28 Burst results for "The Life And Death Of"

The Illogical Reasoning of the Pro-Death Colt

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:27 min | 3 months ago

The Illogical Reasoning of the Pro-Death Colt

"What depths to what depths is the American left willing to stoop to what depths will the American left. Go to be able to protect, if not again, expand and enhance their rights to kill their child. It used to be the mantra that we believe in quote unquote choice, which is a weak way out because it's not choice that is the opposite of life, death is the opposite of life. I've covered this. But for newbies, look it up. Grab a thesaurus, you'll see synonyms and antonyms. Antonym for life is death, and the antonym for death is life. So if you are pro life, the antonym or opposite of that is being pro death. So the pro death cult known as the American left. Those full well what they are killing in those full well what they are doing, and the old adage used to be safe legal and rare. That would be their mantra. Safe, legal, and rare. We think abortions should be allowed. We think death should be allowed to be the choice for a mother for their child. Death should be an option, but we want it to be safe and we want it to be rare. Now it has become any time any place for any reason at any stage of gestation including, including the third trimester.

AJ on Life, Death, and Memories

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

00:44 sec | 8 months ago

AJ on Life, Death, and Memories

"When I found myself on my back, I knew, okay. You've been rehearsing for this all your life. You can't talk much, so now you've got to think about all the things you want to say. You got to think about your life. It's going to flash before you. Not quickly like they say in the movies. When you're on your back and you think you're going to die, life goes really slow through your head. And I'm glad mine did because it got me to remember a lot of moments in my life that to a lot of people would mean nothing, but to me meant everything as silly and inconsequential as they may seem to you to me they were evidence of a life well spent.

"the life death of" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"the life death of" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"I think the understood fucking complicated and just fucked up. The whole situation was how charles never wanted to marry. Diana the first place not really how queen elizabeth have been a thorn in the side of diana charles and camilla all right. The heart of the timeline. Now explore some conspiracies about what really happened. Good job soldier. You've made it back there to this day. Rumors persist diana's death was no accident. Many believed some still believe is planned. Assassination by the royal family. They cited several reasons that the royals would leads. You want to kill diana almost all of which have been disproven by numerous investigations. The daily express a british daily tabloid and hamad. Al fayed dodi's father were the main spreaders of the theory that the royal family helped plan this car. Crash and response to metropolitan. Police launched operation. Paget two years cost millions of pounds only if the police to agree with the initial reports their investigation examined one hundred seventy five different theories determined. None of them were true here. The nine main reasons and or clues conspiracy theories point to regarding her motives. You know Regarding believing the royals had diana killed the number one is dina was killed because she was pregnant. With dodie fayad's baby mohammed. Al fayed was the guy who really pushed us. When he felt the royal family could not accept an egyptian muslim could eventually be the stepfather of the future. King of england. Rumors of her pregnancy were rampant before her death on holiday in france newspaper speculated that she was pregnant diana also made comments about a big surprise coming soon however the post mortem exam found no signs of pregnancy. Her blood tests revealed no pregnancy. Dining close friends went on record to say that she had never mentioned anything about this to them. Never told them she thought she might be pregnant. So doubtful dated Number two dinah did believe at one point she was going to be killed by the establishment. So this feels conspiracy rumors right. Of course paul berle. Her former butler disclosed a lot of the dyna- gave him for safekeeping said. I fear my husband is going to kill me in an automobile accidents. That doesn't look good at the time she wrote this letter. She was having car troubles. She feared first aid and she was a very dramatic person. based on a lot of other confessionals and her writing stuff. Her bodyguard recently died an accident. You'll her former lover. She thought this part of the conspiracy and again. This does not look good but people worry about shit. That has not all the time. I'm one of my fucking crazy head. I built up so many scenarios or so so has it out for me only to realize later. Not the case at all made a lot of stuff in my brain and mike yeah. I'm crazy. dana schubert crazy to The third Theory here the paparazzi intensity caused a car crash to cash in on the carnage right. According to this theory the paparazzi chased pushed the car causing it to crash into the pillar so they could get the death photos and then make millions. an investigation. Term is not true that this is a really stupid. I think because she was worth a lot more in my opinion to the tabloids in the long run alive right sure..

diana diana charles The daily express royals dodie fayad Al fayed dinah dodi camilla hamad Paget Diana paul berle elizabeth charles mohammed Al safekeeping france england
"the life death of" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"the life death of" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Up to a billion people watch. Their wedding is the most wash wedding. The history of the world like by far time magazine reported a splendid prince. His beautiful princess a carriage a crowd. Fantasy come to life a dream writing in stately progress through london. Accept this moment in the ones that came before and after we're real for all to observe diana became the first englishwoman to marry the heir apparent first in line to the throne in three hundred years. Previous brides had long been from other nations and england fell in love with one of their own. Just fuck cabral. She's one of us She seemed more like one know one of their own. The compared to a lot of other royals. She was modern. Kind came across his down to earth and approachable seem stiff and unapproachable like queen elizabeth and many other royals she gave off less of a blue blood ripped shape shifter drina chrome harvest survive. If you're longtime sucker and current on your conspiracy lore. She basically immediately became much more popular than her husband. Who seems stiff and aloof. The popularity discrepancy would quickly cause problems. Marriage actually charles. Well aware that the people preferred his wife to him and that was not the power dynamic hope for overall though the royal family Loved the attention initially shedding diana. They saw her as the perfect princess. Initially the royal family you know viewed her as a wonderful public image asset and public image. So important today. Huge for the royals and monetize fucking everything for them. The prince charming stuff All those disney movies and more great for royal business keeping a high risk profile is what keeps the british monarchy afloat the position. They now hold in british culture. It's so interesting to me. They've had any real political power. Roughly two centuries and their bauer has been waning actually for centuries before that ninety nine point nine percent symbolic now the king or queen is still technically the head of the state or head of state in the uk but in name only. The prime minister runs the government. An elected official. The prime ministers voted member of the house of comments. Now's comments where legislation actually gets Legislative the monarch privately advises the prime minister to some degree. But the prime minister doesn't actually have to listen to them. It's doesn't have to take their advice. Legislation passed by a body of voted in representatives not by a monarch Not by other nobility. one of the crown's most important responsibilities now is to be the official patron of over six hundred charity and that is very cool but even this role is just about drawing attention to these charities not actually deciding how to run them how to fund them what state money or even donate to them just to show up and you know Bring some attention to them show but at a gallery opening will make a statement. Most of the royal family's income today is totally dependent essentially on tourism tourism driven by the image of being royal. They're distant echo of what they used to be. A variety of properties collectively referred to as the crown estate such as buckingham palace charge tourist to enter and explore them. They sell stuff and their gift shops..

far time magazine royals diana queen elizabeth house of comments london england charles disney uk buckingham palace
"the life death of" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"the life death of" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"They're still fighting sony fires so so many in the west hail nimrods stay safe now. It's getting some royal blood but not the awesome hard rock. Power duo by that name from brighton. And those guys are still fucking good. Amazed at the amount of sound can come out of the two guys Sewer talented level What are we talking about them today. Now we're talking about the british royal family there. They're royal blood. of course. How did the current royal family queen elizabeth and her brood. Come to be. How lady diana spencer become diana princess wales charm the entire world with their beauty fashion philanthropy lovable personality style into an overview of who lady di was followed by a bit of british. Royal history followed by a timeline. Of diana's life exploration expiration conspiracies that surrounded her death henceforth majesty it has convinced with some regal.

diana princess wales sony brighton diana spencer queen elizabeth di diana
Lady Diana: Fairy Tale or Horror Story?

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Lady Diana: Fairy Tale or Horror Story?

