35 Burst results for "The New Yorker"

Is New York Is the Groping Capital of America?

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:03 min | 20 hrs ago

Is New York Is the Groping Capital of America?

"The story today that tickled me pardon the pun was the Times Square Elmo. Who got busted for grabbing a 14 year old girl's ass. While she was posing for a photo, listen, this kind of shit is far from an isolated incident. There are people who are actually keep reports of this nefarious stuff in New York. They keep reports on panhandlers who have hands on people between panhandlers and homeless people and I guess Disney pseudo characters or assessing street characters. New York City authorities say that people are touched 24 people per hour or touch without consent. I don't know who the fuck does this counting? I guess these complaints are called in and they notated. I don't know. But they also said that 47% of New Yorkers have had unpleasant interactions with these pushy plushies or other street hustlers at the crossroads of the world,

Times Square Elmo Disney New York New York City
People Are Being Killed Because Other People Are Being Silent

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:58 min | 2 d ago

People Are Being Killed Because Other People Are Being Silent

"We were just talking at the end of the last hour about how this could happen, how people could be silent. And what we have to say over and over and over and over is that these things have happened before. In Germany in the 30s, many good people chose to look the other way. They said, well, I don't really want my neighbor to think I'm not on board with being a patriotic German or whatever it was. People were willing to keep their mouths shut to go along a little bit more to prevent somebody thinking that they might be hostile to whatever narrative was being peddled. It is precisely the same today. And if you want to demonize the Nazis like Daniel goldhagen did, speaking as a German, I should say, to demonize the Germans, you can not say that the Germans were uniquely evil. That's like saying the Jews were uniquely evil. We believe that all human beings have the capacity for evil. And so we look at a civilized nation in the early 30s, civilized, educated, largely Christian, that did not have the courage to stand up in the face of evil. And today, precisely the same thing is happening. And Naomi, our classmates, people who have gone to all these Ivy League schools who populate places like The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times and The New Yorker and the Atlantic, they refuse to talk about this. And you have to say, why do they refuse? Why do they have to demonize those who would raise the objections that you're raising so vitally in your book and in the things you're writing about? It's no different. They are afraid of being thought ill of by their peers. That is their ultimate value. And right now, people are being killed because other people are being silent.

Daniel Goldhagen Germany Ivy League Naomi The Wall Street Journal The New Yorker The New York Times Atlantic
NY Post: New Yorkers Swap to Florida Licenses in Record Numbers

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:51 sec | Last week

NY Post: New Yorkers Swap to Florida Licenses in Record Numbers

"Big headline in the New York Post today, the state escape. And they've got a Florida license plate on the cover of the New York Post in big, bold letters, see ya, a record, a record number of New Yorkers switched their driver's licenses to Florida last month, breaking the record. As more and more people are seeking lower taxes, no vaccine mandates, better weather, a better quality of life, fleeing New York for Florida. Well, as somebody who did exactly that, I can confirm it's true. Normal people aren't going to put up with insanity much longer.

New York Post Florida New York
The Reality of Race-Based Criminal Reform in New York

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:50 min | Last week

The Reality of Race-Based Criminal Reform in New York

"Final day in New York for a while. I was here on business and just here for a couple of days. What I witnessed yesterday was so wild. I watched a guy over on 48th street, 49th street, go up and down a row of garbage cans in front of a residential block and just empty out all the all the trash cans in a rage, screaming at the sky, and you know, you got to have compassion, but the damage this guy did, somebody's got to clean all that up. People were just watching him. Warily, New Yorkers are so beaten down, I was at a target, I was hearing there were two police officers, two NYPD officers in there talking to the manager about the same two guys that come in every day and just rob the place blind. The guy with the hatchet, the axe wielding maniac at the McDonald's. He's given interviews. He says, I'm not unhinged. The guy who flew into the axe wielding rampage at a lower east side McDonald's who did not did not go to jail because of the no cash bail rules that progressives here in New York have instituted. Alvin Bragg, Kim Fox, good on the list of all these lunatic prosecutors and district attorneys who don't want to incarcerate black men who commit crimes like this. That's what it's about incidentally. It's all about race. They'll tell you it's race because this is criminal justice reform to right the wrongs that have been done against black people in the past.

New York Mcdonald Nypd Alvin Bragg Kim Fox ROB
Lee Zeldin: Where Your Campaign Donations Go

The Dan Bongino Show

01:18 min | 2 weeks ago

Lee Zeldin: Where Your Campaign Donations Go

"You know we have it sorted history of corruption The Shelley Silverstein I mean it's this stuff goes on and on and on And we need Law & Order folks in there like yourself who are going to come in there and not corrupted by the process to clean this place up Let me get the website out so people can support you It is Zelda Zelda four spelled out Zelda four New York dot com Zelda and four New York dot com His Twitter feed is at Lee zeldin Please give him a follow Please give him a look send him a few bucks if you can The race is going to be ridiculously expensively I only got about 30 seconds left but you could use the money New York as the most expensive media markets in the country Commercials aren't cheap there Yeah no doubt And we're Kathy hochul is selling out access to the state capital like I just told you how she got that $300,000 donation And there are many other examples like that We're competing against that We went up on TV today that new Ed is posted on our social media feeds It's about crime I would encourage everyone to go out and watch that ad So when you send in $5 it's going towards getting this message out to New Yorkers of all walks of life Red blue it's not about that Republican Democrat independence about everyone as New Yorkers And as you pointed out it's important for all of us as Americans to care what's going on all over our country these policies these debates matter everywhere

Shelley Silverstein Zelda Zelda Lee Zeldin New York Kathy Hochul Twitter
Dinesh Examines Leftist Arguments of the GOP 'Undermining Democracy'

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:08 min | Last month

Dinesh Examines Leftist Arguments of the GOP 'Undermining Democracy'

"One of the consistent themes of the left these days. Is to attack conservatives and attack Republicans for somehow undermining democracy. There are passing voter suppression laws that undermine democracy. They're engaged in partisan gerrymandering that undermines democracy. They want to uphold the filibuster, which is a restriction on democracy. And there's an interesting article I want to discuss that is in The New Yorker by Louis menand. Believe in hands of smart guy, I've actually crossed swords with him a few times before. He was one of the early intelligent critics of illiberal education, my very first book out in 1991. And I think at that time Anand was at NYU, he subsequently been at Harvard. He might still be at Harvard, but in any event, he's got this essay in The New Yorker called American democracy was never designed to be democratic. And I was reading the article and kind of laughing through it because he's right. Now, let's see what menand is trying to say because he's trying to give a left wing message to the left. But the message happens to be one that we can heartily endorse even though we're coming from the opposite end of the political spectrum. Basically what men and is saying to the left is listen, you keep complaining that the right is undemocratic. And you're acting as though we have a pure democratic system in this country, America is a kind of democracy across the board and the right is somehow acting in a sort of way that subverts that. And manan goes but America's never been a democracy. The founders weren't believers in pure democracy. America has democratic elements, but it also has Republican elements and quite frankly it has very clearly undemocratic elements by which I mean elements designed explicitly and deliberately to cut against democracy.

