17 Burst results for "The Martin Agency"

"the martin agency" Discussed on Talking Junk

Talking Junk

02:49 min | 2 months ago

"the martin agency" Discussed on Talking Junk

"This earlier. We were listening to your spotify stations. It is a cluster. Fuck on their because we can hardly gear your tracks. Apparently there's some foreign group name tags ingham. They're horrible listed with you. And you guys have those people who use seo to their advantage right latch onto tag team and then we get on their portals. And i've i've done a real good job of cleaning that up right. But i've not i haven't got to spotify you. I really don't care about what we've done as far as putting old music. It's not that important. Because i get more out of i more out of the seo than would just having spotify and everybody knows where they go find the stuff that they need to but everybody does remiss to stop that so many doesn't tight remixing. They thought out there then. Hey they can have fun doing it. But it's not my responsibility to run after people who are remixed. That might not be right and then they get permission to do this right. They did permission from The label who has administration over the mass over the over the published. Because we own. We still don't have to record. But the fatal flaw was signing over the administration right. That's like avenue. Avenue rolls royce. But you gave keys by now. You can't never really drive the car you got at. You could ride in the car which came. Never drive it by yourself. Can't ever make no move. No but that's coming down though because that was part of that was part of the settlement so we just got a little that away once. We whittled away. Then we'll be straight. So i look at won't there. It is being pension plan. But she after gawk careless as often auteur everything that twenty eight. Go on that twenty years. I wasn't able to do and it did it. Wipe the slate clean. And now i'm good and you know the things that are happening to me in because of my hustle is all because of my hustle. Man not all of it but most of everything that's popular with mies. Mockup is my hustle. Because i play off. It's right like. I know everybody in the martin agency. Who who makes the guy go commercials up and down the chain all sorts. Don't even get to meet those people because they got a publicist or manage or people who go into work born on the zoysia roadblocks. I'm everything is so there's no middleman for you. Just go straight to the source but this is another learn how to learn thing we were talking about when i told you it's my responsibility. Get my own money right. So we've always done shows do the halftime shows. Nba halftime shows..

twenty years spotify twenty eight martin agency rolls royce
"the martin agency" Discussed on Brunch

Brunch

03:27 min | 5 months ago

"the martin agency" Discussed on Brunch

"To help you wash the dishes. It's just all like the exact same thing as the the the tag team commercial. That's where I would want to intern. I thought you were going to throw out like a, you know, I'd like to in turn off. The belko company, who do you think do you think that interns were their part of that? I mean, if you're an unpaid intern and you were a part of the belko experiment experiment that that is not worth the exposure. It is funny in the belko experiment when they realize of course, this isn't a real company. They what's the the main character's name. What's that girl's name is John Gallagher. John C. McGinley know. Jhansi McKinley. Absolutely send that movie. Yes, he is boss. Who's the asshole? No, he's not the boss. Not the boss. But like he's like a small like supervisor, right? You just like a creepy guy that works there John Gallagher who I think is the main character, like, of course. This isn't a real company. They never check our own network or tell us what if we're doing a good job. Everything we do is just random ass busy work. What how would you not think that? Okay. What do you do for them? Really nothing meant years of this company and you have no idea like what you're doing like what you're what you're working towards. Yeah, it's crazy movie that belko experiment. But Martin Agency, that would be it for me an incredible update on our video episodes that it appears to be Frozen right now, and I don't know how to fix it. Really? Yeah, Well, let's see. This is this is the authentic real thing. Hey, it's oh now it's working. Oh, we're good. Okay. Hell, yeah that we just pulled a speed. You know, when they've Loop the video. Have you seen speed? Yes, when I think they do this to get the people off of the bus. They Loop the like the the video on the bus home. So who's the Dennis Hopper is just watching the same video on a loop, but really they're doing other stuff. So we're just Frozen there for a second we are dead. And we're at all we're playing video games or something. I did get a Nintendo switch this week. Oh boy, very excited about that. That was like, I think I want to change that and play Nintendo switch with you. I know I don't know anything about video games. I want you to do that too. I've been asking Ellen for a while. If I could get me switch. Can I guess we're taking a which yeah, and she was like no no no and our anniversary was last week and she surprised me with the switch. She said we're not doing gifts this year. She got me switch. Wow, that's a good move. Great use of the were not doing gifts this year. We're not doing gifts this year is obviously this this is such a basic conversation. I think that we're above it to even have but we're not doing gift box is just the it just summons chaos. Oh, yeah, just because it's it's like a it's are we not doing gifts or are we are wage? Are we saying that we're not doing gifts but we're doing gifts. Yeah, there's a lot of there's a lot of gray area there and it's it's very confusing relationship. Semi, right right, like one person is like thinking this this other person think about why can't people just get along. Oh man..

Jhansi McKinley John Gallagher John C. McGinley Dennis Hopper last week Ellen belko Nintendo this year Frozen this week one person Martin Agency team
"the martin agency" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

03:16 min | 6 months ago

"the martin agency" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

"He was just an extra. He had no lines in the movie so they couldn't figure out who the guy was They looked online. They just couldn't figure it out. And so eventually when jim tucker eventually his mom rode to jim tucker and she started to keep a record of everything that ryan would say because he had a lot he was doing a lot of memories you know and she would every day write them down and she had this long journal. It was about this. She called her to journal about this thick and she would send these things to jim tucker that her child said so they were dated. There was a record this expert had so nobody could say well she figured out who it was i and then she went back. And you know embellish it or anything she had no idea. She sent the memories off And eventually jim tucker went out met the family and through a long process they were able to get an archivist from this huge film library in la to go into the archives and look up this movie which was called night after night and in that file there was a picture of the guy he had pointed to with his name on the back of the picture and his name was marta martin and so once they had the name they were able to do all kinds of research on and they found out that fifty five of through all kinds of travel documents newspaper articles. This here's an example. Alex you know we're a ryan said he he. He worked for an agency. He was an agent. He wanted to play agent. He worked and they thought oh is some fantasy that he was part of the cia or something you know they just thought oh yeah it must be talking about is. Maybe it's imaginary. Mary not but he kept saying it was an agent and he said in my agency. We change people's names. We change people's names so when they figured out who mardi weren't was right. It turned out that he ran a talent agency in la. There's even stationary says. Mardi mary martin agency and they would change people's names because they were actors trying to have stage names so you know there's a process where all these things were verified and then the interesting part which leads to what you were asking about. The ceres was finding the daughter of mardi martin. Marty martin died nineteen sixty five which was another element dry and kept insisting that he died in nineteen sixty five but the birth certificate said sixty three or the death certificate and every and he would say no it was sixty five and they were all saying no sixty three and then jim found and i helped find some of this stuff some additional documents and including a photograph of his grave. Eventually that revealed that actually ryan was right. It was sixty five which is another interesting thing but anyway so they found the daughter of mardi martin so he had a daughter who died when the little girl was eight years old when her father. Marty martin died. Now she's like in her sixties And she was very close to her dad and of course it was traumatic when she lost her dad. So i mean. I actually was the one that reached out to her. Initially because i covered. I'd reached out to her at the time. I was writing my book. Actually and we had a good connection and you know..