"Diana princess of wales oftentimes called the people's princess born into a wealthy aristocratic family with strong royal ties. Dina grew up assuming her future would be pretty damn bright of course. She assumed that she was raised. Essentially to be married someone with royal blood to be married to a high born man of means. But you couldn't have known or assumed dreamt. Maybe that you would actually marry the prince of england heir to the british throne and become the british commonwealth princess. That's exactly what happened. She i caught. Prince charles is is a teenager when he was of all things. Dating her older sister would appear to be a sweet and dreamlike. Royal romance would begin later when that would capture the world's attention then it seemed to have it all to be living a fairy tale. A little prince the off romanticized prince charming had picked her her foot at fit the fabled glass slipper and she looked like a fairytale princess. She was young elegant fashionable beautiful. And now she wasn't actual princess but fairy tales. Don't often actually really come true do they. Yes dan i was becoming a princess but she was not becoming the happy bride of a devoted in love struck prince charming their fairytale romance was fake from the beginning a show put on for the cameras to uphold the all important picture perfect and profitable image of the british royal family beneath the facade of their romance behind the beautiful clothes and jewels. Extravagant wealth was a woman who is sick and suffering. Diana wet a man whose heart and bed already belonged someone else someone. The king and queen had deemed unsuitable wife for the prince. Diana's happy heavily publicized honeymoon was spent largely in tears. She married a man who she didn't really love because you didn't really know him a man who wished he was married to someone else and now diana worked hard to hide her true feelings from the media frenzy that surrounded her. She'd sacrificed any hope for a private life. Once she'd said yes to prince charles's marriage proposal. The british media and paparazzi would now watch her every move the rest of her life often waiting for her to make a mistake looking for suspected chinks in the royal family's armor diana herself said towards the end of her life after her marriage had ended. I seem to be on the front of a newspaper every single day which is an isolating experience and the higher. The media puts you places you. The bigger the drop

Diana Princess Dina Prince Charles Wales Diana England DAN
"the life death of" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"the life death of" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"Is there really a difference between stopping certain medical treatments and he says something else and then failing to turn the car off when drive into the garage you know. Is there really a difference. There have any or all of you sat at someone side as they drank the cocktail and breathed their last breath. Lowery i are both senior guides. So we've been at a number of deaths. Mary has taken the training. But i don't think mary has been at one of our deaths. She was with of course with her husband. But we certainly been with a number of people who have died under the education of our program so without betraying anybody's confidence. I mean tell me about it. what's it like. I think they're going to clarify that. The method of self deliverance. That we teach the use of inert gas so we are We do not work under the medical model which is partly what allows us to work in all fifty states. The district of columbia. So you're saying there were a greater restrictions for those who would have a Want to say phenobarbitol but something else that some. There's a series of medications or drugs. That will relax you into a state of unconsciousness before stopping your lungs and heart. That is not your model. Those drugs are highly highly regulated. They are extremely difficult to get medical aid. Dying laws where they exist are very helpful in that you can get a physician to legally prescribe them but those laws are very limited to people who are only within six months of death. You have to be a resident of the state and people like dave. We're not explained by the time he's within six months of death. He may not be able to swallow so while medical aid and dying malls wonderful. They don't meet a lot of the need out there so there's diseases like the neurodegenerative diseases but also these days dementia is a disease. That really really scares people as it gets to. The heart of we are who we consider ourselves to be with dementia by the time. You're within six months death. You're no longer competent. You can't access medical eight nine laws. You're not spatially aware. How can you make life death decisions with kind of a broken brain abs interested in a book that was recommended to me by you. Brian called the inevitable by engelhardt and she had a great point. Because even the laws that say well you have six months to live. That's a hugely subjective. Prognosis can gas well. We think you've got six months. But what if it stabbing what. It's six months in two days. This is a big gray area. That becomes problematic whenever you get physicians trying to decide who does and who doesn't qualify for medical aid in dying right. I should also point out as larry said for our to meet our requirements. You do not have to be terminally ill in that definition so We provide education to people who have intolerable suffering but they're not necessarily terminal. That's why we can work with dave and people with dementia put at this is. Larry is absolutely accurate. Six months is putting your finger into the wind kind of thing and interestingly the more adopter has worked with a patient in general the more optimistic their prognosis become which means that the closer you get the longer. You've worked with the doctor the longer. The doctor is unlikely to predict that. You have to live which just makes it all the more complicated so if i can. I'd like to come back to your question about what does it feel like. And i'd like to tell you a story about a woman. In los angeles requested our services she was in mid eighties of event tastic artist renowned artists had four children and she was violently independent and was ready to josh. She had a number of medical issues but she passed our qualification. They set up a day where people flew in from around the world for everybody to get together to say goodbye tour. When when we walked into the room they were head champagne. They had cheese. They were all there very sorrowful but they were all having a nice exchange they they spent four hours all these people telling her goodbye and then when the time came that she decided to die they all came into the room together with us and before she pulled the hood down. She said goodbye to everyone. I love you all. It was one of the most beautiful deaths. That i've ever been around. And i would just say that everybody in the room was moved because they got a chance to say goodbye to this marvelous person in a very personal way. They got to celebrate her death. Like they celebrate. Live and i would just say it was one those things that stays with me to this day. I'm not being morbid. But i have been so fascinated that i have. There was a bbc documentary about death with dignity or right to die issues involving He was Successful business owner who had a degenerative disease which had really advanced and just decided. I'm going to while. I still have my mind and some of my body. I'm going to check out on my own terms. And so they brought him into his own living room. They had cameras rolling with his permission and blessing and he He sipped some cocktail. And within you know two minutes he was asleep in his wife was sitting next to him holding his hand and there was something i guess. The word dignified. I mean about the fact that you know. He wasn't lying in a vegetative state he wasn't wasting away in a hospital bed merely existing totally unaware of what was happening around him. I mean he knew he had control. And even though it's it's a very sobering piece. It was as i understand one of the highest rated tv documentary episodes in britain up to that time and perhaps even now people are genuinely interested. I just want to ask you. Is that the lewis throw. No his name is terry something okay. I'll look it up while you're speaking lowry did you wearing. Yeah terry patchett thank you. Yeah i think. I just might jump in on this concept of dignity which is katie. Engelhardt points out is far more elusive than it might sound and yet also sort of practical. You mentioned the idea of being in control. People often look at the method of self deliverance. That we teach and get a little creeped out by the idea of a bag or tank. And i i think when you get down to the depth of what dignity is it's the ability to make one's own choice to sail one's own ship and the things like the outward accoutrements are much less important but when you talk about control you're getting to the heart of what that means for dignity and the human experience i think. Also it's a protective mechanism. As you read the stories of people who become desperate there was one story of a guy. He had no medical aid in dying option. He knew his life was going to end in suffering. He notified the police that he was going to do this. And then he shot himself and Do that not. What the word is i guess. Incorrectly and survive but barely in a vegetative state. i mean there's so many ways to screw this up that's terrifying. I had a client early on who had dementia and he was a university. Professor loved hunting loved hiking and he told us that had we not come along he was going he was planning to take a gun and shoot himself because he would not live with his brain not functioning because all of his life. That's that's who he was was his brain and his thinking bauer and He was so thankful for us. Because he didn't wanna screw up and didn't wanna use a gun to do that.

Brian Engelhardt Larry terry patchett los angeles larry Six months Mary two days two minutes engelhardt terry mary one story columbia eight nine laws fifty states four hours four children six months
"the life death of" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