Louis Menand The New Yorker Harvard Menand Anand NYU America Manan
New York City's Finest

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:23 min | Last month

New York City's Finest

"So I was still living in New York. I was your age. I left New York when I was 25. So I was living, I had lived in Brooklyn. I've lived in Manhattan, and then I lived in Queens, my last borough. I was in my queen's apartment, and it was a very bad time like now in terms of crime. So bad that New Yorkers would leave their doors open to the car unlocked, and put a sign unlocked, please don't smash glass. Really? Yes. My God. So, sure enough, even though parked at my apartment building in white stone queens, by the window was shattered with a rock, a guy threw a boulder through it, and took out my car stereo. Which were always separate units in those days. Okay. So I reported it to the police, and it was a time when police actually responded even to theft today. They'll tell you to have a great day. I get a knock on the door one night. New York, New York City police. I open up, they stop, they look around. And they go. Holy did they do a job? You

New York White Stone Queens Brooklyn Queens Manhattan Boulder New York City
AJ Remembers Waking up to 9/11

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:23 min | Last month

AJ Remembers Waking up to 9/11

"Anyhow, without any more further ado, this is my story. About 9 11 and it's called fear and loathing in Middle America. It was somewhere on the edge of Zion national park with 400 miles of Utah ahead of us when the percocets finally kicked in. It was only 20 hours earlier. When my bedroom door was kicked open by my screenwriting partner, Neil gumbo. He just driven all night as he usually does from his home in Oakland, California. He turned on my TV when he arrived and saw the surreal footage of the first twin tower blown to pieces. Jesus fuck, Neil screamed as he ran into my bedroom and told me what was going down. It was not even ten minutes since the first coward flew the hijacked jet into tower one and my cell phone's mailbox was already at its capacity. I wiped the sleep from my eyes, kissed my girlfriend awake and punched my messages on. Neil and bessie did the same thing. And there we were. In the pitiful position too many of us transplanted New Yorkers found ourselves in that day. We all sat on the bed and listened to the terror filled and trembling voices of our friends and family back in New York City who were literally running from the smoke and horror. An ex-girlfriend called me screaming as she ran to a west village elementary school to pick up her 7 year old son. The same kid I held to my chest at night through his terrible twos and watched Jurassic Park some 400 times. There was even a quivering message from my ex-wife and childhood sweetheart wondering aloud if I was in the city that day before telling me she loved me, as she signed off with a heavy side. I finally lost it when my friend Jamie called from Virginia and cried that she hadn't heard from her husband John at all. And that's not like our boy John. John is a pilot for American Airlines. That's all he ever wanted to do. He'd been saying that since we were 15 years old, when we used to stand on tippy toes to spy on Jamie through the high school gymnasium windows, she would flirt with him during her balance being routine while Fleetwood Mac sang dreams. And suddenly, Stevie Nicks lyrics running hauntingly true to me. And the stillness of remembering what you had. And what you lost. It was the most pivotal, painful moment of truth of our lives. None of us knowing what would fall next. How many more would die? How many more breaths each of us had left?

Neil Gumbo Neil Zion National Park Middle America West Village Elementary School Utah Bessie Oakland California Jurassic Park John Jamie New York City American Airlines Virginia Stevie Nicks
The Silence of Merrick Garland Is Very Instructive

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:27 min | Last month

The Silence of Merrick Garland Is Very Instructive

"Silence of Garland. I think is very instructive. Now both could be true, by the way. More might be coming, all the while something might have went wrong. They might have went too heavy. Could you imagine if someone misunderstood in a meeting, hey, go subpoena Trump's documents and someone thought they said, go raid Trump's documents. That's unlikely, by the way. But I'm only inferring that because of the silence of the FBI. By the way, it's 30 agents for 9 hours would be 270 man hours. Sorry, I screwed up my math a little bit. Catherine emailed us freedom at Charlie Kirk dot com, Charlie, don't be surprised. This is the left's MO. They lob a bomb and won't respond. Call you names and walk away. They didn't make a mistake. It is possible they're planning more, watch your back. That's why I led with that. But there is still something suspicious about the silence of it. And even the liberal media is starting to get a little bit nervous about this whole thing. The New Yorker comes out with an article and says that the silence is not here after the Trump raid silence is not an option for Merrick Garland. That is 19 hours ago. The New York Post says if Merrick Garland doesn't give a solid fast reason for raiding Trump's home, he probably just reelected him. Everyday Merrick Garland is silent about the raid, the more they are losing the court of public opinion.

Donald Trump Charlie Kirk Garland Merrick Garland FBI Catherine Charlie The New York Post The New Yorker
Bernie Sanders's Economic Advisor Wants to Keep Printing Money

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:20 min | Last month

Bernie Sanders's Economic Advisor Wants to Keep Printing Money

"Is no shock that The New Yorker ran a piece, August 2019, titled The Economist who believes the government should just print more money. Stephanie kelton, a senior economic adviser to Bernie Sanders and Professor of economics and public policy at stony brook university, is popular in a way that economists almost definitionally are not. Filmmakers trail her with cameras. She goes on international speaking tours. And once it sold out a basketball arena in Italy, kelton is the foremost evangelist of a fringe economic movement called modern monetary theory, which argues in part that the government should pay for programs requiring big spending like the Green New Deal simply by printing more money. This is a polarizing idea. This spring at kelton spoke at The Wall Street Journal's future of everything festival on the day as a journal staffer introduced kelton as an economist with an idea that will either solve the world's problems or send it into ruin. She made a face and then walked on stage. So what exactly does she say? Well, adherents of MMT imagine a world built on MMT principles in which the government provides guaranteed jobs, healthcare affordable college, launches clean infrastructure projects to replace crumbling highways airports and bridges. Kelton, who does at least 5 interviews per week, plus lectures speaking gigs in conferences, is more than anyone else responsible for building MMT's digital army. So what exactly is MMT? Well, it means that we just spend money, and don't worry about it.

Kelton Stephanie Kelton Stony Brook University Bernie Sanders The New Yorker Basketball Italy The Wall Street Journal MMT
Judge's 3rd walk-off HR of year lifts Yanks over Royals 1-0

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 2 months ago

Judge's 3rd walk-off HR of year lifts Yanks over Royals 1-0

"Aaron judge hit his third walk off home run of the season to break up a pitcher's duel and give the Yankees a one zero victory over the royals Judge came to the plate in the bottom of the knife with one ad against Kansas City reliever Scott Barlow and blasted his major league leading 39th Homer It's always good you know today I was talking especially coming off the two losses a city field and then coming in here and a singer shutting us down all game It didn't feel too good but this team's got a lot of heart The Yankees had only one hit going to the 9th as royal solder Brady singer struck out ten over the first 7 innings Jameson Taylor captured with 6 scoreless innings and two New Yorker relievers through three more to set the stage for judge Tom Arian New York

Scott Barlow Yankees Royals Aaron Kansas City Jameson Taylor Brady Judge Tom Arian New York
AJ Reflects on Death and Love

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:56 min | 2 months ago

AJ Reflects on Death and Love

"I watched snippets of Ivana Trump's funeral today and it got me set. Said that a great New Yorker is gone. Said that a woman who was as big as any building in that city's great skyline has passed. And sad just at the thought of what many of us will face one day. What many of you have faced and what Donald Trump is facing and dealing with today? And that is that awful moment when the good lord takes away somebody, we married, made children with loved and built a life with and somehow, when that day comes, it's not the fighting and the screaming and the disappointments and yes, even the infidelity, we went through that we think about, we cry because we know that a small part of us was still in the deepest purple of their hearts. And as such a small part of us dies along with them. Now the good news is that my first and second wives are still here walking this earth and either one has my ear and support whenever they should need it. And the next wife and I think we'll know who that shall be is as spry as ever and it's got a long way to go. But a little piece of my heart went under my mom and dad died. They took the little piece and my sister Lorraine took a small chunk too, Chico and Ronnie got their share. And, you know, too many others to count to be honest. So, as we suffered through these tragedies, our hearts become smaller and smaller until finally, they give out on us. One day. That's the way I look at death, anyhow.