jim tucker marta martin Marty martin ryan Alex Mary fifty five mardi sixties mardi martin jim eight years old nineteen sixty five sixty five sixty three Mardi martin mary
"the martin agency" Discussed on Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

05:52 min | 8 months ago

"the martin agency" Discussed on Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

"Yeah the other one. I wanted to shout out was womb stories ad from acidy An it's am amd bbdo london. Right that those. Yeah so it's like the third installment of these really like taboo breaking adds that sap has been making just around the experience of having a female body. I guess And i think they're a this was really interesting and different I wrote a little bit about their first. To the vivo i. There was some prior to that too but about viva level then Blood normal and this one is is like a bit more intense and like rod. I guess like it's it's sweeps across like this whole experience of having a uterus and like how it impacts your life in so many different ways there's some like really tragic moments in the ad and it's just like such a variety of illustration and storytelling within it. That i just got it was really beautiful. Really intense But i thought it was worth a shout out for sure because it's just a really incredible piece of work. Yeah i mean. Someone asked on twitter their day. What do you think is a piece of advertising that has changed the world over the last few decades and the first one. I was thinking of his blood. Normal blood normal was years ago from ssd which for americans who don't know sat's parent company of body form la brass and a few others but they own a few brands in america are really not not any that most folks have heard of But a very big deal. Globally and blood normal. Just basically tried to normalize de stigmatized the way we talk about and show periods And to actually show blood and not just blue liquid Among many other things. So i really think is one of the most impactful campaigns. I've seen in my time covering this and it's great to see how they've continued that with With vivo of all the last year and then with with womb stories this year. That's a great pick in his. Were more yeah so an obvious choice for brands. This year was to bring their activation to instagram. And i think the one that did it. The best in terms of what i saw was audible and it was kind of perfect timing because this happened around in july when comecon was supposed to take place but they released audio adaptation of neil gamons the sandman the graphic novel series and so to promote that they essentially made this digital gallery on instagram. And they asked fans to submit their actual dreams so kind of tying into themes of the novel fans could either submitted on this custom website or they could actually call this hotline that was narrated by neil himself And they would select like i guess what they deemed the most interesting dreams than than they had actual dc comic illustrators draw them than they uploaded them on instagram with audio snippets from be new audio series so I just thought it was really all dumb. Jamison less when you wanna show adding. I really liked the jordache for delivery from martin agency are us each of the year. I you know it was a great great idea. band together. They supported all the other food. Delivery apps ubereats Caviar and encouraged all the restaurants there to be visible that they were open for delivery. That cut delivery fees and restaurants. Say they did a lot to support the restaurant community and you know it probably helped lot places stay in business this campaign So i think that's. That's something very admirable and You know shared very widely across social media Twitter so you know. I gotta go with door. Nashes open for delivery to great one and on our list that that one tied some..

amd bbdo sap neil gamons london twitter america neil Jamison martin
"the martin agency" Discussed on Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

03:29 min | 8 months ago

"the martin agency" Discussed on Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

"Few years that i think over the past few years we've kind of seen them when some new clients when momentum i know buffalo wild wings was a big when they had maybe two two years ago when they've had stuff like that happened and i think this year that Even even the face of all the problems in in hardships that came for agencies this year they still managed to Kind of still continue to win. They want access this year in a few other clients and they even think you know. I mentioned this in my story is well they They won old navy at the beginning of this year. And i think like literally weeks after they won old navy The retail chain had the shut all of their stores down because of because of covid nineteen and They kinda just ran with it. And we're able to pitch ideas for them and and I interviewed chief marketing officer for the story and she basically said like yeah they. They're the best kind of partner we could have this year. They've just been able to roll with the punches and and So yeah that that's that's part of the reason. Why why they have that why they were chosen. This year is just because of an adaptability. I guess that they were able to to show. And then and then like you mentioned. They did have some creative changes. This year in terms of leadership. On danny robinson was named chief creative officer. He's one of few black chief officers in the industry and he's been with martin for quite some time. I think probably around fifteen twenty years. I forget exactly how long but yeah they just. They've kind of had a rough couple of years but also a lot of growth at the same time in And clearly were able to show a lot of resiliency this year. And doug i feel like Martin's also a great example of that got an earlier start on diversity and prioritizing diversity. I say earlier in like two years ago. But you know it's gonna compared to the disease that just this spring under intensive pressure realized that maybe diversity would be a good idea especially in leadership you know. This is an agency with a very diverse leadership. both in terms of gender balance and racial diversity. I believe something. Like fifty percent of their new hires this year Were minority Identifying and And one of the things to release strikes me as they lost. Karen costello their c. c. o. Who just due to personal reasons had to relocate. I don't think. I think it was a very amicable party. But they're able to replace one of the best known women in one of the most prominent women in creative With one of the most prominent and respected black men in in creative. You know that just goes to show a lot of agencies be lucky to have you know either of those much less the ability to replace one with the other so seamlessly. So what's your take on barton's commitment to diversity and how that was reflected this year. I think that the martin agency understands that diversity. Equality and inclusion can be a very significant driver of business. I mean we can go back and forth on this. And there's continuing continually evolving research that diverse teams are more profitable. And you see that brands. You see that agencies. And i think that they're demonstrating this and the other side of this. I was just having a conversation with somebody about this recently. That excuse me there are a of brands. That have these proclamations of we want your agencies to be diverse. But i'm not really sure. Many of these brands have followed through..

danny robinson buffalo wild wings Karen costello martin doug Martin barton
"the martin agency" Discussed on Ad Chatter

