35 Burst results for "The New Yorker"

New York governor asks Pfizer to directly sell COVID-19 vaccine doses

Night News

01:07 min | 15 hrs ago

New York governor asks Pfizer to directly sell COVID-19 vaccine doses

"New York governor Andrew Cuomo sent a letter to New York based pharmaceutical Fizer today to see if the steak and work out a deal with them. Cuomo is trying to buy New York's way to more Fizer vaccines. Visors in New York company headquartered here and I sent a letter asking for if New York could buy directly from Fizer. Fizer agrees It would be the first time a state would be buying vaccines from the company. Cuomo is hoping since it isn't part of operation works be that this would be possible. As for how many doses and how much the state would pay. It's too early to know. Cuomo also sent a letter to HHS Secretary Alex A's are saying the state demands answers as to why it will receive 500,000 fewer vaccine doses as its eligibility has increased by two million New Yorkers. You made a bad situation worse, you know, public confidence is very important now on they created public chaos. By this situation, The federal government is in control of the supply, they must increase the supply. Christi collision. WCBS news radio 8 80.

Fizer New York Cuomo Andrew Cuomo Secretary Alex HHS Federal Government Christi Wcbs News Radio
Cuomo asked Pfizer to sell its COVID-19 vaccine directly to New York

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:09 min | 22 hrs ago

Cuomo asked Pfizer to sell its COVID-19 vaccine directly to New York

"Than a million vaccine doses have now been administered in New York state problem Moving forward is replenishing the vaccine supply. Seven million New Yorkers are now eligible to receive the vaccine and New York's A lot man has been cut back by 50,000 this week to 250,000 doses. Juliet. Papa has been pressing the governor about going directly to the vaccine makers. I ask Governor Cuomo Friday why he couldn't pursue additional vaccines directly from the pharmaceutical companies. He chuckled. See Juliet. New Yorkers think the same. But he said it wasn't possible because they're allocated directly from the federal government. But it seems the governor looked into it and today announced he's requested a direct allocation from Fizer, a New York company. Fizer is technically not bound. By any federal agreement because they did not get engaged in what the federal government called Operation Warp speed. The governor says he's the first in the country to do this as he looks at a reduced federal allocation from 300,000. Said 250,000 Doses a week. Juliet Papa

Governor Cuomo Fizer Juliet New York Papa Federal Government Juliet Papa
Cuomo update on COVID-19 in New York

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 1 d ago

Cuomo update on COVID-19 in New York

"It's going slower than many would like. But vaccinations have hit a milestone in New York state. Here's Governor Cuomo In terms of vaccination rate, the good news is more and more New Yorkers getting vaccinated were over one million doses totally administered. Most people overwhelming majority first dose It's but 21. Days later, people starting to get the second dose in the update comes as another mass vaccination site opens in the tri State area.

Governor Cuomo New York
Dr. Fauci says 100 million vaccinations in 100 days 'absolutely a doable thing'

The New Yorker Radio Hour

00:57 sec | 1 d ago

Dr. Fauci says 100 million vaccinations in 100 days 'absolutely a doable thing'

"The U. S is on pace to record. 400,000 confirmed deaths from Cove in 19 before the inauguration of President elect Joe Biden. NPR's Joel Rose reports, the incoming administration is looking to ramp up vaccinations quickly. Incoming White House chief of staff, Ron Claim, says the Biden administration is inheriting a quote mess. Here's claim speaking to CNN virus is going to get worse before it gets better. So it's going to take awhile to turn this around. The average daily death toll from covert 19 has risen to more than 3000. President elect Biden has set an ambitious goal of injecting 100 million doses of Corona virus vaccine in his 1st 100 days in office 100 million doses in the first 100 Days is it is absolutely a doable thing. Dr. Anthony Fauci, speaking on NBC says new vaccines from AstraZeneca and Johnson and Johnson could be presented to regulators for emergency authorization in a matter of

President Elect Joe Biden Joel Rose Ron Claim Biden Administration President Elect Biden Cove NPR White House CNN Dr. Anthony Fauci Johnson Astrazeneca NBC
Starbucks closes New York City locations amid protest concerns

Fox News Sunday

00:18 sec | 1 d ago

Starbucks closes New York City locations amid protest concerns

"New Yorkers hoping to buy a lotta at Starbucks today were disappointed the coffee chain temporarily closed select stores in Manhattan. Due to the chance of protests today, according to an email statement from a company spokesperson. A slew of posts on Twitter and the company's online store Locator show the closures are

Starbucks Manhattan Twitter
New York City Opens New Vaccine Site in Harlem

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 1 d ago

New York City Opens New Vaccine Site in Harlem

"Appointments for vaccines are booked around the city. With slots filling up assume his new pop up sites open a new site opened today at the Absentee in Church in Harlem, New York state has administered 83% of the vaccine it's been given, according to state health officials, with New York City's still lagging behind the rest of the state. It's only used 74% what has been given Seven million New Yorkers are now eligible. The state has been given less than a million doses so far, and everyone will need two doses if they get the Fizer or Moderna.

Harlem New York New York City Moderna
How many COVID vaccines have been distributed in New York?

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:20 sec | 2 d ago

How many COVID vaccines have been distributed in New York?

"State has administered 83% of the vaccine it's been given, according to state health officials, with New York City's still lagging behind the rest of the state. It's only used 74% of what it's been given. Seven million New Yorkers are now eligible. The state has been given less than a million doses so far, and everyone will need two doses if they get the Fizer or Moderna vaccines.

New York City
Coronavirus Updates: New York City’s COVID-19 Positivity Rate Declines For Third Straight Day

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 2 d ago

Coronavirus Updates: New York City’s COVID-19 Positivity Rate Declines For Third Straight Day

"Rate and deaths related to the virus fell slightly. Yesterday, Governor Cuomo announced the positivity rate from testing. Was it 5.77% that's down from Thursday? 6.14% 157 New Yorkers died on Friday in a statewide breakdown of the seven day average percentage of positive test results Long Island Friday. I mean, the highest at 8.6%, while the city's average was at 5.66%. An additional case of the UK variant of the virus was discovered Friday. That brings the state total in New York of known cases. To 17 in terms of the

Governor Cuomo Long Island UK New York
Guggenheim hires first Black deputy director and chief curator

New Yorker Radio Hour

00:17 sec | 3 d ago

Guggenheim hires first Black deputy director and chief curator

"Guggenheim disappointed Naomi Beckwith as it's deputy director and chief curator. Back with his currently the senior curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, where she spent since 2011. The Guggenheim says she will oversee collections, exhibitions and publications. In her new role. Beckwith is the first black woman to hold the

Naomi Beckwith Guggenheim Museum Of Contemporary Art Chi Beckwith
Andrew Yang announces run for New York City mayor

BBC World Service

00:45 sec | 4 d ago

Andrew Yang announces run for New York City mayor

"Democratic presidential hopeful Andrew Yang is now running for mayor of New York City. More from NPR's Hans alone, Andrew Yang is joining a long list of Democrats were trying to win a primary in June that will likely determine who will become the next mayor of New York City, which has been a Democratic stronghold. Before dropping at the presidential race, Yang rose to the national stage by proposing a universal basic income I ran for president because I saw that the economy was not working for everyday Americans for New Yorkers. Yang is calling for more high speed Internet access and for the city to run the subway, which is currently run by a transit authority that's controlled by New York's governor. Gang has faced criticism during the pandemic for quarantining outside of New York City. Hanzo Wang NPR NEWS New YORK, This is NPR news.

Andrew Yang New York City Yang Rose NPR Yang New York Hanzo Wang
New York state bars and restaurants to reopen for indoor dining

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 4 d ago

New York state bars and restaurants to reopen for indoor dining

"State has for now given the green light to endure dining in orange cluster zones. This after a number of restaurants in Western New York sued restaurants in parts of Westchester can resume indoor dining, but indoor dining remains banned in New York City they would've Kuala says he knows covered fatigue has set in, and he knows New Yorkers crave normalcy. But he said, people still have to wear masks and social distance so we can get through this.

Western New York Westchester Kuala New York City
Andrew Yang announces run for New York City mayor

All Things Considered

00:44 sec | 4 d ago

Andrew Yang announces run for New York City mayor

"City. NPR's Hansi Lo Wang reports, the country's largest city set to vote for a new mayor this November. And your Yang is joining a long list of Democrats were trying to win a primary in June that will likely determine who will become the next mayor of New York City, which has been a Democratic stronghold. Before dropping out the presidential race. Yang rose to the national stage by proposing a universal basic income. I ran For president because I saw that the economy was not working for everyday Americans. For New Yorkers. Yang is calling for more high speed Internet access and for the city to run the subway, which is currently run by a transit authority that's controlled by New York's governor. Gang has faced criticism during the pandemic for quarantining outside of New York City. Hansi Lo Wang, NPR news, New York, and now they're opened down Trading day on Wall Street. With stocks ultimately closing lower. The Dow

Hansi Lo Wang Yang Rose Yang NPR New York City Npr News New York
More New Yorkers start receiving the Covid-19 vaccine

Night News

01:04 min | 6 d ago

More New Yorkers start receiving the Covid-19 vaccine

"New York City Council learned more today about a plan to ramp up the city's vaccination program. We get details from WCBS is Marla Diamond. Two million New Yorkers are now eligible for the vaccine, according to City Health Commissioner Dr Dave Choksi, leading city Councilwoman Carlina Rivera to ask how many doses are we getting from the federal government each week? Currently, um well, I would start by saying that the amount changes week to week and often were not made aware of that allotment until a few days prior to receiving the doses for the week. In some weeks. We've received upwards of 200,000 doses in other weeks, including this one we've received about 100,000 doses, Doctor, Choksi says. The uncertainty makes it challenging to plants and offer appointment slots, he says. Within the coming days, as supply increases, they'll be able to replicate New Jersey's online system that allows anyone to sign up for the vaccine and be notified once they become

