly effective but stressed if they go ahead with, it is only to ensure the safety of the vaccine to get rid of. Completely, any further waiting for safety I think most scientists would say, no, you really gotta be careful the FDA declined to comment on the president's threat, but just hours earlier testifying on Capitol Hill. The FDA. Commissioner was adamant they are being guided by science not politics are thorough review processes and science will guide our decisions. FDA will not permit any pressure from anyone to change that vaccine could be authorized as soon as next month, but it is not expected to be widely distributed until next spring with concerns that the White House is increasingly injecting politics into the pandemic response New York today announced it's going to conduct its own review of any vaccine. Frankly, I'm not going to trust the federal government's opinion. And I wouldn't recommend New Yorkers based on the federal government's opinion tonight at least five other states in Washington. DC have also said they would conduct their own evaluations before distributing a vaccine with two hundred and two thousand. Americans. Now, dead officials are predicting up to twenty three thousand more dead by mid October, and now we're learning about a large study out of Houston, that is. Not. Peer reviewed saying the virus mutated and could be more contagious. But so far there's no evidence it's more deadly, potentially a more contagious strain. But as you point out no evidence that it's more deadly in Mary Bruce amid all this talk, these latest headlines The president is threatening to overrule the FDA stricter guidelines in a vaccine and Americans are growing increasingly skeptical about all

FDA President Trump Dr Anthony Fauci Mary Bruce DC Commissioner Scientist White House Xiaojie Washington Houston New York
Museum Workers Must Decide Whether To Return To Work Amid Pandemic

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:00 min | 4 d ago

Museum Workers Must Decide Whether To Return To Work Amid Pandemic

"Back, in the spring New York City with the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak. But recently, case numbers there have stayed low and New Yorkers are trying to get back to a life that's as normal as possible during a pandemic the big museums the met the Whitney in the Guggenheim have started reopening. Some people are thrilled but some museum workers are not hear Sally herships on the sidewalk outside the Museum of Modern Art. A slender man is smugly holding the world's tiniest Chihuahua Torres climb out of taxis gazing. At their phones with directions and digital tickets, they're wearing interesting glasses and have not haircuts but everyone is masked. Harry Allen is visiting from upstate New York and he's nervous. This is his first big outing since the pandemic began just seeing goes, but for employees on the inside, it's a bit more complicated some of the turmoil from the pandemic has crept into the museum. Lay says for her the problems began in early. March at the time it was her job to help museum visitors learn about workshops and activities. But coronavirus virus cases were starting to spike and she didn't feel safe at work. They gave us hand sanitizer and it was I could have gloves you ought. She was a contract worker paid around twenty one dollars an hour but her hours were capped at thirty per week. So she didn't get benefits like health insurance. What if she got sick spoke to nearly a dozen contract workers likely who said the problems began long before the pandemic it's called the fissured workplace where you end up having to take multiple jobs in order to support yourself and everything is so contracted and then you don't get any safety net from your employer laces. There's another problem too at Moma diverse workers both contract and paid staff or at the bottom of the pyramid in terms of pay and. Power all the front facing staff, the security, the restaurant workers, customer service, and educators are all very diverse, and then I would then go to the cafeteria where all the staff eight and then like everyone else would be why Lisa's us that meant when financial problems from the pandemic it diverse workers were more likely to be affected in March. The museum laid off eighty four people in an email. The museum said quote we did not have to furlough or layoff a single employee of the museum unquote that means all of those laid off were contract workers like lay the museum said it paid those laid off through March. Or heard from full time employees who are afraid to speak out publicly for fear of losing their jobs they say, they feel under intense pressure to return to the museum when they can do their job safely at home. But moma has told almost all staff they need to be at the museum. Here's museum director Glenn, lowry explaining his thinking during an online staff meeting. We must show solidarity with each other that our place of work is the museum, and while some of US might be able to argue, we never need to be museum to still do our work that's not equity. opposite. A spokesperson from the museum said, it's taking every precaution and workers are only required to be onsite part time but the workers I've heard from say the logic doesn't make sense. For example, the Metropolitan Museum of art is only allowing certain staff to work in person Makita flowers worked with visitor engagement at Moma but as a contractor, she was also laid off in March. She says, lowry is out of touch with workers like her with his multi-million dollar salary. He's the highest paid museum director. In the country I had a chance to speak to Glen I would just feel like. Roll like look at your family look at what you call the family. How are we doing now? Where are we as for on lay she has a new shop working with the city to help other Southeast Asians navigate resources during the pandemic

Museum Of Modern Art United States Metropolitan Museum Of Art New York City Moma Sally Herships Chihuahua Torres Whitney New York Harry Allen Director Lowry Glen Lisa Makita Glenn
MTA Honors Man For Catching New York Subway Derailment Suspect

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:50 sec | 4 d ago

MTA Honors Man For Catching New York Subway Derailment Suspect

"A strap hanger, dubbed a hero for attempting to stop a derailment and holding the suspect for police started, like most mornings for raking Wilder. I'm a frequent writer of subway system. But this time he couldn't believe what he was seeing a man on the track bed, putting debris on the rail of a north bound a train. I felt very angry. I was disturbed A wilder cleared the track himself. But then the man police identified is Dimitrius Harbour did it again, causing a partial derailment watching him smile. Wild and watching the train wreck and the fire and the smoke. It was like being on a you know, Hollywood said. Wilder ran after and tackled Harvard holding him for police Mth era pat for he calls the 44 year old. A hero may have saved the lives of dozens of New Yorkers boy presenting with a giant MetroCard and a wallet sized version. Unlimited rides for a

Wilder Dimitrius Harbour Writer Hollywood Harvard
Is Mitch McConnell Rigging The Game?

All In with Chris Hayes

09:54 min | Last week

Is Mitch McConnell Rigging The Game?

"Other news, there's the other branch of Congress or the other house. Of Congress. The Senate and everyone knows their Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell is unshakable and ruthless, and he's going to maximize his power however cam, but it is also the case the death of Justice Ruth Bader GINSBURG has taken us to uncharted territory. There are very real political pressures that are going to affect how the next several months play out. Mitch McConnell does not care about being charged with the Crisi but the raw politics of this moment themselves are not uncomplicated. As it was with the affordable care act remember Mitch McConnell had a lot of bravado about that and he failed famously and humiliatingly to replace the law. Here's mayor discuss across pressures. He faces longtime McConnell Allah Gist Jane Mayer Chief of Washington correspondent New Yorker wrote an incredibly insightful profile McConnell back in April this weekend row quote from Mitch McConnell keeping a Senate. Majority matters more than the Supreme Court. Jamie. It's great to have. Let's start with that because it seems to me there's two imperatives here. Everyone says about McConnell the two things he cares about is keeping the Senate majority and being Senate majority leader. Judges the Federal Bench, and there is a way to interpret the politics of the moment that there's a little bit attention between those two imperatives. How do you see it? Well, I mean there is I mean he wants to get obvious wants to hold the majority wants to stay being majority leader. And, this is going to be the crowning moment of his career to have yet one more justice on Supreme Court here we can get him through and he's promised trump of course that he's going to have a vote on this, and so how do you do this the problem? The problem for McConnell is it's unclear if he can keep the majority in the Senate. It's a dicey election year for him. There are a number of racist. They're very close and he doesn't want to do anything that's going to hurt the endangered members of his caucus. So he's got to try to juggle the schedule in some way that doesn't put those members on the spot in a way that will hurt them. So he's the first thing he's going to do an, and surely his done is canvas. Those members find out exactly how they feel about how this this process would affect their races. And then, and then way that in terms of whether it be better have a vote before or after the election. So. It's it's. It's. It's it's tricky but he is nothing if not clever about things like this this is he he? Very early on in his career, he ran for office from a district where he hadn't been resident in residence long enough and he vowed after that, he would never again ignore the rules, and since then he's become kind of a master of the rules, the more arcane the better. And he just he loves talking to the parliamentarian in the Senate and figuring out sort of the the most devious ways to get what he wants. The most sort of obvious pressure here. Just talking about this and I think it's pretty interesting. There's a bunch of folks who are up. In who are imperilled where it's not clear That going ahead with this would be helpful them. We have a bunch of pulling out today showing majority of people oppose it. Those numbers will probably change as they converge towards the polarization and everything else. But like Cory Gardner is down in all the polls and Colorado, he's in a state that Democrats have carried. Now a bunch and plan to carry again Martha. mcsally sally is down a to mark Kelly. You know they're on the sort of aggressor side here in terms of public opinion. It does seem like they've kind of don't care. It doesn't seem like there's a jump together mentality here in terms of getting them to come out whether it was him or not a publicly for those. Well I think. He's GonNa. Be Looking at McConnell will look at each of these races and I think you can almost imagine that he's written off. Gardner in. Colorado, and makes out the in Arizona. So he's not going to change his plan just for them unless he thinks it's going to save them and you'd probably thinks it won't save them and he's already given collins kind of buy in Maine. So it gets you down to the racist that are really going to matter in this are probably it's it's probably Tillis in North Carolina, Joni Ernst in Iowa, and Danes in in Montana, and if McConnell feels that those three or not endangered by going head, he may just gun it. You know and and try try to get I think though that in addition to just thinking about each of these races and how it affects each of the races, there's something else. He's probably got to think about, which is the overall look of this thing if if it appears to the American public that he is one set of rules for Democrats and there's another set of rules he's got for Republicans here, one Senate rules for America and another set of rules for whoever trump nominates at this point, it looks like he's reading the game it looks corrupt. It looks like a naked power, grab an and it's ugly and that could actually create a backlash I think that both he and trump have to think about. It it might really bother a lot of people in this country to think that that it's it's just too corrupt game in Washington. Yeah, I. think that's a correct reading of both where the polls are and the political risks they run and I think it's notable that McConnell has committed to vote but not win and I thought. This was also notable. He wrote this dear colleague later re basically says I don't say anything don't lock yourself into position. Let it give it give us time to work over the coming days. We're GONNA come under tremendous pressure from the press to announce how he will handle the coming nomination for those who are unsure how to answer for those inclined to oppose giving nominee a vote I urge you all to keep your powder dry Dombrowski and collins. Have not heeded that but Mitt Romney said declined today saying anything I know Pat Toomey in Pennsylvania I fully expect will support moving forward. But that that to me, it was interesting because the timing here and the sort of needle to thread is not nothing I think we'll try to do it and the odds are in their favor they will. But because of exactly what you and unseeded from the political standpoint, it's not clear that this is help for them politically in the short term. I think it may not be I. Mean I think also it's going to energize the base on both sides here for and the thing is that when it comes to the energizing the base, the base that needs more energizing really is probably on the Democratic side and you've already seen it happen I, mean look at the amount of money that act Lou raise you know practically overnight a hundred, million dollars two, hundred and sixty. Now it's one hundred and sixty million dollars. Shipping shocking about money. Shocking money an and I think the other thing that it might do is from was doing some reporting two days. I think it may really energize kids younger voters because. You know they were kind of holding their nose, a lot of them about Joe Biden it wasn't an exciting. It didn't seem you now like there was that much reason to do it. Now there's a reason that a lot of young people are GONNA see they're gonNA look they're gonNa see Roe v Wade is in the balance they're going to see a four Bul healthcare act and possibly anything to do with insurance for preexisting conditions and they're looking at the future this is going to. Their. Lives for the this is a this is a decision that has tremendous implications for everybody in the country and it's GonNa be clear and so I, you know it may turn you know help turn out. The Democrats who were young. Six three Roberts court climate. Regulation jurisprudence. A. Favorable to the kinds of solutions. That are necessary. Do you think? Ultimately McConnell himself is up and I don't think he's. He's personally a lot of trouble against say, McGrath at least the pulling now but there are also just a bunch of seats that weren't supposed to be in play that really do seem like they are. There's A Texas poll that has cornyn barely up. There's a Mississippi poll out today that has. Chrissy Hyde Smith a just a few points on Mike espey. There's the Iwa Joni Ernst race I mean it's wild how wide the sort of battlefield has gotten for him to try to hold this thing together. It's it's really volatile and and and the thing is it. What it does is it puts the Republicans on the spot about they've been doing kind of a split that's broader and broader that gotta keep the trump face and and but that's not enough for in many places to get reelected, and so they've got to do is add in. The moderates the you know suburban women particularly and got a candidate here who for a nominee for the supreme court that is truly the choice of the evangelical part of the trump ace it by very much alienate moderate women in the suburbs and in other places especially over things like abortion where sixty two percent of the people in this country saver. Abortion. As keeping it legal and don't WanNa go backwards. So it's it's. It's I think it's a it's it's a it's a it's a risky thing for some ways. You people think it's all into such a gift. Not, necessarily think that's right. Read on the situation Jane Mayer thanks as always great reporting and inside appreciate it. Great to be with you.