Ad Chatter

04:45 min | 10 months ago

"the martin agency" Discussed on Ad Chatter

"Do to get a better balance of talent entering the business all completely just to go back to your point. Historically in the united states shield great age of come from the boonies and gone back to howard gossage in san francisco. Which will they kind of goes from advertising backwaters you know if you look at orion dosage. You look at fort. Linda oregon. You look at crispin you look you know kind of fella gallagher. Historically the great stuff is coming from the some not from new york. That's a great point. The martin agency in richmond virginia. So it's very interesting but you know now now that those agencies have those reputations worldwide reputations they can pretty much bring the talent from anywhere in the world they want to you once again you get that sort of like minded ness but let me ask you. Let me ask you this you know. Is this something. That can be trained. Is you know is agencies. Don't train people the way they used to. They want people hitting the ground running. They want young folks You know is is this notion of Empathizing with the somewhat with the somewheres can be training can you can you train somebody to do that. Or is it a fault of the recruitment process That we're just not getting the talent that we really need. I think you just said eight. And perhaps even now that those pockets of kind of provincial kind of away from in the over stakes if agencies do set up still recruiting college university educated middle-class kids you know So now you're gonna get less great felon miguel guts. You're going to get less. You know kind of kind of got an. Because i think that we you know when you look on the over golden age it coincided with the emergence of a lot of jewish italian kids pollen jobs. Now you're talking about the be in the sixties. Yeah exactly and the occasional greek guy. You know you're former before my time. Steve yes well before nine..

howard gossage Linda oregon fella gallagher san francisco richmond united states virginia new york Steve
"the martin agency" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"the martin agency" Discussed on Revision Path

"Bozeman an art director at the Martin Agency in Richmond Virginia. Let's start the show right so tell us who you are and what you do high so my name is Ashley Bozeman. I N an art director here at the mortgage interest located in Richmond Virginia. So as far as like title magical roles so basically I were in the creative department added creative Ad Agency. I'm usually paired with a copywriter and together. We are the ones who were briefed and tasked to basically come up with ideas for campaigns commercial. Social Coast really anything. You can think it's our job to basically come up with that creative idea. And then specifically as art director at my job to rematch like visually. So how does that look? Who is being represented you know? What a colored choices where the style choices cinematographer no working with directors and things like that but we basically just. We're the ones who control. Everything looks whereas partners on our copywriters. They're the ones who control the tone of voice and what that sounds like and scripts and things like that so together. We're the ones kind of The big brains behind You'll see on TV as far as like commercials and things like that is sounds like your work is a lot of against like meetings and sort of heads down work sessions Yes definitely a lot of meetings but it's also a lot of consenting so it's just like. I was briefed earlier today. We'll get a brief and then on you know. Look at our calendars hanging time. Report like two or three hours on on our schedules. And then we'll just find room in the office and literally. Just sit by ideas that are large. Kinda lost the that? We're not sure clients whatever even by or do and Ideas that also fit the brief exactly so we basically will just kind of get together. Just kind of brainstorm different ways. We can kind of find the best solution for that..

director Richmond Virginia Ashley Bozeman Bozeman Ad Agency the Martin Agency Social Coast
"the martin agency" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"the martin agency" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing

"And that stuck you know I was like man that is the crispus articulation of agency life and it's why I always believed that the man is GonNa win over. The machine in the marketing business is about the talent every day that comes up and down the elevator and how we invest and make the right bets on how to empower them. So what advice would you today. Give to your sixteen year old self. ooh. Probably Shave your head earlier. That's that's actually true. I would probably say that to be a little bit more confident definitely my sixteen year old stuff in Florida. I would have said don't be so intimidated about New York. Don't think I think that where you are now that you don't have the raw materials to make it on the big stage. My mom instilled in me a belief that I can do whatever I put my mind to but it took a awhile for that to really kick in and for me to be fearless about that and just go for it. We always end our episodes with shouts a math magic the analytical and the creative if you think about it. Can you name a person. WHO's the greatest math marketer yeah I mean? I got a bunch of them. I learned everything I learned in the math and crm world from Lauren Grossman Roseman who I worked for RAPP slobby Samardzija Super Smart and Gatlin the whole analytic crew. All those guys are way smarter than I do and I give a lot of credit for instilling Celescu. The magician whose that great creative market repudiate thinks the great magician early in my career is no longer with us but mark McDonald is Scottish. I call them the party furnace. He was the first creative director that I worked with and his personality with so huge. I was in awe of what he could do. He had a big impact on me and then also Luke Luke Sullivan moved from the Martin Agency Down West Wayne. I stole his presentation style. He could suck all the air out of a room and then a lot of my planning chops came early career from a guy named Andrew Jones he worked for John Steele previously and he taught me a lot about brand planning and how to moderate focus groups and draw qualitative insights and headland something to where a creative team would be interested in using it Scott Hagedorn truly you embody math and magic and thanks for being here. They saw pleasure..

director Luke Luke Sullivan Lauren Grossman Roseman Martin Agency Andrew Jones Florida Scott Hagedorn New York John Steele Gatlin mark McDonald RAPP sixteen year
"the martin agency" Discussed on Marketing School