Wcbs Marla Diamond City Health Dr Dave Choksi Carlina Rivera New York City Council Choksi Federal Government New Jersey
New York will turn Citi Field into a 'mega' Covid vaccination site, mayor says

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | Last week

New York will turn Citi Field into a 'mega' Covid vaccination site, mayor says

"In New York City, opening the week of January, 25th. As the mayor spoke, he was dawning, a Mets jersey and baseball cap. It is amazing news, you might say, And it's ah, such a welcome moment. Starting January, 25th Citi Field will be a 24 hour vaccination site. The Mets organization has stepped up to the plate to help us out. Team owner Steve Cohen joined the mayor. He says he wants to do his part to help the community. Have think of any way that's more important than what what what this effort is. Citi Field is expected to handle up to 7000 vaccinations a day and all New Yorkers can come out, the mayor says. Even Yankee fans Julia Papa 10. 10 wins news. Well, folks don't need a study to tell us that thanks

Mets Citi Field New York City Steve Cohen Baseball Julia Papa
Portrait Of: Gabby Rivera

Latino USA

05:47 min | Last week

Portrait Of: Gabby Rivera

"On a monday afternoon. Writer gabby is visiting her local comic bookstore. It's a place in downtown oakland. that's called cape and cowl. Remember have come in for like adventure comics and stuff. What'd you got anything fun. Anything a little poking around this is where gabby looks for heroes who are not your basic white guy. I'm gonna grab that like you know girl kicking as basically right like i wanna grab. A miss marveled sues as gabby is flicking through at the comic bookstore. There's a young man who's wearing thick black glasses and camouflage jacket and he spots you. Miss america america is america chavez. That would be marvel's first. Latina queer superhero gabby began writing for her in two thousand seventeen. She wrote twelve comic books about america's adventures as a spangler speaking college student who can also punch through dimensions of time and space miss america. That's my girl. It was important to me. I appreciate that despite her happiness at chatting with a fan gabby hasn't always found community in the comic book world as sometimes on online space says it can be like or you're not telling the story writer. You shouldn't tell the story for gabby. The in-person experience has been a lot more positive. Whatever you're doing here. He's like whatever magic. You're actually a witch. Keep it up from media. It's let usa madonna wholesome and today a portrait of writer gabby playback before gabby libra got into writing comic books. She wrote juliet takes a breath. It's a twenty sixteen novel which is a coming of age story about a young queer latina. Who leaves the bronx which is where she grew up and that novel got her. Some attention from an unusual place marvel comics. They ask gabby if she would be interested. In writing specifically for their superhero america these after decades featuring mostly white male heroes. Marvel comics has recently been making an effort to introduce more women where people of color and lgbtq heroes in their comics. Some people were angry with these changes shortly. After gabby began writing for america chavez. She started getting threads and being harassed. This was a tough time for gabby. Suddenly she was swept up in an online backlash called comic escape which criticized. The comic book industry's attempts to be more inclusive. I sat down with gabby to learn more about her beginnings as writer and about her experience. Shaping queer latinas superhero during a really tense moment. Gabeira welcome to let the usa. Thank you maria. I'm so excited to be here with you. I'm excited to excited to so your favorite term for yourself is what quirky rican is what you are on instagram. But you love to call yourself a nerd. Right yeah I love nerd. Butch thea loverboy. I have a couple of terms for myself. Keep on going going. I think butch the is really the one that i'm embodying these days right because everybody has a bush the you know. She's got her fade. She's got her corona. She's sitting at the barbecue in the back as she loves you. So much me. You grew up in new york You are not only new yorker. you're from the bronx. So tell us little. Bit about little vera growing up in what part of the bronx and what life felt like. Oh my gosh. I was just a little baby in the eighties. Growing up my neighborhood. Was you know that kind of mix of like bronx lake hood ish but also some Suburban right at that intersection of westchester county in the bronx. I had my grandparents. My mother's side living in the house with us and we have my father's family like two blocks away so i was also always surrounded by like my puerto rican family and we went to church. I grew up. You know super religious pentecostal. Puerto rican evangelical speaking in tongues. All of that. You know it's also terrorists kind of like a traditional quote american sort of upbringing rate lake My parents my mom was a teacher. He knows so. She was taught kindergarten of thirty five years in new york city. My dad was a salesman for gov will stelle off from most like thirty years of his life so there was kind of this lake nuclear family. Whatever puerto rican middle-class looks like the bronx very strict but also very secure households and in the middle of that we were in the bronx and there was definitely struggle violence. It was wild to be in so many lake constrains morally good controlled environments right and then have all of this like beautiful neighborhood. Chaos real life. Real people happening all around me.

Gabby America Madonna Wholesome Gabby Playback Gabby Libra Chavez Marvel Gabeira Oakland Butch Thea Loverboy Juliet Bronx Bronx Lake Hood Butch Maria Vera Westchester County Bush Puerto Rican New York
De Blasio says New York City could run out of COVID shots in 2 weeks

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:11 min | Last week

De Blasio says New York City could run out of COVID shots in 2 weeks

"In two weeks, we could be out of vaccines. That's what Mayor de Blasio warned last night. Let's go to City Hall. Here's 10. 10 wins reporter. Glenn Schuck with our update. Indeed, By the end of the week, we'll have 24 7 vaccination. Hubbs sit up in each of the five boroughs at this pace. It's really picking up Now, this problem, according to the mayor on New York one at the rate we're going, we're gonna be out in two weeks or so if we don't start to get bigger, resupplies, you know, we're talking about a constantly escalating level of giving vaccines here 100 thousands last week we hit that goal, but he had 175,000 this week by the last week of January before 100,000 we could do in a week. The question is gonna be. Is it going to be vaccine? To actually achieve our goals. The City Council's Health committee will hold this hearing later today, they'll hear from the health commissioner and others they'll talk about fair and legitimate distribution of what's been going on with the vaccine. Making sure no communities are being left out. And can the system be improved, while critics like city Comptroller Scott Stringer? Thanks so he's calling websites that have been set up by the city for eligible New Yorkers to get appointments complex and cumbersome. They must be simplified, he says.

Mayor De Blasio Glenn Schuck Hubbs City Hall City Council's Health Committe New York Scott Stringer
More New Yorkers start receiving the Covid-19 vaccine

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:23 min | Last week

More New Yorkers start receiving the Covid-19 vaccine

"Will receive his second coveted vaccinations today. Air de Blasio. His daily briefing today praised progress in getting out covert 19 vaccination. What we said for this last week was we need to reach 100,000 doses we had to vaccinate 100,000 people. This last week. We got there 101,799 doses given Last week in this city. About as much as I've been given all Previously in December in the first days of January, he says, to mass vaccination sites and now open 24 7 in the city. They are appointment only. Make an appointment. You go to the website and why. Si dot Gove's slash Vaccine Finder phone reservation system at 877 Vax four, The number four and Y C and that's open from 8 a.m. to 9 P.m.. A state widened vaccine eligibility the people over 75 frontline workers, including teachers and police officers, today, the two sides located at the Bathgate Industrial Park in the Bronx and Brooklyn Army Terminal Annex Building in Brooklyn. The mayor has said he wants to set up a total of 250 city run vaccination sites by the end of January

De Blasio Gove Bathgate Industrial Park Brooklyn Army Terminal Annex B Bronx Brooklyn
Newly Eligible New Yorkers Get Their First Shots

Democracy Now! Audio

00:56 sec | Last week

Newly Eligible New Yorkers Get Their First Shots

"New york has loosened rules in recent days. Around who's eligible for vaccines after reports of medical providers throwing out doses because they could not find patients who matched governor cuomo's strict vaccination guidelines teachers pharmacy workers who interact with the public. And new yorkers seventy five years and older are now able to get vaccinated. The javid center is set to become a mass vaccination center here in new york city and related news. Data suggests large numbers of frontline workers including up to forty percents to frontline workers in los angeles county and sixty percent of home care. Workers in ohio are refusing the shot. Experts say more efforts are needed to understand the reasons behind this and to counteract the uncertainty

Governor Cuomo Javid Center New York New York City Los Angeles County Ohio
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