Mitch Mcconnell Senate Supreme Court Washington Cory Gardner Congress Colorado Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Jamie Collins Jane Mayer Allah Gist Jane Mayer Mitt Romney Joe Biden Joni Ernst Maine Arizona Pat Toomey
Kim Cattrall, actress and producer: I have self worth. And Im expensive.

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:11 min | Last week

Kim Cattrall, actress and producer: I have self worth. And Im expensive.

"CAM drawl joins us on skimmed from the couch. She needs no introduction we are geeking out, but we will introduce her anyway she is a Golden Globe winning actress and producer you know her from her role as Samantha Jones on sex in the city and. She's The star and producer of the new series filthy rich on Fox which premieres on September twenty. First, we are so excited because we need some new shows in this Cogan, Environment Kim. Thank you so much for joining us today. welcomed the skimmed from the couch. Thank you for inviting man. It's good to be here. I will just say I'm geeking out 'cause I've loved you since Mannequin. So this is just So we're going to start the first question. We ask every guest, which is skim your resume for us. Oh my gosh. You know when I first started as an actress I was desperate to get credits and now I'm trying to eliminate. Oh well, you know they say don't have any regrets and I don't because even from jobs that I didn't particularly feel good about in retrospect I learned something it starts off with, of course, theater credits and commercial credits I remember getting a job on a lob laws commercial this Toronto. Before I came to the United States studied in the United States but then I went back up to Canada. And I had a clerk in a grocery store and William Shatner, he was sort of the MC selling the product and years. Later when I did a star trek movie with him, I said I. I, know you definitely don't recognize me I was shocked in. Clerk. Needless to say that's not on my resume anymore but. At the time I was doing a lunch hour theatre Gig you know and was making about one, hundred, fifty dollars every two weeks. So those those little jobs meant so much because I could I could keep in the theater I keep working as an actress and I was very grateful and when I brought it up, he simply smiled and said I don't remember. At least he was on. Yeah. So walk us through what was your big break? How did you go from the shopping clerk to being able to pick and choose what credits you have I did a show called scruples. First of all, I did a Columbo episode, which was kind of it was the hot hot show to to watch never mind beyond and they were waiting for another actress who just had dates and I was there I was told later on I was the first choice but they wanted to have some unknown entity is as an actor as one of the guest stars. And it was a really fun little role on this sort of passionate young girl who was in love with his older man. In a she was kind of nympheas but was very soulful. I got that job and Dan they were auditioning for this movie called scruples and that was really got everybody excited. It was based on a judith krantz novel was very soapy and fun and passionate. Packed with all kinds of wonderful personalities and actors and it was about Beverly Hills and it was we shot in nineteen seventy nine even before the glove, the eighties and more is more I played this kind of trouble Starlit who is bisexual and not that they really touched on that. You know very gingerly of course at the time, but it introduced me to a different level of just struggling and making due to being brought in the room because I had done that and and people like what I've done. So that was a marked difference, and then shortly after that, I did have a film called tribute and ticket to heaven and a lot of sort of films. What's one thing that we can't Google about you there's so much out there. But like what's the one thing that people would be surprised to know I think one of the things that people are surprised to know very recently is that I I am now an American citizen I think a lot of people associate associate me with being American and being a New Yorker of course, but I have just taken the plunge. So I can vote

William Shatner Samantha Jones Producer Cogan United States Judith Krantz Google Toronto Beverly Hills Canada DAN
Jiayang Fan On 'How My Mother And I Became Chinese Propaganda'

All Things Considered

04:24 min | Last week

Jiayang Fan On 'How My Mother And I Became Chinese Propaganda'

"We've been talking a lot about how crises collide in this country. The corona virus pandemic has led to serious hardship for many people. And at the same time, longstanding grievances have led to street protests, which are exhilarating for some, but for others, emotionally draining and even destructive, and that's also how it's been. For many individuals. One crisis begets another in a way you never expected. We have a powerful story about that. It's by Ji Young fan, a staff writer at The New Yorker. A recent issue of the magazine. She tells the story of how she and her mother, who's living with a less in a nursing home in New York, became the subject of Chinese propaganda and a vicious campaign of online harassment all because John was trying to get her mother the care she desperately needed during the covert locked down. But it's much more than that. It's also the story of a mother and daughter coming to terms with how they're decades in this country have shaped them. Both thie essay is entitled Motherland and We asked Giant fan to join us and tell us more about it. Giant fan Thank you so much for speaking with us. It's great to be here First. I have to say the essay is both beautiful and devastating. I mean, what what inspires you to write? And I say that because It had to have been hard to right, right? I mean, I didn't intend to write a personal essay, especially one this personal in nature. I intended to write a much shorter piece about the phenomenon off this information and Chinese nationalists trolls in The geopolitical moment that has made their appearance almost par for the course. So when I was writing this much shorter piece, I realized that I wanted to make sure I could give them the humanity that they sometimes don't grant their targets. So when I was reading through the messages where many had wished me to die, and to Pull apart my corpse and things much worse. There was such rage in a fury and in their words. And I detected the existence of a person who was very alive. On the other end of this anonymous attack and He made me think of all the times. My mother when I was growing up in the darkest moments had launched similar attacks on me for being a traitor to her. And for disobeying her, And as I thought about my relationship to her on DH, the trolls on the other side of the world. It made me think about where that resentment comes from, and all the sorrow and the indignity and emotions that we don't often speak of that lives on the other side of that rage. So I guess I'm just trying to understand. Like why would people be attacking someone who came here at eight years old through no decision of her own The polarization. Um off. China and the U. S. Has caused rampant this information to be distributed and I am somewhat stuck in the middle as someone who is of Chinese heritage who spent as you said, You know the first almost eight years of my life in China and then who received an American education and is currently Lives here. So for my detractors, what makes it so personal for them is that China has been a very good job of Telling its citizens that their personal identity is aligned with political identity of China, you know? Propaganda from the Chinese government has been quite successful. And also I remember as a child. I mean that you know, in from our earliest school primers, Tio. What came through the loudspeakers are personal identity was very much intertwined with that of the national and the Communist Party identity so For my detractors. They see what I'm doing as a personal attack on them.

China Chinese Government Giant Communist Party Ji Young New York Harassment Staff Writer The New Yorker John
New Yorkers Pay Tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg Outside Downtown Courthouse

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | Last week

New Yorkers Pay Tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg Outside Downtown Courthouse

"People gathered outside a lower Manhattan courthouse last night to pay tribute to the memory of trailblazing Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Corners, played music lit candles and placed flowers outside 60 Center Street to pay their respects to the Brooklyn born feminist who died of cancer Friday at age 87 outside the Supreme Court. Mourners gathering to pay tribute to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg inspiration So many so many people, a pop culture icon who became known as the Notorious RBG, New York's governor, Andrew Cuomo, directing landmarks across his state be lit up with blue, the color of justice. Announcing Justice Ginsberg will be honored with a statue in her hometown of Brooklyn

Justice Ginsberg Supreme Court Brooklyn Andrew Cuomo Manhattan New York
NYC indoor pools to reopen at 33% capacity on Sept. 30

Rush Limbaugh

00:31 sec | Last week

NYC indoor pools to reopen at 33% capacity on Sept. 30

"Rate in New York State and New York City continues to come in and under 1%, And that means mohr and more re openings are taking place. For instance, the city's indoor pools can reopen on September 30th. They will be limited to 33% capacity inspections will take Place that the pools to make sure they're in compliance with Corona virus. State regulations, Mayor De Blasio says is the transmission rate remains low City can offer more ways to slowly return to business as usual Mayor is also urging New Yorkers to call an overcrowding in unsafe conditions at the pools to 311. I'm

New York Mayor De Blasio Mohr Corona
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

05:03 min | Last week

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"Poetry podcast. I'm Kevin Young. Poetry Editor of The New Yorker magazine. On this program, we invite posts that she's a poem from the New Yorker Archive to read and discuss. Then, they read a poem of their own that's been published in the magazine. My guest today is Joy Harjo the current poet laureate of the United States. She's also chancellor of the academy American poets and her many honors include the Ruth Lilly poetry prize in the wall Stevens Award Toy. Welcome. Thanks so much for joining us. It's great. It's great to be here with you. So the pony decides today is still life with potatoes, pearls, raw meat rhinestones, Lard, and horse hooves by Sandra. Cisneros tell us what drew you to this particular poem as you're looking through our archive. I guess it appeared recently, but it's a little bit older poem of Sandra's. And I like the the wildness of you know it reminds me especially in these times when we can't even go hang out of you know being able to hang out and visit with people and be wild with people and dream and dream together and And have fun. You know even as it's also a poem I also a little bit about being at the edge of ruin and discovery, which is usually the same place. Or can't be Sinclair's. Let's listen to the poem. Here's joy Harjo readings still life of potatoes, pearls, raw meat rhinestones, Lard, and horse hooves by Sandra Cisneros? Still, life with potatoes, pearls, raw meat rhinestones, Lard and. Horse. Hooves. In Spanish it's naturalism Huerta and not life at all but certainly, not natural. What's natural you and me all by drink. To a woman who doesn't act like a woman to a man who doesn't act like a man. Is Natural at least in. Spanish I think life I'm not so sure. Consider. The CONTESSA who in her time was lovely and now sports award to size of this diamond. So regards Oh you're Venice to you to Bennett's not the one of cazenove. The other one of cheap pins donates by the railroad station I recommend narrow bid staying with semen P. and sorrow facing the wall. Staying decay or romantic your positively Pasolini likely to dangle and Fandango, yourself to death. If we let you I won't let you. Not to be outdone I'm.

