37 Burst results for "The New York Times"

Fresh update on "the new york times" discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

The Rich Eisen Show

00:09 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "the new york times" discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

"And we have this soon to be 11 month old in the house and a 12 year old, and a 12 year old obviously is pretty self sufficient, and has way too much clothing anyway, so that's kind of done. How much more stuff does the 11 month old need? I don't know. There's always something coming in Amazon. I get to the building and the guy's like, hey, you got some packages. I'm like, why? I didn't order anything. So the game now is, is it my name on the package, or is it whitey's name on the package? And I will tell you art, 98% of the time, guess whose name it's not for. It's not for you. Darn right. Darn right, it's not for me. Because I don't buy anything. I don't need to update my clothing. I'm married. Like, what do I have to update, right? I'm not out there impressing anybody. You should impress the wife. No. I'm pressed anyway. I don't need to buy new clothing. I'm always buying boots. I mean, I've got like 6 pairs of boots. Like a cowboy boots? Two pairs of tactical and three pairs. Oh, like work boots. Three pairs of hiking boots. Yeah. Why do you need three pairs of hiking boots? What's wrong with the other? What's wrong with two pair? Or like one pair? Like how many do you need? See, that's the color match like what you're wearing. Yeah. You know, the black ones for today. I feel black today, you know? I feel blue tomorrow. I didn't know art Martinez, the marine has a tactical idea. Oh, absolutely. Like one pair of sneakers and like 30 pairs of boots. Exactly. What a closet that must be. Next time I'm in LA, I want to see the Martinez closet. The boot collection. Do you wipe them down every time you get home? Do you display them? I'm cleaning them. I'm spit shining them. Yeah, absolutely. If you have a little label on it, what these are, what they usage for? Exactly. These boots, I purchased in 2013 at red wing. They were fantastic. The leather is second to none. Abby hilarious. You can curate your boots. I had no idea. I learned something new about you all the time. There you go. Absolutely. You have a boot fetish. That's not one you probably want to tell people. Oh, I got another one for you too. Fetish or what? Remember when Blake Martinez signed with the Raiders? It would be me and the Pokémon guy? Yes. Yeah. Yeah, and he only lasted four games. Did you buy a Blake Martinez Jersey? I did. Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait, wait, wait, wait, wait. You bought a Jersey for a guy that had no guarantee that he would last anywhere, 'cause he's a journeyman type of linebacker, right? Yeah. So. But it's my name. It is my name, though. Okay, so that's okay. Okay, that's true, art. I will give you that. So that's fine. Did you buy it? Because you like Blake Martinez or did you buy 'cause it was kind of cool that a raider had your last name so you could get a Jersey that actually had your last name. That one. Yes. Okay. See, that's not bad though, and I'll tell you why. There's nothing worse than people that will take an existing number that a player has. Like, you take Derek Carr's for Jersey and you put Martinez on that, right? Like that's ridiculous. Yeah, I wouldn't do that. Right. So because your last name is Martinez and they have a guy in the team named Martinez. Who only lasted four games? But still, but that's kind of clever. You didn't like put some, you didn't put your name on Khalil max Jersey number, right? It was like 52 in there. So the whole point for me is that's fine. You can actually, you know, the explanation makes it okay. Now there's never been in probably never will be a guy named schwarzman playing in the NFL. So I don't think I'm gonna be buying a Jersey anytime soon. Yeah. Right. That one's kind of hard. My name is Smith. I have the pick of the litter, right? Do I go to fontaine? Do I get? It's a good question. Who's got the most whose last name has raised the most? How many of guys are in the NFL with the same last name? Gotta be Smith. Has to be, right? Ah, that's a good question. I mean, if you look at every roster, or Wilson, maybe, right? The Jets have Garrett, they have Zach, Miami's got Jeff Wilson right, former former 49er. I'm sure there's other Wilson's out close. Russell. Russell Wilson, exactly. Russell Wilson? Yeah, yeah. And we just named four off the top of our heads, and we haven't even delved into the bowels of a 53 man roster. Exactly. There's got to be other guys named Wilson. Smith got Harrison Smith, devonta Smith. Who am I missing? Oh, roquan Smith. Oh yeah, can't forget him. What's the guy, the guy on the ravens, got 9 and a half sacks. He came from Green Bay. That's a smith, right? I think Green Bay's got. This is Darius. Right? Something like that? I mean, there's gotta be Smiths all over the place as well. Has to be. I'm going smither Wilson. If I have a Betty man, I'm betting Smith or Wilson is going to be. Yeah, absolutely. The most common name. How many Martinez is are there? Blake retired, right? He's selling Pokémon. He was probably the only one. Yeah, he's probably the only one. 28 years old, retiring and what did you see how much he sold that Pokémon 50, right? 650 grams? Yeah. That's insane. Isn't that shouldn't that be for kids? Exactly. Yeah, jeez. Kids guess he's worth that? I guess he had it. He's had it for a while. Here's what I don't get. That piece of cardboard. Cost triple the average home price in America. Right? Not in California. Well, no, not in California, but I'm just saying like, you know, the rest of the country. The rest of the country. Everywhere else, besides like New York and California, like 200 grand, you can buy a decent home, right? Yeah. Yeah, right. So you buy it and you get the closing costs put in three times over. For a Pokémon card. That you can sit in your house. Incredible. I want to get real quick to this art. The World Cup, the U.S. plays England, that kicks off in about ten minutes or so. England is a better team. Let's not kid

Blake Martinez Martinez Jersey Whitey Derek Carr Khalil Max Jersey Schwarzman Russell Wilson Wilson Smith Amazon Abby Raiders NFL Harrison Smith Devonta Smith Roquan Smith LA Green Bay
How to Watch the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade - The New York Times

Masters in Business

00:44 sec | 2 d ago

How to Watch the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade - The New York Times

"Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade kicks off shortly in New York City. These folks bundled up on the sidewalks on Central Park west well before sunrise to get a front row spot. It's tradition now and it's just so fun to see the balloons up front and everybody's energy. Everybody's really excited to perform. The parade is expected to draw millions along the two and a half mile route. There are 16 giant character balloons 24 floats and hundreds of clowns, wind isn't expected to be a factor with the balloons. Ohio's Cleveland Hopkins international airport is up and running normally following an incident last night. The airport says somebody drove through an airfield gate around 9 p.m. last night in the interest of safety and security operations were temporarily placed on whole police took the suspect into custody. Authorities investigating the stabbing deaths of

Macy Central Park New York City Cleveland Hopkins Internationa Ohio
Rachel Bovard on What Makes Trump Different

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:58 min | 2 d ago

Rachel Bovard on What Makes Trump Different

"Joining us now is Rachel bovard, who wrote a very interesting piece of The New York Times. What makes Trump different from desantis and other Republicans, Rachel is with us right now, Rachel, welcome to the program. Thanks for having me. So Rachel, why don't you summarize the piece for our audience and we'll dive into it from there? So the piece really looks into what I think is the appeal of Donald Trump. And I think people in Washington, particularly establishment Republicans, and even sort of what I call a conservative intelligentsia, missed this. And this is exactly the dynamic I saw play out in 2016 and it's going to play out again in 2024 because people in leadership of the Republican Party have no idea still have no idea why it is that Trump won. And it is this visceral connection that he has with his base voters who trust him implicitly. And interestingly, Dave Chappelle honed in on this, I think, really well when he was hosting Saturday Night Live recently. I don't watch Saturday Night Live personally, but I caught this clip and I thought he articulated it extremely well. He said, look, I live in Ohio. You people have no idea why Trump is so popular there. And he said, Trump is what I call an honest liar. And what he meant by that was, you know, he pointed back to this debate that Trump had with Hillary Clinton in 2016, where Trump basically said, look, I know the system is rigged because I use it. And that was just, I think, distilled to its essence, the why people trust Trump the way that they do. Because he set out loud as a beneficiary of someone at the top of the system who benefited from how it's going to rigged and corrupt toward the top. He set out loud what everybody at the bottom has long suspected, which is that the system itself is rigged and because he benefited from it. He had tremendous credibility in pointing that out. And so people, I think, who vote for Trump really see him as someone who can not bend the system because he's been part of it.

Dave Chappelle Rachel Ohio Donald Trump 2016 Rachel Bovard Washington Hillary Clinton 2024 Republican Party Saturday Night Live New York Times Republicans
Hugh Isn't Buying Sam Bankman-Fried's Mea Culpa Apology

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:50 sec | 2 d ago

Hugh Isn't Buying Sam Bankman-Fried's Mea Culpa Apology

"Many articles on Sam, bankman free. Sam bankman fried ran FTX as a personal teacher, according to the Financial Times. FTX assets still missing as the firm begins bankruptcy process, according to The New York Times. This, from the Financial Times as well, Sam bankman fried issues a mayor couple letter to former FTX employees, calling them family. We frantically put everything together. It claimed Pierre, the position, it's just this nonsense. It's gobbledygook. I deeply regret my oversight failure. I lost track of the most important things in the commotion of company growth. I don't actually think that's true. Not when you've got a $120 million worth of Bahama pads. Nope, not buying that. You didn't have anything all of a sudden you think it's your money? Nope.