Marketing School

06:56 min | 2 years ago

"the martin agency" Discussed on Marketing School

"Get ready for your daily dose of marketing strategies and tactics from entrepreneurs with the guy and experience to help you find success in any marketing capacity. You're listening to marketing school with your instructors, Neil Patel, and Eric SU. Martin's wall. And I'm Neil. Me each and be marvelous of first and foremost. What is a B, two B marketing? Yes. So most people when they're creating funnels. They're like, all right. I'm going to get people to go to my page. I'm going to get them to buy a product that I'm going to upsell them down on the to another product. And then it just keeps going, the may have two or three pox, a good example of checkout bumps. This click funnels were when you check out a little tick box being like oh, if you get this extra few dollars, you can get one hundred dollars worth of value. Now, if you're beat a b that funnel doesn't work because you're not really selling, physical Adam. So how'd you end up creating a better performing fall when you're in beat ABI, and there is way we wanna go over that today? I think there's a lot of different ways is gonna cat here. Maybe Neil might be helpful if you talk about your talk about how are right now and it's all obviously ever evolving beast. I can say the vile that you had two years ago, three years ago, stressing different than what you have now who can start there. And then we can kind of keep going yet. Sounds good. So for us at seal. Rain on the on the Martin agency side of things BB. Right. We do very much have abuse to be Martin now. How Jewett is through cotton in the very beginning. So that's the top of the fall. Right. So we're bringing people through podcast through blog pose through. Let's even like speaking engagement for even add writing people, rape will maybe a piece of content, I, and they're these are people that had never heard of before for the most part. So this is top of the fall. Right. A lot of traffic goes there first. Okay. Great. So you have your top of the fog of people coming it. Now, what happens is, they might be interested you after walls listened to sixty or so episodes of marking score growth. Everywhere you might be interested in learning a little more about what we do. Maybe what we do fits what you need. Right. So the second part is going to be the middle or right. Middle of the funnel is where they might opt in for an equal that you might have. Or maybe a webinar training that you have they're putting their Email address raising your hand little bit. They're indicating what they're interested in and then that you have an Email address now. So what happens there is you could you DeMarcus people, maybe ask them to a tenure maybe next fun of his game to live, the idea, here is that you taking people from unaware of you to you. Maybe a little more interested you wanting to get really interested in ubod the funnel where they're close to buying something from your right? Maybe they're buying a course from you. Maybe they're buying tickets to a live event. Maybe they're buying your services. Right. But you're taking people from the top to the bottom to convert them may different ways, in terms of how people do it, but at Siegel rain, what we do is we start with content first, and then maybe they often something and then. Maybe he just come to date they're interested in services. But maybe by strategy I pay one time cloth and then the ready to ascend in the next level, which is they're paying on recurring basis. And then it goes even higher than that might come in for intensive with Neil ISO that's a high level, how things yet and the way my final works is I get people in through content similar to Eric. And I also have another version, where I have a tool called Uber suggests that get people into. And then the way collect the lead is get them to register for something, whether take a quiz, or analyze their website once collect their information, then from there, Mike is our selling them. And if they're qualified for enterprise, get kicked off into enterprise through not pushed down into SNB, thus and BT at a Utah from there. They ended up getting sold if they're qualified, the then continue get sold on more, and more products and services, if they're not they'll get down sold until we don't have any more products or services to offer. And then one other portion that I forgot to include. My final is the moment. We know they're qualified a self service. They give their information. If we know it's qualified one hundred percent sure will even show him a calendar option where they can book or call right than in there. So than that way, it's more efficient. We get less of a drop off, but our funnels pretty simple. The key is what can we do to entice him to come in and then from there, get them to give their information? And also, let's think about all the people that are starting out hell how should their work simple really? I think you're starting out, you don't need to think about what Neil has having a calendar or producing all these different things. Right. Like all these channels will reproduce. You gotta keep it simple. Maybe you find one thing that works for you get into your file on and try to close. What are your thoughts on that? I agree. So keep your funnel really simple at the beginning, and then at other layers to it because the moment you add to me layers. Beginning. It may not just work out the way to keep a simple as you get people to your site with us through e books blog post paid odds. Whatever it may be. You drive them to landing page offers them something. And then that's it. You follow up, try to close them right than there, that's up to you. The moment you know that works. You'll find that a certain portion of those people will be qualified for more stuff. That's when you add in the downsize, you'll also find that a good portion of the people if not the majority won't be qualified at all. That's where you offer secondary offerings third offering of products that are more qualified for them, and you can either do this on your own custom code, or you can just use tools like click funnels to get up and running pretty fast. And I believe click on those even has a free trial now you're one phone away. All right guys today. But before we go, this is part of our funnel marketing school in the IRA slash intensive is where we can apply to do a one day intensive event health grow, your business faster is gonna be intimate amazing speakers to be Neil myself as well. And it is for the people that are super motivated, and really wanna get with other motivated people, so marking school dot IO slash intensive. And by the way, forget rate movie described it as podcast helps us grow. And we'll see tomorrow. This session of marketing school has come to a close be sure to subscribe for more daily marketing strategies and tactics to help you find the success you've always dreamed of, and don't forget to rate and review, so we can continue to bring you the best daily content possible. We'll see you in class tomorrow, right here on marketing school.

Neil Patel Martin Eric SU Adam the Martin agency ABI Siegel rain rape Jewett Mike BT Utah one hundred dollars one hundred percent three years two years one day
"the martin agency" Discussed on Rework