Sandra Cisneros Joy Harjo The New Yorker magazine New Yorker Archive Poetry Editor Kevin Young Ruth Lilly Huerta Pasolini United States Venice chancellor Sinclair Stevens Bennett
Episode 008: Using Artificial Intelligence & Technology to Improve Outcomes - burst 02

The Better

02:44 min | Last week

Episode 008: Using Artificial Intelligence & Technology to Improve Outcomes - burst 02

"Yeah. So what did I don't even know if you have this kind of conversation but do you do you ever have clinicians or? Folks are in the field in the trenches. So to speak that are worried about trays like you bring trays. I'm not gonNA have a job anymore. You know what that's listened to. Mike my vision number be really transparent which I always have bow-ties. I hope this will be live and it was the goes but but the reality is is my opinion is I don't I leaving the human being right I believe in therapist being a critical component I'd been through a northbound thirty myself or a diss or injuries all kinds of stuff you probably have to rough. That interaction man I believe in. At The Mayo manipulation and things along those lines that can't be done by technology today right? I also believe that. Just like any other profession that we have the top ten percent of the profession and we got the other presented at the bottom ten percent right or twenty percent that might just you know the eighty twenty rule or? Ways look at that but the reality is and I think that tracer can. Provide a more efficient and effective process. and. Delivery of of incur modalities or gently quantified outcome measures. Than, even your typical condition can, but it cannot do everything. It still takes brilliant conditions do that. Now with that said, I think that what we'll see moving forward with telehealth. Portrays. Aside tell how technology etcetera. I hope what happens is that we get the best clinicians working with patients. Are, your for lack of better term half asked clinicians and again, better right Buddy I. Go to the New Yorker. Me Over and again, it goes for any profession right? You weed out the bad. You keep the good. The good ones are going to always have a place, the good ones and the great ones they're they're a staple and they're going to provide incredible value. No matter what technology brings to the table but ultimately, we're GONNA be able to weed out the poor ones in have. Far Less you have ten collision aquatic maybe two or three if you use technology the right way. Yeah I always wants right? Yeah. Now, I tell that to clients all the time I'm like listen this stuff can be like a force multiplier I mean it can make your outcome. Super Super Good. But if you're going to be kind of mediocre telling the line doing what you gotta do to get paid then yes, it's going to be detrimental to your involuntary.

Mike
New York - Macy’s Announces Changes For Thanksgiving Day Parade

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:29 sec | Last week

New York - Macy’s Announces Changes For Thanksgiving Day Parade

"Well, this year's Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade goes virtual because of covert 19. NBC's Adam Cooper Stain explains Snoopy and Santa will still be parading through the streets of the 2020 Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade. Just not the way New Yorkers have come to expect it. There will be a 75% reduction and participants. There will also be no parade route with production to take place in and around Herald Square. That's really gonna happen in this one block area right around Macy's interesting to see it on

Macy Adam Cooper Herald Square NBC Santa
Facing backlash, Netflix defends ‘Cuties’ as ‘social commentary’ against sexualizing young girls

The Breakfast Club

01:46 min | 2 weeks ago

Facing backlash, Netflix defends ‘Cuties’ as ‘social commentary’ against sexualizing young girls

"Defended that movie cuties right. It has been a lot of backlash over the sexualized portrayal of Children in that drama, but what they're saying now, according to Netflix, They're saying it's a social commentary against the sexualization of young Children, According to a Netflix spokesperson. It's an award winning film in a powerful story about the pressure young girls face on social media and from society more generally growing up, and we'd encourage anyone who cares about these important issues to West the movie, so a lot of people had issues with it, but hadn't even seen it yet. Every time I would post about girlfriends this weekend, it would be people in my mission saying, Oh, you still watching Netflix? We need to cancel Netflix because it is show called cuties. I'm like you want to cancel the whole God damn subscription service Because one of the one show don't focus on getting the ones I don't focus on getting the one show canceled. Get rid of the whole screaming service. He want to get rid of all of the content like Central Park, 5 13 girlfriends. All of these things you can actually learn from that depict the black experience in a great way. You want to get rid of the whole screaming service because you're against one show gallery did contributed for the New Yorker, Richie Brody wrote of the movie that Netflix did itself a disservice with the misleading marketing And that's why this campaign is against it. And he said the subject of cuties isn't working. It's Children, especially poor and nonwhite Children were deprived of the resource is the education. The emotional support the open family discussion to put sexualized media and pop culture into perspective? And, he says, the story is a girl's outrage at and defiance of a patriarchal order. So you start to it sometime. Yeah, My daughter loved those kind of shows. She loves dance, Mom and you know my daughter competitive. She's a competitive cheerleading, So she watches all of that kind of stuff.

Netflix Richie Brody Central Park
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

12:56 min | 5 months ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"This time of year would have been a joyful one the start of baseball season. Not The worst casualty of this pandemic by far but for a fan the loss of baseball is a bitter pill. The deprivation of really beautiful distraction and this talk that maybe the season will open. June. But that's really impossible to know until then I wanted to revisit a conversation I had with the Great Baseball writer. Roger Angell who is now ninety nine a few years ago. I brought Roger to the studio to talk about his long and remarkable career at the magazine in more than seven decades. He's contributed fiction movie reviews Comic Poems Essays About Aging and lost. There really isn't a genre that he hasn't touched but on the subject of baseball there's no greater writer than Roger. No one and for this. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of fame. In two thousand fourteen. So this is a thrill for me as roles honor. The rostro spent honorees is stuffed with old heroes of mine like Red Smith and Tom. Meany and with baseball writer friends who have also been models. In Heroes Folks Jerome Holtzman Peter Gammons and Bill Madden. Who were so quick to put me my ease and the clubhouse fill me and whenever I turned up again my gratitude always goes back to baseball itself which turned out to be so familiar and so startling. So spacious and exacting so easy looking and so- heartbreakingly difficult filled up my notebooks and seasons in a rush a pastime indeed. That was an amazing day Roger. I just wonder you know year and a half later looking back at what it meant to. You. You've been writing about baseball for a long time. Since the early sixties I was extremely anxious beforehand and I was anxious about so many friends of mine are this enormous distance though is not going to be very good and actually was using a little. Maalox near the end lost some weight but when I got there was just terrific but you had to invent a voice for this you had to. You had to figure out a way of covering baseball. God knows at Baseball's especially when you began was the focus for sports writers. In fact in the fifties the the most the prestigious sports. Because WE'RE IN IN BASEBALL. Baseball here are appropriate sheer terror. I didn't know what I was doing. I was baseball fan. I'd been a writer but not read about baseball only a little bit and I was very self-conscious talking to the players. Really quite quite scared. Why is that well? I felt that they would. They would know more than I did that they wouldn't. What's this guy doing here I was? I was shy and a little bit nervous. So what I did was to sit in the stands at first and because I felt I did realize that nobody was writing about the fans and I was a fan and I could sit in the stands via a fan and also be a writer. Is the press box a bad place to cover things from no? I don't think so but once you get used to it but I wasn't. Wasn't that easy. The press box yet one of the things. That always amazed me about your baseball. Riding is that you have a tone a of of a of a happy man of someone who's going at this at his leisure and that all the difficulty of writing which we know to be the case is somehow way out of the frame that there is this voice of someone just in love with what he's watching that's that's hard to achieve well it it developed over the years. I mean I didn't really plan it in advance. It was just. It was some kind of me. What kind of sports writing that? You couldn't stand. What were you trying to avoid? Actually one I started. Sean William Shawn. The editor said. We're on spring training and take a look and he said we don't want to be sentimental they don't want to be a tough guys. You know the two things to avoid and Sean know anything about baseball. Nothing nothing pace. He came into my office carrying a gal is my first piece from that. Spring Training and he pointed to a page place on on the page and he said what's this Looks and I said that's a double play bill. You said what's the double play and I explained it to him and his. She's glowed with excitement. Did you find it harder to talk with players as time went by as you got a little older? Did you gravitate more toward coaches and managers than they call you? Syria in big trouble. I gravitated toward good talkers of said before But today's thin out. The good talkers become less and less numerous. I yes I think so. I mean I got over eighty. It was impossible for me to talk to players really because they would say sir and and also as you said the the habit of talking openly as a person not as a very well paid celebrity semi celebrity. All player is pretty. Well gone because it's a big difference when the ball players are making a bet as much as a as solid orthodontist. You're older but you did pay attention lease I did. I would carry notes right endlessly long notes and and keep my ears open. Listened for something. I remember being outside the Office of Jim fry the Kansas City manager after his great star. George Brett had another extraordinary date plate. And I'm waiting to go into the manager. There too old coaches at their lockers just outside the door in their underwear and clogs talking a coupla country guys and what? I'm says the other everything that George hits goes through the infield like stream of milk and this country image and I wrote it down. I wrote it down. Wow thank you you wait days for things like that in the Nonfiction Game Roger you practice nonfiction as it were by night and fiction by day. For years and years he was the fiction editor of The New Yorker. To this day you read short stories for us and in the fiction department. Was this bred in the bone with you. I think I think some of our listeners will know that your mother was really had singular responsibility for introducing serious fiction to the New Yorker. Catherine White was the the person who brought real fiction to the New Yorker and you must have grown up hearing about this process knowing this process and my and my stepfather was who was the white and writing for the magazine every week. And My mother and father's house was full of Gallison pencils and racer rubbings and and conversation about the magazine in about Harold Ross and and about the writers of the day and sure I pay close attention but I wasn't planning to be New Yorker editor or to be a New Yorker writer planning. I was hoping to be maybe four naturalist herpetologist. I I am but I did pay attention. And My mother was editing Vladimir Nabokov from people. Like that Nabokov. Take editing I was this whole usual hot. He wear and the famous Nabokov. Editing was by the Great New Yorker of founding editor Harold. Ross who love clarity above all not classically or much educated but loved clearness and in the middle of some terrific nabokov member. Part of his speak memory. Pieces is wonderful memorial memories about his family. There's a line that at the dinner table. And some insist past the nutcracker and one of Harold Ross is endless queries. Yours had about twenty or thirty years but every piece of copy from the evidence we've been given so far. I would assume that the logos were more than one nutcracker family so I was looking. I was looking through some letters that that came to Harold. Ross and roll doll. Who wrote all those great children's books but also a number of things for the New Yorker and Memoir Pieces Than Yorker wrote a scathing letter to Ross complaining about the editing and the number of commas that injected after things. And he says it's as if you would take a great commerce. Shakur and sprinkled commas throughout my style. It's lightened up. A LITTLE. Bit about your. What is age do for your writing? How does it affect things? How does it either deepen your work or make it more difficult? What what's the effect of time on a writer? So I'm not sure I mean I'm aware of my my waning powers. I really am but I can't. I'm not ready long pieces. I'm not going out there and read another ten or twelve thousand. Were baseball piece. I'm not sure that's a matter of of what getting up downstream you doing the interviewing and doing the traveling and and taking the time love lot of hard work and it's hard for me to get around it starts to seize hard for me to hear a little bit and I'm doing much. I'm very happy to fall back and undo posts and blogs but with with this. This is the amazing thing you are in your midnight is hope you don't mind me saying you're perfectly aware of it and yet sentence by sentence. You're as funny and as touching and as good writers you ever were and you've taken to the Internet in a way a lot of people resisted. You took right to it. While I liked the brevity of the blog. You can make it quite short are you. Could just go on as long as you want to go. And then just stop. It's sort of like making a paper airplane. No it's it's about the I used to love to make paper amid great paper plants and you throw it out the window and take it goes a little ways. Turnley Kerr's beautifully and I think it was out of sight and has forgotten forever and that's like a blog but immediacy of the Internet. You know you've got a post and it's six o'clock it's the air and you're getting a well taking me afternoon sometimes but fair enough but No I I can sort of see the end one. I'm starting which is not bad. So tell me about this new book you you've put together an enormous range of things you've got in here. Some obituaries were published in the New Yorker. Online you've got A couple of long sustained essays. We'll we'll talk about Some baseball writing Letters the book is called This old man by Roger Angel. All in pieces is Roger. This old man Roger Angel on. Well I'm a little tired of the joke title already but tell me about the book itself. Well I I wrote the piece this Oh man. I started the piece in two thousand thirteen. I think late late in the year and I think can you long about February or something like that came as a complete surprise to me just opted on my desk. I wrote it in different pieces. Got Didn't quite know what I was doing. And it was about physical ability and it starts off with a description of Mar Meyer arthritic hands and which which you say. The the tips of your fingers like they've been the subject of torture by by my forefinger at you like pistol and fired enough in fear knows issue in the knee but I describe some. Some of the or everyday disabilities have age and I didn't quite know what I was doing but I. I knew that loss was at the middle of this. I lost my wife of married for forty eight years and I lost a daughter and Beloved dog of Carrollton Mine Went out to fifth-floor window in the middle of a half through in panic was jumped out the window the fifth floor and was killed losses for people. My Age are common. Ed Hirsch. The wonderful poet lost his son and wrote a great book about last year. And he says that anybody over the age of sixty five as a one hundred pound bag of cement of loss on his shoulders and he writes about reading about the loss of his son and said he says you can't make a story out of it. You can't do that with the life so I didn't know how to touch on these subjects if I wanted to even and I did so actually through the loss of the dog I'd written a piece about about The losing my wife..