Sam Bankman Bankman Financial Times FTX SAM The New York Times Pierre
The NYT Is Eager to Blame the Spread of COVID on YOU

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:21 min | 2 d ago

The NYT Is Eager to Blame the Spread of COVID on YOU

"A meanwhile, The New York Times eager to blame any spread of COVID on you. If you use anything they consider to be a far right platform, that includes gap. Now I don't use gab, but I don't know what's on gab. All I know is that it's a year after omicron surge officials see a reduced COVID threat this winter, who are the officials, Anthony Fauci, does anyone care no? Really? I mean, I've never seen such shattered credibility from the public health agencies ever. A lasting legacy of COVID far right platform spreading health myth. Now, I think that's absurd. Here I am, a conservative talk show host center Wright, perhaps got my two boosters, told this in the beginning, get your two vaccines, got your three boosters. I've got them still haven't had COVID. I fully expect somewhere down the road. I will get it, and I help my immune system has developed the necessary antibodies. No misinformation, there is a tunnel full of people who want to worry about that and that they're fine, but they don't do it on right wing. They find each other everywhere. You don't need to say this is a conspiracy theory. It's not. The CDC dropped the ball the FDA dropped the ball. Parts of the Trump administration originally, while they were doing warp speed, dropped the ball on the communications because they were being driven by Tony Fauci. And now the entire government is wrapped up in trying to prove that they didn't do anything wrong. In fact, public health completely botched the entire pandemic.

Anthony Fauci The New York Times Wright Trump Administration Tony Fauci CDC FDA
The Left Wants to 'Columbus Day' Thanksgiving

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:42 min | 2 d ago

The Left Wants to 'Columbus Day' Thanksgiving

"In today's Los Angeles Times about how Thanksgiving should go the way of Columbus day. It should be noted it should be noted that you can not have the Thanksgiving. Without the LA times. Yeah, no, that's correct. It's not just Thanksgiving. Remember what The New York Times did LastPass over. It was, for every religious holiday, The New York Times, the LA times, I don't know about The Washington Post, but I would presume it would be similar. We'll write an article debunking the validity of that holiday. People who have nothing hate those who have something. And I don't mean, in terms of material possessions. They have nothing. They don't have religion. They don't have love of country. They have nothing, and they hate those who have something. I wrote about this many years ago in explaining George Soros. George Soros has no religious or national identity, and he hates those who do have a religious or national identity. The left is their identity is the identity of biology. And I don't even mean male female because they don't even have that. It is the identity of blood. That is the only identity the left has. The identity of race.

Los Angeles Times The New York Times Columbus George Soros The Washington Post
Paul Kengor on Bella Dodd's Struggle Against Communism

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:49 min | 3 d ago

Paul Kengor on Bella Dodd's Struggle Against Communism

"In the 1930s, many, many people thought communism was the wave of the future. It was a good thing. It made tremendous inroads. People were we have apologists for Stalin, you know, getting Pulitzer prizes in The New York Times. It was a time before much of the world knew the satanic evil of the Soviet Union. And so you had a lot of these folks that were, they really believed somehow that communism was a good thing. Obviously, bellad was one. So what was it that they saw or that they believed communism could bring about? And when did they, when did she begin to see that this wasn't the case that this crusade that she was on had not been a good thing? Well, kind of the final thing, I'll hit that first that pulled her in was fascism. And there's a quote from her in the book. She said, I joined the devil himself, but that's what it took to fight fascism. Now, of course, you don't have to be a communist to fight to fight fascism, right? But the party was really good at creating groups with front groups with names like the American League against Warren fascism. But in her case, she came to America, she was born in Italy in 1904. So Eric she had this beautiful Italian Catholic name, right? Mary asante Isabella of the stono, which means like the assumption of the blessed mother, right? And she comes to America and she came to New York, her family brought her here for a better life. And she immediately fell in with radical elements in her grade school in her high school at hunter college in New York. College was a hotbed of the dish. That's a fact.

Bellad Stalin Soviet Union The New York Times Warren Fascism Mary Asante Isabella American League America Italy Eric New York Hunter College
Mike Rowe: 7 Million Men Are Choosing Not to Work

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:03 min | 3 d ago

Mike Rowe: 7 Million Men Are Choosing Not to Work

"And I continue to quote. And I mean, last week, there was an article in The New York Times called something like how to combat the assault on modern work. And I thought it was going to be an article about coal miners or crab fishermen. You know those tough guys, this is me going out of the quote like deadly catch stuff like that. Or you know big tough jobs where the danger is real micro says. It wasn't. It was an article about everything from paper cuts to the non existent pet bereavement policies that are being deemed harsh. And he says, I'm not making this stuff up. And so we are, we're in a place where 7 million able bodied men are not only not working between the ages of 25 and up 7 million able bodied men are not only not working, they're affirmatively not looking for a job. That's never happened in peacetime. He says, ever.

The New York Times
Glenn Kirschner: It's Time for an Investigation Into Justice Alito

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:10 min | 3 d ago

Glenn Kirschner: It's Time for an Investigation Into Justice Alito

"You tweeted Congress if you're listening. It's time for an investigation. I'd fashion it an impeachment inquiry of justice Alito, his lies to the Senate to the American people into the late senator Ted Kennedy must be investigated because women's constitutional rights matter. Yeah, I got to get your take on this latest bombshell report about justice Alito leaking. Yeah, The New York Times made it pretty clear in its reporting. I think two days ago, a couple mister and misses Wright had dinner with another couple, mister and misses Alito, and the next day, misses Wright contacted this reverend shank is his name and said, I've got some very interesting information. No emails, please, and then she told him that basically Alito authored the hobby lobby opinion. Another opinion that basically is religion over the rule of law, and that hobby lobby is gonna win. So Alito leaked his own opinion, the hobby lobby opinion. Don't you think he probably also leaked the Dobbs opinions revoking women's constitutional privacy rights? Yeah. And then acted all huffy about it.

Alito Justice Alito Senator Ted Kennedy Wright Congress Senate The New York Times Mister Shank Dobbs
What's Next for the Ukrainians?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:02 min | 4 d ago

What's Next for the Ukrainians?

"Let's get right to the essential thing, which is the Ukrainian winter offensive. Two stories about this in The New York Times that Ukraine expects to go over to the offensive. Now, I don't, I'm not a military experience. I just read the books about the winter war in Finland. And the Russians, you know, what do you think are the odds that any significant change in the battlefield will occur now that winter is descending upon Russia and its neighbor Ukraine? I think the odds of a significant shift are low, but not impossible because of the ongoing collapse of Russian brow. Having said that, you are sufficiently tuned in to military tactics to know that offense is. One is to three meetings. You got to have three times as many troops on offensive overcome a dug in component and that's why the Russians had a lot of trouble at the front end of the Ukrainian defense, Russia didn't have that three to one ratio overwhelmed them. Now, down south, the Ukrainians who have to come up with the three to one. But here's how they're compensated. They're using special force brilliantly. They are used in the advanced Thrones. They are maneuvering around and cutting out supply lines. So there's a balance there. What I'm watching also suited to kind of conclude an overview is the electric grid on the Ukrainian side. You know, in a sense, we're in a tale of two wars here. One is the groundwork to the south. Ukrainian winning. But in the air war over you in the strike against the electric grid going into the winter very significant. That's the other war we ought to be focused on.

Ukraine Russia The New York Times Finland
Democrats Will Set Precedent if They Prosecute Trump

Mark Levin

01:44 min | Last week

Democrats Will Set Precedent if They Prosecute Trump

"So what damage was done to the United States when it comes to these documents Nothing was done to the United States when it comes to these documents Nothing And you have to really come up with a almost fictional type tale to put in your charging documents if you're going to take on Donald Trump On this interference issue and you're going to create a precedent For every single politician in this country but the Democrats don't care because they usually control The Department of Justice and the rest of it And there's this long piece in The New York Times By aruna this wasna and Sadie gurman Talk about a sprawling investigation into 2010 Sprawling investigation Why Why are they doing this It's a funny thing You keep hearing the media say let's get on from this 2020 You keep hearing republik say the same thing Let's get on stop looking at the past Stop being a victim move on move on already for crying out loud The people don't want to hear about this The reason Donald Trump keeps talking about it and I haven't talked to him about this It's because they're trying to send him to prison You understand what I'm saying That's what they're doing

United States Sadie Gurman Donald Trump Aruna Department Of Justice The New York Times
Rejecting Medical Myths

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:42 min | Last week

Rejecting Medical Myths

"I have no problem. I don't care if it sounds like I'm bragging. I don't care how it sounds. It's more important. The issue is more important than me. I was right the whole time about lockdowns about vaccinations. I was right the whole time. April 2020, I said it was the greatest universal mistake ever made. Sweden proved me right and the decimation of young people in this country proved me right as well. The sick world of the hypochondriac left wing teachers of this country, what they produced, the damage they did to your children, desecrated the word teacher. It's okay. The number of people in medicine who have desecrated the word medicine is also very high. So here's another one. Gradually, in the sick world of The New York Times, which lied to you about people who oppose the vaccine as fanatics or people who oppose lockdowns as fanatics, and supported the firing of people for not getting vaccinated and supported kicking out the best of our military who refused to be vaccinated. Why a healthy person and you don't get physically healthier than the average person in the military like 22 years old and great shape. Why they should get this, the chances of there being hurt by the vaccine were greater than their chances of being helped by the vaccine for a healthy young person.

April 2020 22 Years Old Sweden The New York Times ONE
Police: Man with ax, sword asked to enter NY Times newsroom

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last week

Police: Man with ax, sword asked to enter NY Times newsroom

"Police in New York say an armed man entered The New York Times building I Norman hall Authorities say the man carrying an axe and sword went into the lobby of The New York Times building and asked to speak to the political section He then handed over his weapons and waited for emergency personnel when he was denied entry The New York police department said officers responded to the times building in midtown Manhattan shortly afternoon after getting a 9-1-1 call when officers arrived building security told him the man had the two weapons He was then taken to the hospital for evaluation at times representative thank police for resolving the situation quickly and peacefully By Norman hall

Norman Hall The New York Times New York Police Department New York Manhattan
Charles Payne: Did Sam Bankman-Fried Buy Protection From Democrats?