05:15 min | Last month

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"Hi samantha. Hi deborah. Thanks for having me. How did yin li's work. I come into your life <hes>. That's a great question. I have to say. I think it was originally from the new yorker. It wasn't this story. This wasn't the first. Union story i encountered. Maybe it was extra. This one though sheltered woman has always stayed with me so deeply. There's no easy way to forget it. There's no easy way to feel like i'm done thinking about it. And i've been interested to see how often it returns to me again. And again. And i think that i initially was so attracted to it. Because it's such a complicated story about mothering and mothering. Stories while not rare <hes>. Ones that are complicated enough to satisfy me are rare that to find a story that questions mothering. Or even that digs in to the extent that this one does where you know we're bringing in themes of capitalism and the effects of capitalism on mothering. I mean. I don't know that i've seen that really anywhere else <hes>. Maybe in some amazing science fiction but never in a story that dwells in realism. The way this story does and the fact that yijun decided to kind of capture this luminol moment of one month. You know the first month and to take that tiny quiet microcosm and make it into this devastating huge chasm of a universe. I i find that unbelievable right. The story deals with a character who only takes care of babies in the first month of their lives. And who also takes care of mothers in the first month of <hes>. Of motherhood motherhood is something you have written about a fair amount in your own fiction. Yeah yeah. I am a mother of three and i think that when i became a mother i like most mothers was amazed at how little i knew beforehand. Despite having mother despite being daughter. I knew so very little about how to do this. And the way that it would change my identity the way that it would open me up in a tremendous way and so i. I went looking for literature that reflected that to some extent in. I don't know that i found too much of it. Even the word mother the first place we go is someplace. Really very basic and stereotypical i. You know it's like making dinner making cookies driving mini vans and there's none of that in a sheltered woman and i really appreciated that because i did feel like when i first became a mother having made life became obsessed with death which ultimately you know that makes a lot of sense and yet no one had prepared me for that and no one had told me that was going to happen so i kind of looked for the pieces that dealt with that question and tried to write these stories myself so now. Here's samantha hunt reading sheltered woman by and li a sheltered woman. The new mother groggy from a nap sat at the table is though she did not grasp why she had been summoned. Perhaps she never would anti may thought on the place mat sat a bowl of soybean and pig's foot soup that anti may had cooked as she had for many new mothers before this one many however was not exact in her interviews with potential employers. Auntie may always gave the precise number of families she had worked for a hundred and twenty six when she interviewed with your current employer. A hundred and thirty one babies altogether the families contact information the dates she had worked for them their babies names and birthdays these. She had recorded in a palm size notebook which had twice fallen apart and been taped back together years ago. Auntie may had bought it at a garage sale in moline illinois. She had liked the picture of flowers on the cover purple and yellow unmelted snow surrounding the chased pedals. She had liked the price of the notebook to five cents when she handed a dime to the child but the cashbox on his lap. She asked if there was another notebook she could buy so that he would not have to give her any change. The boy looked perplexed and said no. It was greed that had made her ask but when the memory came back it often did when she took the notebook out of her suitcase for another interview. Auntie may would laugh at herself. Why on earth had she wanted to know books. When there's not enough to fill one. The mother sat still not touching the spoon until tear-drops fell into the steaming soup. Now anti may said she was pushing herself in the baby. A new rocking chair back and forth back and forth this squeaking less noticeable than

yin li yijun the new yorker samantha deborah samantha hunt
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

03:10 min | Last month

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"Hi samantha. Hi deborah. Thanks for having me. How did yin li's work. I come into your life That's a great question. I have to say. I think it was originally from the new yorker. It wasn't this story. This wasn't the first. Union story i encountered. Maybe it was extra. This one though sheltered woman has always stayed with me so deeply. There's no easy way to forget it. There's no easy way to feel like i'm done thinking about it. And i've been interested to see how often it returns to me again. And again. And i think that i initially was so attracted to it. Because it's such a complicated story about mothering and mothering. Stories while not rare Ones that are complicated enough to satisfy me are rare that to find a story that questions mothering. Or even that digs in to the extent that this one does where you know we're bringing in themes of capitalism and the effects of capitalism on mothering. I mean. I don't know that i've seen that really anywhere else Maybe in some amazing science fiction but never in a story that dwells in realism. The way this story does and the fact that yijun decided to kind of capture this luminol moment of one month. You know the first month and to take that tiny quiet microcosm and make it into this devastating huge chasm of a universe. I i find that unbelievable right. The story deals with a character who only takes care of babies in the first month of their lives. And who also takes care of mothers in the first month of Of motherhood motherhood is something you have written about a fair amount in your own fiction. Yeah yeah. I am a mother of three and i think that when i became a mother i like most mothers was amazed at how little i knew beforehand. Despite having mother despite being daughter. I knew so very little about how to do this. And the way that it would change my identity the way that it would open me up in a tremendous way and so i. I went looking for literature that reflected that to some extent in. I don't know that i found too much of it. Even the word mother the first place we go is someplace. Really very basic and stereotypical i. You know it's like making dinner making cookies driving mini vans and there's none of that in a sheltered woman and i really appreciated that because i did feel like when i first became a mother having made life became obsessed with death which ultimately you know that makes a lot of sense and yet no one had prepared me for that and no one had told me that was going to happen so i kind of looked for the pieces that dealt with that question and tried to write these stories myself so now. Here's samantha hunt reading sheltered woman by.

yin li yijun the new yorker samantha deborah samantha hunt
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

05:03 min | 4 months ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"Poetry podcast. I'm Kevin Young. Poetry Editor of The New Yorker magazine. On this program, we invite posts that she's a poem from the New Yorker Archive to read and discuss. Then, they read a poem of their own that's been published in the magazine. My guest today is Joy Harjo the current poet laureate of the United States. She's also chancellor of the academy American poets and her many honors include the Ruth Lilly poetry prize in the wall Stevens Award Toy. Welcome. Thanks so much for joining us. It's great. It's great to be here with you. So the pony decides today is still life with potatoes, pearls, raw meat rhinestones, Lard, and horse hooves by Sandra. Cisneros tell us what drew you to this particular poem as you're looking through our archive. I guess it appeared recently, but it's a little bit older poem of Sandra's. And I like the the wildness of you know it reminds me especially in these times when we can't even go hang out of you know being able to hang out and visit with people and be wild with people and dream and dream together and And have fun. You know even as it's also a poem I also a little bit about being at the edge of ruin and discovery, which is usually the same place. Or can't be Sinclair's. Let's listen to the poem. Here's joy Harjo readings still life of potatoes, pearls, raw meat rhinestones, Lard, and horse hooves by Sandra Cisneros? Still, life with potatoes, pearls, raw meat rhinestones, Lard and. Horse. Hooves. In Spanish it's naturalism Huerta and not life at all but certainly, not natural. What's natural you and me all by drink. To a woman who doesn't act like a woman to a man who doesn't act like a man. Is Natural at least in. Spanish I think life I'm not so sure. Consider. The CONTESSA who in her time was lovely and now sports award to size of this diamond. So regards Oh you're Venice to you to Bennett's not the one of cazenove. The other one of cheap pins donates by the railroad station I recommend narrow bid staying with semen P. and sorrow facing the wall. Staying decay or romantic your positively Pasolini likely to dangle and Fandango, yourself to death. If we let you I won't let you. Not to be outdone I'm.

Sandra Cisneros Joy Harjo The New Yorker magazine New Yorker Archive Poetry Editor Kevin Young Ruth Lilly Huerta Pasolini United States Venice chancellor Sinclair Stevens Bennett
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