08:38 min | 1 year ago

"the life death of" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"Joked with my mom. I said it's almost romeo and juliet without the poison. Scott said we use humor in. Our family is a coping mechanism. In a way there was somewhat of a relief that a decision had been made because it was very up and down. Margie lost consciousness in the days before and the family thought she might die naturally before the agreed upon date. They kept a vigil around the clock with one or more of the three children. Always in the room. With bob and margie for the week before they died nicole. Tony stayed awake. Most of the night on may twenty fourth and into the early hours of the next day watching the clock counting down the hours they had left with their parents. We were just left with our own thoughts and emotions. She said at seven. Am on may twenty. Fifth doctors came into the room for a final check. They took the family to a different room away from their parents and briefed them on the procedure. Even though margie wasn't able to verbally consent recent changes to the assisted dying law made it possible for doctors to carry out her wishes. Bob indicated to the doctors that he wanted to go through with it too. He was committed that as they did in life. They would do this. Final step together. Scott said they were both terminal. There was no coming out of the situation. They pushed the couple's band together so they could be close. Nicole held her father's hand. And they said i love you to one another first. Doctors gave the couple injections that put them to sleep. After bob was snoring peacefully doctors gave them both a series of further injections. Over about ten minutes they died together peacefully. You could just see the weight of all the pain and suffering was gone. Nicole said she wants people who are terminally ill to be aware that options do exist and they should be informed of all choices available to them know that the option is available. If you so choose she said my message is really look at the quality of life and remember those happy times and think of what's right for you as an individual rather than everybody else around you. There shouldn't be any judgement. She added scott said he wanted to share his parents journey because he is immensely proud of them. I'm really proud of my parents. And the hard decision they had to make. That takes a lot of guts. He said the family is still in mourning. And they say they will have to adjust to all the first without their parents. Nicole's house is quiet without bobbin margie. Living downstairs she grips tightly. The crocheted heart. Her father held as he died. I do sleep with it sometimes. She said it's comfort beautiful piece from the cbc from june the fourth of this year pe. I couple who used medically assisted. Dealing went out on their own terms says family in case you wanna look it up on your own. I want to go deeper into the whole idea of medical aid in dying assisted. Dying physician assisted dying death with dignity. Whatever you wanna call it. And i have on tap three representatives from the final exit network brian ruder. Mary ewart and lowry brown. Can i get each of you to quickly introduce yourselves and what your role is with efi. An i'm brian ruder. The president final exit network board. I'm mary Executive director final network. And i'm lowery brown the client services director four or five Networks exit guy program. I'll just start with a devil's advocate question. Are you guys a death cult or what. I like to think this is mary. I'd like to think that we're a compassionate group of people. I think that we're anything. But a death cult. We care about people who maybe are experiencing pain and suffering. And i suppose it's are somewhat natural impulse to want to lessen pain and suffering when we see it for those who don't want to experience this is larry. I think we're very focused on choice and that you can relieve a lot of suffering just by giving the choice whether or not they wish to endure it brian. You probably get some hate mail. I mean people are accusing you of being obsessed with this sort of I don't know if i think we especially here. In the united states death is the taboo. Death is darkness. You're morbid if you think talk and even do activism around anything involving death. Yes but i. I haven't got a lot of hate meal. What what. I did find as i got into the board got more active was that my friends started to ask me questions about it and i must say that as we talk to people about who we are and what we do. I find especially among older people. They all have a feeling that they would like to have a nice option. They're not sure that they can but no. I haven't had any hate mail today. I'm glad to hear that this has been on. My mind is turn out to talk. I don't want to drive my audience. Crazy as i've been talking sort of navigating the death of a parent but you know he suffered at the end. He had pulmonary fibrosis. And obviously you know i-. I grieved at the idea that he was suffering. And the next step in that conversation is what would i do like if i knew that. The scarring of my lungs would cause me not to be able to get oxygen. What if i was given a cancer diagnosis that would result in much suffering. And i knew there was no way out. What if i had a. Ls like dave warnock. Who i recently interviewed and released a video about and i told natalie i mean i wouldn't want to wait 'til i'd degenerate to the point where i'm useless or just in agony. Random existing my lungs draw. Breath is beating. But i'm i'm not living and in my own mind i it one galvanizing thing about the crisis in my own family is at least for me. I've had more resolve about the control. I would want to take over how i go out what you just shared with us. points to a couple of experiences. I had that led me to the movement really one. what's my father dying of prostate cancer. That went to his bones and he was in great pain the last couple of days of his life he was very gentle man and it was very difficult to see him in pain. The other stories my husband who had a ls and We were living in europe at the time. He went to the dignity s clinic and he had that resolve of from the time he was a young adult. I was unaware of the movement. But he had derek code frey's book and so when he did develop ls. It was rather startling that he had already thought about this. He was a very rational individual and him. Having the ability to take control of the end of his life was just an amazing thing and i was so grateful that he didn't have to suffer in a way that he did not want to. Can we have appointed clarification there. I mean i'm not familiar with. Is it eric humphrey and what is the book. And what's that about. okay derrick. Come free wrote the book final exit and it's still in print. I think it was written in the ninety s. Lowery probably knows more about the details of it. It was a very popular book at went to the top of the new york times bestseller list even though derek had finally printed it on his own and he based his beliefs on his experience with his wife. Jean who have self delivered when she suffered from breast cancer. As i understand it. If we're thinking about the same book than this is it was almost like stereo instructions.

Nicole Tony Scott eric humphrey Bob Jean europe margie brian ruder scott lowry brown Mary ewart derrick dave warnock juliet derek natalie may twenty Margie may twenty fourth
A Prayer for Greater Confidence in God

Your Daily Prayer

02:03 min | 1 year ago

A Prayer for Greater Confidence in God

"Confidence in god by meg bucher read by liam martin. Now when all the people were baptized. And when jesus also had been baptized and was praying the heavens were opened and the holy spirit descended on him in bodily form dove and a voice came from heaven. You are my beloved son with you. I am pleased luke. Three twenty one through twenty two soft thick flakes of snow accumulated an illuminated. The dark hours of morning. It's a marshmallow day my youngest daughter exclaimed. She bounded down the stairs online school cancellations and quarantines hadn't told her wonder and excitement for data to play in the snow. I'd overheard her praying for marshmallow day the night before my husband and i watched the weather and anticipated a snow day but her surprised joy overflowed onto me as her smile. Lit up the room that morning. The sky lit up the day. Jesus was baptized a day. Four told in scripture alongside so many prophecies fulfilled by christ's early life death and resurrection. John who had simply come to prepare the way for jesus baptized him. As the dove hovered. Over christ's heavenly had in. God spoke that he was pleased. Luke mentions the baptism of jesus almost in passing the new bible. Commentary explains he wants his readers to know that jesus was praying at the time and above all that he received a divine revelation. Prayer is powerful. An often overlooked daily. We rush about powering through difficulty and hardship without laying at the feet of our savior. We don't ask for help glance up to say thank you. We fail to get quiet enough to listen for in here. His encouraging guiding voice of wisdom comfort direction

Meg Bucher Liam Martin Jesus Luke John
China finance official executed in bribery case

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

China finance official executed in bribery case

"The former head of the Chinese state owned asset management company has been executed on charges of taking bribes in an unusually severe penalty full of reasons corruption case lie Sharmeen is among thousands of officials said in a long running and G. Groff campaign others including Chinese former insurance regulator could be sentenced to prison now the government's announced by was put to death by a court in the city east of Beijing saying the harshest sentences was justified because light took especially enormous bribes to make investments on offer construction contracts most death sentences imposed by Chinese schools also suspended for two years and usually a commuted to life death penalties without the chance of a reprieve a rare I'm Charles through this month

Sharmeen G. Groff Beijing Government Charles
"the life death of" Discussed on Rare with Flair

Rare with Flair

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"the life death of" Discussed on Rare with Flair

"Shop gift shop gives that people just like by you out of the shop. Just like the most random hodgepodge of things also between the children's hospital the university hospital. So i that's under it was funny. 'cause that's where i went to college but you know before i was in college. I was in the hospital in. So i got to like a lot of ohio state paraphernalia. That people were buying the gift shops. And it's like spirit Having well-meaning visitors that stay for way too long these people like like the thing is like you feel like you need to entertain them when they say way too long. But you feel like crap. So you're like you leave. Please don't want to be rude and the to be clear you know. It really does mean a lot when people visit you when you're in the halls. Oh yeah it can brighten up your day right and like you know. A lot of those people probably drove for a while to be there but at the same time like i'm in pain and i don't want to show you that i'm in pain. 'cause you'll be uncomfortable but i also want to go back to bed for like some oxycodone because i'm dying here. The reason i want to go back to bed is because the nurse came in the room. Five times why sleeping or when guests comes and they like that's right when they will you out of the room for something. It went up person comes. Yeah it's really and then they have to awkwardly. Wait on you like an hour back. But and then you're you're ready to like see or whoever usually with my parents were in the room. Saw him like ready to complain to my dad. And there's person there. I'll suppress Yeah yeah. I actually don't have any more. I think i did all lied. I have another two. People brought balloons though because balloons make on my last one was having like a nurse that do you remember ever having a specific nurse that just made you feel really special. Yes yes i loved. I never was like jive it with the doctors as much but the nurses were like great. Do you have a story like a good nurse story. Oh man not that i can think of. I just overall remember them being super kind. Yeah yeah. I did like when i was like in the middle of a lot of stuff and they had done like the last colonoscopy i ever got on the nurse that was in the room was just so kind and she was like you know you need to make the decision. That's best for you. Like just was so special so nice that she said that to me but made the made sweet. Yes so thank you for common. Everyone to our big. Thank you so much for listening and we hope you enjoyed it. Follow us on all the socials as we always say our instagram twitter and facebook or send us an email at hello at rare with flair dot com. Join us in another two weeks for similar content. Yes fresh to love you i..

university hospital ohio instagram twitter facebook
"the life death of" Discussed on Rare with Flair

Rare with Flair

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"the life death of" Discussed on Rare with Flair

"And it's really really cool so you know it may may come for me which could be nice but it also may come for someone. Maybe ten years younger than me. And that's okay. Yeah we feel like pioneers when we're doing our blood samples and stuff because it's like we hunger for future generations. It's so wild and it's kind of a cool position to be even though we may not actually reap the benefits the now but about worldview I feel like. I said a lot of it earlier but at the same time. I think that when you're in your twenties most people who don't have health issues like to think that they're invincible. You're kind of at your health prime anyway and people think that they have all this time and we may but we also may not and so i. I don't really like bucket list calls her. I feel like it's just like putting off something that you wish you could do for a later time when really like like we said earlier all we really have control over as what we're doing now and you know if it's feasible financially responsible for you to do what. What's on your bucket list now. You should do it because there's always going to be a reason not to do it. Like saying eventually means that it may never happen. Because you don't know what's coming in the future Right and like. I don't know i think i've never really thought of myself getting past the age of maybe forty or fifty i like. I'm like preparing for the day. That i might retire but i know that i may never end up getting to retire so i think getting old actually sounds really scary to me because for so long since i was a teenager. I've kind of known like i might die prematurely. So like being being like seventy and saggy honestly. You sounds really bad. No offence to anyone who is older but no fence to anyone who has seventy and saggy..