Mark Levin

01:53 min | Last week

Charles Payne: Did Sam Bankman-Fried Buy Protection From Democrats?

"But it's very interesting to me the Democrats don't seem really angry about this Here they are busy getting things done that they want to rush through but they don't even want a hearing on this The SEC the failures there and the other regulatory entities that are out there You have big tech that monitors their own platforms but apparently didn't care about this And I look at this and I say to myself was this guy buying protection from the Democrat party because the Democrats are much more aggressive in their investigations and Republicans Right Yeah it's possible And in fact I had a guest on today who was a Bitcoin expert And it's not just the Democratic Party in the regulators but the media Since all of this has come out yesterday The New York Times wrote a glowing article about this guy Never mentioned a word fraud never mentioned the word crimes never mentioned any of those words They did talk about how little sleep he gets and Internet he was frugal even though he has a $40 million pad in The Bahamas He flies around in private jets Vox wrote an article saying that the talk of him having influence over the Democrats is over is oversimplified or exaggerated Forbes wrote an article suggesting he and his parents practice I think you call it it's called utilitarianism and apparently this doctrine that you go through life and you try to help as many people as possible So Forbes wrote an article saying whatever he did was altruistic in an effort to help other people This is the media circling the wagons around this guy who has ripped off a million people are now creditors in this bankruptcy Billions of dollars and they're making him out they're still trying to make them out to be a hero

Democrat Party SEC Democratic Party The New York Times Forbes The Bahamas
New York Times: Throw Your Feelings About Trump Into a Blackhole

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:15 min | Last week

New York Times: Throw Your Feelings About Trump Into a Blackhole

"I've been impressed that the mainstream media treated Trump's announcement last night as the bona FIDE news story that it is. I just had a feeling they mock it and they did largely. The New York Times, The New York Times, wants people to take their feelings and put them into a black hole so that Trump can stop living rent free in their heads. I'm not kidding you. I told Joey hutchin about it this morning in South Carolina. He said, you're making that up. Oh no, I'm not. New York Times Patrick Healy deputy opinion editor. How are you feeling today about Donald Trump? Now he's back in our lives as a presidential candidate. We had an idea. My colleagues and I came up with an idea at The New York Times. Why not take all of our thoughts, feelings, obsessiveness, and distraction that Trump inspires and cash them into our own black hole? Could that little act give us some of our emotional energy and brain space back? Oh yeah, they've devised a black hole as a link that you should plant your feelings about Trump's return. I kid you not.

The New York Times Donald Trump Joey Hutchin Patrick Healy South Carolina
NY Times: FBI Had Informants in Proud Boys, Court Papers Suggest

The Dan Bongino Show

01:05 min | Last week

NY Times: FBI Had Informants in Proud Boys, Court Papers Suggest

"The New York Times tweeted out yes sir New York Times by the way I'm not talking about the blaze or breitbart or bongino dot com The New York Times which is interesting because we were told this was a conspiracy Definitely a conspiracy theory They tweeted out the FBI had as many as 8 informants inside the Proud Boys in the months around the January 6th capitol attack recent court papers indicate they do Wow 'cause I was told that was a crazed conspiracy theory The New York Times notes raising questions about how much federal investigators were able to learn from them before and after it took place You know I'm going to talk about this more after the break but it's days like today do you ever say to yourself listening to this program as my grandmother used to call radius at the program You ever say to yourself it's incredible that the New York slimes right These people have millions upon millions of dollars to go dig up news that you knew about a year ago Do you ever say that to yourself

The New York Times Sir New York Times FBI New York
Did the FBI Informants Find Any Crimes by the Proud Boys?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:24 min | Last week

Did the FBI Informants Find Any Crimes by the Proud Boys?

"Folks we already told you that about a year ago based on multiple sources that there were highly likely to be FBI informants in there we were told it was a conspiracy theory to ignore it the fact checkers of course probably had a field day banned people I'm just proud to be on the right side of the information arc of history why the Democrats are constantly stupid They figure out things a year later they put it out in The New York Times They're like hey look at what look Look at what we did We reported the news Yeah a year and a half too late So I have some questions about that Given that I'm very familiar with how confidential human sources work what exactly were these confidential human sources doing and who were they reporting too Now you would like to believe that there was some reasonable suspicion of a crime being committed by these Proud Boys if the FBI was working with confidential human sources in the investigation of a crime But what was the crime Was the crime not being antifa Does the FBI have confidential human sources inside BLM and antifa too Folks these are pretty serious questions because if they don't to organizations we know we know have committed the acts of terrorism in front of the cameras Ben that says to me that there's a political motivation here not necessarily a law enforcement one which says to me we've got even bigger problems

FBI The New York Times BLM
Steve Deace Discusses His New Book Titled 'Why Thanksgiving?'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:32 min | Last week

Steve Deace Discusses His New Book Titled 'Why Thanksgiving?'

"Welcome back I'm talking to Steve dais, T Eric metaxas show. Steve has a new book out called why Thanksgiving. I wrote a book on Thanksgiving called the squanto in the miracle of things giving and I talk about Thanksgiving and the roots of Thanksgiving in my book. If you can keep it, I did not know you had a book on Thanksgiving. Tell us about your book titled why Thanksgiving. Well, about a year ago, my publisher came to me and asked me if I'd consider doing a line of children's books. So I'm like, having a bunch of people already done that, you know, like rush before he passed at his great series. And I said, I'll consider it if we can do something different. How about America's Christian heritage, a series on that? And they were all for it, and then asked me, called my bluff and said, what should be first? And I said, well, I guess we should start at the beginning. America's Christian heritage begins with the pilgrims and the Puritans. And Thanksgiving. And so I basically took the history and I don't know if you've ever tried writing a children's book before Eric. This was very difficult. I must have been an 8 drafts of this thing. You don't realize I've written 30 children's books. I didn't know that. I needed about two New York Times best sellers, but I know you were in that many children's books. I've written 30 each other. I'm a lot older than you, but children's books in a way are much harder to write. The books for adults because you can't fake it. You got to be clear as a bell. And it's got to be water to the molecular down to the molecular level. And so I normally turn in a draft. We do one round of edits when I do a book and we're good, and we did like 8 rounds on this one, but I'm very proud of it.

Steve Dais Eric Metaxas Steve America Eric New York Times
Republicans Had Mixed Success Electing People to Local School Boards

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:37 min | Last week

Republicans Had Mixed Success Electing People to Local School Boards

"School board candidates who pushed parental rights he mixed results. That's the reason for concern. You read that article, right? It's from a Wall Street Journal, and it's very important to remember The Wall Street Journal news department is not the same as the opinion and editorial department. It is quite to the left. I wouldn't say it's left, I would say it's liberal. There is very little in common between The Wall Street Journal editorial page and opinion page and their news pages. On the other hand, The New York Times, the opinion pages and the news pages are identical. Conservative candidates who ran for school board saying they would change what students learn about race sex and gender or who opposed COVID protocols saw mixed results in Tuesday's election, according to supporters and a sampling of nationwide results, ballot PB, a nonpartisan election site, analyzed 361 races and found that about 36% of candidates who opposed school COVID protocols diversity initiatives or the use of gender neutral learning materials won their elections. Only one out of three. This is about a serious a reason for concern about the American people as I have come across recently.

The Wall Street Journal The New York Times
Midterm Results Continue to Roll In

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:15 min | Last week

Midterm Results Continue to Roll In

"Midterm results continue to come in and of course one question is why are they coming in so late? The New York Times keeps talking about technical glitches and Republicans are calling into question these elections and to my knowledge, no one has actually said that the elections of fraudulent, the 2022 elections, but there are lots of there's lots of frustration, law, why does this happen only in swing states? Why is it taking so long to count a relatively small number of votes? How come other countries do it so much more quickly? So yeah, my cousin, Venezuelan cousin, is like wondering, hey, guys, what's going on? I mean, you know, third world country can do it faster. What are you doing? What's going on? What's going on? Two big results that did come out. One is that Blake masters lost in Arizona. That's a disappointment I was hoping that masters would make it master's campaign kind of together would carry Lake and holiday. They were kind of campaigning as a team, but of course what happens is you got to realize that even if they're campaigning as a team, they're not going to be judged as a team. People are going to judge masters against Mark Kelly and this guy is very chameleonic, very clever, and playing the astronaut car. You always thought he said that. And also the other cardi plays very well is his wife, congresswoman Gabby, is that yeah, yeah. Yeah. So, you know, she was shot ten years ago, 11 years ago. And so he plays, he plays that card really well. The combination. The combination of gun violence and all those things. So I knew that he wanted to go to Washington to kind of hammer at the gun control issue. On a happier note for us, in Nevada, a big result, Joe lombardo running in the governor's race, knocks out the incumbents. Yeah, and he's like so cute. He's like this old sheriff guy, you know? It's like I loved his I love this campaign come up with a sister I kept announcing and saying he's ineffective and so on and but so I can give him a speech basically saying that sheriff and the country is right here Joe lombardo stand up Joe. Let's have a round of applause for Joe so lombardo just played that as his ad saying listen, this is coming from my apartment. Very effective.