Ivana Trump Donald Trump Lorraine Chico Ronnie
Heat wave to hit Pacific Northwest a year after deadly event

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Heat wave to hit Pacific Northwest a year after deadly event

"A nearly weeklong heat wave that hit the northeast is supposed to be waning but not soon enough for New Yorkers who were still trying to beat the heat Mary Elizabeth margolis is out running errands which means hitting the pavement on the hot streets of Brooklyn You feel like you're already wet the second you walk outside Nadia Jong who was on her way to work has the answer Staying inside AC on I'll worry about the bill later Elise mason who was exercising says these aren't the same 80 and 90° she remembers as a kid Now it feels like oh it's 83 degrees I need to go sit down For a while Forecasters say temperatures in the northeast will stay in the upper 80s through the week but may feel hotter some days because of the humidity and there'll be a few storms mixed in Julie Walker New York

Mary Elizabeth Margolis Nadia Jong Elise Mason Brooklyn Julie Walker New York
Joe Moreno: Getting Rid of Cash Bail Allowed for Violent Crimes

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:20 min | 2 months ago

Joe Moreno: Getting Rid of Cash Bail Allowed for Violent Crimes

"Is a bit of a curve ball, but you're a native New Yorker. Army vet Lee zeldin is an army vet congressman Lee zeldin running so hard for governor of New York and yesterday attacked. I mean, I would daresay an attempted assassination. The guys charged with a felony and then released immediately, what kind of laws do they have up in New York these days? Jeff, it's amazing, right? I mean, Lee zeldin happens to be a close personal friend of mine. We serve together in the army. I've known him for about ten years. He's got a beautiful wife, two beautiful daughters, lives out in Long Island in the New York's first district where I grew up as coincidentally. And he's a great American. And it's unbelievable that people look around and say, why are we having problems with crime in our inner cities and places like New York City well guess what? When you do things like get rid of cash bail and you basically have as a default, anyone more or less anyone who commits a crime, even violent crimes be let out, I mean, what do you think is going to happen, right? So sure enough, you have a person who assaulted with a knife, my friend leaves out in. He got wrestled to the ground. There's no question about what happened. It's caught on videotape in front of a crowd of people at a campaign event, and a few hours later, he's let out.

Lee Zeldin New York Army New Yorker Jeff Long Island New York City
Danielle D'Souza Gill Joins Dinesh to Discuss Post-Roe America

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:27 min | 2 months ago

Danielle D'Souza Gill Joins Dinesh to Discuss Post-Roe America

"Danielle, welcome to the podcast. I want to start by just asking you I've been reading this article and I sent it to you from The New Yorker on abortion, but before we get to it, are you surprised that we are somewhat uneventfully in a post role America? For me, it's a little bit startling that we've seen this sea change in jurisprudence on this issue, and yet, you know, things are going on as normal, which is another way of saying that the left's hysterics on the issue and some of those are continuing. Our out of sync with the fact that people are living their normal lives and the issue is being decided locally as it should be. Of course. And I think that we won't really see the full effects of this until maybe a generation later because so many progressive activists that grew up in the 1960s and later after roe V wade in the 70s think that, oh abortion is just kind of a fragment, you know, it's something that's part of our society. And so they kind of just take it as part of the country almost, even though it really wasn't. And it was such a radical decision. And so I think that when people grow up, knowing that abortion isn't an option, they will probably make sure that they are not in that situation. And so I think there will be a lot more people who are pro life not even as activists, but just because that's the way the society is that they grew up in.

The New Yorker Danielle America
New Yorkers Drop Their Covid Vigilance as a BA.5 Wave Hits

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:52 sec | 2 months ago

New Yorkers Drop Their Covid Vigilance as a BA.5 Wave Hits

"New York Times. So 6 COVID wave hits many New Yorkers shrug it off. Of course they do. We were alarmed when it was alarming. When we were alarmed during the first wave and during delta, then we figured out that omicron is not is far more transmissible and not nearly as deadly. And we stop wearing masks, and many of us, and I still urge you to get vaccinated and boosted. And when they come out with a new booster, I'll go and get that because I don't want to get sick and lots of people have had COVID in my life in the last month. Half and they have a bad cold. So be .5, it's just diluted. It's down in its lethality. It's up in its transmissibility in New Yorkers are treating it like the flu. And like a cold. And no matter how many people yell at us to do something differently, we're not changing our mind. We know what it is.

New York Times FLU
Child Star Mason Reese Dumped by Model After Sex Confession

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:38 min | 2 months ago

Child Star Mason Reese Dumped by Model After Sex Confession

"About. Do you guys remember mason Reese? Remember the kid that commercial, he did a TV commercial in the 70s for Underwood, devil ham, the kid who couldn't say smorgasbord, right? He was like a dwarf, and we all laughed. Nowadays, if somebody pitched that commercial, they'd go to jail. You can't do that. But I know mason Reese for many years, he was in New York or a staunch New Yorker. And by hooker by crook, he's managed to still be a fixture in town. I love the guy. I just said, I know him Greek guy. And this is story going around that make it while you listen to this show. I need you to Google mason Reese. And look at the commercial he did when he was a kid. Just understand that first before I get into this sexual side of the story. Mason Reese has been dumped by as much younger girlfriend, just days after he claimed she was not the best lover he had. Now remember, this guy's under four foot tall. He's 57 years old now. And that is it. He shot to fame, starring in a series of popular commercials in the 1970s. And he began dating an only fans model named Sarah russie, who's 29. He started that three years ago. Now, this whole new thing of an only fans model. I understand as many beautiful girls out there, but this is a whole new thing. In my day, it used to be like if you date a model, she was either catalog or runway or. Working Europe, but now everybody is a model because they have an only fans page and most of those pages are them stick of their tits out for people for $9 a month or whatever the hell they charge. So everybody's a model now. Let's just make sure we understand that. So this chick russie ended the relationship last week after mason made this rude remark about her bedroom skills in an episode of the web TV series love don't judge. He said it's been messy, but actually she said it's been messy, he said, mean things to me and I said being things in, but our relationship sadly just became like

Mason Reese Underwood Sarah Russie Crook Hooker New Yorker New York Google Europe Mason
How to Get Through the Constant Flow of the News Cycle

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:51 sec | 3 months ago

How to Get Through the Constant Flow of the News Cycle

"Let's take an aside there. One of the things that you pointed out here is that the rapidity of the news cycle, the vast velocity with which news moves has changed everything everywhere in ways that we're only beginning and you as a novelist are beginning to see it before the public generally realized we all know that we can say it's moving so fast. But we actually don't know how fast it is yet. I mean, I start every day by reading the daily New Yorker. I mean, can you imagine back in the 1940s that there are 50s that New York would be publishing in effect a daily addition with fresh new pieces for every news cycle. Even the New Yorkers had to change. The stain came out of information that's out there.