"the life death of" Discussed on Rare with Flair

Rare with Flair

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"the life death of" Discussed on Rare with Flair

"For it. So it is chronic But a lot of e. I don't know you don't watch your life flash before your eyes multiple times and come out unscathed so i have since pursued treatment for post traumatic stress disorder Honestly it's been super helpful by. It's it's not like something that ever like fully goes away and like i'm i'm super grateful for where i am outright now but it was it's been pretty it was tough like honestly i can say that So yeah and it's just been super healing to be able to even doing this. Podcast is really healing. I think after everything happened. I knew i needed to talk about it. So like for the first couple years afterward it was like i was like maybe share. I like was super into advocacy on social media and After more stuff happened. I realized that it was really affecting me to kind of an unbearable degree with just wanting decided to proceed treatment but I don't post as much about it on my personal social media's anymore i kind of reserve that for specific days but you know also we have this as an outlet that like this is a place where we can talk about these kinds of things. Yeah so it's kinda healing. But i think one thing to know about both of the things we were talking about though is to like. Listen to your body yes. I think it's really tough to do that. When you either kind of escape the reality that my body is breaking again or you're worried it's like in your head but you know listening to your body's super super key to be able to maintain a healthy life. Yeah like we've gotta learn not to push ourselves and it's unfortunate but we have to say no a lot so earlier in the episode. Casey and i mentioned that we have different types of each. Ps i have type one and she has type three also in our first episode. We mentioned that type one develops pulmonary fibrosis or scarring of the lungs in the future. Anti three dozen. So you're just gonna take a to talk about that so me knowing that i'm going to probably get lung disease in my life is kind of wild I think that it is a blessing and a curse to maybe know your own destiny or future but at the same time you have to kind of realize that anyone could die at any point for any reason so even though it feels like maybe i. Yeah okay i'm gonna die of lung disease maybe prematurely You know i. I don't know what could happen tomorrow. And of course like we're looking for cures for lung disease. That's kind of like a thing that our whole each pass network does I'm involved in a bunch of studies on you. Know monitor my lungs. And doing what my i can but at this point in my life i know that if a treatment doesn't come for me You know that's okay..

lung disease pulmonary fibrosis Casey
"the life death of" Discussed on Rare with Flair

Rare with Flair

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"the life death of" Discussed on Rare with Flair

"Parents and people like that. Go into their first conferences because it can never conferences are kind lot since they're really medical. I think it's it's different than any other conference. I've ever been to because people are so close. And you you laugh a law and then you also like cry worn line and like it's just yeah and there's doctors everywhere and you're like giving samples blood samples and urine samples and it just feels like trip and like now. It's like my home. I'm like so used to it now. But the first time i had a bit of a panic attack actually like the first night Like i don't even use that word. Those words lightly. I genuinely had to leave the room at one point. Because i was just like this is a little yeah new. It's it's funny though like we'll have to do an episode on conference south just because it's it's such a thing but we like it's it's a different world because people are like fan girling over doctors like does do okay. Okay when you say people you mean you. I love our suavely. She's like hold on. I gotta go go picture with this girl too but you like our holy pictures you like especially gi. I like during a lot of the time that i have mentioned previously. Where are super unsure. He was there and he would answer my like my parents emails within like an hour. Look it was amazing to have that level of community Even when like medical professionals which is just so neat. Yeah no. I forgot to put a picture of me with a doctor in the sooner. Yes well we also wanted to touch on mental health because like mental. Health is another part of health and i. I have a lot of mental health in my family. A lot of mental health issues and my family And so i think a lot of my stuff is genetic. I think just naturally like an anxious person but i will say like preparing for this episode. I was really thinking a lot. About how a lot of my anxiety is directly tied to my health. And i think it's because when i was diagnosed no so late in life with something i've always had. It felt really jarring to me and my health. My whole life has always been really like up and down there been random things that just go wrong in the blink of an eye and so i feel like i can never trust my own body and and i'm kind of a control freak so i feel like i'm never in control and when things are going well i'm always just kind of waiting for the next shoe to drop and i think getting diagnosed h. A large version of that of like a shoe like really dropping like in my life. That's a lot It's interesting how your concerns about your health future lot of minor but my health pass so obviously like everything i just explained in my whole like. Ibd crohn's story which is not over. Actually you know. I i still deal with symptoms of crohn's disease to day They're not as drastic as they ever were of course But you know..

Ibd crohn crohn's disease
"the life death of" Discussed on Rare with Flair

Rare with Flair

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"the life death of" Discussed on Rare with Flair

"Got the procedure done and she was like i could eat anything and i was like anything is all i can eat as ensure in really frigging After a few more weeks after graduated high school. I had a really rough night in the hospital and i kind of just came to the realization of i am tired of being alive in this capacity. Like i don't remember like who i am or what i like to do and i don't think i can do this anymore. So if surgery is going to at least give me something better than this a half to try it because i'm sick of this so after like after the operation finally happened I feel like a lot of people who get this done. Experience a wide range of emotions but i woke up and i saw this like little blob on me and i knew that like i would never see the right corner. My abdomen ever again. But i was just so excited because i knew that like my pain. It wasn't going to be this endless pain. I had suffered through for the past several months. It was gonna be the post op. Pain that i could deal with and i think the last thing that i had wanted to say was what made it. Super worthwhile was that. I was seventeen and i wasn't sure what i like. I'd never met anyone with my the thing i had now but i wanted to be involved with it. I wanted it to be my friend. And so named her seles and when they came and changed the the appliance. When i like when they i had to do it they were trying to do it for me and i was like no no no. I'm blind. I have to know what's going on so i have to touch it so like i was like. Please get off. let me do it. And i also found a couple of girls on youtube who were like around their twenties and they would make it fun and they had their cute bikinis and their bag and they make jokes about.

youtube
"the life death of" Discussed on Rare with Flair

Rare with Flair

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"the life death of" Discussed on Rare with Flair

"Ulcers and like kind of cuts inside and bad things. Those cuts a lot of times can cause bleeding in normal people without bleeding disorders. But i have a bleeding disorder and that sort of sat up the perfect storm. Which i'm about to get into so in twenty eleven. I was a freshman in high school. And i was starting to have some kind of confusing symptoms. I was really constipated and we didn't know why and so going to the pediatrician. After this was persisting for a bit they said. Eat more fiber. And i was like okay. But that's actually kind of the opposite of what you wanna do. Because fiber is not good for a swollen call sil- we had no idea though and after lots of months of trying to do different stuff. It wasn't getting any better was getting much worse and we have pushing to see a gastroenterologist at gsi and finally when we could. It was around the time that i turned fifteen. I finally got a colonoscopy that diagnosed me with currencies during that colonoscopy they had to take biopsies or skin samples from my colon and that will usually make people bleed and since my colon was already kind of not doing the right and set it out such that i actually hemorrhaged so you know obviously really scary but we after some transfusions. We were like okay well. We're gonna put you on this medication. That's going to help the inflammation in your colon. Ideally go down and that sort of worked for the next few years things were kind of touching go. I was trying to do my best in high school. And probably every year. Though i would go to the hospital for like a week but you know. It's like doable. But it kind of culminated in the spring of my senior year of high school. In twenty fifteen things were not going well and they did another scope and they saw that i had like a bazillion serves in my colon and they said well clearly. This medication is not working so they decided to try something new but my cohen was not ready for something new and between trying. Lots of new medications and a lot of other factors. I quickly down spiraled. And i ended up from about march through. I didn't have a life I was in constant pain. I always have to go to the bathroom. I was always tired. I could barely keep food down and it was just like exhausting. And i also lacked motivation because i was so tired so i spent most of those three months like laying around in bed and i really tried my best to do have my senior year but honestly it was kind of impossible and not really worth it in my opinion if you want to read more about a lot of that time i have written a personal blog post a few years ago. My personal blog lincoln. The show notes But by the time we hit. May i had been like i spent may like in and out of three different hospitals. I got out pretty much in time for high school graduation. But like i've always been kind of tall and i have kind of the athletic build. I'm not very curvy. But i'm like tallin. Lean and in high school. I was somewhere around one hundred thirty to one hundred forty pounds. But by the time i graduated high school i was like one hundred eight pounds and it was like i couldn't stand at graduation kind of pushed me in a wheelchair and i.

gsi inflammation cohen tallin lincoln
"the life death of" Discussed on Rare with Flair

Rare with Flair

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"the life death of" Discussed on Rare with Flair