Congresswoman Gabby The New York Times Mark Kelly Joe Lombardo Blake Cardi Arizona Nevada Washington JOE Lombardo
"the new york times" Discussed on The Kicker

The Kicker

01:46 min | 7 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on The Kicker

"I mean, picture what it must have been like to be the editor of The New York Times. During the during the Vietnam War, when there was a draft, when there was a staff, mostly men, who were draft eligible, right? I think if you want to, you should have a newsroom that reflects society. I mean, that's the essence of diversity, right? And if you get a newsroom that reflects the society, you can also get a newsroom where people are going to sometimes disagree with us. Our job is to listen to them, to hold on as Joe described to the values that are important to the place, but also listen to them. And sometimes change things in response to them. But it doesn't bother me that there's a, you know, that we have a newsroom, there is no institution in America right now. That's not a little bit restive. Would you have to do is hold on to your values, stick with your values, and figure out what things should change, and some things, of course, should change. I really appreciate both of you coming on. It's been a great conversation. Thank you so much. Thank you, Kyle. Take care. Bye bye. You can follow all our coverage of the times and everybody else in media at dot org. Watch this on Facebook and Twitter and read our daily email newsletter the media today. Thanks for listening..

The New York Times Vietnam Joe America Kyle Facebook Twitter
"the new york times" Discussed on The Kicker

The Kicker

05:10 min | 7 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on The Kicker

"Reporting and being open minded in going into any reporting exercise. Is the way to win trust from people and is the way to find stuff out. And but I do, of course, I think there's a threat to democracy right now. Let me ask it this way. I saw a pew poll that said something like more than 90% of New York Times readers identify themselves as Democrats. Do you think that we've all we all acknowledge that there's a significant number of especially conservative Americans who don't trust outlets like The New York Times and may not ever. Are those people winnable to you? Is there something you could do is there do you think that there's is that an audience that you're interested in trying to get back in the fold? And if so, what would you have to do to do that? Joe? Great. I've glad you asked that one joke. I guess what I would say to that is. I'm definitely interested in continuing to increase the readership and the reach of The New York Times, including among people who do not identify as Democrats, right? I mean, the idea that we are narrowly targeting people who have a political identity as Democrats would never really enter my mind. I do think that. You know, the idea that we're going to reach people who have gone down the rabbit hole of partisan propaganda, which, among other things, targets The New York Times, and somehow, you know, persuade them through targeted articles that were a friend, not a foe. You know, is a little bit unrealistic. But I think that there are actually very large numbers. Of open minded Americans. And open minded, non partisan readers, globally, who are in the market for genuine, independent journalism, that offers high quality reporting.

The New York Times Joe
"the new york times" Discussed on The Kicker

The Kicker

05:26 min | 7 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on The Kicker

"Toxic environment where The New York Times for some is seen as a tax on The New York Times as seen as a way to get traction on social media. Dirty tricks or part of the playbook of some journalistic adjacent kind of attack groups and you know The New York Times editor is going to be heavily scrutinized and occasionally even harassed the way dean has been. So I would be lying if I said that didn't bother me or I'm looking forward to that part of the job. It is part of it is part of the risks of the job. I would say that the benefits of the job away that the journalistic platform that we have, the role that we have in American life, I do think that this is an important institution and I've been in this the business of journalism my whole life and this is an important as important moment as ever. To make sure that we get it right, more often than we get it wrong and that we aggressively cover the biggest issues of our time and report hard and present that the most compelling way that the opportunity there to me outweighs the risks. But I'm very aware of the risks. So dean was talking about this question of what is all the things that you now have to be that you have to do. And this isn't running a newspaper. It's not even necessarily running a news organization, and it seems just much broader than that. I mean, you helped shape the live coverage, the live feature. That I've seen referred to as the times attempt to be sort of CNN, which I think it does. You have a documentary studio, you have an audio studio, you have you have a big lifestyle arm so what is this thing now? Is it sort of like what do you call is it information brand? Is it a, how do you articulate it? It's a fair question. I'd slightly, if you don't mind, you know, just try to refine a little bit what you said about live because I think that is something I have thought about a lot. Over the past couple of years. And we do say that we think we can fulfill a news need in the lives of our readers that address some of the role that you once went to linear television for, which is, you know, there's a major story unfolding and you want to know the latest thing and you want to see images of it. You know, you want to be taken to the scene, that is not a role that newspapers played in people's lives ever. But I don't think that our live experience should be compared..

The New York Times dean CNN
"the new york times" Discussed on The Kicker

The Kicker

03:50 min | 7 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on The Kicker

"There were a number of people in the newsroom who got various degrees of feedback and 360° reviews and stretch assignments and challenges. What's a stretch assignment? What's a stretch assignment? You know, we've got a big problem. We'd love you to step in and try to solve it. You're the leader of this initiative. Here's here's some feedback on how you did and that situation and the sort of reaction. What was yours? Boy, there were a bunch. There were a bunch of them. Yeah, I mean, you know, there were one of them, honestly, was, you know, some of the, you know, some of the cultural challenges that we had during the pandemic and some of the racial tensions in American society that obviously had manifestations inside our newsroom in 2020. When I was asked along with some other future leaders of the place to take a really hard look at our workplace culture at our retention and recruitment policies, but also at the way we make journalistic decisions in the place, could we have a more open process could we be more transparent? Could we do better work to help people for more diverse backgrounds, feel like they have a path at The New York Times? That was one. That kind of thing came up. That wasn't the only one, but that's an example of it. And was that was that was one outcome of that the report that was presented to the staff. Yes. Okay. So what's interesting about this traditional retirement age is that both of you are going to have almost exactly the same number of years in your tenure. You're assuming I last. I mean, you live that long. Dean, what is the sort of trajectory? What is the learning curve of this job? If you're in it for 8 years, I assume it takes a couple of years.

The New York Times Dean
"the new york times" Discussed on The Kicker

The Kicker

05:01 min | 7 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on The Kicker

"Hi, welcome to the kicker. I'm Kyle Pope, editor and publisher of the Columbia journalism review. This week, the new editor of The New York Times. So there are a few jobs in journalism that generate the amount of speculation and gossip as the executive editor of the times. We've known for months now that dean McKay, who's been in that job, would be stepping down because he turned 65 in the fall. And the only question was who is going to succeed him and would that result in a change of course? Of the newspaper. The times announced that Joe Kahn, who has been managing editor of the paper in the number two job, would be stepping up into beke's role. There's a widely held view that that is not going to result in major changes. To the place. And in fact, that fact that we shouldn't be expecting radical change has been disappointing to some people who think that especially in this moment of great peril in the democracy of America, we should be seeing bigger changes at a place like the times. I sat down with Joe Kahn and dean McKay on Thursday, two days after the announcement of cons hiring. And we talked about objectivity. We talked about wurtele. We talked about how they both see the newspaper and what it's become. Can you guys shed some light on how this process of picking a new editor works? It's completely opaque in my mind. Is there a committee or are there interviews? What happens? We bring the Cardinals together. I knew there was going to be a white smoke. No, it's the publisher's call. It's AG's call. And what I tried to do was in my commitment to him when I became the editor is that I would make sure there was a slate of candidates that people who he could sort of think through and get to know. And. There is no committee. It's essentially his call. And he spent a lot of time with Joe. Which Joe can talk about, and he spent a lot of time with some other leaders in the newsroom. Because I don't think he just thought about it. Nor did I as picking the next executive editor, obviously that's the most important and the most visible choice, but I also think he wanted to make sure there was a leadership team overall to lead the place into the next generation. And the only ad is it's, with AG, it's been much more I mean, it's a very thoughtful process. I mean, we even start to think about the next generation after just generation, which obviously Joe is going to be the one to nurture. But I mean, I think we just, he's just trying to identify a whole bunch of people who can lead the place going forward. But it's not any more mysterious than that. And when was when did all that start? When did those conversations begin in earnest?.

dean McKay Joe Kahn Kyle Pope beke Columbia journalism review The New York Times the times The times AG Joe Cardinals America
"the new york times" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

06:07 min | 10 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Stand. She bombed. It was catastrophic in my view. She bombed, I think, at every juncture. You know, she came off as authentic, a family person, someone who believes in her politics, I think that when she was originally being questioned by her friendly counsel, her own attorney, she did pretty well. But once they got into the nitty Gritty of things, it became a complete disaster in my view. There was one point in which her attorney was questioning her about the editorial. And he asked her about her reaction to the editorial, and she starts talking about how everybody in her inner circle realized that she needed to respond again to The New York Times as lies. And so all of a sudden the judge said, well, again, what do you mean by again? Because it was pretty well established that this was a one off, you know? This was a discrete error by The New York Times? Yeah. And then she's like, yeah, well, you know, they did this before. And the judge was like, before the editorial was published, they did this same thing. And they go back and forth and the judge says, what specifics do you have? And she says, well, you know, the link that they established between me and political incitement, and of course I don't have the articles in front of me here. And to anybody who's listening to Sarah Palin for the past decade or so. You know that her broadsides against the media are these generic broad brush mainstream media things. For these lame stream media characters to get all wee weed up about that. First you have to ask yourself, have they ever ever attended a Sunday school class even have they never heard this terminology before? And she's never really pushed to state her tastes or builds her tastes or sight supporting links and evidence. And so they were like, what are you talking about? And then this forced a huge sidebar where they had to leave the courtroom, I think their sidebar is now down the hall because of COVID. But they were in there for a good ten, 15 minutes, trying to figure out this situation because they didn't want to poison the jury, having the jury think that The New York Times did this multiple times. Since Sarah Palin, did she blow it bad enough to blow her case? I mean, jeez, I don't know, I can't put myself in the jury box, but I felt that blue an enormous hole in the credibility of her case. If only because the times put forth people who were real sober detail oriented and they did not jump out of their own brief. You know what I mean? They never once went over the line factually, they never once really got the court to slip up and say, what are you talking about? They were just outstanding, you know? You know, in the context of having made this huge mistake. You could see how they all felt terrible about this mistake. And then Palin comes up there, and she sounds like, you know, she's still on Fox News. The contrast with The New York Times journalist was 100%. Hey folks, I'm Heather Cox Richardson, and I'm Joanne Freeman. We're the hosts of now and then, a weekly podcast that looks to the American past to make sense of our current political and cultural climate. There's been a wave of headlines recently about book bands. School boards and state governments are trying to outlaw the teaching of books that they find objectionable. From art spiegelman's mouse, to Toni Morrison's the bluest eye. This week, on now and then, we're releasing the first episode of a three part series. The series will dive deep into past book panics, explore why public schools so often become ideological battlegrounds and dissect the interplay between book bands and political bullying. Join us as we try to make sense of the role that bands have played in our national culture and explain why we're seeing so many bands today. Listen for free on Apple, cafe dot com or wherever you get your podcasts. Have you ever wondered whether New York City bagels are really better because of the water or why the mafia got its start in Sicily's lemon groves, or if those CBD infused seltzers actually do what they promise. Gastropod is a podcast exploring food through the lens of science and history, each episode journeys into the weird and wonderful as we uncover everything you never knew about your favorite foods. I'm Cynthia graber. And I'm Nikola Tilly. And whether you're obsessed with food or someone who wants to learn more about what's on your plate, we'd love for you to join us. Listen and follow gastropod on apple or wherever you listen to podcasts. Did you enjoy your week in New York City? You know I did, Katie, and I wasn't sure I would at first, New York is, of course, home to the liberal media elite, but Todd and the kids had a great time going to the Central Park and the FAO Schwartz and that goofy evolution museum. Eric, it sounds like in your eyes at least Sarah Palin kind of blew her argument here at this trial. And she might be blowing for her at least a golden opportunity to sue the so called mainstream media for libel and win. Why is it so hard to do that in the first place? In 1964, The New York Times versus Sullivan case, the court decided that we need a robust political marketplace. We need a place where news organizations can feel emboldened to really, really criticize the people who make big decisions about.