baseball writer Roger Baseball Hall of fame Harold Ross Vladimir Nabokov Roger Angell editor Roger Angel Jerome Holtzman The New Yorker Red Smith Meany Sean William Shawn George Brett Yorker Catherine White Syria Peter Gammons
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

13:27 min | 7 months ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"Poetry Editor of The New Yorker magazine on this program. We invite poets to to a poem from the New Yorker Archive to read and discuss. Then we ask them to read one of their own poems. That's been published in the magazine. My guest today is does the author of over twenty books of poetry fiction and nonfiction. His many honors include Twenty Nineteen Windham Campbell prize a Guggenheim fellowship a Barnes and noble writers for Writers Award and the Ford Prize for poetry. Welcome kwami thank you for joining us. It's good to be here Kevin. It's great to see you so the poem you selected from the Archive is the season of phantasmal piece by Derek Walcott. Can you tell us a little bit about why you picked poem? It's a very familiar form. I think it's on many Caribbean core syllabi And it struck me that it's a very New York poem. Our Very City Forum for Caribbean writer. Here's Komai Dawes. Reading the season of phantasmal piece by Derek Walcott the season fantasma piece then. All the nations of birds lifted together the huge net of the shadows of the Earth in multitudinous dialects twittering tongue stitching and crossing it. They lifted up the shadows of long pines down. The track ler slopes the shadows of glass face towers down evening streets the shadow of a frail plant on a city. Seal the net rising soundless as night. The birds cries soundless until there was no longer dusk or season decline. Or whether only this passage of Fantasma light that not the narrower shadow dare to civil and men could not see looking up what. The wild geese drew while they are sprees trailed behind them in silvery ropes that flashed in the icy sunlight. They could not hear. Batallions of starlings waging peaceful cries bearing the net Haya covering this world like the vines of an orchard or a mother. Drawing the trembling goes over the trembling is of a child fluttering to sleep. It was the light that you will see at evening on the side of a hill in yellow. October and no-one herring knew what changed had brought into the ravens coining the kill deer screech the ember circling chaff such an immense soundless and high concern for the fields and cities where the birds belong except it was their seasonal passing. Love made season less or from the high privilege of their birth something brighter than pity for the wingless ones below them who shared dark holes and windows and in houses and higher. They lifted the net with soundless. Voices above all change betrayals of falling sons and this season lasted one moment. Like the pause between dusk and darkness between fury and peace but for such as our earth is now it lasted long. That was the season of phantasmal piece by Derek. Wolcott originally published in the October twenty seven nineteen eighty issue of the magazine. I was struck Because I have the New Yorkers version of some small changes he made Which is really interesting because he says in this version in quiet October and you read in yellow. What an what a different Yeah and it locates. It doesn't it because you know I was reading the form again and again and I'll tell you a little joke one of the struggles that I think the Caribbean students have with it. Is They thinking Caribbean right? And and some things. Don't make sense and you'll October makes absolutely no sense to them. And so these students wrestling that you know the the the reflecting towers and all that stuff. So it's it's quite it's quite striking but it. It clearly is a poem that that walk is sort of engaged with all the birds and all those references are very much north. America and It's an I thought that was one of the things that struck me as interesting. But that's an interesting change and actually not notice that. Yeah yeah well. I think what's interesting? I was struck by the multitudinous. Dialects tutoring tongues stitching and crossing. It you know that to me is almost the cosmopolitan city quality. That he's trying to Volk He's listening to this multitude and I think of that with Wolcott a lot. So he's doing a lot of weird things in this poem where these contradictions. So so the the multitudinous first of all. He's he's evoking babble. You know the towel babble. Those voices but but there's a lot of silence in the form. The point is actually the absence of noise. Yeah that the birds not making a noise that that the people in distance are not making a song and yet the represent noise. So there's not that vocation and there's another weird kind of I think it's an illusion that I think is fair. I don't know if you know this image in the New Testament where where Peter I think. gets a dream and in the dream. There's this cloth on the ground and there's all kinds of foods and and birds and all kinds of creatures that are not kosher and then God says than eats on this sheet that lifts up and he sees the sheet and then God says to him. It's all fine this this this sort of very sort of New Testament. Yeah that's not. The one I remember. Fire and Brimstone. Yeah Okay Okay but I think I think Walcott is evoking that. There's some lines that seem to suggest that. But it's the idea that there's love at the heart of mope witness to love the openness the difference openness to that whole range of things but as humans we are the ones huddled in the little window Where the little distant creatures that he refers to their one time that I sort of feel comfortable saying universal about this the statement. This is wonderful poem. Where the place is clear but yet it's also this largest statement. What do you take phantasmal piece to be? It's an illusion. I think that signature. Wolcott things like you know between dusk night. That twilight non Walcott's moment. Yes that muscle in that singular moment. There's this illusion of peace and love So it's a pretty depressing alive. But when he says I want to zero in on what she say says such an immense soundless high concern for the fields and cities or the birds belong. What lovely rhythm. Except it was their seasonal passing. Love made season less right and think that's the one hope season less means that I. I think it's not constrained by the seasons. Non It is something. It's almost the same as same. Timeless couldn't get away with right so I think I think he's saying love as as this timeless moment and there is hoping that lasts instance where he says but in this moment which seems short but it is grand. There's this economical sense that love as this seeming. Fleeting thing yet multiplies itself. That sense so even though I describe it as sort of pessimistic depressing. It's not. It's not that it's not you can't get love. You can't get hope with permanent. It's not permanent. Yeah and but it's a moment and we should go grab that. Yeah and what's interesting? He says and this season lasted as you said. One moment. Like the pause between dusk and darkness between fury and peace. I mean you know. I don't think it's the opposite of pieces fury but right here it is here here. He's made us know that but for such as our earth is now lasted long. What's he saying about that Earth and that now which I think feels super urgent now even. Yeah and this is the thing you would you? We're getting which is that fury and peace and there's other language that is all the street older the newspaper the the language of of diplomats of politicians of wars and rumors of wars. And so on. And he saying that as a moment in between there which is a moment that transcends that is bigger than any of these two extremes but it's a fleeting moment. It's a moment that we hold onto. The fury is all the kiosks in life and source of fourth and pieces and absolute so this is a moment in between and therefore it's illusory but as a port he saying illusion is a good thing. The allusion is not necessarily Something to dismiss as a lie but something that feeds us that I think gives us some kind of hope I love to the second stanza where he says. It was the light Before but right before that. He says they could not hear battalions of starlings great praise burying them at higher covering this world like the vines of an orchard or a mother. Drawing the trembling gauze over the trembling is of a child. Dude Dude repeats trembling away with areas. But yeah what works is exactly like that double and he's doing this layering thing and it's A. It's a bold gesture to do it. Well I think he gives us the metaphor within the simile. That's gives us the trembling 'cause which I don't take to be literal but like but but drawing a curtain overseas that's the metaphorical and then the trembling is of a child fluttering so that it trembles and flutters redundant different. It's slightly different. There's an ominousness to the trembling gods at first And yet at the same time. It has my family's from Louisiana. You would almost evokes kind of call. Call call the second the second site. Yeah that's a very Caribbean thing. Yeah and then to sleep then. We're thinking death but then the second sleep you know so so. He's playing with that idea but it's attend a moment of of a mother. Which is the same as this authored sort of this sense of the the covering of the world events and origin covering the world in order to is a it's different than four s or would it is updated. Uh there's something he's he is really Rustling in ways that I appreciate you saying very carribean but also he's wrestling with this kind of pastoral tradition that also thinks about the city That's really interesting so we should not leave this without realizing that. His big metaphor is the weaving of a net. The birds and what the birds leave behind that is the nest and a shelter and he keeps that all it with gauze all of these elements of fines. He's just constantly working that same image in ways that we kind of you know we go. Oh okay so he has. He keeps that up. He keeps that up all the way through how he's able to do that. You know he takes a thing and turns it which is what poetry does turns it into another thing. Yeah this is. This is one of the great one of the great lessons. I learned not from Walker. I but from Shakespeare speeches. You don't. I discovered this thing when I was when I was reading Shakespeare and I had an old professor. Amman called Dr England you and he said he said that Shakespeare does these conceits through place. Oh cloth- clothing is a big motif that runs to you. Know the merchant of Venice and saw but then when you start looking what. Shakespeare does from the beginning of a speech to Dan Speech. You'll begin with a shoe and it ends with a sword. It's all metaphorical door. And he keeps switching that metaphor so the shoe becomes a piece of leather then becomes a wallet then become and he's just shifting it and he's not he's essentially mixing metaphors but doing it with such slow careful slippage between one to the other that by the time you're done you get this this netting of a single kind of IMI it's it's part of the bombast of Shakespeare which you can do. Because he's a playwright right. He's writing for the stage. Walcott sort of masters that and I think it's one of the criticisms that sometimes people had to walk up which is the flamboyance of his his metaphor and his image. And so on. But but I like it. You know you kind of have to admire the skill of it. And he's very very good at that thing following that image and staying consistent with that image..