Daily New Yorker New York
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

03:39 min | 3 months ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"I <Speech_Male> would imagine, I mean, if you <Speech_Male> think of horror <Speech_Male> as a Supernatural, <Speech_Male> right? <Speech_Male> Then <Speech_Male> the reason <Speech_Male> it's a subversion <Speech_Male> to the story is <Speech_Male> because whatever is being <Speech_Male> put into it <Speech_Male> has happened in real <Speech_Male> life, right? <Speech_Male> And so <Speech_Male> I can imagine <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> story where <Speech_Male> you only include <Speech_Male> things that have happened in <Speech_Male> real life and that feel <Speech_Male> like horror. <Speech_Male> Right? So <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> can easily <Speech_Male> imagine <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the father figure <Speech_Male> who is a devil, <Speech_Male> right? <Speech_Male> I mean, the <Speech_Male> title suggests <Speech_Male> something like that. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> What the title <Speech_Male> is doing is taking <Speech_Male> the weight off <Speech_Male> or <Speech_Male> is acting as sort of <Speech_Male> a buttress and arch. <Speech_Male> So the weight <Speech_Male> isn't falling <Speech_Male> the way you would expect <Speech_Male> it to fall. <Speech_Male> By calling it <Speech_Male> zombie, what <Silence> the title is doing <Speech_Male> is it's <Speech_Male> directing you <Speech_Male> to not <SpeakerChange> read it <Speech_Male> as memetic <Speech_Music_Female> fiction. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> It's just a wrap <Speech_Female> up <Speech_Female> you have recently <Speech_Female> gone to the <Speech_Female> experience of <Speech_Female> rewriting your first <Speech_Female> novel and a medium <Speech_Female> father. <Speech_Female> And the <Speech_Female> figure at the center <Speech_Female> of that novel <Silence> is also <Speech_Female> someone <Silence> morally reprehensible. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Whom, <Speech_Female> you know, you've <Speech_Female> built a book around in the way <Speech_Female> that Joyce is <Speech_Female> built a book <Speech_Female> around or <Speech_Female> first historian and <Speech_Female> then a book around this <Speech_Female> character. <Speech_Female> What is the appeal <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> of <Speech_Female> bringing someone like <Silence> that into <SpeakerChange> your fiction? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> For me, <Speech_Male> I've always <Speech_Male> felt that <Speech_Male> the value <Speech_Male> of a work of <Speech_Male> art is <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> weird can take you <Speech_Male> where you could <Silence> not go on your own. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And so the value <Speech_Male> of writing <Speech_Male> about somebody <Speech_Male> challenging <Speech_Male> is that it <Speech_Male> is taking you into a <Speech_Male> world that <Speech_Male> you could not imagine <Speech_Male> on your own. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> the value of a <Speech_Male> work is <Speech_Male> in direct <Speech_Male> relation to <Speech_Male> how <Speech_Male> far it can take <Silence> you from where you are, <Speech_Male> you know, <Speech_Male> that sort of how I was <Speech_Male> raised with the <Speech_Male> books that I <Speech_Male> read as a child. <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Male> one thing. <Speech_Male> The other reason <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> if <Speech_Male> you have characters who <Speech_Male> are doing things that <Speech_Male> are terrible, <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> attention, <Speech_Male> the dramatic <Speech_Male> action is always <Speech_Male> going to be around the <Speech_Male> characters who are active <Speech_Male> or agents, <Speech_Male> and so in <Speech_Male> that sense, it lends <Speech_Male> itself to <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> being converted <Speech_Female> into <SpeakerChange> scenes. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> So good people <Speech_Male> are boring. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Good people <Speech_Male> require a different <Speech_Male> structures with <Speech_Male> fiction. <Speech_Male> You know, it's a little bit <Speech_Male> like how <Speech_Male> in Gilead, <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> section will end <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you will have <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> basically <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> character <Speech_Male> announcing some loveliness <Speech_Male> inside them. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And that <Speech_Male> provides relief <Speech_Male> for the reader and the <Speech_Male> reader doesn't mind <Speech_Male> that going into the next thing. <Speech_Male> It provides <Speech_Male> a slide into <Speech_Male> the next thing. <Speech_Male> Whereas <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> zombie, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you are <Speech_Male> not sliding, <Speech_Male> you're being dragged <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> into scenes. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Dragged <Speech_Male> with a nice <Speech_Music_Male> pick. Yes. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Well, thank you <Speech_Male> so much, thank you. <Speech_Male> My <Speech_Female> pleasure. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Joyce Carol Oates <Speech_Female> has published more than 5 <Speech_Female> dozen books of fiction, <Speech_Female> including the novel's <Speech_Female> blond, the grave <Speech_Female> digger's daughter, and <Speech_Female> breathe, which came out <Speech_Female> last year. <Speech_Female> A new novel, <Speech_Female> babysitter, will be <Speech_Female> released later this <Speech_Female> year. <Speech_Female> Oats is a winner of the <Speech_Female> Penn malamut award, <Speech_Female> the ray award for <Speech_Female> the short story and <Speech_Female> the Jerusalem prize <Speech_Female> among others. <Speech_Female> She's been publishing <Speech_Female> fiction and nonfiction <Speech_Female> in The New Yorker since <Speech_Music_Female> 1994. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Akhil Sharma is the <Speech_Female> author of the story collection <Speech_Female> a life of adventure <Speech_Female> and delight, and the <Speech_Female> novel's family life <Speech_Female> and an obedient <Speech_Female> father, which won the pen <Speech_Female> Hemingway award in 2001. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> A revised <Speech_Female> version of an

Joyce Joyce Carol Oates Akhil Sharma The New Yorker
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

04:56 min | 6 months ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"Well, that it belongs to someone else in a weird way, like that it isn't felt or experience, but it's spoken of, as you say, it doesn't feel like you can quite reach it, but it also feels used up somehow already. It has grown inside me and corrupted my eyes. Yeah. Second hand, everything becomes secondhand. Sure. I want her to, you know, just hearing it now allowed as we've been still two years later dealing with the pandemic and different ways. You know, if we take it for a moment to be literal or think of that kind of removal from the streets that's happened to many of us, I think that's really a powerful moment because it also has this other accompanying feeling or set of feelings that I don't think we've sorted out yet even if we all return to work tomorrow. So here we are. What scrambled the way? I mean, it's a different feeling, but it's curious to me. What you're talking about, the literal, which I think is also accompanied by the metaphoric maybe. I think a powerful way to think about this poem and evidence of how a poem can really shift, doesn't necessarily change it, but shift its meaning depending on the context, make K Ryan has a famous example in The New Yorker about the chickens coming home to roost and that was accepted before 9 11, but then it ran after 9 11, and of course it had a completely different, meaning different inflection to the poem. And I know she was ambivalent about that. Right, right. Well, how do you feel about a kind of poem like this, which I think is purposely thinking about ambiguity, but also able to kind of talk about philosophy, but the Lake. I mean, it's a thing I admire in your work too, that we're going to hear in a minute. But do you think it ships on you or is that a tonal thing that you're drawn to as well? Absolutely. I think it's more powerful, given the reading that you gave it, that it seems to be more power poem becomes more powerful if it can speak into these different circumstances in which it wasn't written. Despite whatever misgivings of poet might have, but I think the powerful thing about this poem is it relates to now it's sort of exactly what you were saying that the pandemic has existed literally and figuratively at the same time. And we can't disentangle the two, and we're suffering from both. And so it's very difficult to even figure out when did this start? How did this start? You know, is this something that was even happening before the pandemic? I know in my own life, there's a kind of depression or despair that the pandemic has brought about, and you can't get your hands around it. You know, you can't figure out exactly.

The New Yorker Ryan depression
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

02:37 min | 6 months ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"<Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> But <Speech_Female> actually just <Speech_Female> brought up a point that's <Speech_Female> interesting to me, which is <Speech_Female> the story <Speech_Female> waivers <Speech_Female> between present <Speech_Female> tense and past tense, <Speech_Female> constantly, <Speech_Female> like one <Speech_Female> sentence after another <Silence> he switches tenses. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> There's someone telling a <Speech_Female> story and there's someone living <Speech_Female> a story. <Speech_Female> And they are <Speech_Female> both happening <Silence> at <SpeakerChange> the same <Speech_Male> time. <Speech_Male> Yeah, there's even that <Speech_Male> moment I was <Speech_Male> reading it. There's that moment <Speech_Male> when he's remembering <Speech_Male> being naked in <Speech_Male> the window and <Speech_Male> then he talks about leaning <Speech_Male> back and there's <Speech_Male> a moment of confusion <Speech_Male> there. Yeah. <Speech_Male> Wait, he's leaning back <Speech_Male> naked from the window <Speech_Male> or leaning back <Speech_Male> in the present day and it's <Speech_Male> in the present day, <Speech_Male> but you're not <Speech_Male> sure <Speech_Male> as the sentence is <Speech_Male> happening. It's only when the <Speech_Male> next sentence pops up <Speech_Male> that you realize he <Speech_Male> has transitioned back. <Speech_Male> And that's the only <Speech_Male> unclear one. <Speech_Male> Which says we're <Speech_Male> talking about it is very <Speech_Male> interesting that that's <Silence> the only unclear <Speech_Male> one. <Speech_Male> Wow. I mean, <Speech_Male> the guilt and shame <Speech_Male> of being an alcoholic <Speech_Male> and what he's done <Speech_Male> in his life. You're always <Speech_Male> doing the autopsy of <Speech_Male> yourself. <Speech_Male> The inventory <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and I <Silence> think that's what's going on <Speech_Male> for him. <Speech_Male> And then he gets <Silence> to that moment <Speech_Male> and <Silence> wow, so is he bringing <Speech_Male> something <Speech_Male> beautiful from <Speech_Male> the past into <Speech_Male> the present? <Speech_Male> Maybe that accounts for <Speech_Male> the blurring. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That he made <SpeakerChange> a positive <Speech_Female> step there. <Speech_Female> There you <Speech_Female> go. And he <Speech_Male> leans back into the step. <Speech_Male> Yes. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Literally. Yeah, <Speech_Male> you're working hard on <Speech_Male> you. You're never. <Speech_Male> Sherman, <Speech_Male> this is a <SpeakerChange> happy story. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> know, I just keep trying. <Speech_Male> I want to <SpeakerChange> have some hope <Speech_Male> for these guys. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And I do, <Speech_Male> I do, because <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> it works <Speech_Male> if you work it. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Well, <Speech_Male> thank you so much. <Speech_Male> Well, thank you, <Music> Deborah. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Raymond Carver, <Speech_Female> who died at age <Speech_Female> 50 in 1988, <Speech_Female> was the author <Speech_Female> of more than a dozen books <Speech_Female> of poetry and fiction, <Speech_Female> including the story <Speech_Female> collections will you <Speech_Female> please be quiet please, <Speech_Music_Female> what we talk about <Speech_Music_Female> when we talk about love <Speech_Music_Female> and cathedral. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Sherman Alexei's <Speech_Female> works of fiction include <Speech_Female> the absolutely true <Speech_Female> diary of a part time <Speech_Female> Indian, which won <Speech_Music_Female> the national book award for <Speech_Music_Female> young people's literature. <Speech_Music_Female> The toughest <Speech_Female> Indian in the world, <Speech_Female> and war dances, <Speech_Female> which won the pen <Speech_Female> faulkner award for fiction. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> You can download more <Speech_Female> than a 170 <Speech_Female> previous episodes of <Speech_Female> The New Yorker fiction podcast <Speech_Female> or subscribe <Speech_Female> to the podcast for free <Speech_Female> and Apple podcasts. <Speech_Female> On the writer's <Speech_Female> voice podcast, you can <Speech_Female> hear short stories from the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> magazine read by their <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> authors. <Speech_Female> You can find the writer's <Speech_Music_Female> voice another New Yorker <Speech_Music_Female> podcast on your podcast <Speech_Female> app. <Speech_Female> Tell us what you thought of <Speech_Female> this program on our Facebook <Speech_Female> page or rate and <Speech_Music_Female> review us in Apple podcasts. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> The New Yorker fiction <Speech_Female> podcast is produced <Speech_Female> by Michelle Moses. <Speech_Music_Female> I'm Deborah <Speech_Music_Male> treisman, thanks <Music> for listening.