The New York Times Sarah Palin Heather Cox Richardson Joanne Freeman spiegelman Toni Morrison Fox News Cynthia graber Nikola Tilly Palin New York City Sicily Apple Katie FAO Central Park apple Todd New York
"the new york times" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

07:23 min | 10 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Up against a Tea Party favorite. And the times publishes an editorial about these shootings. So what happened in this 2017 editorial was the times was trying to make an argument trying to fasten an argument about how political rhetoric had amped up the possibility that we would see political violence in this country. And they citing that 2011 shooting. Claimed that there was a quote unquote political incitement link between a map that Sarah Palin's political action committee had circulated before the lochner shooting months before the loughner shooting. In fact, as a lot of reporting indicated after that 2011 shooting, there was no link between that Sarah PAC map and the Jared Lee loughner shooting. But the times said there was this political incitement link. What exactly did Palin take issue with in this editorial? We're talking about two or three sentences that are in two paragraphs in this editorial. The main passage is, in 2011, when Jared Lee loughner opened fire in a supermarket parking lot, grievously wounding representative Gabby Giffords and killing 6 people, including a 9 year old girl. The link to political incitement was clear. Before the shooting, Sarah Palin's political action committee circulated a map of targeted electoral districts that put misses Giffords and 19 other Democrats under stylized, crosshairs. And then in the next paragraph, they basically compare the two shootings and they say, though there's no sign of incitement as direct as in the Giffords attack. Liberals should, of course, so those are two instances there, where they're really, really, you know, their own factual territory pretty much. Was the times within its sort of editorial guidelines to write this or was this objectively wrong? I think that in today's media age, opinion writers get more and more leeway to do what they do and that's always the commonly cited defense for what Fox News Sean Hannity Tucker Carlson. Their opinion journalist. There are talk show hosts. But in this case, the answer would be no. The times did not have the authority to say what it said because it was directly contradicted by objective facts that had already been reported. And The New York Times itself would acknowledge and does acknowledge that its opinions piece is need to be based on a commonly shared factual basis. And this was not anything close to that. And so they published the editorial and they learned pretty quickly from Twitter that they had problems. Ross doubt that, who was a colleague and a conservative columnist at the times, alerted the editorial page editor James Bennett, via email to this problem. I would be remiss if I didn't express my bafflement at the editorial that we just ran on today's shootings and political violence. James was clearly starting to get unnerved. He later testified he didn't sleep that night and sent an email to his colleagues at 5 O 8 the next morning, saying we need to get to the bottom of this and perhaps run a correction, but we need to learn the truth. He said. How does that go? Well, I don't think it took them that long to figure it out because the editorial itself had linked to a story that debunked it. Right within the editorial itself was a link to an ABC News story, saying, you know, that there is no link between the Sarah pax map and what Jared Lee loughner had done. You know, and this is what made, I think this suit somewhat plausible is that this was really widely debunked. And for them to just insert this and say it was fact, you could possibly think that it was evidence of reckless disregard or knowing falsehood. Yeah. Given that it had been anybody who followed this back then, probably would have known. So the times corrects itself, but Sarah Palin still decides to sue? Yes, a 100%. She says she was harmed and obviously she has been a critic of The New York Times and the mainstream media for a really long time. You're seeing some idiots in the press. In this case, I think that she had a genuine group. And people who have dismissed her suit when her suit initially came out, I put a headline on my piece saying it was a convincing lawsuit. And I took a lot of heat for that. And my response to those people who are upset with my original assessment is, well, you've probably never been accused by The New York Times of inciting a mass murder. So I think it was a pretty serious thing. So heading into this trial, what exactly do Sarah Palin and her lawyers have to prove? What Sarah Palin and her lawyers have to prove is one of two things. Either The New York Times published this falsehood fully knowing that it was false, or they have to prove that the times published it with reckless disregard. As to its truth or falsity, which basically means they have to prove that the times entertained serious doubts about its truthfulness. And that's a real tough thing to do because you can't just document that they define industry standards or industry guidelines or best practices as the wonks might say. They have to prove that James Bennett walked by like informational signposts telling him that this was wrong. This case is pretty close because it's proven that James Bennett didn't click on various things that were writing his vicinity. That would have alerted him to this falsehood. And the trial after being delayed because Sarah Palin herself got the rona started earlier this month, and James Bennett himself takes the stand at trial, right? What was his testimony like? You know, it was many hours. I found it kind of riveting, I think that he was tremendously measured, tremendously responsible and tremendously contrite. I mean, he said, you know, this was my mistake. I own it. One of the lawyers asked him, did you send the editorial back to Elizabeth Williams and after you finished your revisions? And he said, yes. And I think he sensed that answering the question might shift blame onto Elizabeth because maybe she didn't review it enough after he finished his edits. And he was like, I just want to be clear on something here. This was my fault. But it is true that after he put these edits in the story that his other colleagues did not really scrutinize those edits. One of the dynamics there is that James Bennett was a revered editor. He was the top editor here. It was kind of a forceful editor. And I don't think that people were inclined necessarily the challenge his edits, the way they would be inclined to challenge someone lower down on the organizational hierarchy if you understand what I'm saying. Sure. Was Sarah Palin in the room for all of this? Sarah Palin was in the room I believe every day for the trial. Yeah. And she eventually takes the stand too. She eventually take the.

Jared Lee loughner Sarah Palin the times James Bennett lochner Sarah PAC Giffords Gabby Giffords The New York Times Tucker Carlson Tea Party Sean Hannity Palin Fox News The times ABC News Ross Twitter James
"the new york times" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

03:11 min | 10 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Senator John McCain and more recently she wrapped baby got back on The Masked Singer in costume as some kind of like Technicolor teddy bear. Tell the shake it. Shake it. Shake your healthy butt. Baby got back. A lot of people like to credit Sarah Palin as being some kind of pre trumpy Trump. They share a lot of ticks, including a real, love hate thing with the media. Social media and activists like both your scene today. They help render the lame stream media powerless and the people then are empowered. They can do their own homework. And now she is suing the mainstream media for libel, she's saying the mainstream media made stuff up about her and not just any mainstream media Sarah Palin is going after The New York Times. Trials of the sort almost never make it to a jury. Eric wemple has been covering the trial for The Washington Post. This is a trial that involves the most storied landmark media protection in American history. It's the 1964 actual malice test, which requires a public figure like Palin to prove a hell of a lot if they're going to prevail in a lawsuit against any media organization. So this is an enormous enormous case in the sense that we don't often see this standard tested before a jury. And if she wins, what kind of precedent could that set? If Palin were to win this case, I think it would probably encourage a lot of public figures, public officials, celebrities to come forth with suits, perhaps, because, you know, if she can do it, they can do it. I think if she loses, there is a chance for significant ramifications as well. And that is that they could possibly appeal the case and try to overturn or upend actual malice. That's something that the lawyers for Palin have signaled that they might do if they lose the case. Before digging into this actual malice test, we figured we should dial it back to the beginning of the story with Palin and the NYT. This story begins on June 14th, 2017. That was the day that James hodgkinson, who was a leftist Trump hater. Open fired on a baseball field in Alexandria where a number of Republican lawmakers were practicing for an upcoming baseball game. And all out gun battle as Capitol Hill police and Alexandria officers engaged a lone gunman among the first to be hit, Republican whip, Steve scalise. It was the second attack on a congressional lawmaker in about 6 years, because in 2011, Jared Lee loughner attacked a bunch of people in the Tucson parking lot where Gabby Giffords then congressional represented was holding an event. Witnesses are reporting that they heard 15 to 20 gunshots and an event being held outside that supermarket, of course we do not know if any of the emotions that might have flooded over from the political midterms took any sort of play in this event. We do know that that race was a very hotly contested race. She won.

trumpy Trump Palin Sarah Palin Eric wemple Senator John McCain The New York Times The Washington Post James hodgkinson Capitol Hill police Alexandria Steve scalise baseball Gabby Giffords Jared Lee loughner Tucson
"the new york times" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