"It made sense because i had a bleeding disorder and we knew that my parents were prepared that when i lost a tooth they would have a teabag because that helps cauterize bleeding and they had all the right things to help. Stop any sort of bleeding. But those mainly it. And we had the knowledge that i had this disorder and so it wasn't a surprise to us then like the vision component which. We talked a lot about in our last episode. Right you right so i. My childhood was young. I didn't know. I had a bleeding disorder so i was covered in bruises literally covered and got to the point. Where like it looked weird. It looked like there was whispers. That i was like being abused which is horrible to even say like i feel uncomfortable even saying that because i was not abusing my childhood at all and i wasn't even that rambunctious like i wasn't even running into a lot of things so it didn't make any sense for me to have bruises. I was like i had probably thirty bruises on my legs like at any given time and it just looked really weird and my mom asked my pediatrician about hp she'd read it in a textbook because the internet was just not like a thing back then and she had read it in about a textbook in new. It was a bleeding so she asked and he ran a few tests but he didn't know what he was doing. And you know this was back in the day. But i also like you know if this is. Tmi some people. I'm sorry nothing. Medical is tmi casandra. And i but also like when i hit puberty and how do period i you know was bleeding a lot and i also had an ovarian cyst rupture and that's also a pretty common thing to happen to women and But i had a lot of blood leftover in my abdomen and even the doctor was making comments that it was like an abnormal amount of blood leftover. But you know we just didn't know so looking back at those things now. I can see how i bought more. But i just didn't know back then. Yeah i'm actually among one of the really really few. Hps's that doesn't really have any abnormal periods like my periods are extremely normal. So i i'm i'm grateful but i do have a whole lot of things to make up for it. Oh you have a lot of other things to make up for it. Yes and i guess it's time where we can kind of get into that. We both have these like wild stories. And so you can go first on your monologue. This take ten minutes. That i'm gonna do my best to make it interesting ten minutes it will be trust me. I've heard a guys. It is amid reference to this and other episodes past saying i had a lot of medical issues will here. We go so in episode one when we talk about hp. I mentioned that each yes can affect your intestines. Ibd is inflammatory bowel disease. Which just means that your intestines will get swollen and inflamed which sounds painful probably because it is but that also means that because like your intestines stretched out more than they should be because they're swollen they're subject to developing.

hp Ibd
"the life death of" Discussed on Rare with Flair

Rare with Flair

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"the life death of" Discussed on Rare with Flair

"This point does actually matter and it's interesting because While we do have a good about in common we even notice while talking about this. Our experiences especially throughout child tied. I pretty different. And you'll see why this episode might get a little monologue ee but stay tuned. We promise that the monologues aren't good yes. We think they're pretty juicy if we then again we're a little bias of our own stories. They are pretty. They are pretty wild rides. Let's just say that. Yeah oh yeah. So we were born and we were born and we were born. What five issues apart. But it's interesting. Because i was diagnosed almost at birth but casey was not so. Hp s is extremely common in puerto rican populations because of jean paul My parents are both from puerto rico. They came to the united states. And it's kind of obvious when you have when you're brown and you don't have a baby so they. The doctors definitely knew that i had albinism because i was so fair and had white hair and everything so as we were leaving the hospital we went to go. See the pediatric allergist eye doctors. But right before they went in there. Was this geneticist. Who stopped them and he had the presence of mind maybe he read it in a textbook somewhere that hp the puerto rican disease and handed them a pamphlet and like what nineteen ninety-seven seven so still not the age of information that we're in but saying that you know albinism puerto rican person can signal a different condition. So they were like. I guess we'll get tested. And so finally. When i was eight months old i got diagnosed with hp so. I my parents. And i have known pretty much my whole life that i've had. Hps yes and that's not the case of you right right. No and that's incredibly rare for a rare disease like she said it is home in puerto rico so that was a factor but i'm white and my family is pretty fair skinned anyway. So when i was born i looked normal and also We have to specify again that there are a lot of different types of albinism and i have more pigment than a lot of the people with really white hair so when i was born we had no idea anything was wrong. I was sitting home. And then two months later i went to an ophthalmologist appointment. And that's when they diagnosed me with albinism through looking at my is Of different things wrong with our eyes so they could look at my eyes and say she has albinism but they diagnosed me by looking at me with ocular albinism. Which just means. Oh you have album but it only affects your eyes because you have pigment in your hair and skin. So that's what i was diagnosed with. I was not diagnosed with her manscaping like syndrome. Unfortunately at that time and that is sadly extremely common lots of people with diseases like it's really hard to tell early on unless you pretty much the entire description which was me but that's also really common among the hps community that are caucasian. It's hard to get diagnosed when you're young. Yeah absolutely so growing up though. I think that knowledge really made a difference in our childhoods growing up. My parents knew that i had a bleeding disorder. And if you go back and listen to our last episode. You'll know kind of how i was as a kid. I was like super hyper rambunctious. And i would like run around and trip on things and kim my knee and i'd have a lot of bruises but.

puerto rico jean paul hp casey Hp ocular albinism united states kim
The Mystery of Woodchester Mansion

Haunted Places

05:38 min | 2 years ago

The Mystery of Woodchester Mansion

"People have lived in the area of Gloucestershire share. Now known as would chester park since the Romans invaded Britannia but the site of the Winchester Mansion itself began as a hunting lodge in the middle of a heavily wooded deer park. The ducie family purchased the Land Law in Sixteen thirty one renovating it into a Georgian. House called Spring Park. The ducey's kept the house in a near constant state of renovation added several landscaping features to the sprawling four thousand Acre valley including a group of art official lakes in eighteen forty. The second earl of Ducie inherited the property from his recently deceased father. The Legend of what happened that fateful year would be the first indication that something wasn't quite right at the would chester estate. It's no wonder that rumors of full body apparitions, disembodied voices, and the strange smell of extinguish candles persist. Not when the initial occupancy of the mansion turned out to be so very, very strange. Henry was grateful that his father and past he would never say so loud but he could not be happier. He had long toiled in the shadows of Thomas Reynolds Morton look first earl of Ducie. While the reward of inherited title was a nice reward for his time. It wasn't enough Thomas expected a lot out of him henry heated the permanence near the Thomas War around his son the constant lack of approval had driven Henry to dark thoughts. It was unfair that someone who had so much could feel as though they were nothing. He'd contemplated killing his own father regularly. It wished for his father's death a thousand times. But wishes weren't enough. At night he trump of sneaking into his father's room and crushing his windpipe Thomas, Cole ties would stare back at him in defiance but Henry would only press harder. He would steal every ounce of paint from his father that he could. He would revel in at even. This was the retribution he deserved. But by the time, he finally summoned the courage to act on his feelings fate had intervened. His father was dead and Henry would be able to keep his soul free at sin. He should have been overjoyed, but there was a part of him. That was disappointed. Henry had wanted to watch the life leave is father's is. Instead, S. he stood in the church on that summer morning he saw the corpse of an older man that felt nothing like his father. This husk of a person wasn't even the slightest bit intimidating. He was justice Shell Serene still. No fire behind the size no disapproving sneer. To the best of his knowledge Thomas Reynolds, Morton had never looked serene is life. Death was as the saying goes the great equalizer Henry didn't WanNA. Feel equal to his father he wanted to feel better that him. His shock at being robbed of the chance to end his father's life was eventually swallowed by his own greed. He held the title and the purse strings that once belonged to Thomas. The legacy had been passed onto him and he could do whatever he wanted with that power. His first act of filial disobedience was going to be a party. He would holden enchanted forest themed masquerade at his father's last real estate acquisition but converted Hunting Lodge in Winchester Park. It was still under construction, but the ballroom was mostly finished and the incomplete designed would really add to the atmosphere. Henry woke with a sense of clear purpose on the day of the party even though he held the title for weeks, this would be his entrance into high society as an earl. The people would give him the respect they never gave his father. A. Played softly as Henry mingled with his guests, he welcomed as many people as he could bobbing out of conversations whenever he grew tired of the subject matter. Most of these guests were more his father's friends than his. He despised them, but he couldn't resist the chance to hold his new title and the imminent chaos heads. He outranked nearly all of them now. Though the event was a masquerade few visit guests had been particularly inventive. There was fun and trying to guess who everyone was. Something always gave them away the gate, the bone structure, the laugh. There were at least four uninspiring looking deer and far too many rakish second sons had decided to come as wolves. But there was one person Henry didn't know. A strange masked man was weaving his way through the crowd. He had never introduced himself and his body language was unfamiliar. Henry tried to get closer, but he struggled to even get a clear view of the masked man. The pushed through the of gentry ignoring their complaints. Finally. When the crowd parted they met. The mysterious man was standing still gazing out one of the large glazed windows to the forest behind. And redrew closer and put one gloved hand on the man's shelter. The did not turn around.