Rework

13:33 min | 2 years ago

"the martin agency" Discussed on Rework

"Right now, we were told when it was going to run. So it's like may was on the right channel when I thought Ron. And I think that's when I finally believed that it was real. 'cause you keep waiting on something, especially like this, you keep waiting for some grownup somewhere to go. Okay. We're not running this who approved this, you're all fired. And but, you know, there was right there on my TV and my living room. So I was like, well shit. It worked within a j buzz was happening. I mean you know, there's still cliche in the industry. We want to create buzz, you can't mandate that we are getting calls from media outlets like you wouldn't believe this was covered by the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, we were on VH one. We were on ESPN coal pizza. We flew to New York and Ron TV the interviewed us. This was covered by at age and weak. Creativity magazine which is a big industry magazine. Covered it in, in the in the creative director who, who, who reviewed. It said something very interesting on the surface. This just seems like a bunch of crazy, maybe gross creatures, you know, being funny, but he says you look at this work. This campaign is brilliant, retail advertising, the clients store name. The logo is ominous green the entire time characters. They're not just singing funny song. They're singing about the sub, and that they're toasted, and they then show the toaster, and the sandwiches going through the toaster. And then they're talking about the price of the sandwiches. This is brilliant a story in the Denver post from that time. So quiz knows got thirty thousand emails and phone calls in the first month of the campaign, launching the spun monkeys managed to spark a national conversation. Meanwhile, back in London were Jill. Have return to work. The ads were in airing at all. It was a really strange time because I was still in this basement, working crazy. I was on this on this show. An everyone around me was slightly know about me, having taken time off to go and do this thing. And I think everyone was kind of like, didn't really won't be to bang on about two months. They just wanted me to get when we was used to be doing that on my fine wasn't ringing, because we're in the basement and this production kept having to nip upstairs and they'd be like, because it caused a real Rory. Everybody wanting to talk to me. I killed my website is well, my website immediately exploded. I was discount of underground Wade's divisive celebrity briefly. Yeah. No, I loved every moment of it is wonderful. However, not everyone was as excited about the ads as Joel on the folks at the Martin agency. We were given a heads up that that some people were complaining, and we kind of laughed about it and said, they'll get over it. But I guess they didn't. Look, it's a polarizing campaign, and it's very edgy campaign. I would say if we made a mistake with the campaign, it was we ran it on general media at the time. You know, there were spike TV MTV VH one. All of those, it should have probably been exclusively on those channels. But I do think that some of the, the notoriety was because it ran in mainstream media that it horrified whole bunch of people who were middle aged. And that's what got tournaments gauze. I think all young people like the notion of rebellion and these characters were rebellious characters in the fact that we are willing to take it out, and put it right out in the middle of middle America landscape was part of the rebellion was fun is so nice like a consent tissue. Right. If you're doing something completely mental and you're putting it on the internet people in that medium have control over what they say. And so if someone shows you that because they usually they think you'll like it will you've gone there because you such doubt this kind of nonsense. But if you put something mental, the talian beaming into everyone's homes, especially an ad because it's not even the thing that they're there to watch. Everyone's like, yeah, you'll, you'll fool senior on in a slightly consent. You why? Not hadn't thought about until until that point. Quiz knows eventually dropped the Martin agency, but his carry explains it wasn't all because of the blowback from the spring monkeys campaign. The company was becoming more corporate. They had hired someone who came in from the more Nain stream fast food sectors. And they were much more conservative people in the people who actually bought the original work. So. No, we weren't. We weren't fired a. We did another campaign. It was a typical show, the sandwiches the entire time nothing. Interesting. It was all beauty shots of food classic category advertising, which was remarkably uninteresting. And I'm sorry. They just sorta got what they deserved the conservative people didn't realize the DNA of this company. Quiz knows and quiz knows has. Well, certainly not, not not not doing a brand that it wants was. Let's, let's say that quiz news is really interesting story. This is Mark Lohman chief brand officer for the Rigo restaurant group groom airport volume includes quiz knows and talk with Omar. We love working with brands that maybe aren't having their best day right now. But we love working with them to bring them back into help, turn them around based on what consumers want Mike Lohman started his job in February. His company, Rigo is backed by a private equity firm that specializes in turnarounds of consumer brands that should give you an idea of how quiz knows has fared in the period, since the spun monkeys add ownership changed hands from one private equity firm to another the company got sued by its own franchisees, it filed for bankruptcy. And in went from forty seven hundred US locations to four hundred and ten years. If you look at what made quiz. No successful. It really comes down to a few things. We built our foundation on having. Fantastic, high quality food that tastes great. We also build our foundation originally on innovation and coming out with new products and new ideas that other brands didn't have and at the time that they weren't willing to try. And then if you look at history, I what happened to quiz knows has happened to a number of brands, and that is we lost our way we started to stray from that north star. And a lot of that happened during the economic downturn. And when you stray from north star, and you move away from who you are, and what consumers want from you. It's no surprise when challenges head your way. Krizner's is still going after a young male demographic. But the media landscape is much different than it was in two thousand and four windchill Vitas spun monkeys were introduced to the world. It was before you to before Instagram before Netflix streaming and cord cutting before Twitter and brands getting into fights on Twitter. Mark Lohman says quiz knows is considering opportunities like twitch, the live streaming platform for gamers. National television campaigns in the near term probably aren't the best fit for us. But there are new tactics new channels coming out like twitch and other ways that, that really do seem to be reaching guests and reaching them in a way that we haven't been able to reach them before twitch has incredibly high engagement within certain demographics and psycho graphics. And I would say that, that many of those many of those consumers are a good fit for what we're designing for everybody talks about it, and the terms of wealth, social media's taken older, everything. But I can promise you, when you go to pitch a client, these days, still the first words out of their mouth are basically show me the TV, and you can call a TV or not TV, but at the end of the day, it's still a commercial of sorts. And so it runs as a pre roll, you know, where, you know, the parts of when you go to a website, and they said, you know, you can skip this ad. Well, that's still a commercial playing in if it's not interesting is just. Beauty shots of food. They are going to skip it. But when those characters come on, and sing we love the sobs, you know, I'm sorry in this day and age people would continue watching it. I, I still believe so you know if ever there was a time for creativity and film content that looks like commercials or or whatever it's now because since consumers are in control of not only wear when in how they'll interact with your advertising. They're in control of F L even be bothered to interact with your advertising, which means it better be damn interesting and entertaining. So to me, the spun monkeys would explode in today's a social media age. So if that's how the media landscape looks for people in marketing and advertising. What does it look like for people like Jovic who are still making weird stuff for themselves? It was. Bit the world west back in the Nevada thousands, the internet was very open. An it really just depended on. We'll people sending it to each other. And that was all matted and then Google cleverer than YouTube came along, and then Facebook, it will become beholden to. These huge multinational corporations on their invisible, algorithms all of which were designed to maximize revenue full said corporations on it changed the game enormously, a lot of the people from Mike coho who make animations. Have really struggled over the last few years, because if you if you will dependent on YouTube, which is will a loss of creative than animation is a real problem because animation is hard time conceiving inexpensive to Mike. It is a medium, which if you will spending ages in a fourteen on Mike, two minutes of ready, high quality stuff. But the algorithm is rewarding somebody who's sitting looking camera to king about full Naito Mike up a half an hour, which they can just do in real time this, there's no way of really making that viable when that sustain, but is a shame. I have a different outlook on life. Now in a number of ways unsought, always spent my early years bouncing from chill thing thing on. That's great. When you're younger on you don't have to worry about United feeding kids and stuff. But you know, I'm a bit older now and not have to leave a little bit more responsible anew. So at spent years doing very useful things I wanted to concentrate more on bigger moa, losting stuff. It seems fitting them in the afterlife, of the super weird commercial. That a couple of animated singing creatures that Joel in his brother created on a whim would end up burrowing so far into the American cultural consciousness. I look at is one of the mini successful brand campaigns over the last ten or twenty years and really helped drive consumers to the quiz knows brand. It was something that wanna came on TV you noticed because it was a little bit different. Is it was a little bit odd in a very, very good way. And because of that people remembered it and took action, visit quiz knows they wanted to see what, what all the buzz was about. And when we talked to guests and consumers today, we get a lot of feedback about the, the campaign, still my wife's family owned a quiz knows before that predating the ads. So we were like familiar cuisines. Anyway, in kind liked it. I'm like very into sandwiches again. This is Jonas at basecamp. So, yeah, we would go and get the sandwiches, and I remember. Yeah, I was like, more into quiz, those after that thinking like, oh, this is a company that something's going on there, like, I don't know what's going on. But I like what they're up to my wife and I kind of had. A running gag about it. And we would go around sort of quoting the song in the like offensive off key voice, and be like I got pepper like we go around and do that. Now train creative people and recount, people strategy people around the country of agencies on how to present himself creative work in the workshops that I do the only piece of creative work that I show because people want to know how I sold it while we sold it as an agency is the quiz knows work. And now many of the people that I'm doing my workshop or now twenty five twenty seven years old. You know, thirty years old, and, you know, they were fifteen twelve fourteen years old when the quiz knows campaign came out. And when I play it, they all start laughing. They start reminiscent of remembering seeing these characters, and it's the campaign that keeps on giving. When you're able to do that, it never leaves them, and they remember to this day. I mean they're still on my website, and they're that old format. It was before, like TV's got, like everybody had wide screen or whatever. So they're in that old format, but I'll be damned. I'm not giving them up. I love those little fuckers..