12:56 min | 10 months ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"This time of year would have been a joyful one the start of baseball season. Not The worst casualty of this pandemic by far but for a fan the loss of baseball is a bitter pill. The deprivation of really beautiful distraction and this talk that maybe the season will open. June. But that's really impossible to know until then I wanted to revisit a conversation I had with the Great Baseball writer. Roger Angell who is now ninety nine a few years ago. I brought Roger to the studio to talk about his long and remarkable career at the magazine in more than seven decades. He's contributed fiction movie reviews Comic Poems Essays About Aging and lost. There really isn't a genre that he hasn't touched but on the subject of baseball there's no greater writer than Roger. No one and for this. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of fame. In two thousand fourteen. So this is a thrill for me as roles honor. The rostro spent honorees is stuffed with old heroes of mine like Red Smith and Tom. Meany and with baseball writer friends who have also been models. In Heroes Folks Jerome Holtzman Peter Gammons and Bill Madden. Who were so quick to put me my ease and the clubhouse fill me and whenever I turned up again my gratitude always goes back to baseball itself which turned out to be so familiar and so startling. So spacious and exacting so easy looking and so- heartbreakingly difficult filled up my notebooks and seasons in a rush a pastime indeed. That was an amazing day Roger. I just wonder you know year and a half later looking back at what it meant to. You. You've been writing about baseball for a long time. Since the early sixties I was extremely anxious beforehand and I was anxious about so many friends of mine are this enormous distance though is not going to be very good and actually was using a little. Maalox near the end lost some weight but when I got there was just terrific but you had to invent a voice for this you had to. You had to figure out a way of covering baseball. God knows at Baseball's especially when you began was the focus for sports writers. In fact in the fifties the the most the prestigious sports. Because WE'RE IN IN BASEBALL. Baseball here are appropriate sheer terror. I didn't know what I was doing. I was baseball fan. I'd been a writer but not read about baseball only a little bit and I was very self-conscious talking to the players. Really quite quite scared. Why is that well? I felt that they would. They would know more than I did that they wouldn't. What's this guy doing here I was? I was shy and a little bit nervous. So what I did was to sit in the stands at first and because I felt I did realize that nobody was writing about the fans and I was a fan and I could sit in the stands via a fan and also be a writer. Is the press box a bad place to cover things from no? I don't think so but once you get used to it but I wasn't. Wasn't that easy. The press box yet one of the things. That always amazed me about your baseball. Riding is that you have a tone a of of a of a happy man of someone who's going at this at his leisure and that all the difficulty of writing which we know to be the case is somehow way out of the frame that there is this voice of someone just in love with what he's watching that's that's hard to achieve well it it developed over the years. I mean I didn't really plan it in advance. It was just. It was some kind of me. What kind of sports writing that? You couldn't stand. What were you trying to avoid? Actually one I started. Sean William Shawn. The editor said. We're on spring training and take a look and he said we don't want to be sentimental they don't want to be a tough guys. You know the two things to avoid and Sean know anything about baseball. Nothing nothing pace. He came into my office carrying a gal is my first piece from that. Spring Training and he pointed to a page place on on the page and he said what's this Looks and I said that's a double play bill. You said what's the double play and I explained it to him and his. She's glowed with excitement. Did you find it harder to talk with players as time went by as you got a little older? Did you gravitate more toward coaches and managers than they call you? Syria in big trouble. I gravitated toward good talkers of said before But today's thin out. The good talkers become less and less numerous. I yes I think so. I mean I got over eighty. It was impossible for me to talk to players really because they would say sir and and also as you said the the habit of talking openly as a person not as a very well paid celebrity semi celebrity. All player is pretty. Well gone because it's a big difference when the ball players are making a bet as much as a as solid orthodontist. You're older but you did pay attention lease I did. I would carry notes right endlessly long notes and and keep my ears open. Listened for something. I remember being outside the Office of Jim fry the Kansas City manager after his great star. George Brett had another extraordinary date plate. And I'm waiting to go into the manager. There too old coaches at their lockers just outside the door in their underwear and clogs talking a coupla country guys and what? I'm says the other everything that George hits goes through the infield like stream of milk and this country image and I wrote it down. I wrote it down. Wow thank you you wait days for things like that in the Nonfiction Game Roger you practice nonfiction as it were by night and fiction by day. For years and years he was the fiction editor of The New Yorker. To this day you read short stories for us and in the fiction department. Was this bred in the bone with you. I think I think some of our listeners will know that your mother was really had singular responsibility for introducing serious fiction to the New Yorker. Catherine White was the the person who brought real fiction to the New Yorker and you must have grown up hearing about this process knowing this process and my and my stepfather was who was the white and writing for the magazine every week. And My mother and father's house was full of Gallison pencils and racer rubbings and and conversation about the magazine in about Harold Ross and and about the writers of the day and sure I pay close attention but I wasn't planning to be New Yorker editor or to be a New Yorker writer planning. I was hoping to be maybe four naturalist herpetologist. I I am but I did pay attention. And My mother was editing Vladimir Nabokov from people. Like that Nabokov. Take editing I was this whole usual hot. He wear and the famous Nabokov. Editing was by the Great New Yorker of founding editor Harold. Ross who love clarity above all not classically or much educated but loved clearness and in the middle of some terrific nabokov member. Part of his speak memory. Pieces is wonderful memorial memories about his family. There's a line that at the dinner table. And some insist past the nutcracker and one of Harold Ross is endless queries. Yours had about twenty or thirty years but every piece of copy from the evidence we've been given so far. I would assume that the logos were more than one nutcracker family so I was looking. I was looking through some letters that that came to Harold. Ross and roll doll. Who wrote all those great children's books but also a number of things for the New Yorker and Memoir Pieces Than Yorker wrote a scathing letter to Ross complaining about the editing and the number of commas that injected after things. And he says it's as if you would take a great commerce. Shakur and sprinkled commas throughout my style. It's lightened up. A LITTLE. Bit about your. What is age do for your writing? How does it affect things? How does it either deepen your work or make it more difficult? What what's the effect of time on a writer? So I'm not sure I mean I'm aware of my my waning powers. I really am but I can't. I'm not ready long pieces. I'm not going out there and read another ten or twelve thousand. Were baseball piece. I'm not sure that's a matter of of what getting up downstream you doing the interviewing and doing the traveling and and taking the time love lot of hard work and it's hard for me to get around it starts to seize hard for me to hear a little bit and I'm doing much. I'm very happy to fall back and undo posts and blogs but with with this. This is the amazing thing you are in your midnight is hope you don't mind me saying you're perfectly aware of it and yet sentence by sentence. You're as funny and as touching and as good writers you ever were and you've taken to the Internet in a way a lot of people resisted. You took right to it. While I liked the brevity of the blog. You can make it quite short are you. Could just go on as long as you want to go. And then just stop. It's sort of like making a paper airplane. No it's it's about the I used to love to make paper amid great paper plants and you throw it out the window and take it goes a little ways. Turnley Kerr's beautifully and I think it was out of sight and has forgotten forever and that's like a blog but immediacy of the Internet. You know you've got a post and it's six o'clock it's the air and you're getting a well taking me afternoon sometimes but fair enough but No I I can sort of see the end one. I'm starting which is not bad. So tell me about this new book you you've put together an enormous range of things you've got in here. Some obituaries were published in the New Yorker. Online you've got A couple of long sustained essays. We'll we'll talk about Some baseball writing Letters the book is called This old man by Roger Angel. All in pieces is Roger. This old man Roger Angel on. Well I'm a little tired of the joke title already but tell me about the book itself. Well I I wrote the piece this Oh man. I started the piece in two thousand thirteen. I think late late in the year and I think can you long about February or something like that came as a complete surprise to me just opted on my desk. I wrote it in different pieces. Got Didn't quite know what I was doing. And it was about physical ability and it starts off with a description of Mar Meyer arthritic hands and which which you say. The the tips of your fingers like they've been the subject of torture by by my forefinger at you like pistol and fired enough in fear knows issue in the knee but I describe some. Some of the or everyday disabilities have age and I didn't quite know what I was doing but I. I knew that loss was at the middle of this. I lost my wife of married for forty eight years and I lost a daughter and Beloved dog of Carrollton Mine Went out to fifth-floor window in the middle of a half through in panic was jumped out the window the fifth floor and was killed losses for people. My Age are common. Ed Hirsch. The wonderful poet lost his son and wrote a great book about last year. And he says that anybody over the age of sixty five as a one hundred pound bag of cement of loss on his shoulders and he writes about reading about the loss of his son and said he says you can't make a story out of it. You can't do that with the life so I didn't know how to touch on these subjects if I wanted to even and I did so actually through the loss of the dog I'd written a piece about about The losing my wife..

baseball writer Roger Baseball Hall of fame Harold Ross Vladimir Nabokov Roger Angell editor Roger Angel Jerome Holtzman The New Yorker Red Smith Meany Sean William Shawn George Brett Yorker Catherine White Syria Peter Gammons
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