confusion Sherman Alexei Raymond Carver Deborah The New Yorker Apple Michelle Moses Facebook
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

02:22 min | 6 months ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"He tugs the bill of his cap, then he sets about his business. He picks up his bucket, he starts climbing the ladder. I lean back into the step behind me now and cross one leg over the other. Maybe later this afternoon, I'll try calling my wife again. And then I'll call to see what's happening with my girlfriend. But I don't want to get her mouthy sun on the line. If I do call, I hope it'll be out somewhere doing whatever he does when he's not hanging around the house. I try to remember if I ever read any Jack London books. I can't remember. But there was a story of his I read in high school. the sky in the Yukon is freezing, imagine it. He's actually going to freeze the death if he can't get a fire going. With a fire he can dry his socks and clothing and warm himself. He gets his fire going. But then something happens to it. A branch full of snow drops on it, it goes out. Meanwhile, the temperature is falling. Night is coming on. I bring some change out of my pocket. I'll try my wife first. If she answers, I'll wish her a happy new year. But that's it. I won't bring up business. I won't raise my voice, not even if she starts something. Shall ask me where I'm calling from. And I'll have to tell her, I won't say anything about new year's resolutions. There's no way to make a joke out of this. After I talk to her, I'll call my girlfriend. Maybe I'll call her first. I'll just have to hope I don't get her son on the line. Hello sugar. I'll say when she answers. It's me. That was Sherman alexie, reading where I'm calling from by Raymond Carver. The story appeared in The New Yorker in March of 1982 and was included in the collection cathedral, which was published by knopf in 1983..

Jack London Sherman alexie Raymond Carver The New Yorker knopf
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

04:27 min | 6 months ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"This month, we're going to hear where I'm calling from by Raymond Carver, which was published in The New Yorker in March of 1982. We've only been in here a couple of days. We're not out of the Woods yet. JP has the shakes and every so often a nerve, maybe it isn't a nerve, but it's something. Begins to jerk in my shoulder. The story was chosen by Sherman Alexei, who's the author of 19 books of fiction and poetry, including blasphemy, new and selected stories, and the novel flight. High Sherman. Hi, Deborah. How are you? It's nice to see someone in person for once..

Raymond Carver The New Yorker Sherman Alexei High Sherman Deborah
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

02:38 min | 7 months ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"Well, <Speech_Female> she believed that through her <Speech_Female> writing that she was making <Speech_Female> a kind of community <Speech_Female> of people. <Speech_Female> She really believed <Speech_Female> in imagined communities <Speech_Female> and she <Speech_Female> really believed that by <Speech_Female> imagining this community <Speech_Female> that she could <Speech_Female> change the world and that <Speech_Female> we would see <Speech_Female> our own communities <Speech_Female> in her community <Speech_Female> and that we would <Speech_Female> feel affirmed <Speech_Female> and to borrow <Speech_Female> a phrase <Speech_Female> from Thomas haney <Speech_Female> steadied. <Speech_Female> When he said poetry is <Speech_Female> studying, <Speech_Male> you know, I do feel that that's <Speech_Female> one of the functions <Speech_Female> of fiction to be <Speech_Female> steadying. <Speech_Female> And I think <Speech_Female> that Paley believed that, <Speech_Female> so she would write these <Speech_Female> things and that <Speech_Female> we would recognize <Speech_Female> her own agency <Speech_Female> in this, we would <Speech_Female> recognize our own <Speech_Female> networks of <Speech_Female> women. We would <Speech_Female> understand the potency of <Speech_Female> that and that <Speech_Female> it would go straight <Speech_Female> from the page <Speech_Female> right out into the world. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> I think when <Speech_Female> you look at the way that <Speech_Female> her work has survived, <Speech_Female> I think she was right. <Speech_Female> I mean, <Speech_Female> it's just amazing. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> The people who are still <Speech_Female> reading grease pale <SpeakerChange> today, <Speech_Female> I mean, <Speech_Female> they are passionate <Speech_Female> about her. <Speech_Female> It isn't just <Speech_Female> like, oh, I really <Speech_Female> admire the story. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> It's not that. <Speech_Female> They are just <Speech_Female> completely completely <Speech_Female> completely. <Speech_Female> Her acolytes, <Speech_Female> really. <Speech_Female> And so I think <Speech_Female> that when I look <Speech_Female> at the story and I <Speech_Female> look at kind of this <Speech_Female> world that she imagined, I <Speech_Female> look at the way she <Speech_Female> turns <Speech_Female> the family <SpeakerChange> upside down, <Speech_Female> marriage is upside down. <Speech_Female> It's all upside down. <Speech_Female> And so <Speech_Female> we have this world where, <Speech_Female> yes, there are lots of <Speech_Female> problems, but women are <Speech_Female> in the middle of it. <Speech_Female> And I think that imagining <Silence> that <SpeakerChange> world, <Speech_Female> she <Speech_Female> helps us kind of think, <Speech_Female> you know what? <Speech_Female> I'm not wasting <Speech_Female> my time when <Speech_Female> I, you know, when I hang out <Speech_Female> with these kids, <Speech_Female> it's not all just <Silence> time away from my writing. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Actually, these things go <Speech_Male> together and <Speech_Female> actually, <Speech_Female> what am I doing with <Speech_Female> my writing, if not <Speech_Male> making the world better <Speech_Male> for my children? <Speech_Female> This is a kind of <Speech_Female> wholeness of vision <Speech_Female> here that <Speech_Female> I still find just <Speech_Female> incredibly inspiring. <Speech_Female> It's <Speech_Female> maybe only one <Speech_Female> idea about art, <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> but it's certainly <Speech_Music_Male> a very powerful one. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Well, <Speech_Female> thank you so much, gish. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Oh, it's my <Speech_Male> pleasure, Deborah. <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Grace <Speech_Female> Paley, who died in <Speech_Female> 2007, <Speech_Female> was a short story <Speech_Female> writer, poet, and <Speech_Female> political activist. <Speech_Female> Her books <Speech_Female> include the story collections <Speech_Female> enormous changes <Speech_Female> at the last minute, <Speech_Female> and later the <Speech_Female> same day. <Speech_Female> And the poetry volumes, <Speech_Female> leaning <Speech_Music_Female> forward, and begin <Speech_Female> again. A grace Paley <Speech_Female> reader, a collection of <Speech_Female> her stories non fiction <Speech_Female> and poems edited <Speech_Female> by Kevin Bowen <Speech_Female> and norah Paley, <Speech_Female> was published in 2017. <Music> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Christian is the author of <Speech_Female> 9 books, including the <Speech_Female> novel's world and <Speech_Female> town which was nominated <Speech_Female> for the international <Speech_Female> impact Dublin <Speech_Female> literary award, <Speech_Female> and the resisters, <Speech_Female> and the <Speech_Female> story collections <Speech_Female> whose Irish and <Speech_Female> thank you mister Nixon, <Speech_Female> which was published in February. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> She's been publishing fiction <Speech_Female> in The New Yorker <Speech_Female> since 1990.