Mark Lohman Ron TV Joel the Martin agency Twitter Mike YouTube Creativity magazine New York ESPN Mike Lohman Denver post New York Times US Wall Street Journal Nain stream
"the martin agency" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

07:13 min | 2 years ago

"the martin agency" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"I guess it's gonna be war. If the race was in Vegas last weekend. They were gonna know we're getting snow unbelievable. They wouldn't have had it. Yeah. So yeah. Okay. So Las Vegas, Las Vegas. And we're gonna get a better picture here of this. This will be more typical. What does this new package? Just try to try to break closer racing. And and. Essence they like the idea of pack racing because it's fans seem to like it. So part of what this is is does is it. Gives it gives the cars a lot of downforce. And and when you get a lot of down for steak become a lot easier to drive, but they're also it's also much more difficult for you to get away from somebody, you know, you end up impacts, and so we may see that in Las Vegas. The whole idea is to not do what happened in Atlanta where you end up with a ride around it goes on. And then in the last twenty laps. Everybody races at tries to win to try to try to get away from that and create better acing all the way through. Of course. When the stage races comes over the people were racing to try to get stage points, but other than that, it was a writer out, which is kind of typical of Atlanta. So it's kinda hard to judge. If this package is gonna do what they're talking about. But they've cut, you know, two hundred horsepower. Are these? I mean, you can't you can't just run away from somebody. So. The other thing is is it makes it makes. Less experienced driver. It makes the cars easier to drive for less experienced drivers. And so. On one hand. That's good. But on the other hand, it gives them more confidence and can promote they can get into trouble a lot easier. So and everything is I think it's going to be a huge premium for running out front. I think if you get get out front. It's gonna be hard. It's gotta be hard to catch you. So you could still get a runaway. If you got out front. But I don't know that for sure. We just don't know yet. So that's what everybody's kind of sitting waiting to see what unfold but the new package then. Yeah. The other thing is the fours come out of the box, certainly a lot better the new Ford Mustang. I is coming out of the box certainly a lot better than the Camaros did last year, certainly and the Camaros have made great strides. If you if you think that. Kendrick you. I don't know. Was it just a mistake in Atlanta? It could very well. Be that the Hendrick cars are set up to to work really really well with this new package and Atlanta turned out to be not partially because of the cooler weather and the rough track turned out to be a really good test for that. So it could be the Hendry cars are going to show up backup when we get to Vegas. So we'll see we'll find out here in a few short days. Right. Yeah. Right. All right. I'm looking here and via Geico dot com, and yes, that's the winters are in and I guess the camel hump day. That's number one. Let's see number two turned out to be Maxwell the pig. We do. Yeah. He was too. Caveman at the airport number three. Oh, really you beat out the squirrels got fourth place as they did the mischievous squirrels now number five. I think maybe I've seen this one time or two it was it's called the spy if you're a mom, you call it. The worst time just asked this spy who's trying to navigate the action packed escape. You. Remember that one? No, they've got they've got all the collect phone. Call was an honorable mention. I think that was from the Super Bowl not this past but the year before. Got what their annual budget is forever ties must be big one billion dollars. Wow. One deal. Well. Collect call. You got the the dad on the pay phone, and he's trying to call his family to let them know. What's going on? So he's calling collect. And he's using code when he's talking to him hospital. Girl, hangs up the phone number that. Yeah. I remember that. Campbell. Was that's from the Martin agency, which is up in Minneapolis and had a really run a super creative strength for quite a while. I think it's got joined with another agency now, but they were huge hot streak and that that spot really the advertising world, put them on the map. I don't know that they've well. I I don't know what they've done butter better sense. But. I can't believe that they wouldn't bring you back now that he's won. I gotta believe that might bring it back. Of course. He's like, I don't know if he's still alive what six seven years older now. So I don't know how long does a Campbell live, right? He might get got cranky old age. So cool space. Man says hey, it's gonna be like it feels like it's nineteen Seventy-nine this spring. We're going to have the Rolling Stones the who Fleetwood MAC kiss and Elton John are all going to be on tour row. Wow. It is gonna like nineteen Seventy-nine that'd be kisses always on tour somewhere. This is their farewell tour. This is this is their last lawn. Ed, this is it. I don't I don't believe that case said this is their last one. Gene Simmons is now he's he's seventy or seventy two something like that. I don't not getting those boots on it. Probably take a little bit of work. We're all getting older and all that costume. Exactly. All right. Let's get back to our callers here. Where did we leave off that our current trivia question is is another fifth grade question, which makes me it's? This. What does this represent apple three point one five four? Apple's report one for I d Jays in Illinois. What you think DJ Gatiss definitely tie? What does this represent apple pie? Boy. Five four. Do you feel dumb? Right..