15:51 min | 1 year ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"To the New Yorker radio hour. I'm David Ramnik. It's not often than at article comes along that changes the world, and that's exactly what happened with Tana hoc- coats five years ago. Now when he wrote the case for reparations that article in the Atlantic was a very big deal to say the least I was shocked how big it was. I can remember going up to the red rooster to meet somebody for lunch in house restaurant Harlem, and I was leaving. And they were two people at the bar is a black woman in a black dude who will old end the dude is get. So big is all my God. Oh my God. And the woman said to me, he said praise God praise. And he runs into the car, and he has an Atlantic. He's lead scientists praise. God, I was what? Wow. And I was so pleased that people would ask me to sign the paper people who couldn't get access to the magazine with, like printed out and would come because they're like sold out at a certain point. Tana hussy coats, somehow, got everybody talking about reparations now that subject had been discussed since the end of the civil war. And in fact, there's a Bill that's been sitting in congress for thirty years about reparations, but now reparations for slavery. And legalized discrimination is a real subject of major discussion among the democratic presidential candidates. We're going to spend the entire hour of our program today, talking about what exactly are reparations and what the political future of the might be I talked to Tallahassee coats last week. Don for those who have may not have read the article five years ago. What exactly is the case that you make for reparations, which is a word that's been around for a long, long time, case, I make reparations is virtually. Every you know, institution with some degree of history. In America, be a public be. It private has a history of extracting wealth and resources out of the African American community. I think what has often been missing. I was trying to make the point of in two thousand fourteen that behind all of that, you know, oppression was actually theft in other words, this is not just mean, this is not just maltreatment. This is the theft of resources out of that community theft, the resources continued. You know, well into the period of, I would make the argument around the time of the fair housing. So what year is that's nineteen sixty eight I, there are a lot of, you're not saying that between nine hundred sixty eight in two thousand and nineteen everything is hunky Dory. I'm not saying everything was on key at all. But I'm trying if you were speaking to, you know, the most intellectually, honest dubious person because you have to remember what I'm battling his idea that it ended in eighteen sixty five with emancipation the patient. Yes, yes, yes. And the case I'm trying to make is with end the lifetime. Of a large number of Americans in this country. There was a lot of your article was about Chicago housing policy. Because like technical analysis has housing policy with people talk to me about the article, when I could tell they hadn't read it, so it's kinda hussy making a case for first and foremost. It's a dissection of a particular policy emblematic of somebody, other policies saw all of those policies of I had to pick one, you know, now that was really my going to one, I picked was housing was our housing policy. Again, we, we have this notion that, you know housing as it exists today, sort of sprung up from black people coming north, maybe not finding the jobs that they want bring, you know, indus- form, you know, some sort of pathological culture, and white, people just being concerned, citizens fled to suburbs. But beneath that was policy. The reason why black were confined neighbors in the first place and white people had access to neighborhoods. You know, further away was because of political decision. The governor. You know, under road that to FHA loans through the GI Bill, and that in turn caused the devaluing of black neighbor than an inability to access credit to even improve neighborhoods. Now, your article starts with someone who lived through these racist policies, a man named CLYDE Ross. Tell us the story of CLYDE Ross. How did he react to the article? So Mr Ross was living on the west side of Chicago, started out Mississippi started out Mississippi in, in the nineteen twenties. Born in Mississippi under Jim crow, his family lost lost their land, headland basically stolen from them had his horse stolen from him. He goes off fights in World War. Two comes back like a lot of people can't live in clarksdale. I just can't can't be I'm gonna kill somebody on Gill. Comes up the Chicago. In Chicago, all of the social conventions of Jim crow. A guy and had the move off the street. Somebody white as long had take his hat off all, you know, look down anything like that gets a job at Campbell Soup company and he wants to, you know, the last implemeting American dreamy was home ownership couldn't go to the Bank, get alone like everybody else. And he was making a decent way making a decent wage enough that he could save some money. And you know, I'm enough down payment and ours. He has no knowledge. None of us really did at that point of what was actually happening of widest was, you know, no concept of federal policy. Really? And so what he ends up with is, you know, basically a contract lender is a private lender. Who says, you know, hey, you give me down payment and you, you own a house, but would they actually do what they kept a deed for the house, and you had to pay off the house in its entirety in order to get the deed, although you effectively renter? You had all of, you know. Lack of privilege that rent a has, and yet all the responsibilities that a buyer has. So if something goes wrong house, you have to pay for that. And so these fees would just pile up on these people, and they would lose their houses, and you don't get you down payment back. Claros is one of the few people was able to actually keep his own the such a moving moment in the piece where he's sitting with you. And he admits we were ashamed did not want anyone to know we were that ignorant and, and felt that his ignorance said extended to his understanding of life in America in Chicago, which it seemed to use the phrase of, of the great migration, the promised land, right? Right. And he felt like a soccer A fell stupid to says, anybody would and I don't think he knew on the level the extent to which the con- actually went and then living in a community of people. And this is somebody get into piece, but living in a community of people who are being ripped off, and they couldn't talk about it to each other, because they wanted to maintain this sort of facade is front, that they own their homes, not that somebody else, actually held the deed, and so on. There was a great period of silence. You know about did Mr Ross react to your piece. Yeah. He did what he say. He said, reparations will never. So in the aftermath of the peace peace comes out fifteen thousand words neat landing tremendous interest in it. You said this about the PC I think it was in the Washington Post. You said when I wrote the case for reparations my notion wasn't that you could actually get reparations past even in my lifetime. My notion was that you could get people to stop laughing. Right. Would you mean? Well, I mean, it was a Dave Chapelle joke. You know, and sort of what the joke was was. If black people got reparations oughta silly, dumb things, they would actually do meaning know caused by Rams fancy clothes. You know as as other people don't do those things, you know, and once I started researching, not just the fact of plunder, but actually, the history of reparations fight, which literally goes back to the American revolution. George Washington when he dies and his well, he leaves things to those who are in. I wasn't a foreign notion that if you had stripped, people of something, you might actually, oh, them something, it really only became Faren after the civil war, and any man to patient. And so this is quite a dignified idea, and actually an idea that was quite a bit of literature on and the notion that it was somehow funnier. I thought really, really diminished, what was a serious trenchant and deeply deeply perceptive idea if you visited Israel between the fifties and a certain time you would see Mercedes-Benz taxis all over the country. And you'd wonder this is not particularly rich country. At least not yet, this was reparations. This is part of the reparations payment from Germany, Israel, and in, in the immediate. Aftermath of the holocaust second World War. What is reparations look like now? Right. Because they get vouchers to buy German goods. Right. What are we what's being asked for the rewriting of textbooks, the public discussion? What in terms of policy? How do you look at it? So fresh, you need the actual crime document you need, like which you would get is the official imprimature of the state say, this actually happened. You know, I just think that's a crucial crucial first up and the second reason you haven't commissions to figure out how we pay. Back, you know, I think it's crucial to tie reparations to specific acts. Again, why you need to study. This is not, you know, I checked black on my census, therefore I, I don't I I'll give you an example of this, for instance, we have what I would almost call a pilot significant reparations program right now, actually running in Chicago, Jon Burge, who ran this terrible unit of police officers that tortured black people and sent a lot of innocent black people to jail you over cost. I think it was like twenty twenty or so years. And then once he was found out in Chicago. The reparations plan put together with victims were actually given reparations. But in addition to that crucial to that they change how they taught history. And you had to actually teach John Burnett actually teach people about what actually happened. So it wasn't just the money, it was there was some sort of I hesitate say educational, but I guess that's where we use educational element to it. And I just think you can't win this argument by trying to hide the ball. Not not in the long term. You know. And so, I think both of those things are crucial ten hoc-. So as of this moment in two thousand nineteen there are more than twenty democratic presidential candidates running, eight of them have said, they'll support a Bill to create at least create a commission to study reparations. What do you make of that is it symbolic or is it lip service? Or is it just a way to secure the black vote? Was it something much more serious than all that? As folly in some measure, affordable. Thanks, certainly, is symbolic. Awesome pudding commission is now reparations in of itself. It's certainly limps lip service from at least some summit of candidates. I'm actually less. Sure about.

Chicago CLYDE Ross America Atlantic theft Jim crow Mississippi David Ramnik Harlem congress clarksdale Campbell Soup company Washington Post soccer Dave Chapelle African American community
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"This New Yorker podcast is supported by indeed dot com. Are you hiring with indeed? You can post job in minutes. Set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard. Get started today at indeed dot com slash New Yorker. That's indeed dot com slash New Yorker. You're listening to the New Yorker poetry podcast. I'm Kevin young poetry editor of the New Yorker magazine on this program, as you may recall, we ask posts to select a poem in the New Yorker archive to read and discuss along with one of their own poems. That's been published in the magazine. My guest today is fierce and Claire who's honors include a award a Metcalf award for the American Academy of arts and letters and OC 'em. Boca's prize for Caribbean poetry and a Ruth, Lilly and Dorothy Sargent, Rosenberg fellowship from the poetry foundation. Thank you for joining us, today, the heaven me, so FIA the poem you've decided to read for us is from the desire field, by Natalie Diaz, which was published as part of envelopes of air are online, feature by Natalie Diaz on eight, only moan it was our first interactive poetry feature at New Yorker dot com. Tell us what drew you to this particular poem, as you were perusing the archives. This poem is to me, so magical in its imagery in its texture and the way she builds not just a system of imagery, but like returning to this refrain of green and desire, what's here it here, a Sinclair, reading from the desire field by Natalie DS. From the desire field. I don't call it sleep anymore. I'll risk losing something new instead like you lost your Rosen moon. Shook it loose. But sometimes when I get my horns in a thing, a wonder a grief or a line of her, it is a sticky and ruined fruit to unfussy, and from despite my trembling. Let me call my anxiety desire, then let me call it a garden. Maybe this is what Lorca meant when he said, Verde kits carer Verde, because when the shade of night comes I am a field of it of any worry ready to flower in my chest. My mind in the dark is gonna best thea on focused hot and if not yolks to exhaustion beneath the hip and plow of my lover than I am another night. Wondering the desire field bewildered in its. Low green glow Belling. The meadow between midnight and morning. Insomnia is like spring that way. Surprising and many Petzold the kick and leap of gold grasshoppers at my brow. I am struck in the Wichita hours of want. I want her green life, her inside me in green, our, I can't stop green vein in her throat green wing in my mouth green thorn, in my I, I want her like a river goes bending green moving green moving fast. Is that this is how it happens soy sonnambula, an even though you said today, you felt better, and it is so late in this poem. Is it okay to be clear to say, I don't feel good to ask. Ask you to tell me a story about the sweet grass you planted and tell it again or again, until I can smell. It's sweet smoke. Leave the thrashed field and be smooth. Well read, thank you. That was from the desire field by now ideas from envelopes of air by -nology as Italy, Mon published on New Yorker dot com in may twenty eighteen carrying the poem everything you said, was, of course, quite accurate about it. It's music and imagery. I was struck also by its language or should I say languages the way it really moves, effortlessly, between Spanish between Highland widget. And, and I wouldn't say, low language, because everything is so grand in the poem. I think that's one of its strengths, but in a very human, you know, lustful way that I think, is a really great. Let me call my anxiety desire, then let me call it a garden, and then she brings up Lorca who you know, has been hovering over the poem. But suddenly, she lets Lorca in tell me about hearing it again, what comes to mind. I do love this ball. Readily tension in the poem, you know, and how the physical is always there, and it's so reflected in the lush texture of the work, you know, it's kind of like a vine, imagine it as like a vine, the way that the lines sort of intertwine with each other. And we come back to this refrain of green of which is, of course, the lore can influence right from his own poem sleepwalking. Yes. And so, I agree that it's so seamless the way she sort of loops in this idea of, of the desire to Lorca on this, this, this refrain of green, how