Derek Walcott Shakespeare Wolcott New York New Yorker Archive Komai Dawes Poetry Editor Kevin Ford Prize writer Guggenheim fellowship Writers Award Fantasma The New Yorker magazine Venice Haya America herring
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

15:51 min | 1 year ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"To the New Yorker radio hour. I'm David Ramnik. It's not often than at article comes along that changes the world, and that's exactly what happened with Tana hoc- coats five years ago. Now when he wrote the case for reparations that article in the Atlantic was a very big deal to say the least I was shocked how big it was. I can remember going up to the red rooster to meet somebody for lunch in house restaurant Harlem, and I was leaving. And they were two people at the bar is a black woman in a black dude who will old end the dude is get. So big is all my God. Oh my God. And the woman said to me, he said praise God praise. And he runs into the car, and he has an Atlantic. He's lead scientists praise. God, I was what? Wow. And I was so pleased that people would ask me to sign the paper people who couldn't get access to the magazine with, like printed out and would come because they're like sold out at a certain point. Tana hussy coats, somehow, got everybody talking about reparations now that subject had been discussed since the end of the civil war. And in fact, there's a Bill that's been sitting in congress for thirty years about reparations, but now reparations for slavery. And legalized discrimination is a real subject of major discussion among the democratic presidential candidates. We're going to spend the entire hour of our program today, talking about what exactly are reparations and what the political future of the might be I talked to Tallahassee coats last week. Don for those who have may not have read the article five years ago. What exactly is the case that you make for reparations, which is a word that's been around for a long, long time, case, I make reparations is virtually. Every you know, institution with some degree of history. In America, be a public be. It private has a history of extracting wealth and resources out of the African American community. I think what has often been missing. I was trying to make the point of in two thousand fourteen that behind all of that, you know, oppression was actually theft in other words, this is not just mean, this is not just maltreatment. This is the theft of resources out of that community theft, the resources continued. You know, well into the period of, I would make the argument around the time of the fair housing. So what year is that's nineteen sixty eight I, there are a lot of, you're not saying that between nine hundred sixty eight in two thousand and nineteen everything is hunky Dory. I'm not saying everything was on key at all. But I'm trying if you were speaking to, you know, the most intellectually, honest dubious person because you have to remember what I'm battling his idea that it ended in eighteen sixty five with emancipation the patient. Yes, yes, yes. And the case I'm trying to make is with end the lifetime. Of a large number of Americans in this country. There was a lot of your article was about Chicago housing policy. Because like technical analysis has housing policy with people talk to me about the article, when I could tell they hadn't read it, so it's kinda hussy making a case for first and foremost. It's a dissection of a particular policy emblematic of somebody, other policies saw all of those policies of I had to pick one, you know, now that was really my going to one, I picked was housing was our housing policy. Again, we, we have this notion that, you know housing as it exists today, sort of sprung up from black people coming north, maybe not finding the jobs that they want bring, you know, indus- form, you know, some sort of pathological culture, and white, people just being concerned, citizens fled to suburbs. But beneath that was policy. The reason why black were confined neighbors in the first place and white people had access to neighborhoods. You know, further away was because of political decision. The governor. You know, under road that to FHA loans through the GI Bill, and that in turn caused the devaluing of black neighbor than an inability to access credit to even improve neighborhoods. Now, your article starts with someone who lived through these racist policies, a man named CLYDE Ross. Tell us the story of CLYDE Ross. How did he react to the article? So Mr Ross was living on the west side of Chicago, started out Mississippi started out Mississippi in, in the nineteen twenties. Born in Mississippi under Jim crow, his family lost lost their land, headland basically stolen from them had his horse stolen from him. He goes off fights in World War. Two comes back like a lot of people can't live in clarksdale. I just can't can't be I'm gonna kill somebody on Gill. Comes up the Chicago. In Chicago, all of the social conventions of Jim crow. A guy and had the move off the street. Somebody white as long had take his hat off all, you know, look down anything like that gets a job at Campbell Soup company and he wants to, you know, the last implemeting American dreamy was home ownership couldn't go to the Bank, get alone like everybody else. And he was making a decent way making a decent wage enough that he could save some money. And you know, I'm enough down payment and ours. He has no knowledge. None of us really did at that point of what was actually happening of widest was, you know, no concept of federal policy. Really? And so what he ends up with is, you know, basically a contract lender is a private lender. Who says, you know, hey, you give me down payment and you, you own a house, but would they actually do what they kept a deed for the house, and you had to pay off the house in its entirety in order to get the deed, although you effectively renter? You had all of, you know. Lack of privilege that rent a has, and yet all the responsibilities that a buyer has. So if something goes wrong house, you have to pay for that. And so these fees would just pile up on these people, and they would lose their houses, and you don't get you down payment back. Claros is one of the few people was able to actually keep his own the such a moving moment in the piece where he's sitting with you. And he admits we were ashamed did not want anyone to know we were that ignorant and, and felt that his ignorance said extended to his understanding of life in America in Chicago, which it seemed to use the phrase of, of the great migration, the promised land, right? Right. And he felt like a soccer A fell stupid to says, anybody would and I don't think he knew on the level the extent to which the con- actually went and then living in a community of people. And this is somebody get into piece, but living in a community of people who are being ripped off, and they couldn't talk about it to each other, because they wanted to maintain this sort of facade is front, that they own their homes, not that somebody else, actually held the deed, and so on. There was a great period of silence. You know about did Mr Ross react to your piece. Yeah. He did what he say. He said, reparations will never. So in the aftermath of the peace peace comes out fifteen thousand words neat landing tremendous interest in it. You said this about the PC I think it was in the Washington Post. You said when I wrote the case for reparations my notion wasn't that you could actually get reparations past even in my lifetime. My notion was that you could get people to stop laughing. Right. Would you mean? Well, I mean, it was a Dave Chapelle joke. You know, and sort of what the joke was was. If black people got reparations oughta silly, dumb things, they would actually do meaning know caused by Rams fancy clothes. You know as as other people don't do those things, you know, and once I started researching, not just the fact of plunder, but actually, the history of reparations fight, which literally goes back to the American revolution. George Washington when he dies and his well, he leaves things to those who are in. I wasn't a foreign notion that if you had stripped, people of something, you might actually, oh, them something, it really only became Faren after the civil war, and any man to patient. And so this is quite a dignified idea, and actually an idea that was quite a bit of literature on and the notion that it was somehow funnier. I thought really, really diminished, what was a serious trenchant and deeply deeply perceptive idea if you visited Israel between the fifties and a certain time you would see Mercedes-Benz taxis all over the country. And you'd wonder this is not particularly rich country. At least not yet, this was reparations. This is part of the reparations payment from Germany, Israel, and in, in the immediate. Aftermath of the holocaust second World War. What is reparations look like now? Right. Because they get vouchers to buy German goods. Right. What are we what's being asked for the rewriting of textbooks, the public discussion? What in terms of policy? How do you look at it? So fresh, you need the actual crime document you need, like which you would get is the official imprimature of the state say, this actually happened. You know, I just think that's a crucial crucial first up and the second reason you haven't commissions to figure out how we pay. Back, you know, I think it's crucial to tie reparations to specific acts. Again, why you need to study. This is not, you know, I checked black on my census, therefore I, I don't I I'll give you an example of this, for instance, we have what I would almost call a pilot significant reparations program right now, actually running in Chicago, Jon Burge, who ran this terrible unit of police officers that tortured black people and sent a lot of innocent black people to jail you over cost. I think it was like twenty twenty or so years. And then once he was found out in Chicago. The reparations plan put together with victims were actually given reparations. But in addition to that crucial to that they change how they taught history. And you had to actually teach John Burnett actually teach people about what actually happened. So it wasn't just the money, it was there was some sort of I hesitate say educational, but I guess that's where we use educational element to it. And I just think you can't win this argument by trying to hide the ball. Not not in the long term. You know. And so, I think both of those things are crucial ten hoc-. So as of this moment in two thousand nineteen there are more than twenty democratic presidential candidates running, eight of them have said, they'll support a Bill to create at least create a commission to study reparations. What do you make of that is it symbolic or is it lip service? Or is it just a way to secure the black vote? Was it something much more serious than all that? As folly in some measure, affordable. Thanks, certainly, is symbolic. Awesome pudding commission is now reparations in of itself. It's certainly limps lip service from at least some summit of candidates. I'm actually less. Sure about.

Chicago CLYDE Ross America Atlantic theft Jim crow Mississippi David Ramnik Harlem congress clarksdale Campbell Soup company Washington Post soccer Dave Chapelle African American community
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"This New Yorker podcast is supported by indeed dot com. Are you hiring with indeed? You can post job in minutes. Set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard. Get started today at indeed dot com slash New Yorker. That's indeed dot com slash New Yorker. You're listening to the New Yorker poetry podcast. I'm Kevin young poetry editor of the New Yorker magazine on this program, as you may recall, we ask posts to select a poem in the New Yorker archive to read and discuss along with one of their own poems. That's been published in the magazine. My guest today is fierce and Claire who's honors include a award a Metcalf award for the American Academy of arts and letters and OC 'em. Boca's prize for Caribbean poetry and a Ruth, Lilly and Dorothy Sargent, Rosenberg fellowship from the poetry foundation. Thank you for joining us, today, the heaven me, so FIA the poem you've decided to read for us is from the desire field, by Natalie Diaz, which was published as part of envelopes of air are online, feature by Natalie Diaz on eight, only moan it was our first interactive poetry feature at New Yorker dot com. Tell us what drew you to this particular poem, as you were perusing the archives. This poem is to me, so magical in its imagery in its texture and the way she builds not just a system of imagery, but like returning to this refrain of green and desire, what's here it here, a Sinclair, reading from the desire field by Natalie DS. From the desire field. I don't call it sleep anymore. I'll risk losing something new instead like you lost your Rosen moon. Shook it loose. But sometimes when I get my horns in a thing, a wonder a grief or a line of her, it is a sticky and ruined fruit to unfussy, and from despite my trembling. Let me call my anxiety desire, then let me call it a garden. Maybe this is what Lorca meant when he said, Verde kits carer Verde, because when the shade of night comes I am a field of it of any worry ready to flower in my chest. My mind in the dark is gonna best thea on focused hot and if not yolks to exhaustion beneath the hip and plow of my lover than I am another night. Wondering the desire field bewildered in its. Low green glow Belling. The meadow between midnight and morning. Insomnia is like spring that way. Surprising and many Petzold the kick and leap of gold grasshoppers at my brow. I am struck in the Wichita hours of want. I want her green life, her inside me in green, our, I can't stop green vein in her throat green wing in my mouth green thorn, in my I, I want her like a river goes bending green moving green moving fast. Is that this is how it happens soy sonnambula, an even though you said today, you felt better, and it is so late in this poem. Is it okay to be clear to say, I don't feel good to ask. Ask you to tell me a story about the sweet grass you planted and tell it again or again, until I can smell. It's sweet smoke. Leave the thrashed field and be smooth. Well read, thank you. That was from the desire field by now ideas from envelopes of air by -nology as Italy, Mon published on New Yorker dot com in may twenty eighteen carrying the poem everything you said, was, of course, quite accurate about it. It's music and imagery. I was struck also by its language or should I say languages the way it really moves, effortlessly, between Spanish between Highland widget. And, and I wouldn't say, low language, because everything is so grand in the poem. I think that's one of its strengths, but in a very human, you know, lustful way that I think, is a really great. Let me call my anxiety desire, then let me call it a garden, and then she brings up Lorca who you know, has been hovering over the poem. But suddenly, she lets Lorca in tell me about hearing it again, what comes to mind. I do love this ball. Readily tension in the poem, you know, and how the physical is always there, and it's so reflected in the lush texture of the work, you know, it's kind of like a vine, imagine it as like a vine, the way that the lines sort of intertwine with each other. And we come back to this refrain of green of which is, of course, the lore can influence right from his own poem sleepwalking. Yes. And so, I agree that it's so seamless the way she sort of loops in this idea of, of the desire to Lorca on this, this, this refrain of green, how