Las Vegas Atlanta Vegas apple Campbell Ford writer Gene Simmons Kendrick Hendrick Hendry Mustang Maxwell Minneapolis Elton John Illinois Fleetwood the Martin agency Ed
"the martin agency" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"the martin agency" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Right. Bring everybody Handel and the morning crew on a hump day. Hey, what's very exciting. Gyco has brought back the hump day commercial. I just thought two nights ago that may be my absolute favorite, gyco commercial among the hundreds of brilliant commercials. They do Paul. Just the best. Very good, Mike, Mike, Mike, Mike, Mike. They is it. Oh god. It is brilliant. Oh, guess what? Mike, Mike, Mike, Mike, Mike. What day is it? Mike. Listen, guess what today is? Hump day. And the Campbell. Of course is walking through the entire office. Very very funny. What's so brilliant about what gyco is pulled off not that? It's so funny, which it is. But they're one of the few advertisers that have been able to combine hilarious. With people knowing which company it is the problem with funny commercials as people remember the comedy, but they don't remember the name of the company is very hard to do that. In the funnier. The commercial the bigger the problem. Gyco is pulled it pulled it off the agency for gyco. I'm assuming it's been the same agency forever. You know, what is the agency for Geico just curious, and how long have you been around? I mean, just spectacular. I would like I think it's too late. Now, we should have been compiling all this time a list of all your requests for what you want her to Alex to look up. If you could just see a list of these questions over time of the things, you ask her to look, it would be very weird that actually would. So someone should keep track of that. So it's called the Martin agency. And they have been in business. I think with for how long with Geico Geico. I think about twenty years believe it. You don't give up an agency like that? All right. Good morning. Jennifer I handled and there's Wayne Resnick. Yes. And how are you Alex fabulous? I couldn't believe how much I wanted to hear that. And. Then get your food, dude. That's true. And then there's John to Alex is by far the most important purporting person here on the show by a long shot. Oh, okay. Oh today. Not only am I ham and cheese on a bad yet. But I also brought some egg rolls from panda express. Wow. Them in the refrigerator and. Refrigerant roy? Found them that means they weren't yours. They were mind last night. Oh, I've just found him this morning as I put him away. It's a breakfast to champions right there. Protein protein is a lot going on today. Oh, the news. The news. The news. The dodger Don Newcombe died in a little bit of history from him. Really extraordinary, man. Just see small at this is not looking good for Jesse it truly isn't. And then the I I think the biggest news is the train. The bullet trains getting slower and slower this high-speed train of ours. So we'll certainly cover all of that. He missed the top story. It's national. Love your pet day. Of course. I want to make sure you covered everything. Okay. Fair enough. I'm waiting for a national. Are you getting John Thomas Eckhardt? I am. That's fine. National eat your pet day. But they don't I'll bet you. I'll bet you betcha. There isn't one. No. There isn't okay, guys. Are you ready to do it do it? Here. We go lead.

Mike Gyco Geico Alex John Thomas Eckhardt Campbell Handel Don Newcombe the Martin agency Jesse Wayne Resnick panda Jennifer I twenty years
"the martin agency" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"the martin agency" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"Takes place from the kitchen. Now, these being the bedroom every once in a while and commercials. Oh, she's to be like in a Danner living room or something. Business in the kitchen making phone calls or make an egg. It's all the heart of the home in the kitchen. All right. All right. So this is confusing. It's definitely confusing. So this was done by the Martin agency who's done. Discover for years and years they're out of Richmond Virginia, but they also have a little outpost in London every single ad except for one. I think it's the one that they said awesome sauce. They're different people. But that has the twins. I guess Lisa. Julie. I don't know. I apologize. Someone on Twitter who actually tagged us all in a link of like a huge debate about this. It's so this has been going on for four or five years. Yes. Is it? Confusing. Absolutely. I think they were trying to do too. Because if if it wasn't confusing, the what they're trying to get across the feature benefit of the of the card like I own a discover card, and I get XYZ, and I'm proud to have that. But because the creative concept is so confusing that gets totally lost. Like, I watched five or six of them. And they talk about there's no annual fee fee on any card. There's a social security alert if it's any risky sites. There's one hundred. Percent US-based customer service, all of that messaging gets totally lost. Because they're like, wait. Is it the same person is not the same person? I don't know. I think that took a creative risk because if they did research on this people were probably heavy into that debate. But the problem is it just overwhelmed the messaging, so like I mean Brian's that I'm I have no idea what they're saying. I wouldn't recall any sort of message visceral benefit. Yeah. Did it the pirates? We were talking about McCaw your buddy who is to be on the venture capital or the adventure card from first star. Yeah. No there were there. Yes. Right. So you that was that was a creative. Interesting concept, but it didn't get in the way of what the benefits of the card were. Well, then there was that whole debate or they've Vikings Visigoths, right? Right different than this. So this isn't particularly offensive. So I think that they've gotten they've gotten away with doing it for so long because there's a thing called cultural currency, and any brand worth its salt wants people to talk about them for better for worse. But in my opinion, just from doing this for a little while if you're confusing people and the debate becomes about what the creative concept was meant to be and not about what your benefit of your brand of your product is eve not done a good job. I never get. Why? Nobody just the first time somebody floated what can Brown do for you racer Hannah went that makes people think poop like I just float on purpose. I'm just saying the first time this thing was proposed. Like, yeah. How come no one's razor and went? I'm sorry. I'm confused. I don't I don't get what we're here. It was interesting because on Twitter because Brian's like so up in arms, and I'm like, yeah. He hates it. And I understand it the people who were like against it. They weren't like viscerally against it. You should use one person. And I agree because if it's we we treat you how you tree. Oh, yeah. Then it's I should be the one treating myself right way. I I don't get it. So I've theory with this. How we treat. You like you treat you it's not we treat you like you're d'appel gang or treats, you the obviously the overall ethos. The the message was we treat you like, you treat you you to you. So I'm thinking, I wonder what you think about this Kristie. I wonder if the whole cultural currency thing like we loved the debate was a retroactive band-aid like Otit, we fucked up there debating debate good thing the printer talking about the I went through their Twitter feed a lot just to see what the conversation was. And so they were talking a lot about Bill. Cosby, I don't think he likes. We call that negative sentiment. Benjamin negative feeling. So the Twitter feed that God bless them. The customer service team at discover is in it like they respond to everybody within minutes, which I love, but they don't have a unified message..

Twitter Brian Danner Cosby Richmond Virginia the Martin agency Julie Lisa Kristie McCaw Bill Otit Benjamin London Brown Hannah five years
"the martin agency" Discussed on The Candid Frame

The Candid Frame

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"the martin agency" Discussed on The Candid Frame