New Yorker magazine Lorca Insomnia Natalie DS Natalie Diaz Dorothy Sargent Petzold poetry editor Rosen moon Claire Kevin young Boca Wichita American Academy of arts Italy Sinclair Lilly OC Rosenberg
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"WNYC studios is supported by Kerman spader. A national litigation firm representing law firms in malpractice suits ethics investigations and business matters. When the lawyer you choose matters most online at Zuckerman dot com. This is the New Yorker fiction podcast from the New Yorker magazine. I'm Deborah trees Mun fiction editor at the New Yorker each month. We invite a writer to choose the story from the magazine's archives to read and discuss this month. We're going to hear the metal bowl by Miranda, July, which was published in the New Yorker in September of twenty seventeen. If I protested only make his case stronger and less fun than my own. But which is not untrue in my essence. I am a stone unmoving for ten thousand years unless picked up and moved the story was chosen by Emma Klein who published her first novel the girls in two thousand sixteen. Hi, emma. Hi, denver. So the metal bowl was published as I just said less than two years ago. Did you read it when it first came out? I actually I heard it, and I don't normally listen to many audiobooks are people reading aloud. But I was on a road trip and happened to listen to maranda July read the store. Sorry after it was published. I was just so struck by it, and I was in a sort of low with reading where I I just hadn't been engrossed in something in a long time or something had gone a little bit dull. And then something about this story was just so peculiar. And so apt that it really got me excited about stories again in the possibilities for stories. What do you think it was about the story? I think the way that she explicatives certain emotions or thoughts in a way that I had just never seen before. But but in a way that also gave me that sense of recognition or familiarity, even the first paragraph. I think when she's talking about her orientation towards life as this sort of endless gratuitously drawn out experience that she's trying to. Get over with all at once. It just felt very familiar, and I never felt like it had been articulated in that way before it just got me very excited. Yeah. Were you already a fan of Miranda July's work at that point? I had read the first bad man and loved it. And it was similarly strange sort of off to the side of other fiction. I'd read I don't know how to say it in a better way. Almost like it was circling around the alley of fiction and doing something really interesting with it. And I think it's easy to think maybe it's because she is a filmmaker and artist and sort of has these other references, but I think she's just a great fiction writer in so singular. So I'd read that novel. I've only actually seen one of her movies the future. But that also I felt like that in this story that movie in this story had some resonance with each other. Just in terms of exploring these intimate relationships and sort of atomization them. So I think most people probably come to her. I as a filmmaker, you know, she's made these two feature films, which she also started. And sometimes when you do more than one thing people sort of assume that you're Adila tante, do you think of her as a writer? I I think that's how I have the strongest reaction ter- just because that's sort of the world that I'm in. But I don't know. I I wish that I was good at more than one thing. I think it's great. But she she is so good at so many things I think it's really exciting and sort of inspiring to see someone get to sort of explode their subjectivity in all these different directions. I'm jealous. Okay. Well, we'll talk some more after the story. And now, here's m Klein reading the metal bowl by Miranda, July. The metal bowl. He kept the two halves of my tush in spoke directly to them run away with me girls. He whispered she doesn't understand our love. I lay still staring out the window letting them have their time together if I protested I'd only make his case stronger, I'm less fun than my own. But which is not untrue in my essence. I am a stone unmoving for ten thousand years unless picked up and moved it's not just sex. I find this whole experience life gratuitously slow and drawn out. See it crawl second by fucking second. If I'm a workaholic, it's only because I hate work so much that I'm trying to finish it all of it once and for all so I can just ride out the rest of my life and some kind of

Miranda July writer New Yorker magazine Emma Klein Deborah trees Mun WNYC studios Kerman Adila tante editor denver m Klein ten thousand years two years
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

07:14 min | 1 year ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"Hello. You're listening to the New Yorker poetry podcast. I'm Kevin young poetry editor of the New Yorker magazine. As you may know on this program, we invite poets to pick a favorite poem from the New Yorker archive to read and discuss alongside Opole of their own. That's appeared in the magazine. My guest today is Rachel Griffiths. A poet and artist who's received fellowships from the Robert Rauschenberg foundation province town fine arts work center, Covey conham, pound Asian and Jato among others and twenty twelve for collection mule and pair with the inaugural winner of the poetry award for the Blackhawks of the American Library association. Allies are welcome. Thanks so much for joining us having me, Kevin. So the me chosen read today is rain light by w s Merwin. Can you tell us why this one felt particularly specialty you sure? So unfortunately, and very, sadly, recently, we lost US Merlin, although we still have his poems and each day. I've been thinking about Merlin's work his spirit his energy who he was. Was all of the different things he saw in his life. And then just the fact of kind of time passing at the beginning of the year. It was Mary Oliver a few days after WS Moore when it was Linda, Greg, and I remembered actually the the issue of the New Yorker when this poem came out and how I kind of tore it out of the out of the magazine and carried it around into kind of fell apart in my hands. There was just something in the poem for me that spoke to so many aspects of of living and ways to be I'm so I think that's some of I can say immersion himself said that rain light was not a rational poem. And I just love that. Who's ritual Elisa Griffiths reading rain, light by w a smart one. Light all day the stars watch from long ago. My mother said I am going now when you are alone, you will be all right. Whether or not, you know, you will know look at the old house and the dawn rain all the flowers are forms of water. The sun reminds them through a white cloud touches. The patchwork spread on the hill. The washed colors of the afterlife that lived there long before you were born see how they wake without a question. Even though the whole world is burning. Rain light. But w s Merwin which ran in the March third two thousand eight issue of the magazine. I'm really glad we're talking about Merwin because he was in the magazine over two hundred times over seven decades, which is just an incredible thing. And I've been thinking a lot about both the magazine being fortunate to have published him that much, but also that relationship to writer, which are there other places that we can think of that the had that sustained connection. I'm not sure I don't think. So I I mean every time I saw a Merwin poem and the New Yorker it was an event, and I found myself, again, kind of ripping the poem out to carry it around with me and really appreciated whenever those events would happen or so many so ridge. It's wonderful. Yeah. I miss the magnetic won miss about magnets on fridges. Is you know, the poem or you go to someone's house and be a New Yorker poem from ten years before. That got them through. Absolutely. I love that you cut that out and kept it. It's disintegration seems also part of the form of the poem almost it's a poem about leaving. But also about what stays. Has that elegiac tone that I think we're on often has do you think of it as a proper elegy or just eligible, how do you think about the form in a way is interesting because it is giant and at the same time. I find a certain kind of reassurance in it of kind of going on or continuum that there's a kind of way that you move in the world. And no the world even though holes and gaps in like things go missing and lost in Merwin writes so much about memory. And so it kind of is this assurance that you will be remembered things will be forgotten things will be saved or lost or discarded. And yet the world will go on. And I love the sense of the world and the poem. So it's giant to me. But at the same time, it has that that strange Merwin energy where the whole world is burning sounds intense. But at the same time, it sounds like well, here's a way to go forward through those flames, which I love. Well, it's like a cleansing fire or a light in a way. I love that line the washed colors of the afterlife. How do you take that line? It's extrordinary. I mean, I don't I I'm like how did he get away with? If someone hands it in. People are like, well, I'm not sure to watch. But then of course, that's what you're going to remember. You know, exactly I mean, I think Merwin seem to me to write from this kind of I mine intuitive mystic kind of place and the washed colors of the afterlife. It seems. I don't wanna say baptism, but just kind of the certain dying like D Y Wii dying of faith. But also that there's something to be made. Like, there's a there's an object. There's there's an art to this. And it also reminds me I was thinking of it on my way here that I had just last week checked out this Jasper Johns show, and I kept hearing Merlin, and that energy of Jasper Johns, his regrets in these different things in custody work that he does and it has that kind of gray grays and whites and nuance and shadow about his happening. And I feel like that's happening in this poem to that. I could walk into a gallery and see rain light, which is cool. Physicality, and I love that about the John's is a fascinating comparison because you know, John's using it caustic and often using wax with color in it, and it's like a tough process, but it leaves this kind of built up color. That's almost is not just saturates almost part of canvas or something residue. And then you are burning Vernon you're scraping your your chiseling. And so that kind of burning I'm like, oh, I can see that. I can see that. As a thing. I also really love. This palm all the verbs of kind of watching C look reminding us to kind of be observant in our day to day moment. Even though were most mostly engaged with kind of where the fire is like what's happened today in the news, and here's the fire, and we're all Sam PD toward it. But actually, there's also this other kind of washed out kind of chilled out spot of bliss that you can find if you want to find it if you want to see it and that it's there anyway for you whether you're seeing it or not. Was interesting because rain light is

Merwin New Yorker magazine Kevin young Merlin Rachel Griffiths Jasper Johns US Robert Rauschenberg foundation Elisa Griffiths poetry editor Blackhawks Mary Oliver Jato Covey Sam PD American Library association writer John Moore
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"We invite poets to selective home the New Yorker archive to read and discuss along with the palm of their own. That's been published in the magazine my guest today. Deborah Landau, author of the uses of the body and the last usable our both Lannan literary selections she's received a Guggenheim fellowship and the Robert Dana and hinge prize for poetry. And she directs the creative writing program at New York University. Welcome Deborah, thanks so much. Thanks for joining us today. So the palm you've chosen from the archive is little girl. My string bean, my lovely woman by insects, and can you tell us why this particular poem stood out to you? Well, for for several reasons, but I'll start by saying that it would have been Sexton's ninetieth birthday this month. And I thought it would be nice to read this in her honor. Grant, let's hear it. And then we can talk after. Little girl. My string bean. My lovely woman. My daughter at eleven almost twelve is like a garden. Oh, darling. Born in that sweet birthday suit and having owned it and known it for so long. Now, you must watch high noon, enter noon that ghost our. Oh, funny. Little girl this one under a blueberry sky this one. How can I say that I've known just what you know? And just where you are. It's not a strange place. This I'd home where your face sits in my hand so full of distance so full of its immediate fever. The summer has seized you as when last month in a mall fee? I saw lemons as large as your desk side globe that miniature map of the world, and I could mention to the market stalls of mushrooms and garlic buds all engorged, or I think even of the orchard next door where the berries are done and the apples are beginning to swell and once with our first backyard, I remember planted in Aker of yellow beans. We couldn't eat oh little girl..