Henry Thomas Ducie Winchester Mansion Thomas Reynolds Morton Chester Park Gloucestershire Land Law Spring Park Hunting Lodge Thomas Reynolds Chester Estate Official Gentry Winchester Park Cole Holden
The Great Escapes with Life Death and Taxonomy

Your Brain on Facts

04:44 min | 2 years ago

The Great Escapes with Life Death and Taxonomy

"If you've been staying inside as much as possible these past few months. That's a little easier to do now that the summer heat has fully set in your probably anxious to get out to fly the coop as it were. Animals who can fly should be getting out of zoos all the time. It would stand to reason. Though. usually therein enclosures netting across them, or they've had their wings clipped. That's a process of trimming off birds largest flight feathers, so they can't get enough. Lift when they flap which I'm probably going to end up doing to our backyard chickens if they don't knock off the free ranging. Birds generally stay in captivity pretty well, but of course there are exceptions to the rule or I wouldn't have brought it up. In two thousand, five and African Flamingo managed to get away from the Sedgwick county sue in Kansas. A massive search was launched, but The crabs backup singer was nowhere to be found. Until two thousand thirteen, when he was spotted, six hundred and fifty miles away on the Gulf coast of Texas among a flock of wild local flamingos. Bird watcher named Neil Hayward have been able to confirm the flamingos identity by the numbered band on his leg and offered to help recapture it. The Zoo essentially said I'm not even mad. I'm impressed and told the folks in Texas to leave the Flamingo to his new life with a mate who had herself escaped from a Mexican Nature Reserve. Anyone who's dealt with a parrot knows that they're too clever by half, and that certainly applies to Cuba the mccaw a resident of Vancouver's Zoos Parrot Gardens. Even, though the suet taken all precautions to prevent the parrots from escaping, it seemed that the clever girl was hell bent on getting out. On a pleasant Spring Day in two thousand nine zoo staff had moved the parrots to an outdoor enclosure. A little while later, their headcount came up short. The keepers weren't panicked. All the birds had their wings clipped. So how far could you have gotten? Surprisingly are considering. She hitched a ride in an RV. Juba got into a compartment near the vehicle's Engine Bay and hung out for three days before the family in Rv, found her. Luckily they were on one of the more stationary parts of their vacation and had only gone twenty miles, so it was barely out of their way to take what I'm assuming was a very annoyed parrot back to the zoo. Anyone who's watched? Jailbreak movie knows that you won't get very far without stealing a set of wheels. Try to imagine the end of the great escape without the motorcycles. No good. Even one? The Indian spectacle at the Berlin soon knew that. In two thousand and four, he rode a log across the moat, the rounds, the bear habitat and scaled a wall to freedom. Now that he was out, he had to use this time wisely. I stop the zoos playground. Terrified parents rushed their children away while one had a jolly go on the merry go round and went down the slide. After getting bored of that fairly quickly, one wandered off only to find a bicycle across his path. When he stopped to examine it perhaps to assess it for its usability as a getaway vehicle, the keepers who had put it there were able to track him and carry all three hundred pounds or one hundred and thirty six kilos of air to his habitat. And potentially dangerous could also describe a gator named Chuckie who got loose from the Alabama Gold Coast in two, thousand, four with a little help from Hurricane Ivan. Zookeepers hadn't been able to evacuate the gators and the storm surge destroyed their enclosure, setting them loose. Them meaning plural gators, though only chucky got any real publicity. Rapidly due to the fact that he was twelve feet or three point seven meters long and weighed about half a ton. That makes for better copy. Zoo officials weren't as worried about Chucky, going native, as they were of Chucky, going up to people expecting to be fed as he had for the past fourteen. Here's a situation that could get very ugly very fast. Luckily dedicated alligator retrieval team from gator land in Orlando was able to catch chucky less than a week later. Some animals get by with a little help from their friends or even from strangers. Three kangaroos staged a daring escape from a wildlife park near Frankfurt Germany. The name of whom I am now going to attempt to say. The hawksbill shoot par concert. It is what it is taken early vote. They escaped by going under the fence. Thanks to the work of a Fox and wild boar.

Chucky Gators Zoos Parrot Gardens Chuckie Texas Juba Sedgwick County Gulf Neil Hayward Frankfurt Germany Mexican Nature Reserve Cuba Berlin Zookeepers Hurricane Ivan Vancouver Engine Bay Alabama Gold Coast Orlando Kansas
Breathing Exercises

Mentally Yours

08:12 min | 2 years ago

Breathing Exercises

"Hi and welcome to mentally ause. I'm Evan and NASA's mentally it was corona virus a special episode out the pandemic and how we can look at mental health during it. Dan returned to her own. She's a free diver speaker on a breadth trainer. We're going to be talking about how we could use our time in lockdown to improve our breathing because so many of us have gotten into bad habits myself included especially with our terrible wise heracles. Do while from home and hunching overlap dope or going through some breathing exercises can help with anxiety and stress and struggling to fall asleep in lockdown. So how did you get into some silly? How did you get into breathing? I does sound like Israeli question but it's not really at. I discovered free diving Seven years ago now free diving is breath hold diving and I practice the death depth the depth disciplines which means I loan surface of the ocean. I take one very deep breath. And then we don't have as deep as I can on that one single breasts and I come back up on the same breath And in learning how to free dive your taught better breathing habits and how to use breathing to help relax station because that's incredibly important in free diving and Piqued my interest. And the more I continued with my free diving more interested. I got in how we breathed in how it can help us And that helped me to discover how bad breathing habits can can hinder us. Really Dumb and just Both physically and mentally and Yeah I go go quite interested all of that now. I help people improve their habits if necessary Why do you like free diving because to me? That sounds terrifying horrible. My parents think exactly the same thing I I loved a little bit about my history. Twenty years ago I was suffering from chronic depression and I was actually on the verge of suicide and I was very lucky to be able to find the strength to reach out with the sport of the Jess and family and friends. I turned my life around and I live a life today that I could ever dreamed of twenty years ago and one of the things that struck me so profoundly when I started free diving. Seven years ago was the peace and quiet as soon as I put my head under the water. Always background voices that a Gemini Negative at times And Forever Yapping. Away in the background just suddenly disappeared and they sense of calm and wellbeing being totally present in each and every moment as it happened was a intoxicating and I fell in love with it immediately. Yeah I can definitely see because I think so. Many people talk about What's it called open-air cold water swimming? And how powerful is Philip? Quieting your thoughts yes again. I think that's along the lines of the shock. Therapy of your mind can be wondering here there. And everywhere and suddenly the power. The intensity of the coldness of the water brings you frightened to yourself right in that in that very moment and it's refreshing. It's re- physically and mentally It's a release from the everyday chatter. That's going on in your mind and that's that's very pleasant to experience that so yeah I do think what is it about free diving. Because I think what you're saying about having to hold your breath for that sounds quite like intense life or death. Stop do you find that helpful for your mental health? It's life death if you don't follow some very simple rules and watched like he would never put to learn driver in Formula One car and the Nice basic rule free diving is you do not do a breath hold new water by yourself because if you do that you push too hard. Which isn't actually as difficult as it sounds you blackout and the thing about blacking out is it. Feels like it feels when you fall asleep. You're not aware that you're doing it. So the first and biggest rule of free diving is do not do breath. Hold near water by yourself And if you are doing it make sure you have someone who knows what they're doing looking off to you And from their Ronin The depth that I do and the the length of time. It takes me to do my dive. I've I've graduated to. Those levels vary slowly over very many years with lots and lots of training and. I don't come up from a dive about to sort of on that cusp at all. I'm very safety conscientious diver. I always dive with a safety. Taymor all my buddy who on training with and we look after each other and so while it certainly pushes each people's buttons because they consider it to be an extreme sport and the reason why is because we're denying ourselves one of the ultimate things that we need to live by denying ourselves It's actually an incredibly relaxing Cathartic peaceful sport. That's a wonderful way to face your fears in very calm controlled manner trashy work. Count what you're capable of and where where what you thought might have been assaulted barrier actually can flex a little bit you can achieve more so once you go into that and then you said you kind of Interest in breathing in general and learn more about. How did? Where'd you go to learn more about that? How do you learn more about breathing? The Internet's very very good place to start. But you over just save out the kind of the real stuff from the notes so helpful stuff and you know in the free diving world. There are lots of people who are much more experienced than me you. I've I've listened to learn from and I've looked into The medical side of things a lot. There there's in terms of breath were there is a massive spectrum that ranges from The sort of health side of things through to at this Rebirthing elements you can do this. Yoga prony come exercises that you can do which I actually incorporate some of them Into the stuff that I teach. But an says through to kind of the Cold War to therapies. That people can do as well. We're taking the styles of breathing or involved to help people to build up the sweat the list that she gets on and do it in and step into that ice bath and so it's it's a massive spectrum an I tended to on me have gone more towards the medical side of things whether as says documented reports and studies to show that this debris thing how it can be helpful both physically and mentally to us Because it just it carries more weight for me and I come from a medical family and my father would laugh. May Add to town. If I didn't wasn't able to back things up so yeah it's it's been very useful having that