06:41 min | 11 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on On The Media

"Inc for denying them access to Amazon's smile where organizations can collect donations from sales, because of that hate group designation. SPLC in Amazon as the district court to dismiss the case on the grounds that coral ridge ministries hadn't alleged enough facts to show that SPLC acted with actual malice as required by New York Times be Sullivan. The district court agreed and dismissed the case. The dismissal was affirmed by a unanimous panel of the 11th circuit Court of Appeals and will get to that in a moment. But why is this coming up now? Well, having failed to prove its case in the lower courts, the ministry is now asking the Supreme Court to step in and change the rules. Specifically, they're asking the court to overrule nearly 60 years worth of president built on New York Times be Sullivan and to do away with the actual malice standard entirely. Of course, people and organizations filed petitions asking the high court to review lower court decisions every day, and very few of them are granted, but what makes this case worth paying attention to is that this week we got a small sign that at least some of the justices may be interested in granting the case when the court requested that SPLC and Amazon submit briefs explaining why the court shouldn't take it. Court watchers don't know for sure who issued the CFR. It only takes one justice to do it, but the names of clarence Thomas and Neil Gorsuch have both been floated. They both dissented from the court's declining to hear a similar petition this past July. And justice Thomas has long been vocal about his opposition to Sullivan. It remains unclear if these two can convince two more of their colleagues to hear the case as four justices are necessary to grant a review. Since it seems that this crucial piece of case law might be on the chopping block, we thought it would be a perfect time to revisit an interview we aired first in 2014 about the history of Sullivan. The case was heard just months before the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Though the First Amendment had already been around for nearly 200 years, it was narrowly focused. News outlets could be shuddered if sued by public officials over minor inaccuracies. The stakes were thus very high in New York Times be Sullivan. This was a story about the civil rights movement. It was a story about The New York Times covering the civil rights movement. And it was the story of local officials in this case in Alabama, trying to use state libel laws to essentially chill the press. Andrew Cohen is a fellow at the Brennan center for justice and senior editor at the Marshall project. To force reporters, either not to cover stories in the state or to cover civil rights stories in a way that was not true and more favorable to a local officials than it was to the civil rights movement. It begins as you know it in your piece in March of 1960 and it wasn't about coverage. It was about a political ad that appeared in The New York Times. Broadly criticizing southern officials for their aggressive response to civil rights protests. Right. It's a full page ad, which essentially decries the actions of local officials in Alabama. It was signed by Martin Luther King. It was signed by Harry Belafonte and other notable civil rights leaders. The New York Times accepted the ad, and it turned out that there were certain minor inaccuracies in the text of the full page ad. Like what? Well, there was one sentence about the number of times that Martin Luther King had been arrested. The figure was off by two. That's the kind of stuff that was cited by the public safety commissioner in Montgomery, Alabama, a man named Sullivan, who, although he was not identified in the ad, said that the times had liable him by publishing false material about him. And the only protection against libel at the time was it had to be true. And in this case, because there were a couple of minor inaccuracies, the times couldn't argue that. That's exactly right. At the time, the First Amendment and libel laws were essentially separate. No court had really firmly linked the two in the context of public officials. So you had this First Amendment that says Congress shall make no law abridging free speech and of the press. And then you had these libel laws, which were essentially doing just that. How did Sullivan argue for defamation if he wasn't even mentioned? So what he was able to do in Alabama in the state courts, which, of course, were very favorable to him, is to say the mere mention of the police, the word police, linked him in the minds of readers. And that was one of the main contentions that The New York Times asserted as the case got to the U.S. Supreme Court that creating a libel liability in the context where you don't identify the person specifically who is liable would generally preclude any criticism of any government action anywhere by any person working within that government. So the Alabama state court decided in favor of Sullivan and then the Alabama Supreme Court upheld the decision. Let me play you some C-SPAN tape from 1991 of the late great Tony Lewis, who had covered the case for the times. Mister Sullivan asked for $500,000 in damages and a white jury all white jury awarded him every penny of the 500,000. And others sued over the ad, including the governor of Alabama, totaled some demanded $3 million and it was quite clear that if it were up to the Alabama juries, breed be $3 million in the whole of paper. And The New York Times could not afford that kind of money then it was a barely profitable newspaper. It wasn't just intimidating to The New York Times. It was an offensive weapon, if you will, by southern politicians in southern officials to try to financially freeze out the reporting that was occurring in the south at that time. There had been circumstances where reporters were basically not sent on assignments in the south because of the fear of these sorts of libel lawsuits. Had this ruling stood, coverage of the civil rights movement going forward would have been far, far less aggressive, and of course that may have made a difference in the way that public perceptions were altered as a result of that coverage. So the Supreme Court took the case, heard arguments that you call more intense and passionate than most. We have some tape of Herbert Wexler, who.

Sullivan The New York Times SPLC Amazon coral ridge ministries Alabama Neil Gorsuch Brennan center for justice and Marshall project clarence Thomas Martin Luther King Court of Appeals Andrew Cohen the times CFR Supreme Court Harry Belafonte Thomas Alabama state court
"the new york times" Discussed on podnews

podnews

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"the new york times" Discussed on podnews

"Recurring revenue from your podcast. The New York Times is audio app has been released to beat her testers willing to a little look from Alex reyna to the NYT's head of audio product and design today. So our official at axios has access and she posts a detailed look, it contains other audio features in addition to podcasts. In urbina, a journalist who's done some work for The New York Times and others has been accused of operating a scam by musician Ben Jordan, abina is claimed to be collecting royalties for more than 400 artists for music he didn't write using a distribution company that it appears he owns urbino has partially apologized and a facts check has questioned some of the claims made by Jordan. Fireside chat is sending out personal time limited invitations, telling us we have a unique voice what this one that would benefit from being on the far side platform with lots of interest from the podcast community we have limited create a spot left, says the cofounder Fallon for temi, earning us to get in touch at our earliest convenience. I look into a friendly podcast producers email inbox leads us to pontificate that the invitations may not be as unique nor time limited as would hoped she's been sending these emails since October. Flight Delta, you'll get free Spotify access on via sat equipped aircraft from now until January 19th, including three access to podcasts on the platform, no need to pay for Wi-Fi at all. The only hitch of course is that you need to fly Delta. Audio's voter cast app has announced a partnership with the believe podcasting network, believe we'll create digital feed content for the app which offers a more interactive experience, target spot has launched passport audio manager in Peter, a platform allowing self service access for small and medium businesses to manage digital audio campaigns and the quilt team have put together a list of 30 brands that made the biggest impact on the podcast industry throughout 2021. The article says these brands are in no particular order, which is a shame for whoever's number one. And people use Ian walker is to join SCA's listener original podcasts team Ian once at the ABC responsible for a number of award winning podcasts and daisy Smith has been appointed automation director of acast Australia and New Zealand, she joins from Nielsen. Ali podcast is the latest guest on the San Francisco experience is me talking about radio receivers in the shape of frost's packets, and the first daily podcast from a UK radio station hosted by Jim Hurley, the show is from America's favorite city. No, not that one. It's from San Francisco. And in bold talk, bald comedians bran husky and Charlie Sanders interview celebrities actors musicians directors and really anyone about being bald both literally and figuratively. This week they're joined by Mark Sam Rosenthal and Katie Morrissey to talk about dating Baldi's..

The New York Times Alex reyna axios urbina Ben Jordan abina urbino Fallon Spotify Jordan daisy Smith Ian walker SCA Jim Hurley Ian ABC San Francisco Nielsen bran husky Ali
"the new york times" Discussed on Feminist Utopia

Feminist Utopia

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Feminist Utopia

"Yeah but but i don't hear them covering women being told that they should kill themselves that they're going to be raped to death or any of that stuff. I never heard the new york times. Talk about the statistics. We have on this show about. How often female politicians are threatened with death and violence. They aren't even covering the mass wave of threats against school boards bright. So i'm really really hate my new york times that my blood pressure's going up a little bit and this isn't a new thing. I mean this has been happening for very long time. I mean even. I mean looking at the clintons. It seemed like the new york times had a personal vendetta against the clintons and hillary in particular for like thirty years. What about our emails. The emails are just as bad as everything. Trumped it no. They're not they're not and this is part of that whole both side ism like well. Here's one negative thing but it's like a ten percent of what the hundred and fifty percent is happening over here on the right. But they treat them the same. And that isn't unbiased. That's as them putting their fingers on the scale agreed And this is not new permits of american democracy. Yes yes and i'm going to say worldwide democracy. I'm gonna talk a little bit historically about the new york times then. We can roll into some of their coverage of the january six insurrectionists. They don't call them insurrectionists by the way they call them rioters the same way. They called the protesters and seattle rioters. They're all the same lately. Different things yes so anyway in nineteen twenty two Because i'm weird. This way. And i have a subscription for about another twelve hours new york times described. Hitler in november was earlier a little bit earlier in nineteen twenty. He was twenty two years a great orator but the app anti-semitism wasn't that bad was a quote in the britain in the article. And and this is what they modern day. New york times journalist wrote about that article. They their readers. The first glimpse of hitler and profile that got a lot of things right in his description of his ability to work a crowd into a fever pitch then and they're ready to stage a coup which did predict the unsuccessful. Beer hall push which was a year later but the also are off. And i'm like you're saying you got this all right and then we got one little thing wrong. that the anti-semitism wasn't as genuine and violent as it sounded and the later coverage of the beer hall putsch which was a year later. They quoted their original article again. It says you can't expect the masses to fully understand and appreciate the real finer aims. You must feed the masses with crew. Morsels like violent anti-semitism to get them to join your path. Now i swear to god that article you could take all the hitler's and put it in trump's and you'd get the same same stuff so when they covered the beer hall putsch in december of nineteen. Twenty-three this was the title of that article. Beer hall scene gave comic touch to hitler's quote coup and.