Thomas haney Paley Kevin Bowen norah Paley Deborah grace Paley mister Nixon The New Yorker
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

04:39 min | 7 months ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"Yeah, there's something about that conversation on the train because I suppose what happens between faith and Anne, the anger or the sort of slightly subsumed hostility between them, or that an feels towards faith, maybe for her good luck. Comes out and I think that some moment faith sort of four sees a future of enmity between them. You know that this friendship may be coming to an end. Yeah, you know, I have to say that although the tension is there that I don't really feel like that they're going to fall out. But it is interesting. I mean, it's interesting that faith downplays her good luck with Selena. But somehow and still registers that faith has been luckier than she. And resents her. And so we're just seeing the way in which the story of course is very non linear. It's very not about plot. In the end, you know, you feel like what really matters now is that there could be another rupture. Selena's already left them. And on top of it, there could be a rupture with Anne, and then what? And then again, you feel just how much these relationships matter. These friendships really, really, really merely matter. Yeah, in a way, I almost read this as three sisters whose mother has died. You know? And then, yes. Is there Bond going to survive? Yes. Selena was a little older, and she was some other figure that they wanted crowding around them when they were sick or were in danger. And so they've lost this kind of protective force over them that held them together. And do they then stay together? Yeah. And of course it was a very particular kind of protective force because she was the one who said everything was okay. And it's interesting that faith is also kind of accused of being, you know, the goody goody, everything is so hunky Dory person. She isn't actually as hunky Dory is Selena. Selena is really the one who sort of says, you know, actually, it just wasn't that bad. Even being abandoned at home and it just wasn't the bad, you know? She got her own bed in the home. Yeah, yeah. She wore rose colored glasses. Even more than faith. And so you do feel like one of the things that's going on is those glasses are coming off. And now what? Yeah, yeah. And interesting that Selena wore them since she was the one who did lose her child. Yeah, and can they really face reality as Anne presents it? Which is probably the closer to the truth, right? That's a tough question for all of us, I think. Yeah, there's an interesting moment where Anne says that those are facts. That's different from the truth. Yeah. Exactly. You know that Selena has told him the facts about being left at the home. But what she told them may not be the truth about.

Selena Anne hunky Dory
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

04:17 min | 10 months ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"A 100%. What else about the poem struck you? Something that I also think Tracy is excellent at, which you might not be able to perceive in a spoken word recitation is the way in which she completely commands the page. And so thinking about white space in whiteness, thinking about how format of the declaration that we take for granted as kind of being written in stone. She plays with that. And so it's not just kind of cutting off or cutting into the middle of words, but letting them kind of stand on their own. And so for example, to keep hitting that same note at the end, it's taken captive on the high seas to bear. Those sentiments are given their own kind of gravitas and wait, because they matter, it's kind of the largest of what's been left on reconciled. And so it has to stand on its own. Well, and the words to bear are bearing a lot there. You know? And they have those homonyms of bearing one soul, but also bearing up. And I think it's really powerful as you say. And I think I almost take for granted how much that white space as you put it, the negative space. She's kind of turning into a positive. And I think that's really a powerful thing. And you know, it's something that I want to talk about with you briefly when we turn to your work, because I think you very much think about the page in this new book and are thinking about an inventive way so I want to talk about that too. Awesome. Now on December 6th, 2021, The New Yorker published a sequence of poems from your book, call us what we carry, including ships manifest, which will read for us momentarily. Is there anything you'd like to tell us about the poem first, anything listeners might need to know before hearing it? All I would say before you kind of engage with it is when I wrote ships manifest, I originally wasn't necessarily writing it for readers. I was writing it for myself. It was my way to kind of fashion a thesis statement. I could follow and create the rest of the book. And so it more so was my own manifesto, my own type of declaration that is to say of what I was setting out to do..

Tracy The New Yorker
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"This phonetically celebrated among cooks cups and gabby fans not to mention thrillers and switches. As the great example of jeffrey right plays a food writer. Named roebuck. right. Who's one part james baldwin and one part. Aj labeling who is the new yorkers correspondent on eating and boxing to prepare for the part right watch tapes of baldwin debating. Lima buckley in nine hundred sixty five at the cambridge union. Here's jeffrey wright. Reading from james baldwin's essay equal in paris. I considered the french in ancient intelligent and cultured race. Which indeed they are. I did not know. However that ancient glories imply at least in the middle of the present century present fatigue and quite possibly paranoia that there is a limit to the role of the intelligence in human affairs and that no people come into possession of a culture without having paid a heavy price for it. This price they cannot of course assess but it is revealed in their personalities and in their institutions the very word institutions from my side of the ocean where it seemed to me. We suffered so cruelly from the lack of them had a pleasant rain as of safety and order and commonsense one had to come into contact with these institutions in order to understand that they were also outmoded exasperated completely impersonal and very often cruel similarly the personality which it seemed from a distance to be so large and free had to be dealt with before one could see that if it was large it was also inflexible and for the foreigner full of strange high dusty rooms. Which could not be inhabited one hand in short to come in contact with an alien culture.

james baldwin Lima buckley cambridge union roebuck jeffrey wright Aj jeffrey baldwin boxing paranoia paris
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Her mother who spent the more years in a concentration camp says nothing. I feel as if i were watching to screen simultaneously goal still invisible says.