New Yorker magazine Lorca Insomnia Natalie DS Natalie Diaz Dorothy Sargent Petzold poetry editor Rosen moon Claire Kevin young Boca Wichita American Academy of arts Italy Sinclair Lilly OC Rosenberg
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"WNYC studios is supported by Kerman spader. A national litigation firm representing law firms in malpractice suits ethics investigations and business matters. When the lawyer you choose matters most online at Zuckerman dot com. This is the New Yorker fiction podcast from the New Yorker magazine. I'm Deborah trees Mun fiction editor at the New Yorker each month. We invite a writer to choose the story from the magazine's archives to read and discuss this month. We're going to hear the metal bowl by Miranda, July, which was published in the New Yorker in September of twenty seventeen. If I protested only make his case stronger and less fun than my own. But which is not untrue in my essence. I am a stone unmoving for ten thousand years unless picked up and moved the story was chosen by Emma Klein who published her first novel the girls in two thousand sixteen. Hi, emma. Hi, denver. So the metal bowl was published as I just said less than two years ago. Did you read it when it first came out? I actually I heard it, and I don't normally listen to many audiobooks are people reading aloud. But I was on a road trip and happened to listen to maranda July read the store. Sorry after it was published. I was just so struck by it, and I was in a sort of low with reading where I I just hadn't been engrossed in something in a long time or something had gone a little bit dull. And then something about this story was just so peculiar. And so apt that it really got me excited about stories again in the possibilities for stories. What do you think it was about the story? I think the way that she explicatives certain emotions or thoughts in a way that I had just never seen before. But but in a way that also gave me that sense of recognition or familiarity, even the first paragraph. I think when she's talking about her orientation towards life as this sort of endless gratuitously drawn out experience that she's trying to. Get over with all at once. It just felt very familiar, and I never felt like it had been articulated in that way before it just got me very excited. Yeah. Were you already a fan of Miranda July's work at that point? I had read the first bad man and loved it. And it was similarly strange sort of off to the side of other fiction. I'd read I don't know how to say it in a better way. Almost like it was circling around the alley of fiction and doing something really interesting with it. And I think it's easy to think maybe it's because she is a filmmaker and artist and sort of has these other references, but I think she's just a great fiction writer in so singular. So I'd read that novel. I've only actually seen one of her movies the future. But that also I felt like that in this story that movie in this story had some resonance with each other. Just in terms of exploring these intimate relationships and sort of atomization them. So I think most people probably come to her. I as a filmmaker, you know, she's made these two feature films, which she also started. And sometimes when you do more than one thing people sort of assume that you're Adila tante, do you think of her as a writer? I I think that's how I have the strongest reaction ter- just because that's sort of the world that I'm in. But I don't know. I I wish that I was good at more than one thing. I think it's great. But she she is so good at so many things I think it's really exciting and sort of inspiring to see someone get to sort of explode their subjectivity in all these different directions. I'm jealous. Okay. Well, we'll talk some more after the story. And now, here's m Klein reading the metal bowl by Miranda, July. The metal bowl. He kept the two halves of my tush in spoke directly to them run away with me girls. He whispered she doesn't understand our love. I lay still staring out the window letting them have their time together if I protested I'd only make his case stronger, I'm less fun than my own. But which is not untrue in my essence. I am a stone unmoving for ten thousand years unless picked up and moved it's not just sex. I find this whole experience life gratuitously slow and drawn out. See it crawl second by fucking second. If I'm a workaholic, it's only because I hate work so much that I'm trying to finish it all of it once and for all so I can just ride out the rest of my life and some kind of

Miranda July writer New Yorker magazine Emma Klein Deborah trees Mun WNYC studios Kerman Adila tante editor denver m Klein ten thousand years two years
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

07:14 min | 1 year ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"Hello. You're listening to the New Yorker poetry podcast. I'm Kevin young poetry editor of the New Yorker magazine. As you may know on this program, we invite poets to pick a favorite poem from the New Yorker archive to read and discuss alongside Opole of their own. That's appeared in the magazine. My guest today is Rachel Griffiths. A poet and artist who's received fellowships from the Robert Rauschenberg foundation province town fine arts work center, Covey conham, pound Asian and Jato among others and twenty twelve for collection mule and pair with the inaugural winner of the poetry award for the Blackhawks of the American Library association. Allies are welcome. Thanks so much for joining us having me, Kevin. So the me chosen read today is rain light by w s Merwin. Can you tell us why this one felt particularly specialty you sure? So unfortunately, and very, sadly, recently, we lost US Merlin, although we still have his poems and each day. I've been thinking about Merlin's work his spirit his energy who he was. Was all of the different things he saw in his life. And then just the fact of kind of time passing at the beginning of the year. It was Mary Oliver a few days after WS Moore when it was Linda, Greg, and I remembered actually the the issue of the New Yorker when this poem came out and how I kind of tore it out of the out of the magazine and carried it around into kind of fell apart in my hands. There was just something in the poem for me that spoke to so many aspects of of living and ways to be I'm so I think that's some of I can say immersion himself said that rain light was not a rational poem. And I just love that. Who's ritual Elisa Griffiths reading rain, light by w a smart one. Light all day the stars watch from long ago. My mother said I am going now when you are alone, you will be all right. Whether or not, you know, you will know look at the old house and the dawn rain all the flowers are forms of water. The sun reminds them through a white cloud touches. The patchwork spread on the hill. The washed colors of the afterlife that lived there long before you were born see how they wake without a question. Even though the whole world is burning. Rain light. But w s Merwin which ran in the March third two thousand eight issue of the magazine. I'm really glad we're talking about Merwin because he was in the magazine over two hundred times over seven decades, which is just an incredible thing. And I've been thinking a lot about both the magazine being fortunate to have published him that much, but also that relationship to writer, which are there other places that we can think of that the had that sustained connection. I'm not sure I don't think. So I I mean every time I saw a Merwin poem and the New Yorker it was an event, and I found myself, again, kind of ripping the poem out to carry it around with me and really appreciated whenever those events would happen or so many so ridge. It's wonderful. Yeah. I miss the magnetic won miss about magnets on fridges. Is you know, the poem or you go to someone's house and be a New Yorker poem from ten years before. That got them through. Absolutely. I love that you cut that out and kept it. It's disintegration seems also part of the form of the poem almost it's a poem about leaving. But also about what stays. Has that elegiac tone that I think we're on often has do you think of it as a proper elegy or just eligible, how do you think about the form in a way is interesting because it is giant and at the same time. I find a certain kind of reassurance in it of kind of going on or continuum that there's a kind of way that you move in the world. And no the world even though holes and gaps in like things go missing and lost in Merwin writes so much about memory. And so it kind of is this assurance that you will be remembered things will be forgotten things will be saved or lost or discarded. And yet the world will go on. And I love the sense of the world and the poem. So it's giant to me. But at the same time, it has that that strange Merwin energy where the whole world is burning sounds intense. But at the same time, it sounds like well, here's a way to go forward through those flames, which I love. Well, it's like a cleansing fire or a light in a way. I love that line the washed colors of the afterlife. How do you take that line? It's extrordinary. I mean, I don't I I'm like how did he get away with? If someone hands it in. People are like, well, I'm not sure to watch. But then of course, that's what you're going to remember. You know, exactly I mean, I think Merwin seem to me to write from this kind of I mine intuitive mystic kind of place and the washed colors of the afterlife. It seems. I don't wanna say baptism, but just kind of the certain dying like D Y Wii dying of faith. But also that there's something to be made. Like, there's a there's an object. There's there's an art to this. And it also reminds me I was thinking of it on my way here that I had just last week checked out this Jasper Johns show, and I kept hearing Merlin, and that energy of Jasper Johns, his regrets in these different things in custody work that he does and it has that kind of gray grays and whites and nuance and shadow about his happening. And I feel like that's happening in this poem to that. I could walk into a gallery and see rain light, which is cool. Physicality, and I love that about the John's is a fascinating comparison because you know, John's using it caustic and often using wax with color in it, and it's like a tough process, but it leaves this kind of built up color. That's almost is not just saturates almost part of canvas or something residue. And then you are burning Vernon you're scraping your your chiseling. And so that kind of burning I'm like, oh, I can see that. I can see that. As a thing. I also really love. This palm all the verbs of kind of watching C look reminding us to kind of be observant in our day to day moment. Even though were most mostly engaged with kind of where the fire is like what's happened today in the news, and here's the fire, and we're all Sam PD toward it. But actually, there's also this other kind of washed out kind of chilled out spot of bliss that you can find if you want to find it if you want to see it and that it's there anyway for you whether you're seeing it or not. Was interesting because rain light is

Merwin New Yorker magazine Kevin young Merlin Rachel Griffiths Jasper Johns US Robert Rauschenberg foundation Elisa Griffiths poetry editor Blackhawks Mary Oliver Jato Covey Sam PD American Library association writer John Moore
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"We invite poets to selective home the New Yorker archive to read and discuss along with the palm of their own. That's been published in the magazine my guest today. Deborah Landau, author of the uses of the body and the last usable our both Lannan literary selections she's received a Guggenheim fellowship and the Robert Dana and hinge prize for poetry. And she directs the creative writing program at New York University. Welcome Deborah, thanks so much. Thanks for joining us today. So the palm you've chosen from the archive is little girl. My string bean, my lovely woman by insects, and can you tell us why this particular poem stood out to you? Well, for for several reasons, but I'll start by saying that it would have been Sexton's ninetieth birthday this month. And I thought it would be nice to read this in her honor. Grant, let's hear it. And then we can talk after. Little girl. My string bean. My lovely woman. My daughter at eleven almost twelve is like a garden. Oh, darling. Born in that sweet birthday suit and having owned it and known it for so long. Now, you must watch high noon, enter noon that ghost our. Oh, funny. Little girl this one under a blueberry sky this one. How can I say that I've known just what you know? And just where you are. It's not a strange place. This I'd home where your face sits in my hand so full of distance so full of its immediate fever. The summer has seized you as when last month in a mall fee? I saw lemons as large as your desk side globe that miniature map of the world, and I could mention to the market stalls of mushrooms and garlic buds all engorged, or I think even of the orchard next door where the berries are done and the apples are beginning to swell and once with our first backyard, I remember planted in Aker of yellow beans. We couldn't eat oh little girl..