the new york times clintons hillary Beer hall Hitler seattle britain beer hall hitler
"the new york times" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"Now here's the thing. The data science team is very clear. They don't tell journalists which write about they will say right about this. Create this emotion. They need to because the same thing that makes that advertise are want their ad appear next to an article that makes somebody feel extremely angry is the same thing that is motivating journalists to write in that way because they also want their stories to go viral on twitter they want them to go viral on social and they know that the way you do that is by writing about certain topics in in a certain way. What i'm arguing is that we have a lot of times has lost a countervailing force. Everyone is pulling in the same direction business advertisers and journalists and it's away from journalistic value and it's towards engagement and it truly has lost. Its way thank you about younger sargon. Our next speaker. Franks says no will be making his closing argument in opposition to the resolution that the new york times has lost. Its way frank. I come out of cable television. And for years on when i was a white house correspondent when i was a bureau chief of one of the first places i looked each day was the new york times. It still is. What story have they broken. What sources talk to them. What is happening in. What can they report out of washington or other places where washington's imprint politics can be felt the difference with cable television. However if we have this debate again. John maybe we can have it about has cable news lost its way is if you watch television and you watch cable. It's one story at a time. it's one showed a time and the harping on donald trump for and against on various networks has consumed the cable. Airwaves look at the new york times over the last ten years or so the pulitzer prizes. They have won the topics that they have embraced. Foodsafety distracted driving abuse of power in russia. The lives of women and girls in afghanistan business practices of apple and big technology in america. The investigation of donald trump's finances and his taxes predatory lending corona virus coverage. All of these have won. Pulitzer prizes also suffers from hubris. Partly because of all the pulitzer prizes. They win but they argue. Is that the depth and breadth of reporting that the new york times does albeit with imperfections and need to address imbalances in.

the new york times sargon Franks washington twitter donald trump white house frank pulitzer prizes John russia afghanistan Pulitzer prizes apple america
"the new york times" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"The most brilliant journalists of color from dot that same class and so there's no ideological diversity and they don't even reflect the minority communities. They come from. This is my point right when you when you you say that this kind of like. Whoa kness is the result of having a diverse workforce. It is not because they are not reflecting the communities that they come from eighty one percent of black people oppose defunding police right but you will not see that opposition in the new york times owner. Bring in your show josh go. Why does this matter by the way you might be able to find the police. That's fine why is it important About in the new york times because y- of the new york times lose touch with reality when the done seat represented ghost of appoint about diversity that yesterday times is a diverse staff of people from different if misty's who went to harvard university since that he's a knocked representative off. The valley does us city in. Which is not kate. I think i was one of the voices of resistance. I am very proud to have warned about the dangers of donald trump and a four-time populism ron world earlier than most but in use paper needs to hold on facts. The new york times. It was the only news outlet to take seriously the sexual abuse charges the sexual assault rape charges levelled by one terror against joe biden You know the biden campaign was appalled. They walked through every part of these charges which turned out to be false now. A lot of writers on the left had already said they seemed false on their face and certainly they could be away would have been an obstacle to buy the presidency. But the new york times did not primarily she did not dismiss them out of and they instead investigated them and found those charges wanting. I think we can all agree that the charges were quick to rest by the new york. Times all right. So your point made in. Virginia ticket to baccio bochu. Virginia's pushing back against your partners argument that the paper is showing a A pro-democratic bias in the way that it is covering the news not just on the bed page but you can jump into this conversation. We're be like now in terms of trump and biden. I just don't believe that the two of you think biden is getting the same treatment from the near times. That trump did. I just don't believe that you actually think that. I don't think anybody who can read could possibly think that and have a little. Let me just clarify. Do think that trump and biden journalistically merit the same coverage or the same kind of coverage. I think that question is a partisan question. I mean that that is exactly the What we're getting at here so so so so. Donald trump of course was outrageous but that outrageousness was in a very symbiotic relationship with the news media. That was covering him was getting rich off of covering his outrageousness. Now the new york times in twenty seventeen printed trump's name ninety thousand times which means that it appeared the equivalent of every two hundred fifty words. Okay that's like four times per article and you can compare how many times president obama's name appeared. Maybe are thinking. Oh well that's just normal for president. We know how many times president obama's name appeared in his second year in office and it was forty thousand times. Okay so i don't understand your argument. Is that the omnipresence of trump's name and coverage of trump was the paper feeding its audience. Negative coverage of trump wanted. To hear is for financial reasons is out what your argument is doing. Exactly what i said about the new dna of the times where does is success measure. It is measured in terms of engagement and there is nothing that gets the heartbeat of liberal elites going like the word trump bucket. If i man. I think it's very important to recognize. John got to this in his question. Donald trump was not just another president. He came to washington intending to be a disruptor. He was an anti 'institutionalised. He attacked not just as a political rivals but his political allies. If they didn't toe the line much of what he was doing and we have seen this in very thoughtful writing from people who are inside the administration working for him was a challenge to democracy itself. Let us just say to. John's question covering donald trump was not like covering any other president. He was unlike any president. We have had in this country's yasha your jonathan excellent question which is weather. Joe biden maritza seem kind of coverage on slump. What would say is that. They should be covered by the same standards. And if you play the same standards to july donald trump and in my opinion will come up with many more critical stories about donald trump and joe biden and that is absolutely fine. Bad is what journalism is the problem in. The last years has become that the media including the new york times has reflexively stocked to anything. Donald trump who has allies said even in cases where it might be that they turned out to be light. One of those times spent the toll misinformation. Disinformation which your times though thinks of itself as combating has been used was when a few people suggested visit possibility that kodak nineteen escaped a lab in china. This was labeled by the new times in fact checks and other newspapers as conspiracy. Few it was put beyond the balance of respectable At nobel prize winners in virology banda facebook youtube for discussing those few weeks for fourteen fifteen minutes. The only mentions of his furious in new york. Times was as obvious lewis. Well today i don't know what the truth is you know yet today at the white house is taking this very seriously and finally osama mainstream media is taking it seriously as well but there plenty of times. Ufo's were considered far and wide to be a preoccupation of crazy people. Now they're taken seriously by the guards so these things evolve in the new york times ever since you know people on the center left center right. Started to say oh. We've decided that the loudly rapidly hypothesis is ban. So that's the whole reason that we have to talk about it and use it as an opportunity to worry that liberals band speech people have talked about the lab theory to death. And as far as i know it's being investigated on the investigation into being closely watched by the new york giants. You jump in. Frank showed the the observation. You made Also carry something that goes way beyond the new york times but unfortunately so many of things that the former president donald trump said route the coveted crisis. It's ho- sore it's Gonna mirror miraculously disappear or hydroxy. Chloroquine will cure or whatever it is proved to be fundamentally incorrect if not outright fabrications the president's credibility sunk to a level that we've not seen before and whether it's the new york times or any place else they had to take that into consideration in reporting whatever he said the lab league theory which i don't think was banned but was viewed skeptically and covered in ways that the by all news organizations most anyway very carefully and reflected that credibility problem and it reflected the flood of disinformation that we now confront so. I think it's wrong to say that the new york times by itself and some egregious degree banned the.

the new york times donald trump biden us city ron world baccio bochu joe biden trump Virginia harvard university misty Joe biden maritza josh obama kate new york John jonathan
"the new york times" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"Nor vpn dot com slash intelligence. Welcome back to intelligence squared us. I'm your host john donvan. Let's return to our discussion. Thank you for that wrap up. Frank says no. You've now heard the first opening remarks. Then let's move onto the screen next arguing for the resolution of the new york. Times has lost its way among yasha screen is yours. Thanks so much. I'm really looking forward to this debate. And a couple of important things in which we agree. We all agree the new york times as one of the most important institutions in the united states. We all want the new york times to succeed. We also all agree. That new york times is not donald. Trump would put it the failing new of times. The idea that the paper is in financial trouble. Ovitz about to go bankrupt. Fed is about to fail in. That kind of way is really raw. My interest in this between need a newspaper of record. She's luffing your times It's we need an institution. Envy nited states that people from different hats of a political spectrum can look to recognize even if it is beautiful often that it represents the truth that it represents reality in a way that vein can trust and the thing. I'm worried about a central three main changes times implemented over the last year's detract from its standing as the newspaper of record. The i is a very clear narrowing opinion envy up and you didn't have to take my impression as read on that. You can take what that columnists within the new york. Times are saying when he talked Multiple figures within at world f told me over the last years that even quite uncontroversial criticisms of progressive orthodoxy chand by the editors assad things that you simply cannot same time even if ninety percent of a population in america might agree with them. One example of this is very hard within the new york times. Criticize the idea of defending the police and yet we have seen just now in the mail race in new york city that the top candidates chosen by people of color in a progressive city in the united states. Very much in disagreement with that. Slow the second thing i worry about. Is that this is not on just about your opinion pages. It is also a bad news coverage yet increasing seeing an attempt to get away from the old form of the tippety which could be devolve into two ciders abba. Climate change should get scientists who believes in climate change. One denies it. Good when visit consensus. Which would be reflected in the pages of terms the new moral clarity as journalists. Hold it often goes in the opposite direction. The news pages of coming away of managing benard of trying to make clear a which side is right even when that side is making a mistake so the question about future of new york times is not whether it will succeed financially. I'm confident that it will. It's about the role that it's likely to play in american and as has argued at the moment in your times is running after its subscriber base tries to maximize the revenue dollars from the people who most agree with the world of new york times. It is entrusted turning into an american version of guiding stokes. Piece full the most progressive voices in the country. What we need is to preserve the road of the newspaper of record that can actually be a basis of reality for automatic. That is what your time. Losing that is wi fi but is losing. Its thank you again. Our final opening statement will be against the resolution. It comes from virginia heffernan. Virginia your moment. So i started writing for the new york times almost exactly twenty years ago and i was on staff for eight of those years. i should say about the liberal elite according to pew center last year the numbers are very different from what baccio adjust represented to us thirty eight percent of the times readers earn more than seventy five thousand dollars a year but twenty five percent earn between thirty and seventy five thousand dollars and twenty six percent have a household income under thirty thousand dollars in the midst of this debate. I wanna tell you about. Just one article. The obituary of mary. Tyler moore not exactly world's historical piece in two thousand six when moore was still alive..