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

12:50 min | 1 year ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"The faults. That ross devoted. His life to correcting a grief-stricken friend in boston charged with the task of spreading the news. But two days to talk sensibly said it's all over. He meant that ross was dead but the listener took it to mean that the operation was over here in three easy words. Or the ambiguity. The euphemistic softness the verbal infirmity. That herald w ross spent his life thrusting at ross regarded every sentence as the enemy and believed that if a man watched closely enough he would discover the vulnerable spot the essential weakness. He devoted his life to making the week strong a rather specialized form of blood transfusion to be sure but one that he believed in with such a consuming passion that his spirit infected others inspire them and lifted them. Whatever it was this contagion this vapor in these marshes it spread none escaped it nor is likely to be dissipated in a hurry. His ambition was to publish one good magazine not a string of successful ones and he thought of the new yorker as sort of movement. He came equipped with not much knowledge. Only two books webster's dictionary and fowler's modern english usage. These books were his history his geography his literature his art. His music is everything. Some people found ross's scholastic deficiencies quite appalling. And we're not sure they had met the right man but he was the right man and the only question was whether the other fellow was capable of being tuned to ross's vibrations. Ross had a thing that is least as good as and sometimes better than knowledge he had a sort of natural drive in the right direction plus a complete respect for the work and ideas and opinions of others. It took a little while to get onto the fact that ross more violently than almost anybody was proceeding in a good direction and carrying others along with him under torrential conditions. He was like a boat being driven at the mercy of some internal squall a disturbance. He himself only half understood and of which he was at times suspicious in a way he was a lucky man for a monument. He has the magazine date. One thousand three hundred ninety nine issues born in the toil and pain that can be appreciated only by those who helped in the delivery room. These are his they stand. Unchangeable an open for inspection. So let's do some inspecting. The great city began as a cluster of tradesmen's villages. Only the names remain unchanged the bricklayers. Quarter the butcher's arcade pickpocket cul-de-sac like every living city in the movie. The character that owen wilson plays is her saints says iraq in the film says iraq is described as writing only about hobos pimps and junkies. He's based on. Joe mitchell the original low-life reporter for the new yorker. He covered the waterfront. one of his. Most famous pieces was about the city as a playground for rats. A note of caution shakiness ahead. Here's owen wilson. Reading joseph mitchell in new york as great seaports rats bound. One is occasionally in their presence without being aware of it in the whole city relatively few blocks entirely free of them they have diminished greatly in the last twenty five years but there are still millions here. Some authorities believe that in the five boroughs. There's a rat for every human being. The biggest rat colonies in the city are found in random structures or near the waterfront especially in tenements live poultry markets wholesale produce markets slaughterhouses warehouses staples in garages. They also turn up and more surprising places. Department of health inspectors have found their claws and tail tracks in the basements of some of the best restaurants in the city. They nest in the roofs of some of the l. stations in many live and crannies in the subways in the early morning hours during the long lulls between trains they climbed the platforms and forage among the candy bar wrappers in peanut holes there old rap pass beneath the benches in at least two ferry sheds in the spring and summer multitudes of our species the brown rat live and twisting many chambered boroughs in vacant lots and parks. There are great colonies of this kind of rat in central park after the first cold snap. They begin to migrate hunting for warm basements. Herds have been seen on autumn nights scuttling across fifth avenue. The rats came out by twos and threes and some side streets in the theatrical district. Practically every morning around four thirty the scou- shaped trucks that collect kitchen scraps from restaurants nightclubs and saloons. All over manhattan for the pig farms and secaucus new jersey roll into these streets at that time shortly after the trucks have made their pickups. If no people are stirring the rats appear and search for drop scraps they seem to pop up out of the air away from their nests there. Usually on the edge of hysteria they will severely bite babies. There is an epidemic of this year or so ago in a row of tenements in the wall about neighborhood in brooklyn and they will bite sleeping adults but ordinarily they flee from people if hemmed in and sometimes if to suddenly come upon they attack they fight savagely in blindly in the manner of mad dogs. It is dangerous to poke at them. They're able to run right up. A cane or a broomstick and inflict deep gash like bites on their assailants hands a month or so ago in broad daylight on the street in front of a riding academy on the west side. A stable boy tried to kill a rat with a mop. It darted up the mop handle in toward the thumbnail off. The boys left hand their lease cautious in the two or three hours before dawn and they are encountered most often by milkman nightwatchman scrub women policeman and other people who are regularly abroad in those hours. The average person rarely sees one when he does it is a disquieting experience. Anyone who's been confronted by a rat in the bleakness of a manhattan dawn and a seen at world and slink away its claws. Rasping against the pavement thereafter understands fully. Why this beast has been for centuries a symbol of judas in the stool pigeon of sola snus in general an alcoholic wards. The rat is the animal that most frequently appears in the visual hallucinations of patients. With the dt's in ireland in fact the dt's are often referred to as seeing the rat. That's joseph mitchell writing in nineteen forty four. Now we're going to jump ahead to a whole different era of the new yorker. This is the late nineteen sixties touching narcissism of the young. What do they want freedom to woods. How dare you stop dickering. Go make francis. Mcdormand's character listened to cremins is mostly based on mavis gallant. With a dash of lillian ross thrown in gilan mostly wrote jewel like short stories. Set in paris where she lived but she covered the student uprisings of nine hundred sixty eight as well. Here's francis mcdormand reeling from mavis galanos. The events in may may four hd caught in traffic jam around santa mass. I'm michelle midst of student. Disorders says this is different. They all seem very young. He sees a barricade made a parked cars. They've moved away from the curb is very impatient. Hates disorder talk with mb. She saw the police charge outside. The balls are abroad. Raspberry says their apartment full of tear gas. They live on the fifth floor. Wouldn't let her daughter talk on the telephone inside of windows. Police think nothing to throwing grenades houses that if they could throw one up to the fifth floor says gas makes it impossible to sleep at night crowds. Traffic jams see a crowd. I feel the mixture of tension and curiosity that has always a signal of something happening. And i hear shouting and see police cars. I duck into central metro. I hate these things. See more pictures and papers and account surprising of how students far from fleeing regroup and charge may sex in the night here that familiar wave of sound as during the algerian crisis in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight. Get dressed go out. As far as careful. Rospa all confusion students do not run. It is not nineteen fifty eight after all attack in a kind of frenzy. That seems insane courage of these kids. Don't get too near see what is obviously innocent. Bystander hit on the air by policemen. Decide not to tell anyone as friends would have fit all night shouts cries harsh slogans chanted police cars ambulances cars going up and down my one way street running feet. I open a shudder and see that. I am the only person on the street at a window. Are they scared or respectable or what scared of police or a student may fourteenth. Yesterday at the big demo. The woman professor kept looking at me. Coyly with our head to one side and speaking to me as if i were a plucky child recovering from brain fever in a russian novel turned out. She thought i was an algerian. And that was her way of showing. She wasn't racist brief flash of what it must be like to be on the receiving end of liberal kindness. The awful sugar. The police the police involved in last night's tobacco had been brought in from brittany where brito nationalists had been staging a strike. They traveled all night from the morning when they arrived from their breakfast. Time say they were giving no more food. They stood from noon until two o'clock in the morning without one scrap of food they stood. They didn't sit down and they watched the barricades going up knowing they were going to have to demolish them and the kids behind them at around two in the morning they were given the order to charge. They been given clubs to hit with and gas bombs to throw. What were they supposed to do. Boy who lives in my building tells me a story that sounds like a dream how the people who lived on those streets shower. The students with soci- solan chocolate and brought them coffee not the police. How some of the students actually began to talk to the police. Not arguing discussing talking. He says seriously about their problems. And do god the structure society the crs would just people and not all of them middle aged some them only boys at around to their order. King regroup. get back in your lines. Put on your helmets and charge. He says it was unreal. Dream like the tear gas the armed men with those great round. Shields the beatings. But they were the same men. Talk with young barbara. The german students are being deported. She tells me but we need here. They are organized. They can tell us what to do. We news all swan liz alabama. Yes we need the germans..

ross Joe mitchell herald w ross owen wilson iraq milkman nightwatchman fowler webster cremins the new yorker mavis gallant lillian ross gilan francis mcdormand mavis galanos boston Ross saints Department of health Mcdormand
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Classic new.

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

09:22 min | 1 year ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Spruce too was have two was. We want to leave you with this. This thing last show we play in the encore. By the way encores are weird right. We should just call them what they really are as p breaks. We assume that we're going to get an encore. Because everyone always gets an encore. Seems to be self diminishing We at the end of the night. We like to play this song. I hope you enjoy the last song on our record. And it's kind of what we're talking about earlier. I think it's got the stuff All to skid at all joy way so we run in four of arafat. Sitting creeks sift invisibles. Very rich rain could was the sad time. Panama like anna. Don was a friend of mine could however this is not a fairytale this so.