Nasa Evan DAN Taymor Philip
"the life death of" Discussed on Occupied

Occupied

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"the life death of" Discussed on Occupied

"My my parents who are just regular people. They didn't go to college. There's regular people. My mom is a stay at home. Mom My dad's a truck driver. All the sudden they needed just a ton of information about bipolar disorder. Mental illness mental health. Because they were scared for their son and they had a problem they went out and talked to doctors and they couldn't understand them but they wanted to get the information from experts. Luckily they were able to find good sources on the web and good things. Good people to talk to that. Explain it to them from an expert level in a way that they could understand. That's what that podcast is. I get experts in the field. Everything from from licensed social workers to PhD's to medical doctors to occupational therapist. And I have them explain high level concepts to my father. He is not actually on the show. But I'm always thinking that I talk. Would my dad understand this and if the answer is yes I am very happy because my dad wants the correct information. He's excited to have the correct information. And I'm always worried that my that my dad is GonNa get sucked in with the wrong information because that's the thing about wrong information because they're not constrained by facts. It's often easier to understand. Yeah Yeah So. That's that show now. That show got going and it became really popular and I loved it and I loved giving an outlet for you know the simple psychology mental health mental illness. Talk I I loved helping. Experts explain things to a lay audience but I realized that the lived experience voice was was just not really. It wasn't really there it it didn't you know when you say. I'm having experts in the field of psychology mental health and mental illness. Talk about the yeah. They're the fee they don't usually live with it usually and plus. You don't have a lot to say I WANNA say stuff. I want the lived experience response to pop culture. I want the lived experience response to the stuff that happens in the news. I I want people to talk about what? It's like to live with bipolar schizophrenia. Depression anxiety grief mental. I Want I want that perspective captured so I came up with the podcast not crazy and not crazy as co hosted with Jackie Zimmerman. She's a great woman lives with depression and anxiety I am the CO host. I live with polar and the two of US talk about mental illness mental health and everything in between and listen. You're going to disagree with half the stuff we say you're gonNA like the other half and then there's another half because we're not good at math that you're gonNA think I'm GonNa think about that for a while and that's really the purpose of that show so we've got the expert theory we've got the lived experience or I'm sorry. Let me start that over. So the psych central podcast is experts explaining things. Simply the not.

Jackie Zimmerman depression bipolar disorder US PhD bipolar
"the life death of" Discussed on Occupied

Occupied

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"the life death of" Discussed on Occupied

"Danger or putting people like Gabe people like me in because I had no information and the ripple effect that that would have had on all the people around me. I think that we can see that. Wow we we did that because we didn't want to have a tough conversation about mental illness mental health and suicide with with our with our teenager. Yeah Yeah I guarantee every single mother or father who's ever lost a child to suicide would much rather have the awful conversation. The uncomfortable conversation scary casted than than than what they are going through. And and that's the message that I WANNA get out there there. There are worse things than an uncomfortable. Conversation offset it before you better off asking and making a fool of yourself than not asking in regretting it forever. Amen Amen to that is that is yes. Yes and again you know. It's like we talk about brock right. What so what? If you're wrong people ask me. What am I ask somebody about suicide at? I'm wrong well. Then then you're relieved right. You're you're to worry about it anymore. Yeah people say well I? I'm afraid that I have schizophrenia. Bipolar major depression. What should I do go to a doctor? What if I'm wrong? That's fantastic? Are you kidding? But that's fantastic. Yeah it's just what a cancer will do you think to yourself. Oh my God what if I go and it's not know you're praying that it's not but you still get the mole checked out right come on. There's it come on come on. There's this there's this lor around mental illness that is just that is just seeded by misinformation and ignorance and pop culture and our own beliefs that we've piled on without any evidence or facts in the world and and then then we add to that are fear and just it becomes this this mess and this mess is not helping anybody and in fact. It's it's hurting people it. It's literally killing people and I think we just need to have a much more robust conversation surrounding mental illness and mental health and sincerely. I don't say this lightly that will save a lot of lives that will save a lot of lives and I'm not one of these people that believes that everything saves lives i. The tagline of my podcast is not. Listen to my podcast. It will save lives. I know I'M I..

brock
"the life death of" Discussed on Occupied

Occupied

08:29 min | 2 years ago

"the life death of" Discussed on Occupied

"No no that was. Yeah I was not used to having this this level of understanding or feelings or I. I did not know how any of this works. Why WOULD I? I'd never I'd never had to access or use them before so I needed to learn that they existed. I needed to learn about coping. Mechanisms need to learn. It was okay to take a break. I needed to learn how to you know. Do breathing exercises for panic attacks. I needed to learn what a panic attack was for the longest time I thought all panic attacks were hunger paints. Yeah I just love everybody when they were hungry. Their heart started racing. They started to sweat. They got dizzy and their their mind. Raised and things were blurry and they couldn't stand. I legitimately thought that was what hunger was. Why wouldn't I? I didn't know what else it could be fair though I had to learn all of that but the medicine allowed me to learn it all. So that's how come when people say. Well what's more important medicine or therapy? Look if I didn't have the medicine I wouldn't have understood therapy but if I took the medicine without therapy I yeah I I wouldn't have understood. I wouldn't have been able to understand all of these things that the medication allowed me to access. So frankly it's I needed them both to be perfectly well and also frankly. The therapy allowed me to understand what medication does and what medication won't do and look a lot of people with bipolar disorder and mental illness. You know they go off their meds. Eh. Because they don't understand limitations or certain things and unfortunately doctors don't have time to teach that to you. I learned a lot of that in therapy and I learned a lot of that in pure support and a lot of you know unfortunately cautionary tales a ton of cautionary tales. Because that's one of the things. I think mental health so long. That's one of the things. I've seen many many many many many many times and not just with Paulo with people of different conditions that people taking medications will The same thing happens with anybody soon as people start feeling. Well they'll look up. These are done the job that need these anymore and it might not be the next day in my not even be the next week but there's very few people that I've ever worked with. That have used that specific. Excuse that haven't slid back into where they were or sometimes even west. Yeah do think like you said that comes from not fully understanding the purpose of the medication And not only that but its place within this whole system of therapy and therapists and support and all this like it has a place. It's I I liked. Look at it as another health professional. It's a health professional with a specific set of skills and it it to like the rest of us has a very specific place in that person's care it's not GonNa fix it on a sign and in some cases you're not gonna fix it without it same as any other health professional in that mix. It's fascinating to me and you know I I got a million analogies but it's fascinating to me that people readily understand that you need ten different skill sets to build a house or a car or any major appliance that we have it it. It's not shocking to people that you know electricity. I don't know how to do plumbing right. They get it they they they get that you need. Multiple skill sets to work on a house it. Yeah and our house isn't alive. Ray like we understand that right. This is the human body. And they're like no no no. We just need one like you're at our core. We're just extraordinarily complex. Machine and needing multiple types of people to work on. Our brains should not be shocking. And frankly that's really where this analogy should end up when it comes to physical health. They understand that you have a general practitioner. You have a cardiologist. You have oncologist oncologist. You have on and on and on. But for some reason with the brain it's one-size-fits-all there's one doctor handles everything. It's not realistic. The brain is extraordinarily complicated as our hearts as our lungs as our skeletal systems as our bones. Ads are what is it dermatology skin. I mean just on and on they just so it's fascinating to me that on one hand I think people have a very good understanding of this but on the other hand we start talking about our brains and they're like no I look I hang on. Let me pull my box out here. I don't understand why mental health and physical health has been separated. I sincerely don't we always say that. Well this is my physical health. Not Mental help. This is my mental health. Not My physical. Why isn't it all just health? So first and foremost. I can't help but notice that your brain is in your body. Which which makes it physical health right like no. This is my personality in the way that I see the world right. That's coming from your brain. I just I I suppose. Unlike very semantic level. You've got like a small point like we talk about the cardiovascular system but when we talk about the cardiovascular system we say well we're working on physical health today we say we're talking about Gabes cardiovascular system but for some reason everything for mental health is just mental health. Hey we're working on games mental health today. What are you doing? We're working on games. Mental Health will what specifically Gabes mental health. I know but what's going on Gabes mental health. So you mean to tell me that somebody who is experiencing grief after the death of a loved one and somebody who is experiencing psychosis and schizophrenia and believes that ants are boring through all of their skin and that they're being chased by a demon right. We would describe them both suffering from mental health issues. You don't see any difference there. Nope but but again on physical health would fire that doctor. And here's this cardiovascular system you mean your physical health problems I mean you have a physical health problem because you had a heart attack and gave has a runny nose so he also has a physical health problem all right. You're a quack amounts but yet we don't see it over in mental health. It's all health. Just that's all I want people to understand just just all health if our minds works. Our Body doesn't were not happy. If our bodies work in our mind doesn't we're not happy. We need to start looking at this healthcare. I don't understand why we don't I. I've asked so many people so many people and nobody has a good answer for this but yet nothing's changing. It's twenty twenty. We still have mental health and physical health. I got nothing done. A few episodes discussing similar. Things Yeah that's something and again it's it's the same set over here. You Have People Awakened Mental Health and physical health very very few teams that bridge both gaps or bridge that gap between both worlds. But you're right and something that we've said on this show a heap is. There is no health without mental health. Like it's don't care if you're break your leg in your in Physical Rehab. Their mental health aspects to that need to be addressed It's it's something that I'm pushing. It's an agenda and that's what really makes me the saddest of all people with with with severe persistent mental illness. You know we we feel so alone and we feel so isolated and we feel like we're the only ones that have ever had this issue and in reality. One hundred percent of the population at some point has had a mental health issue. Now No of course not no not. One hundred percent of the population has bipolar disorder. Schizophrenia Major Depression. But but.