Deborah Landau Guggenheim fellowship Robert Dana New York University Sexton Lannan Grant
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"Editor of the New Yorker magazine, as you may know on this program, we invited poets to poem for the magazines archive to read and chat about along with the palm of their own. That's been published in the New Yorker joining us today is Nick Flynn, the author of several poetry collections memoirs. He's received the Erikson institute prize for excellence in mental health media as well as wards fellowships from Penn Guggenheim foundation and the library of congress. Welcome nick. Thanks so much for being here. Thanks cannon. I saw also that you've been translated into fifteen languages is that right? Yeah. Not the poems. The pros. Yes. One one book has been translated into fifteen Lang exciting. That's amazing. I don't point out one book. One book fifteen times. So the poem you selected today is objectively as blanket, but Zoe hit sig tell us what about this piece caught your attention as you're looking through our archives the archives is you know, you have to sort of sort through them. They you don't have a whole list of poets that you know. And then you should like remember poem and see you have to sort of actually sure gauge it page comes up this ten in each page. And I my my attention online is is not huge. And so I got through twenty pages of that twenty pages twenty pages. And then just put in Poland. She wanted to just look through and see the past. I didn't see the little search button. So okay. And I actually didn't want do actor after quite a walks. I realize on each page that'd be like ten poets. And I would know either them personally or know of their work pretty well of most of the pages and occasionally be a name that would that. I didn't know. Right. And then after a while I began to read a lot. The poems and after a while be really interested in the post. I'd never heard of before. Yeah. Sure. And I decided to go for that. Okay. All right. So we hear the poem. Sure. I'd love to you. Yeah. Let's hear it objectively as blanket. No, the police hyenas on hearing five confessions for false in one to irresistible nor the mental health elephant tusks by the state, nor the common sense store twisting at the prosecutors feet, nor the one the one juror uneasy facing eleven pale sheep at bay all day all night for conviction, nor the governor, sir, nor the common sense stork. Now in a not nor the shots. No, the clause unbending nor the clause bending nor seeing his fitful approach did one turn back to flip the window latch for the life form. Nearly breaking himself on glass, nor the next governor nor the state carriage horses trotting ever steady blinders acute to the I nor the widower how he could how could he Puma and pull focus not defense counsel. Not for lack of it, nor the stork is she breathing. Is there such a thing as breathing here? Does it mean? The polyester the Royal blue the blanket on the bed of the mother of two. That was objectively as blanket by Zoe hit sig which ran in the March twentieth. Twenty seventeen issue of the magazine while it's really great to hear you re. I love all those Nores. It's it's the denial before the admission, I suppose, how did you hear those? Yeah. I mean the negating opponent at the beginning. I thought was really interesting strategy just to get me into it and just seem to be willing to like right from the beginning to exist in this state of instability, and you know, already with the first line having not being chromatic Lee, completely correct perhaps, and it just allowing that sort of while tumbling energy along with negation and long with a stuttering to nor the one the one juror without even a comet like just doing a lot of things that are genuine to itself. I think. Yeah. Once invested in language and the ways that we might. Miss your language or hear language differently. And I I love that about it. But it's also I think interested in the kind of rhetoric nor the governor, sir this kind of old fashioned Roderick..

Zoe Nick Flynn New Yorker magazine Erikson institute Penn Guggenheim foundation Editor cannon congress Poland Lang Roderick Lee Puma
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"This is the writer's voice, new fiction from the New Yorker. I'm Deborah trees span fiction editor at the New Yorker on this episode of the writer's voice will hear teak or agasin boil read his story. I walk between the raindrops from the July. Thirtieth twenty eighteen issue of the magazine. Boyle is the author of more than two dozen books of fiction, including the novels, the Taranaki and harder. They come a new novel outside looking in, we'll be published next year. Now, here's teak courageous and boil. I walk between the raindrops. Valentine's day. This past Valentine's Day? I was in Kingman Arizona with my wife Nola staying in the motel six. They're just off the I forty. He might not think of Kingman as a prime location for Mandic getaway who would. But Nolan, I have been married for fifteen years now and romance is just part of the continuum. Sometimes it blows hot sometimes cold and we certainly don't need a special day or place for it. We're not sentimentalists. We don't exchange heart shaped boxes of chocolates or glossy cards with manufactured endurance inside, and we don't go around kissing in public or saying, I love you twenty times a day to my mind. Couples like that are always suspect really, who were they trying to fool besides which we were there to pay a visit to Knowle's father, who's in his eighties and living in a trailer park a mile down the road from the motel which made it convenient, not only for saying him, but for strolling into old town where there are a handful of bars and restaurants and the junk shops. My wife loves to frequent looking for bargains where we slumming, yes, sure. Look at her. Stayed anywhere we liked, but this at least number in Kingman is what we like. And if it's not ideal, at least it's different. The local police creep to the parking lot in the small hours running license plates and once in a while, you'll wake to them handcuffing somebody outside one of the rooms which is not a site. We see every day back in California. Plus there are a couple of lean white bums living in the wash just behind the place, and they sometimes give me a start looming up out of the darkness when I step outside at night for breath of air, but nothing's ever happened not even a request for spare change or a cigarette the afternoon a Valentine's Day after we'd visited my father-in-law and treated him to lunch at Denny's, the only place he'll eat Nola, went up the street to cruise, the anti components, and I made for the local bar figuring we'd meet up there for a drink when she was done, then walk over to the Mexican restaurant for Margaritas. And then she laws. This bar which I'd been to before is a cavernous place. That was part of a now defunct hotel, and it features a high tin ceiling along pitted bar, top three pool tables and jukebox that plays the hits of the sixties and seventies at hurricane volume. The front door stands perpetually open. So as to brighten the place up a bit with the best kind of light, the light that doesn't cost anybody anything and across the street as a web of train tracks that guide an endless procession of freight trains through town that's up from your beer or your gin and tonic and more often than not, you'll see a moving wall of freight cars rattling by. The important thing to emphasize here is that this isn't an unfriendly place despite the neatly inscribed message over the urinal in the men's room that says, fuck you liberal pussies which choose to take us ironic, and I wasn't unfriendly myself. Happy, decide up to the bar alongside the mostly middle age, regulars in order a Jack and coke though. Normally that is back in our little coastal town in California, I would have had a Pinot Noir from the Santa Rita hills or a nice full bodied zinfandel from fossil row bliss. This wasn't the place for Pinot Noir, and I'm not knocking it just stating the obvious beyond that I was content to bend over my phone. I've been engaged off and on all day posting on a financial form run by the company. I used to work for and wait for Nollet. A tire out can come join me for a Valentine's Day drink, which in her case, would likely be gin and tonic a drink that nobody whether they were in Kingman or coots could screw up..

Kingman Valentine Nola California Kingman Arizona writer Boyle editor Santa Rita hills Nollet Nolan Taranaki Mandic Denny Jack coke fifteen years
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

03:20 min | 3 years ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"We asked poets a selective favorite poem for the New Yorker archive to read and discuss then we invite them to read a poll of their own appeared in the magazine. My guest today is Meena Alexander the author of over a dozen books. Oppo Trie fiction nonfiction and criticism the recipient of a distinguished achievement award in literature from the South Asian Lewis OC as well as of a pen open book award she teaches at hundred college and the graduate center. Cuny? Welcome to the show me. So the poem. You've chosen a read is one we published pretty recently Adana by Gerald stern. What drew to this particular poem as you're proving the archives? Kevin it actually sort of took my breath away. Because of the extraordinary voice that he has in the poem and the way the whole thing flows in kind of unspools that's verb that he used as you know, almost like a theater, so there's this miniature cedar of the sorrow and of desire and of this early life. I guess we all have that as points in some measure the pull to an earlier life, which is ours, but not ours anymore. And then, of course, the way memory works. The other thing I wanted to mention was just the way the breath works in this poem. I mean, we normally think of points, you know, in different ways, different points, do it. But coupled together stitch together on this certain kinds of poetry particularly contemporary poetry now where you actually see the stitching, but with with this poem, it's the foist in. It's the breath which perfectly. Suits, two things. I think one is the image of music trope of music that is there because music of all the arts is the one that exists in time. It doesn't really have a special form. I mean, it comes out of instruments where it's the voice or instrument, but it doesn't it's not like sculpture or visual art, painting or even appointment a piece of paper so exists in time and by the same token vanishes. And of course, the figure the Adonis is somebody who makes music was a composer. And we don't know if it's for real or not. That's wonderful. Why don't we listen to it? Now, here's Meena Alexander reading Donna by Gerald stern. Donus? I forgave him that debt of having to explain where he came from who is angry father and his loving mother were or are relieved him from any excuse and Sut dozens and dozens of years ago at the counter of sex Broadway and a hundred third he on the other side his sleeves rolled up. His hands is arms in steaming water washing. Tissues and frying, pans and talking music, his dream of studying Chouli are the tiny practice room, a rich lady from the upper east or Upper West side paid for listening all ofter noon to him playing the small though his law dramatic gestures his hair wild, his hands and fingers amazing. Classic polish..