Deborah Landau Guggenheim fellowship Robert Dana New York University Sexton Lannan Grant
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"Editor of the New Yorker magazine, as you may know on this program, we invited poets to poem for the magazines archive to read and chat about along with the palm of their own. That's been published in the New Yorker joining us today is Nick Flynn, the author of several poetry collections memoirs. He's received the Erikson institute prize for excellence in mental health media as well as wards fellowships from Penn Guggenheim foundation and the library of congress. Welcome nick. Thanks so much for being here. Thanks cannon. I saw also that you've been translated into fifteen languages is that right? Yeah. Not the poems. The pros. Yes. One one book has been translated into fifteen Lang exciting. That's amazing. I don't point out one book. One book fifteen times. So the poem you selected today is objectively as blanket, but Zoe hit sig tell us what about this piece caught your attention as you're looking through our archives the archives is you know, you have to sort of sort through them. They you don't have a whole list of poets that you know. And then you should like remember poem and see you have to sort of actually sure gauge it page comes up this ten in each page. And I my my attention online is is not huge. And so I got through twenty pages of that twenty pages twenty pages. And then just put in Poland. She wanted to just look through and see the past. I didn't see the little search button. So okay. And I actually didn't want do actor after quite a walks. I realize on each page that'd be like ten poets. And I would know either them personally or know of their work pretty well of most of the pages and occasionally be a name that would that. I didn't know. Right. And then after a while I began to read a lot. The poems and after a while be really interested in the post. I'd never heard of before. Yeah. Sure. And I decided to go for that. Okay. All right. So we hear the poem. Sure. I'd love to you. Yeah. Let's hear it objectively as blanket. No, the police hyenas on hearing five confessions for false in one to irresistible nor the mental health elephant tusks by the state, nor the common sense store twisting at the prosecutors feet, nor the one the one juror uneasy facing eleven pale sheep at bay all day all night for conviction, nor the governor, sir, nor the common sense stork. Now in a not nor the shots. No, the clause unbending nor the clause bending nor seeing his fitful approach did one turn back to flip the window latch for the life form. Nearly breaking himself on glass, nor the next governor nor the state carriage horses trotting ever steady blinders acute to the I nor the widower how he could how could he Puma and pull focus not defense counsel. Not for lack of it, nor the stork is she breathing. Is there such a thing as breathing here? Does it mean? The polyester the Royal blue the blanket on the bed of the mother of two. That was objectively as blanket by Zoe hit sig which ran in the March twentieth. Twenty seventeen issue of the magazine while it's really great to hear you re. I love all those Nores. It's it's the denial before the admission, I suppose, how did you hear those? Yeah. I mean the negating opponent at the beginning. I thought was really interesting strategy just to get me into it and just seem to be willing to like right from the beginning to exist in this state of instability, and you know, already with the first line having not being chromatic Lee, completely correct perhaps, and it just allowing that sort of while tumbling energy along with negation and long with a stuttering to nor the one the one juror without even a comet like just doing a lot of things that are genuine to itself. I think. Yeah. Once invested in language and the ways that we might. Miss your language or hear language differently. And I I love that about it. But it's also I think interested in the kind of rhetoric nor the governor, sir this kind of old fashioned Roderick..

Zoe Nick Flynn New Yorker magazine Erikson institute Penn Guggenheim foundation Editor cannon congress Poland Lang Roderick Lee Puma
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"You're listening to the New Yorker poetry podcast. I'm Kevin young poetry, Anthony, orca magazine, and director of the Schaumburg centre for research in black culture on this program. We invite poets to select a poem from New Yorker archive to read and discuss along with the poem of their own appeared in the magazine. My guess today. It's Catherine Burnett who's received such honors as a widening award a Guggenheim fellowship and for her second book a game of boxes James Lachlan award. Welcome Kathryn, thanks for joining us. Having them thrilled to be here. The poll chosen read for us is maybe all this by these lower Szymborska. Can you tell us why this poems about to you when you're looking through the archives? I'm poet I've loved for her radical uncertainty, radical doubt sort of with a profound comic intelligence and philosophical intelligence. So this poem you'll hear has all these maybes, which is a form of of radical doubt round. And there it is marked by question marks. You don't actually need to have a question Mark because the maybe is already. Introducing all the doubt. And I love being a poet because I can inhabit and enlarge questions of doubt and uncertainty, and all that we don't know I can pay attention to what we don't know. I used to be a journalist. Oh and wis supposed to be an authority, and I love I love Jim Bush got because she is an authority of not knowing she says, I don't know is most important phrase, we should cling to I'm dying here. Let's hear the poem show. Joey. Okay. Here's Kevin Burnett reading maybe all this. But he's Loa Szymborska translated by Clare Cavanagh and Stanislaw Baronne SaK. Maybe I'll this. Maybe all this is happening in some lab. Under one lamp by day and billions by night. Maybe we're experimental generations poured from one vial to the next shaken in test tubes, not scrutinized by is alone. Each of us separately plucked up by tweezers in the end, or maybe it's more like this no interference the changes occur on their own. According to plan, the graphs needle, slowly, edges. It's predictable. Zigzags maybe dust, far we aren't of much interest. The control monitors aren't usually plugged in only for wars, preferably large ones for the odd. Ascent above our clump of earth for major migrations from point a to point b. Maybe just the opposite. They've got a taste for trivia up. There. Look on the big screen. A little girl is sewing a button on her sleeve the radar shrieks. The staff comes at a run what a darling little being with its tiny heart beating inside it..

Loa Szymborska Kevin Burnett Szymborska Catherine Burnett orca magazine Schaumburg centre Stanislaw Baronne SaK James Lachlan Kathryn Guggenheim fellowship director Joey Mark Anthony Clare Cavanagh
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"This is the writer's voice, new fiction from the New Yorker. I'm Deborah trees span fiction editor at the New Yorker on this episode of the writer's voice will hear teak or agasin boil read his story. I walk between the raindrops from the July. Thirtieth twenty eighteen issue of the magazine. Boyle is the author of more than two dozen books of fiction, including the novels, the Taranaki and harder. They come a new novel outside looking in, we'll be published next year. Now, here's teak courageous and boil. I walk between the raindrops. Valentine's day. This past Valentine's Day? I was in Kingman Arizona with my wife Nola staying in the motel six. They're just off the I forty. He might not think of Kingman as a prime location for Mandic getaway who would. But Nolan, I have been married for fifteen years now and romance is just part of the continuum. Sometimes it blows hot sometimes cold and we certainly don't need a special day or place for it. We're not sentimentalists. We don't exchange heart shaped boxes of chocolates or glossy cards with manufactured endurance inside, and we don't go around kissing in public or saying, I love you twenty times a day to my mind. Couples like that are always suspect really, who were they trying to fool besides which we were there to pay a visit to Knowle's father, who's in his eighties and living in a trailer park a mile down the road from the motel which made it convenient, not only for saying him, but for strolling into old town where there are a handful of bars and restaurants and the junk shops. My wife loves to frequent looking for bargains where we slumming, yes, sure. Look at her. Stayed anywhere we liked, but this at least number in Kingman is what we like. And if it's not ideal, at least it's different. The local police creep to the parking lot in the small hours running license plates and once in a while, you'll wake to them handcuffing somebody outside one of the rooms which is not a site. We see every day back in California. Plus there are a couple of lean white bums living in the wash just behind the place, and they sometimes give me a start looming up out of the darkness when I step outside at night for breath of air, but nothing's ever happened not even a request for spare change or a cigarette the afternoon a Valentine's Day after we'd visited my father-in-law and treated him to lunch at Denny's, the only place he'll eat Nola, went up the street to cruise, the anti components, and I made for the local bar figuring we'd meet up there for a drink when she was done, then walk over to the Mexican restaurant for Margaritas. And then she laws. This bar which I'd been to before is a cavernous place. That was part of a now defunct hotel, and it features a high tin ceiling along pitted bar, top three pool tables and jukebox that plays the hits of the sixties and seventies at hurricane volume. The front door stands perpetually open. So as to brighten the place up a bit with the best kind of light, the light that doesn't cost anybody anything and across the street as a web of train tracks that guide an endless procession of freight trains through town that's up from your beer or your gin and tonic and more often than not, you'll see a moving wall of freight cars rattling by. The important thing to emphasize here is that this isn't an unfriendly place despite the neatly inscribed message over the urinal in the men's room that says, fuck you liberal pussies which choose to take us ironic, and I wasn't unfriendly myself. Happy, decide up to the bar alongside the mostly middle age, regulars in order a Jack and coke though. Normally that is back in our little coastal town in California, I would have had a Pinot Noir from the Santa Rita hills or a nice full bodied zinfandel from fossil row bliss. This wasn't the place for Pinot Noir, and I'm not knocking it just stating the obvious beyond that I was content to bend over my phone. I've been engaged off and on all day posting on a financial form run by the company. I used to work for and wait for Nollet. A tire out can come join me for a Valentine's Day drink, which in her case, would likely be gin and tonic a drink that nobody whether they were in Kingman or coots could screw up..

Kingman Valentine Nola California Kingman Arizona writer Boyle editor Santa Rita hills Nollet Nolan Taranaki Mandic Denny Jack coke fifteen years
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"We asked poets a selective favorite poem for the New Yorker archive to read and discuss then we invite them to read a poll of their own appeared in the magazine. My guest today is Meena Alexander the author of over a dozen books. Oppo Trie fiction nonfiction and criticism the recipient of a distinguished achievement award in literature from the South Asian Lewis OC as well as of a pen open book award she teaches at hundred college and the graduate center. Cuny? Welcome to the show me. So the poem. You've chosen a read is one we published pretty recently Adana by Gerald stern. What drew to this particular poem as you're proving the archives? Kevin it actually sort of took my breath away. Because of the extraordinary voice that he has in the poem and the way the whole thing flows in kind of unspools that's verb that he used as you know, almost like a theater, so there's this miniature cedar of the sorrow and of desire and of this early life. I guess we all have that as points in some measure the pull to an earlier life, which is ours, but not ours anymore. And then, of course, the way memory works. The other thing I wanted to mention was just the way the breath works in this poem. I mean, we normally think of points, you know, in different ways, different points, do it. But coupled together stitch together on this certain kinds of poetry particularly contemporary poetry now where you actually see the stitching, but with with this poem, it's the foist in. It's the breath which perfectly. Suits, two things. I think one is the image of music trope of music that is there because music of all the arts is the one that exists in time. It doesn't really have a special form. I mean, it comes out of instruments where it's the voice or instrument, but it doesn't it's not like sculpture or visual art, painting or even appointment a piece of paper so exists in time and by the same token vanishes. And of course, the figure the Adonis is somebody who makes music was a composer. And we don't know if it's for real or not. That's wonderful. Why don't we listen to it? Now, here's Meena Alexander reading Donna by Gerald stern. Donus? I forgave him that debt of having to explain where he came from who is angry father and his loving mother were or are relieved him from any excuse and Sut dozens and dozens of years ago at the counter of sex Broadway and a hundred third he on the other side his sleeves rolled up. His hands is arms in steaming water washing. Tissues and frying, pans and talking music, his dream of studying Chouli are the tiny practice room, a rich lady from the upper east or Upper West side paid for listening all ofter noon to him playing the small though his law dramatic gestures his hair wild, his hands and fingers amazing. Classic polish..