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

07:19 min | 1 year ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Since then vernon in various bandmates have released three more records and won two grammys. He also became a frequent collaborator with kanye west. The new yorkers amanda petrous spoke with vernon at the new yorker festival back in twenty nineteen. Along with brad. Cook and chris messina who also worked on bony bears album. I come on so a lot of people. I think. I came to know you just kinda dude with guitar. But in recent years you've become something of a master collaborator. It seems to me that one of the central tensions of bony there is that kind of push pull between the individual and the collective. So do you think of bony veras a band. Is it a more kind of fluid enterprise. It's never been nailed down for me. You know if anything the closest i feel to a true way to describe it as it's like a little town that's growing ever forever. It did kind of start out with just me. But i'm always kind of constantly thinking about how you're never really alone. You when you when you are physically alone you got there these evita people that made you who you are and so in a way i think when i thought of that name bona avair for the when it was just playing the music i did imagine a town community so to speak and so. That's that's the closest. I get to to naming the thing so as a bony air nerd my sense of how you guys work is is that it's somewhat modular. You're kind of building a song from pieces in the studio and i'm curious. This is a question for all three of you how you know when a song is done. Yeah i definitely think there's times worse the half the room things asong might be done in the other half dozen and that could be years that goes on but i think what we ultimately figured out. It's a feeling and i think like at least for the three of us. It was a pretty simple litmus test about like where we all psyched on the song. Do we all feel like this is moving us at the car and we left texas feeling pretty confident. We still re-addressed if you little things. But i think that's all it ever it can be with. This is that. Because i think the way they justin rights include so much possibility from source material for example. You know that we just gotta like find whatever the common emotion is and then we sort of go from there and ultimately make room for the voice over that heavens. You're looking at each other in the eye and be like is good and then christie. Do we'd be like no chris. Is that true. Are you the kind of control group. I suppose not always right. This is the most respectable officer on the force. I just an incredible record. So for emma through the new record i think is one of the most masterful for album runs. I can think of and also indicative in my opinion of a really extraordinary range in terms of style tone and sound and i wonder it again. This is a question for all three of you. Do you think about genre. I mean other as listeners or as performers producers is kind of figure into your experience of music. Kind of questioning genres. Is this or even interrogating yourself. In terms of what genres you are drawn to. I've never liked the. I've never liked genres got to meet. Quincy you got to quincy jones. And maybe maybe consciously we try to screw things up a lot to to just like shake loose. Any sort of you know somebody staring at you feel like they're going to melt a laser hole through your brain or something because they're expecting you to do something but i don't think we we don't want that. Yeah yeah so. There's a song on the new record that's effectively titled shittiest day in american history and there are a few other tracks little lewd to the national condition to climate change to our president. I'm curious as songwriters and producers. Sort of how much politics. You're kind of comfortable allowing into the room. Because i think it's a balance. A lot of artists are struggling with right now. Kind of how big of a you know how much space you should give those ideas. It's so tough. It's so tough you you know got you know argument with name name dropping kind enough but got into a big argument with him about about it. You know as willing to listen to a certain point. And then i just wasn't. Because i ran out of patience and i think we all we run out of patience sooner than we'd like to think and it's amazing to me that people that i agree with mostly would be more on the left and i feel like it's you know people with with empathy but when you're looking at when you're looking at the right side or the side that i look at it and i always imagined to be evil or or something to not go there to not approach with like pure love and empathy. It's you're just you're going to be at a battle but then again. I don't really know how i don't know how to do that. I don't want to have that much patience. I don't know how to get not angry. When i'd like to be better at that personally but i mean as a musician you can sing about it and you can mode about it in feel about it. I mean being open to understanding that we aren't right. I think is probably our best. Our best bet and certainly writing songs is vulnerable. Play vulnerable place to be to start so lyrically justin. I feel like your work tends to completely resist narrative extrapolation you. You often are telling traditional stories. Or at least you're not telling them in traditional ways and and i think your language is really beautiful and it's really evocative and it's complicated and i'm curious how you write lyrics sort of what the processes you keep a notebook is it spontaneous and improvised. I mean there's certainly a lot of that. A lot of trying to improvise something into existence that will exist forever but sometimes you also got to just work you know it took it took some pretty firm hand holding of brad because there's just big giant holes or or i'd be like no i think that's it i don't know why don't even know what those words are. They are words but we need to keep it or but just to have the you know you have to put in the work and it isn't it isn't easy just started writing in a notebook again instead of my computer Just to get. If it's much less distraction so you're always here always tweaking. I guess there was a typewriter at one point..

amanda petrous veras vernon chris messina grammys kanye west evita brad Cook justin quincy jones christie emma Quincy texas chris
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Emanuel ax on piano. And yo yo ma on the cello. They played beethoven's cello sonata number. Three in a major and they spoke with alex. Ross music critic. For the new yorker alex's most recent book is called wagner ism. This is the new yorker radio hour. Hope you enjoy the show..

Emanuel ax alex Three new yorker Ross beethoven wagner ism
"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"Hi samantha. Hi deborah. Thanks for having me. How did yin li's work. I come into your life <hes>. That's a great question. I have to say. I think it was originally from the new yorker. It wasn't this story. This wasn't the first. Union story i encountered. Maybe it was extra. This one though sheltered woman has always stayed with me so deeply. There's no easy way to forget it. There's no easy way to feel like i'm done thinking about it. And i've been interested to see how often it returns to me again. And again. And i think that i initially was so attracted to it. Because it's such a complicated story about mothering and mothering. Stories while not rare <hes>. Ones that are complicated enough to satisfy me are rare that to find a story that questions mothering. Or even that digs in to the extent that this one does where you know we're bringing in themes of capitalism and the effects of capitalism on mothering. I mean. I don't know that i've seen that really anywhere else <hes>. Maybe in some amazing science fiction but never in a story that dwells in realism. The way this story does and the fact that yijun decided to kind of capture this luminol moment of one month. You know the first month and to take that tiny quiet microcosm and make it into this devastating huge chasm of a universe. I i find that unbelievable right. The story deals with a character who only takes care of babies in the first month of their lives. And who also takes care of mothers in the first month of <hes>. Of motherhood motherhood is something you have written about a fair amount in your own fiction. Yeah yeah. I am a mother of three and i think that when i became a mother i like most mothers was amazed at how little i knew beforehand. Despite having mother despite being daughter. I knew so very little about how to do this. And the way that it would change my identity the way that it would open me up in a tremendous way and so i. I went looking for literature that reflected that to some extent in. I don't know that i found too much of it. Even the word mother the first place we go is someplace. Really very basic and stereotypical i. You know it's like making dinner making cookies driving mini vans and there's none of that in a sheltered woman and i really appreciated that because i did feel like when i first became a mother having made life became obsessed with death which ultimately you know that makes a lot of sense and yet no one had prepared me for that and no one had told me that was going to happen so i kind of looked for the pieces that dealt with that question and tried to write these stories myself so now. Here's samantha hunt reading sheltered woman by and li a sheltered woman. The new mother groggy from a nap sat at the table is though she did not grasp why she had been summoned. Perhaps she never would anti may thought on the place mat sat a bowl of soybean and pig's foot soup that anti may had cooked as she had for many new mothers before this one many however was not exact in her interviews with potential employers. Auntie may always gave the precise number of families she had worked for a hundred and twenty six when she interviewed with your current employer. A hundred and thirty one babies altogether the families contact information the dates she had worked for them their babies names and birthdays these. She had recorded in a palm size notebook which had twice fallen apart and been taped back together years ago. Auntie may had bought it at a garage sale in moline illinois. She had liked the picture of flowers on the cover purple and yellow unmelted snow surrounding the chased pedals. She had liked the price of the notebook to five cents when she handed a dime to the child but the cashbox on his lap. She asked if there was another notebook she could buy so that he would not have to give her any change. The boy looked perplexed and said no. It was greed that had made her ask but when the memory came back it often did when she took the notebook out of her suitcase for another interview. Auntie may would laugh at herself. Why on earth had she wanted to know books. When there's not enough to fill one. The mother sat still not touching the spoon until tear-drops fell into the steaming soup. Now anti may said she was pushing herself in the baby. A new rocking chair back and forth back and forth this squeaking less noticeable than

yin li yijun the new yorker samantha deborah samantha hunt
"the new yorker" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"the new yorker" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And The New Yorker welcome to The New Yorker radio hour I'm David Remnick article one is adopted well one thing that everybody noticed during last week's impeachment vote again and again during that marathon session was the rigidity of American political tribalism the Democrats framed it all as a matter of principle they invoke the constitution the oath of office and the judgment of history Republicans of course called B. S. on that they said this is nothing more than a political vendetta they said you guys have been out to overturn the election from day one they called it an impeachment looking for a crime it's you against us now one of the truly strange things about this political moment is that some of the old ideological battle lines have actually softened since twenty sixteen we rarely hear now about the national debt for example which is one of the great political divides for a generation or more and yet the softening of those battle lines hasn't brought the parties together one inch somehow exactly the opposite has happened today our political correspondent Charles birthday we'll be taking a long and close look at how partisanship is warping our politics and if you think the floor of the house is the most partisan place in America stick with us because Charles may surprise you that's later this hour we'll start there with the actor Peter Dinklage for a long time Dinklage considered himself a man of the theater a downtown off Broadway kind of guy and he has some good roles in small films but then along came HBO's adaptation of game of thrones and he was cast in the role of Tyrion Lannister.

The New Yorker B. S. Charles birthday Peter Dinklage HBO Tyrion Lannister David Remnick America