Cuny Meena Alexander Gerald stern Adana Upper West Kevin Donna
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

05:53 min | 3 years ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"It. Elizabeth Colbert Thank you. Thanks statement. Elizabeth Colbert staff writer at The New Yorker, You can find to reporting on the Department of the Interior and much else at New York radio. Com. Mm. Now, along with the treatment of animals, the environment is a chief reason why some of us become vegetarian about three percent of Americans at this point. And the environmental statistics are pretty damning. There's the consumption of food crops by animals. The drain on water supplies, the overuse of antibiotics pollution, and the list goes on in the food business. There's competition to create vegetarian substitutes that taste a little better than Well, you know, say Thanh all that stuff And that could maybe one day become viable alternatives to meet Sean a lion who edits the New Yorkers food and drink page has been exploring the options. I used to be a vegetarian I was vegetarian for fifteen years. At that time I ate a lot of veggie burgers. They were the kind that were out of a box. They were frozen. They were dry and sad and gray and in our you could dressed them up, but they they never tasted. Good. So I'm not a vegetarian anymore and I do eat burgers. But then I heard about a new kind of Veggie Berger called the impossible burger, which is a Veggie burger. That looks a lot like a meet Burger. And they said, tastes a like meat Burger. It also bleats like a meet Burger. And I just I was really curious. I really wanted to try it. So we went to an Mommy burger, which is a virtue bill with everything for you guys over. They are known for having beef burgers that are hyper powered with some kind of you Mommy, which is like a savory flavor. And so it was interesting that they were carrying the impossible burger That was a seal of approval like this really tastes like meet dreamt for treat. I haven't yet had many you app. So I brought along this expert on plant-based meet Bruce Friedrich founded and runs the good food Institute on veggie burgers were pretty bad. Up until ten years ago and thought his Good morning Morning Star, All of them are getting better and better. And in out of here, They're all. On their game, and it's a very exciting thing to see people implant based, say like, why limit yourself to animal cells with plant-based me? We can replicate what people like and we can do even better. When you say you can do even better y- you mean you can make it tastes better. Yeah. And animal animal-based burgers are not going to get better, but plant-based burgers well. So maybe the impossible Burger won't make you swear off meet forever, but maybe it will make you eat a little less meat. And Bruce thinks that would be great. One of the sort of obvious, but under appreciated facts is that if one person goes vegetarian. That is the same as two people cutting back by half. But it's probably going to be a lot easier to get to people to cut back by happened to get one person to go completely vegetarian. Two possible burgers from. Thank you very much. You guys. So we've got our impossible Berger. It's pretty big hue to Patty's smothered in Geez. They look a lot like me, the impossible Burger looks like it doesn't look like those fat juicy burgers. It looks like a couple of smashed Patty's like very thin, but also charred on the edges which you know that makes good burger to an. And you know there's this, there's a flag stuck right in the middle that says, impossible burger. The impossible Berger is not really that different from a lot of other Veggie burgers. It's made of protein and coconut oil and potato protein. But the thing that makes it different from other veggie burgers Is he It's an iron containing compound found in blood, which is what gives meet That hiring flavor and impossible Berger found a way to take hime from plants and make more of it using fragmentation. Hime is one of the things that make speakers really satisfied. Why do you think it's so hard for people to imagine giving up meat? I spent like 30 years pondering that question. I adopted a vegan diet in 1987 and that the arguments were just so clear to me, And I thought they would be clear to everybody else. And I thought nobody loves me more than I do. Nobody eats more meat than I do. I can do this. Anybody can do this. And I certainly convinced a fair number of people to cut back or cut out. But the vast majority of people, They're just too busy leading their lives there. The cacophony of life makes it really hard to make two like you've been doing something for twenty or fifty or seventy years, and it's just like what you do when suddenly somebody saying, No, you should do something different. That's a pretty big ask. I'm I wonder if the impossible of our desk, He's like a real Berger. I'm looking for. Okay, Here we go. AKG. Okay,

Veggie Berger Burger Bruce Friedrich Elizabeth Colbert Patty good food Institute New York staff writer The New Yorker AKG Thanh Sean fifteen years seventy years three percent ten years 30 years one day
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"Kevin young poultry under the New Yorker magazine and the director of the center for research in black culture on this program. We invite poets twos Apoel from the New Yorker archive to read and discuss then we asked them to read one of their own poems. That's when published in the magazine Mike s today is Tarrant Hayes a chancellor of the kademi of American poets. Current poetry editor at the New York Times magazine distinguished professor of English at the university of Pittsburgh and distinguished writer in residence at New York University. His many honors include a MacArthur fellowship a Guggenheim fellowship and the national book award for poetry, welcome Terrance. Hey, man. Good to be here. Good to see you. So the poem you've chosen to read his fire by Matthew Dickman, tell us what in particular about this poem Katcher is you're sifting through the archive. Well, naturally, I thought about my own palm, which of my own poems. I would pick. And then I sorta backed up and recalled reading this. Poem and thinking that there in conversation. So I wanted to figure that out with you today just to see what these two poems doing with each other. Let's give it a listen. Here's Terrance Hayes reading fire by Matthew Dickman fire. Oh fire. You burn me at a singing behind the smoke in Kohl's his wife near him. The rest of us below the stars swimming above Washington state burning through themselves. He's like an appellation prince Henry with his banjo and whiskey the court surrounding him and the deer off in the dark hills like the French terrified, but in love and hungry. I'm burning all the time my pockets full of matches and lighters. The blue smoke crawling out like a skinny ghost from between. My lips my lungs on fire. The wings of them falling from the open sky, the top of Michelle's long hands looked like the beautiful coats leopards have covered dark spots all the cigarettes. She would like and then smash out her is the color of hairspray cloudy and stingy and gone. But beautiful she carried her hands around like. To terrible letters of introduction. I never understood who could have opened them read them aloud still thrown her onto a bad still walk into the street. She was still lit what little fuse. She had left. Oh fire. You burn me. My sister, and I and southern comfort making us singer and spark the family ash all around us the way she is beautiful to me in her singular, blaze, my brain lighting up my tongue like a monk in wartime a wash and RH silk and flames.

Michelle New Yorker magazine Matthew Dickman Terrance Hayes New York Times magazine New York University Kohl distinguished professor of Eng Tarrant Hayes poetry editor university of Pittsburgh Kevin national book award Guggenheim fellowship chancellor Washington director MacArthur writer
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Oh mm a this is the new yorker radio hour i'm david ramnik wrong the y uae like it from guinea midnight why man dry in miles away lead free last year i spent a few days with the songwriter leonard cohen cohen had been avoiding interviews for the past four or five six years but once he agreed to talk we talk for days and covered the length and breadth of his career and i'm grateful that i had the chance to visit when i did because not long after leonard cohen died at the age of eighty two cohen once wrote a song called the tower of song in which he compared himself really unfavourably to hank williams but along with the other masters bob dylan certainly joni mitchell konya west everybody's got their own list leonard cohen is way up there in the ranks of songwriters when i visited him in los angeles he was suffering from a number of very serious illnesses although he was keeping that very very private he was in deep pain especially from compression fractures in his spine and he had to sit in the big blue medical chair you was very thin may be a hundred and ten pounds at the most but i have to say that he was in a bullion mood somehow for a man who knew where life was taking him and it was going to take him there in a hurry he was the most gracious toast the side of my mother.

david ramnik uae leonard cohen cohen los angeles new yorker guinea hank williams bob dylan joni mitchell big blue five six years ten pounds
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"This is the new yorker fiction podcast from the new yorker magazine i'm deborah tradesman fiction editor at the new yorker last month in honor of the tenth anniversary of the new yorker fiction podcast we asked you to vote for your favorite episode from our first 10 years what amazed us was it out of more than one hundred twenty episodes seventy one different podcast got at least one vote and most of them got many more than that the final winner was an episode from two thousand twelve in which david sideroads fred and discussed the story roy spivey by miranda july the great selection and we're happy to release the episode now thank you to everyone who voted and thank you to all of our listeners for making this podcast such rewarding thing to work on this is the new yorker fiction podcast from the new yorker magazine each month we invite a writer to choose a story from the magazines archives to read and discuss this month were going to hear roy spivey by miranda july he slept for the first hour and it was startling to see such a famous face look so vulnerable an empty the story was chosen by david sideroads who's personal essays and humor pieces have been appearing in the new yorker for nearly two decades he's published eight books including me talk pretty one day dress your family and quarter and dunham and when you were engulfed in flames high david i'd ever similar under july published a story collection called noone belongs him more than you a few years ago and two of her stories of appeared the magazine but she's also perhaps better known as a film director and performer she wrote directed and start into feature movies me and you and everyone we know in two thousand five in last year's the future but what side of her work to you know best i was not from you.

editor new yorker roy spivey new yorker magazine writer david sideroads david noone director david sideroads fred dunham two decades 10 years one day
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"This is the new yorker fiction podcast from the new yorker magazine i'm deb retracement fiction editor at the new yorker each month we invite a writer to choose a story from the magazines archives to read and discuss this month were going to hear extra by ye lee which was published in the new yorker in december of two thousand three granny lynn gasps she has never had a husband in her life and the prospect of a dead husband frightens her yet auntie wong makes the decision for her right then in there between two fish stance and in a short time she finds granny lynn a match the story was chosen by sarah swan yenbuying them who's the author of two novels miss hempel chronicles and madeleine his sleeping which was a finalist for the national book award in two thousand four hi sarah hi debra so extra was it was the first story by ian lee that was published in the new yorker back in two thousand three and i believe it was only the second story that she'd published anywhere was the first piece of her set you read it was it was an i remember feeling excitement both because of the work itself and also because we had just missed each other at iowa but i had already sort of heard about this wonderful writer who was coming out of the program what impression did the story make on you and you're in it the story felt very poignant to me because the character of granny lynn and i imagine the stories taking place somewhere in the nineties maybe the midnineties or so let character of granny land is around the same age as my own mother um and my mother left china in 1949 and i was struck when i was reading the story of oh if my mother had stayed what might her life had look look like and and in some ways this story offered a window into what another life another self might have looked like river my mother the other thing i was struck by when i first read it.

editor new yorker writer wong sarah swan national book award debra ian lee iowa granny lynn china hempel madeleine