Cuny Meena Alexander Gerald stern Adana Upper West Kevin Donna
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

05:53 min | 2 years ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"It. Elizabeth Colbert Thank you. Thanks statement. Elizabeth Colbert staff writer at The New Yorker, You can find to reporting on the Department of the Interior and much else at New York radio. Com. Mm. Now, along with the treatment of animals, the environment is a chief reason why some of us become vegetarian about three percent of Americans at this point. And the environmental statistics are pretty damning. There's the consumption of food crops by animals. The drain on water supplies, the overuse of antibiotics pollution, and the list goes on in the food business. There's competition to create vegetarian substitutes that taste a little better than Well, you know, say Thanh all that stuff And that could maybe one day become viable alternatives to meet Sean a lion who edits the New Yorkers food and drink page has been exploring the options. I used to be a vegetarian I was vegetarian for fifteen years. At that time I ate a lot of veggie burgers. They were the kind that were out of a box. They were frozen. They were dry and sad and gray and in our you could dressed them up, but they they never tasted. Good. So I'm not a vegetarian anymore and I do eat burgers. But then I heard about a new kind of Veggie Berger called the impossible burger, which is a Veggie burger. That looks a lot like a meet Burger. And they said, tastes a like meat Burger. It also bleats like a meet Burger. And I just I was really curious. I really wanted to try it. So we went to an Mommy burger, which is a virtue bill with everything for you guys over. They are known for having beef burgers that are hyper powered with some kind of you Mommy, which is like a savory flavor. And so it was interesting that they were carrying the impossible burger That was a seal of approval like this really tastes like meet dreamt for treat. I haven't yet had many you app. So I brought along this expert on plant-based meet Bruce Friedrich founded and runs the good food Institute on veggie burgers were pretty bad. Up until ten years ago and thought his Good morning Morning Star, All of them are getting better and better. And in out of here, They're all. On their game, and it's a very exciting thing to see people implant based, say like, why limit yourself to animal cells with plant-based me? We can replicate what people like and we can do even better. When you say you can do even better y- you mean you can make it tastes better. Yeah. And animal animal-based burgers are not going to get better, but plant-based burgers well. So maybe the impossible Burger won't make you swear off meet forever, but maybe it will make you eat a little less meat. And Bruce thinks that would be great. One of the sort of obvious, but under appreciated facts is that if one person goes vegetarian. That is the same as two people cutting back by half. But it's probably going to be a lot easier to get to people to cut back by happened to get one person to go completely vegetarian. Two possible burgers from. Thank you very much. You guys. So we've got our impossible Berger. It's pretty big hue to Patty's smothered in Geez. They look a lot like me, the impossible Burger looks like it doesn't look like those fat juicy burgers. It looks like a couple of smashed Patty's like very thin, but also charred on the edges which you know that makes good burger to an. And you know there's this, there's a flag stuck right in the middle that says, impossible burger. The impossible Berger is not really that different from a lot of other Veggie burgers. It's made of protein and coconut oil and potato protein. But the thing that makes it different from other veggie burgers Is he It's an iron containing compound found in blood, which is what gives meet That hiring flavor and impossible Berger found a way to take hime from plants and make more of it using fragmentation. Hime is one of the things that make speakers really satisfied. Why do you think it's so hard for people to imagine giving up meat? I spent like 30 years pondering that question. I adopted a vegan diet in 1987 and that the arguments were just so clear to me, And I thought they would be clear to everybody else. And I thought nobody loves me more than I do. Nobody eats more meat than I do. I can do this. Anybody can do this. And I certainly convinced a fair number of people to cut back or cut out. But the vast majority of people, They're just too busy leading their lives there. The cacophony of life makes it really hard to make two like you've been doing something for twenty or fifty or seventy years, and it's just like what you do when suddenly somebody saying, No, you should do something different. That's a pretty big ask. I'm I wonder if the impossible of our desk, He's like a real Berger. I'm looking for. Okay, Here we go. AKG. Okay,

Veggie Berger Burger Bruce Friedrich Elizabeth Colbert Patty good food Institute New York staff writer The New Yorker AKG Thanh Sean fifteen years seventy years three percent ten years 30 years one day
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"Kevin young poultry under the New Yorker magazine and the director of the center for research in black culture on this program. We invite poets twos Apoel from the New Yorker archive to read and discuss then we asked them to read one of their own poems. That's when published in the magazine Mike s today is Tarrant Hayes a chancellor of the kademi of American poets. Current poetry editor at the New York Times magazine distinguished professor of English at the university of Pittsburgh and distinguished writer in residence at New York University. His many honors include a MacArthur fellowship a Guggenheim fellowship and the national book award for poetry, welcome Terrance. Hey, man. Good to be here. Good to see you. So the poem you've chosen to read his fire by Matthew Dickman, tell us what in particular about this poem Katcher is you're sifting through the archive. Well, naturally, I thought about my own palm, which of my own poems. I would pick. And then I sorta backed up and recalled reading this. Poem and thinking that there in conversation. So I wanted to figure that out with you today just to see what these two poems doing with each other. Let's give it a listen. Here's Terrance Hayes reading fire by Matthew Dickman fire. Oh fire. You burn me at a singing behind the smoke in Kohl's his wife near him. The rest of us below the stars swimming above Washington state burning through themselves. He's like an appellation prince Henry with his banjo and whiskey the court surrounding him and the deer off in the dark hills like the French terrified, but in love and hungry. I'm burning all the time my pockets full of matches and lighters. The blue smoke crawling out like a skinny ghost from between. My lips my lungs on fire. The wings of them falling from the open sky, the top of Michelle's long hands looked like the beautiful coats leopards have covered dark spots all the cigarettes. She would like and then smash out her is the color of hairspray cloudy and stingy and gone. But beautiful she carried her hands around like. To terrible letters of introduction. I never understood who could have opened them read them aloud still thrown her onto a bad still walk into the street. She was still lit what little fuse. She had left. Oh fire. You burn me. My sister, and I and southern comfort making us singer and spark the family ash all around us the way she is beautiful to me in her singular, blaze, my brain lighting up my tongue like a monk in wartime a wash and RH silk and flames.

Michelle New Yorker magazine Matthew Dickman Terrance Hayes New York Times magazine New York University Kohl distinguished professor of Eng Tarrant Hayes poetry editor university of Pittsburgh Kevin national book award Guggenheim fellowship chancellor Washington director MacArthur writer
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Oh mm a this is the new yorker radio hour i'm david ramnik wrong the y uae like it from guinea midnight why man dry in miles away lead free last year i spent a few days with the songwriter leonard cohen cohen had been avoiding interviews for the past four or five six years but once he agreed to talk we talk for days and covered the length and breadth of his career and i'm grateful that i had the chance to visit when i did because not long after leonard cohen died at the age of eighty two cohen once wrote a song called the tower of song in which he compared himself really unfavourably to hank williams but along with the other masters bob dylan certainly joni mitchell konya west everybody's got their own list leonard cohen is way up there in the ranks of songwriters when i visited him in los angeles he was suffering from a number of very serious illnesses although he was keeping that very very private he was in deep pain especially from compression fractures in his spine and he had to sit in the big blue medical chair you was very thin may be a hundred and ten pounds at the most but i have to say that he was in a bullion mood somehow for a man who knew where life was taking him and it was going to take him there in a hurry he was the most gracious toast the side of my mother.

david ramnik uae leonard cohen cohen los angeles new yorker guinea hank williams bob dylan joni mitchell big blue five six years ten pounds
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"This is the new yorker fiction podcast from the new yorker magazine i'm deborah tradesman fiction editor at the new yorker last month in honor of the tenth anniversary of the new yorker fiction podcast we asked you to vote for your favorite episode from our first 10 years what amazed us was it out of more than one hundred twenty episodes seventy one different podcast got at least one vote and most of them got many more than that the final winner was an episode from two thousand twelve in which david sideroads fred and discussed the story roy spivey by miranda july the great selection and we're happy to release the episode now thank you to everyone who voted and thank you to all of our listeners for making this podcast such rewarding thing to work on this is the new yorker fiction podcast from the new yorker magazine each month we invite a writer to choose a story from the magazines archives to read and discuss this month were going to hear roy spivey by miranda july he slept for the first hour and it was startling to see such a famous face look so vulnerable an empty the story was chosen by david sideroads who's personal essays and humor pieces have been appearing in the new yorker for nearly two decades he's published eight books including me talk pretty one day dress your family and quarter and dunham and when you were engulfed in flames high david i'd ever similar under july published a story collection called noone belongs him more than you a few years ago and two of her stories of appeared the magazine but she's also perhaps better known as a film director and performer she wrote directed and start into feature movies me and you and everyone we know in two thousand five in last year's the future but what side of her work to you know best i was not from you.

editor new yorker roy spivey new yorker magazine writer david sideroads david noone director david sideroads fred dunham two decades 10 years one day
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"This is the new yorker fiction podcast from the new yorker magazine i'm deb retracement fiction editor at the new yorker each month we invite a writer to choose a story from the magazines archives to read and discuss this month were going to hear extra by ye lee which was published in the new yorker in december of two thousand three granny lynn gasps she has never had a husband in her life and the prospect of a dead husband frightens her yet auntie wong makes the decision for her right then in there between two fish stance and in a short time she finds granny lynn a match the story was chosen by sarah swan yenbuying them who's the author of two novels miss hempel chronicles and madeleine his sleeping which was a finalist for the national book award in two thousand four hi sarah hi debra so extra was it was the first story by ian lee that was published in the new yorker back in two thousand three and i believe it was only the second story that she'd published anywhere was the first piece of her set you read it was it was an i remember feeling excitement both because of the work itself and also because we had just missed each other at iowa but i had already sort of heard about this wonderful writer who was coming out of the program what impression did the story make on you and you're in it the story felt very poignant to me because the character of granny lynn and i imagine the stories taking place somewhere in the nineties maybe the midnineties or so let character of granny land is around the same age as my own mother um and my mother left china in 1949 and i was struck when i was reading the story of oh if my mother had stayed what might her life had look look like and and in some ways this story offered a window into what another life another self might have looked like river my mother the other thing i was struck by when i first read it.

editor new yorker writer wong sarah swan national book award debra ian lee iowa granny lynn china hempel madeleine