the new york times john donvan yasha Ovitz united states new york Trump donald Frank Fed new york city virginia heffernan pew center baccio Virginia
"the new york times" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"Hard way that if they ran beds that their own colleagues disapproved of those colleagues take to twitter very publicly denounce them and their bosses at the near times. Would listen to that. Twitter bob again and again. We have seen the times as leadership caving to social media. Mobs and what i want to argue. Is that. This is not a glitch in a hallowed institution. This is actually a feature a nana bug of the times is current iteration of its current. Dna now this new iteration began in two thousand fourteen. When the the now publisher ag salzburger was tasked with helping the times of all into a digital first publication and he came up with the times ovation report and that report was leaked to the media. So we know it's in it and he found that there were a number of things. The times was not doing well enough the first thing. He blamed the wall separating. The business side of journalism audience development from the newsreel. Eiji felt that the the task of growing the audience fell squarely on the newsroom. And the second thing was he felt underwhelmed by the degree to which times reporters where selling their stories or promoting themselves or really becoming social media. Influencers leadership must identify rising digital stars. And ask them how the times can do better. That's a quote from the time ovation report. So this actually reflected a larger shift towards measuring success in terms of engagement online. And of course what that means is you're allowing the most extreme readers to determine what success looks like because the most engaged readers are always the most extreme ones the new dna of the near times explicitly called for seating moral journalistic authority to the worst place on the planet. Which is the internet and the worst place on the internet. Which is twitter now. Ag was right that this was good business. Times is making a lot of money pursuing this but it is bad journalism now. I think that my colleagues on the other side arguing against the proposal are gonna argue that. This was a democratizing force. This was the new york times allowing the readers the masses to speak back to them. Nothing could be further from the truth. The median income of a new york times reader is one hundred ninety one thousand dollars. The new york times always was and remains a reflection of ruling class in worms. Now the ruling class does like good journalism about its enemies. But that's all you're ever gonna find at the new york times which has really lost. Its way very much about younger sergeant. Our next speaker will be arguing against the resolution against the idea that the new york times has lost. Its way here is. Frank says no frank. The screen is yours. Thank you very much. And i look forward to the debate in the conversation here. Let me say the outset. I'm not gonna argue that. The new york times is perfect. I'm not gonna argue that. The new york times hasn't made missteps misjudgements errors and that hasn't got things that he can improve. I don't think anybody looks at any news organization and doesn't bring their point of view their worldview to that experience but i do think we need to be first and foremost precise and in considering what this resolution is all about that. The new york times has lost. Its way that somehow fundamentally forgotten how to do. Journalism is doing journalism anymore. Losing its way is not about getting better. Losing its ways being fundamentally a disoriented and in the wrong place. The new york times must navigate several things and these are the things we need to keep in mind as we define whether it has lost. Its way i it's journalism is it good is it fair is it inclusive is a professional is accountable when it is right wrong and needs adjusting the storytelling is that storytelling creative bold imaginative. Does it make use of the various platforms. The technologies to inform engage news consumers and finally the business model can generate the revenue needed to maintain seventeen hundred journalists around the world on a daily basis. And all the support system that's needed. I the journalists every day. The new york times still does despite what you just heard. Some of the most remarkable journalism in the world breaking news coverage of the assassination of haiti's president within the first twenty four hours fifteen separate stories from reporting on what happened so far as it is known to the implications on the street in the politics. Secular peace stutters in israel Another headline diamond rush in south africa. Another red cradles nurtured china's next generation of communist leaders a breathtaking reach around the planet and coverage from across the country detailed coverage of the collapse of the condo in surf site a remarkable coverage of heat drought wildfires What to know about the latest corona virus and the delta variant arts culture science. These are areas that most news organisations. Don't even touch anymore. And yet the new york times does it in detail and depth on a daily basis from inc. Mommy's linking tattoo artists with their ancestors to The last ice area in the arctic which may be very vulnerable to rapid.

the new york times ag salzburger twitter Eiji the times The times bob Ag Frank frank haiti delta variant arts culture sci south africa israel china inc. Mommy arctic
"the new york times" Discussed on Channel 33

Channel 33

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Channel 33

"Was a reporting fellow for the times previously of and i don't know if that was a collaborative effort between the two of them or not But yeah certainly a fun. One would ask michael about this off the air he goes. I don't know we had multiple sea nick stories that year. I really appreciate coming from. The one about the grannies who were see snakes got the different one that there were two seasons are a fantastic. Grandma's was was the other one about the other the grandmas that the the researchers sent out into the coral reefs to look for c. And they said that they were easier to work with than than graduate students. Which i thought was kind of funny. Lily talk about the way that the offices changed in desert of corona virus. Era that we're all all zoom in slack in anything else out. This is what we miss. We miss being in person with co workers to talk about all the different seasonings stories. That have come across our desk here these areas. This is the most fun of that. Is liz overhearing. Be people talk about work in over a year. Thank you guys so much for coming on doing this. You how you have a. I know that you said michael early on that you the first person to use the more a headline formulation in when discussing heels. But you know. Michael jordan didn't invent the slam dunk. You just perfect it you know and you guys have a level of aesthetic artistic perfection here that i think you should be really proud. Thank you so much. stay tuned. we hope we have some more More similar fun for everyone You know who does the the trial by its section of the new york times or or science and health status general watching toilets relevance. I was reading the comments section on the article which is generally a bad thing to do but in this case it was really lovely but i did see that someone suggested that we should win a nobel peace prize which i'm open to. Yeah you know. i'll. I'll be happy to share that prize money with you. The pulitzer was just the start really nobel prize. We're going for we we want. We want the p. Got sabrina michael. Thank you so much. Thank you take our inky. Our david shoemaker guesses these strained pun headline yeah. Mondays headline about a the who was busted after posting a photo of stilton cheese was cream doesn't pay today's headline comes from the l. A. times david and it's a special occasion because i was informed this week. That steve horne. Who is a longtime editor on the l. a. times sports desk is retiring. Oh wow okay now you know how the la times sports headlines they really punny ones often make their way to twitter Many of those are the work of steve horn and in fact people around the paper when they see a particularly wonderful clever dada. Sports headline say That's a steve horne headline you. So i thought. I would do in la time. Sports headline here In honor of steve horns long and alestra his career at that paper. This is from wednesday. You remember the deondraye. Eytan jae crowder alleyoop that ended game two of the western conference finals. The suns beat clippers. Now remember remember. This is the la times the clippers hometown newspaper reporting this story. What was the la times is strained. Sun headline wow. I'm thinking immediately go to like. Don't forget to tip Forget to guard the tip. Yeah don't forget to tip Though e- been buzzer beater Last.

Michael jordan two michael wednesday steve Mondays Lily twitter Eytan jae today this week two seasons new york sabrina michael liz over a year l. A. times david david one first person
"the new york times" Discussed on Max & Murphy on Politics

Max & Murphy on Politics

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Max & Murphy on Politics

"It does welcome to max politics. This max from gotham gazette coming to you the day after primary day. Well we know some things and we don't know a lot because in part because The primaries were crowded and competitive the so much on the ballot in part because of the expansion of absentee balloting in part because of the start of the use of ranked choice voting. So there are a lot of layers to these elections There are some things we know. There's some things we don't know we're digging into both of those some of the things that we can take away from primary day in the election thus far and some of what to watch for going forward we have a great show for you today. In just a couple minutes. I'm going to be joined by mara. Gay of the new york times editorial board the times editorial board endorsed in the three big races that were on the ballot in the primary the democratic primaries for mayor city controller and manhattan district attorney and all three of the candidates that the times editorial board endorsed got a seemingly enormous boost from those endorsements of times. Detoro board will join me shortly to discuss the choices they made in those three races. How those candidates are doing and what comes next. Those candidates of course were kathryn garcia in the mayoral primary. Now she's in third place but she has far outpaced expectations in this race so far and she's one of the three candidates in the mayoral primary that have a shot to win of any kind. The favourite there of course is eric adams who has a roughly eighty thousand vote lead. Roughly nine percentage points over mile wildly. Who's a little bit ahead of kathryn garcia and those are the three candidates in the running as we wait to count absentee ballots and do the ranked choice run off in another race that the times endorsed in the democratic primary for comptroller brad lander city council member from brooklyn is surprising. Some people by outpacing city council speaker cory johnson by Also about sixty seventy thousand. Votes and nine percentage points in the controller. Primary brad lander looking like. He's in very good shape. They're going into absentees ranked choice. Run off again. These races are knock called and they won't be for weeks and then in the third race that the times editorial board weighed in on alvin brag for manhattan district attorney in the democratic primary. He is leading tally for weinstein. By seven thousand or.

kathryn garcia cory johnson eric adams seven thousand alvin brag third place eighty thousand vote brooklyn today about sixty seventy thousand third race one Detoro manhattan three both three races three candidates three big races nine percentage points