"Inspiration never helped meet the become better photographer. Welcome to the candidate frame. Right. Suzanne welcome to the candid frame really pleased to have you on the show. I talked primarily to photographers about that work in their careers. And one of the things I felt like I wanted to do more of was to talk to people who have experienced on the other side of the desk. 'cause I think there's a lot of misinformation in a lot of ignorance out there in terms of how people who wanna make a living from their photography, actually, engage in have relationships with you know, art buyers, and you've had a lot of experience in that in your in your industry in the advertising industry, and now as a consultant to photographer, so I thought I couldn't think of a better person to sit down and have this this discussion with just briefly for people who may not be familiar with you wanted you give a little background in terms of your year career. I thank you so much for having me here. I really cause. I love helping to personnel way that I can especially in this crazy world marketing, we limit ideologically started. Advertising and small agency in Baltimore where a head to be Jakobsen trades, and it was really great because I got to do print production, which you showing you a hell the printed on kfi ends up in his results. But also got to be a buyer for the graffiti is while I left Baltimore to move back down arrangement where it went to college. And I got a job at the Martin agency there I worked in budget control where I got to see the cost of everything that was involved in doing apprentice or print materials to douse really good foundation through that they were establishing the art buying department in ask that I was interested in being the our buyer. So instead of them asking me questions on a side. I would hide jet. The interview anti Bill to case on why I was right for the job and all the things that I can offer for my life to be a better art buyer. So I wish that department in nineteen eighty eight and was there till nineteen ninety nine it was before we had computers towards, you know, many years before I left we started. Getting computers. We had to do are. We weren't to do marketing in be approached by photographers agents through the computer. But so it's really important to realize what we did prior to computers after I left the Martin agency, I became a consultant and in the same time that I was consulting. I was also able do satellite art buying for Kaplan failure of New York City who's now part of previous they didn't have an art buyer. They didn't wanna bring someone on staff. So I was able to do it in a satellite capacity, especially with New York ad agencies. Are so large that a lot of times you never been meet the people you work with. So I did that for quite some time. And then I realized that that was a little bit harder with having small children. So I brought him Amy Frith who worked for the division than they actually establish the division in our buying up there. I also was able to some small ad agencies here. So that gave me a taste of working with smaller. Budgets and really be. Being kind of having to think out of the box to make in images work in projects were I also worked as a contract for Capital One from nineteen ninety nine to two thousand six that gave me the in house. Corporate advantage of seeing how photographers worked in the in house corporate world didn't alumina work for best buy also retarget. So that was really great to in a satellite capacity. So then I just basically about two thousand six just really focused just on consulting. And I loved it as still love it. I love constantly educating myself when the businesses changed because I think it has changed so much not just in the images, but in the mediums in which the images are shown just talked about. You know, how you sort of defined your interview by expressing why you're the best person for the job, which is exactly what most talkers need to do in order to differentiate themselves from the hundreds if not thousands of Tigers, they're competing with and one.

the Martin agency Amy Frith consultant Baltimore Tigers Suzanne Capital One New York City Bill Kaplan New York
"the martin agency" Discussed on Mickstape: The Barstool Basketball Podcast

Mickstape: The Barstool Basketball Podcast

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"the martin agency" Discussed on Mickstape: The Barstool Basketball Podcast

"Commercial as it is movie. There should be. Let's see. I don't think there is probably not. Can there's those Rover, I'm those. Have you ever watched Rover Dangerfield? Yeah. Oh, sure. I think we need to give that a Google Tyler. The at Google right now, just the the first images, pure com. Hey, but what are you? What are you back in New York Tyler? He'll be up soon. Yep, sure. Well, we're doing good. You got officially say it again. We're doing the Space Jam commentary about that time, but Abreu you gotta bring her a game, you gotta have we gotta have some deep cut takes there. I will. I still want along baseball. I still wanna wanted to stock about. I still want a long discussion about the young, Michael Jordan, how there's no way he actually meant Michael Jordan that movie and you know, he probably lied those friends. Yeah, that was my l zero. Michael. I met him on said, it's like dude, you weren't even in the same scene as him that kid's name. It's either that kid or it's one of his, the people who play his kids in the movie is named Erik Gordon. All really, I thought for the longest. Yes, the same Erik Gordon people. I think he's. To say that the years would line up for that, I think, right. That'd be close. His air farming went thirty. He Eric Gordon is consistently younger than I think he, yeah, I was gonna say be just like twenty eight. Exactly. He's been in the legal while I thought he was thirty four in like two thousand twelve guy had no clue. He was this young man. I think it's just because he is one of those really grounded jumpers that like really old players have where I'm like, oh, that's no. And also just missed a bunch of time. Yeah, the the Wikipedia article and mcgruff is fantastic. So he was he was retired for a while. Cartoon is at the forest. Doesn't twelve. They retired and but it goes in twenty eighteen the Martin agency brought back mcgruff as part of Geico's insurance. Geico insurance is.

Erik Gordon Michael Jordan Eric Gordon Geico Google Rover Dangerfield Abreu baseball New York the Martin agency
"the martin agency" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"the martin agency" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Service model you're able to establish that utilization rate create the team bill the hours and you can control it and control the margins but and you go up and down and that's that's one issue i go up and down that's a huge paul rossi huge point he's now gone from the economist was was bringing this up with manny said we don't have the muscle to just all of a sudden lose a client so we cut fifteen people like that's just not something that publishers necessarily do the well it's cultural it's not it's not in our business but we just hired a brilliant woman amber guilt to run our agency business so she's now the president of hebron she runs the studio sharon's low society the influence our network and fake love for experiential agency so we brought her over she was previously the president of martin agency had a she wants to that she just all this and everything you just said are the things she's been kind of pounding on my desk about over the last few months because they're the they're the tools that you need to run an effective service business right but we gotta talk about contents of us we kind of glazed over that one the future of the content studio so the content studio i just think it's i think you're gonna see a lot of these media companies like us so i want to plug this like t brand has done very well i think and the talent we brought in is incredible and that talent we wouldn't have been able to bring in in the past and the previous business model so we're just selling media that said i think the we are reaching the end of the very the kind of standard branded content sales model where you know you publish the one piece of content on the site and sell audience around it i think that that model is beginning to mature and could potentially decline in the future so you mean like the stuff you guys would like netflix something everybody does i mean every single what is the future kind of like engagement look like if it's not around that you know we're going to create this experiential thing and we're gonna use our media to drive people to we got sell ideas we gotta get back to just focus and it sounds vague and.

manny president hebron martin agency netflix t
"the martin agency" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

Mysterious Universe

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"the martin agency" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

"And they won't show but they went ahead with it anyway and they went to his his house and introduce that the child to your worked in some of these things and the the kid had no reaction at all and in the book you contrast this with when they made the true discovery of the identity of mahdi mountain who he believed he was in a previous life and he's reaction was was quite profound he felt comfortable in the the office of the person in this this previous life he recognized the the old property with the the swimming pool even though it was getting renovated you know these amazing things that you wouldn't expect a kid to just randomly react to loved that he kept on trying to tip his mom because she clean the house he was confused aid to what do i tip as we get going back to your i know he was really he was a he was unusually kind of very identify with his personality like you said to sometimes he couldn't even really separate himself from marty martin which is kind of unusual but yeah i think it's true that the first time they took him to la he had no reaction when they took him to the house of this other person who they thought he might have been an them when they took him to the mardi martin's house of course he reacted in it turned out that agency that they were talking about was a talent agency there was a marty martin agency and you change people's names because they're actors in fact mardi martin's name was changed to wasn't israel name so that's the discount while the other thing he would do is when his parents would would take him out.

mahdi mountain the house marty martin mardi martin swimming israel