Mental Health Physical Rehab bipolar disorder Gabes Paulo Ray psychosis schizophrenia
"the life death of" Discussed on Occupied

Occupied

06:09 min | 2 years ago

"the life death of" Discussed on Occupied

"That confused it was terrifying and I took all of that and I just moved forward. I I was released from the hospital after four days like you said and I start with Mr Bloomberg. I was released from the hospital after four days like you said but I was released into. What in America's community care so it's not like I left. The hospital and I was done. I was given a referral to a psychiatrist. I was referred to what's considered outpatient treatment so I I was still in treatment for the next six weeks. I went to what I would. They call a day program. So you still wake up at home and then you drive to the hospital. You go to like eight hours worth of you know. Classes are therapy. You know just just all kinds of stuff I imagine. It's where occupational therapy would fit in with the luckily I in America. Yeah and then. Around four o'clock you go home for the day and you spend the evening at home you sleep at home and then you wake up and you do the next thing so if like a step down program right. Yep So over the next four weeks. I went through a lot of those programs and I started to get you know. I met with a psychiatrist because they only gave me a enough medicines for a few months. Or I'm sorry a few weeks so I needed to meet with psychiatrist and I you know out of the hospital and then I met with a therapist out of the hospital and so the next few months were getting all of those things together and in those few months I I realized just how wrong. We're just GONNA go with wrong. Everything was I mean it was it was so wrong. I believed so much misinformation net. It just it just could have filled a book and that was of course very reassuring and I think a turning point for me was about a month out maybe a month and a half you know it kind of blurs together. After after seventeen years I went to a support group called bi polar bears and I picked it because it was called bi polar bears and it didn't sound scary. I it was it was it sounded cutesy. It seem safe avenues Biz. Yeah Yeah and it was. It was four people with bipolar. It had a cutesy name and it made it a convenient time in a convenient location and I to that group and in the first or second meeting. There was a woman who was older than me. Remember about twenty-five she was probably about forty. If I'm guessing I don't know her name. I know nothing about her but one of the things that she talked about was her husband and her two children and and feeling overwhelmed getting the kids ready managing her day and all of that stuff. But but forget about all of that. Here's what I heard. Woman with. Bipolar Disorder Spouse Children House. And I wanted that so bad I I wanted to be married. I wanted to be a dad I I I. I wanted to have a family I. I wanted to fit in and and her problems. I I'm not trying to dismiss them but they sounded very normal to me. You know work life balance you know. The kids are annoying in the morning. We don't get everything done during the weekends. I feel like I have no time to relax and get overwhelmed. And all I could think of was if I can get to that point. And she did and at and she was. She was very articulate. She was an intelligent woman. I couldn't even tell you what she looked. Like if you brought her in right now gay but this is the woman like all right. I I don't I don't know if she was shortall. I honestly I don't even remember I. I remember nothing about her. I just remember that. She was a person with bipolar disorder. That was leading the life that I wanted to have. That's pretty motive. That was a big turning point for me because after all. It's easier to do something when somebody else's done it close as much as it is. If you can see that this if you can see the possible endpoint is possible right. It makes it easy to get your head around the whole. I can do this too when people talk about. Peer Support in terms of mental illness. I know that sometimes it gets a bad rap especially in the states. You know people say things like well. Isn't this just the the inmates running the asylum? Isn't this the blind leading the blind? And I said you know look I. It's got a place the the fact that I do. WanNa talk to other people who have been where. I've been who understand the WHO understand the lingo. Who Don't try to correct the way that I speak. I'm bipolar. No you're a person living with bipolar. Look I'm fucking bi polar and I'm sad about it that's the we have like our own little language and that has a very important to me again to to gave. Howard only And I believe many other people that has a very important quality to allow us to be more present. We meet with occupational therapists and psychologists. And because that's different vibrates and I understand why you know people like you. Spend all of your time redirecting. I understand why you're like. Hey we we need to be solutions focused like that's that's really vital. Four your career. But it's also really vital to meet a bitch about my mom and to say how could they do this? How could they not know how you call your doctor? Jekyll and Mr Hyde Child and having a peer say yeah. Your mom fucked up. Yeah Yeah of course. You Did Yogurt. Now you done. Yeah I'm good. They give advice. They don't try to fix it it. It's like yeah. My mom messed up too but you know now we vacation together. F- Why I do not vacation with your parents. Do not just do not..

America bipolar disorder Mr Bloomberg Spouse Children House Howard Jekyll Mr Hyde
Couples Therapy And the Coronavirus with Certified Relationship Therapist Mary Kay Cacharo

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:54 min | 2 years ago

Couples Therapy And the Coronavirus with Certified Relationship Therapist Mary Kay Cacharo

"Let's bring in our special guests. Mary Kay could Shero. She's the certified Imago relationship therapist. She's been working with couples and families for over twenty five years. She utilizes encounter centered couples therapy for communication conflict resolution anxiety and depression. Her expertise is needed. More than ever these days. Welcome Mary Kay are you doing? Okay thank you bill. Thank you for inviting me onto the show You know it's not a merry go round. It's a roller coaster. And just like all the people I'm working with their good days and there are days that are more challenging than others so it would seem that there are different types of couples that we've got listening today. We've got new couples where they're together all the time for the first time and it's all good and we've got old couples. They're together now more than there used to being together and we've got the loving sexually active but together now all day and all night and all day all night and all day and all night. We've got couples that were already stressed. Pre pandemic in pre safer at home. Then we've got couples with kids and we've got couples that were kind of getting ready for divorces but they're together all the time and then we've got couples that are running out of things to talk about. So let's let's address the different couples for just a minute so the couples that are running out of things to talk about. Let's start there Mary. Kay How do we manage that kind of situation? Well first of all. It's clear that when we talk about couples we're talking about two people. There are couples. Who are trying to homeschool their children and to to to them and clean the house and Cook and all of this without the help of secretaries nannies and housekeepers and teachers so there's an awful lot of stress there also people who are unemployed who really have too much time on their hands and they really are feeling bored and lethargic and they're beginning to ruminate and worry and and sink into a bit of depression some seeing high anxiety in the couples that I'm working with and I'm also seeing some- slipping into some lethargy and depression for mothers and you know so much of what is going to happen. Between two people is contingent upon. What's happening in each of those individuals so depending on how strong the couple is like what you were saying if a couple already has some cracks bill and seeing those cracks widen a one of the things we know is that the divorce rates in the Asian countries. That are a little bit ahead of us in this journey had higher divorce rates. When I think about that I think it's really to the point of what you said. Which is that. These are probably couples where there was already Some discontent couples. That weren't getting along who don't communicate well and certainly being locked down together. Intensifies all fat. This is also maybe a life death experience so people suddenly start reassessing. What's important is that that kind of motivator or is it just a stress reaction that you're seeing. I think that when we are under existential threat as we are now that it accelerates our decision making kind of like when I have a couple. I'm working within. Somebody's diagnosed with cancer. You know suddenly it's the stakes are higher. People start to think if this is all I've got left. Is this the way I wanNA spend it now? In my world we see in the intensive care unit. How families as well as practitioners that this kind of stress tends to bring out the best as well as the worst in various individuals. Have you seen the same? With respect to the couple's absolutely I've been getting a lot of requests to help people to let go of the marriage in a very conscious way a less stressful way and conversely I've seen a lot of couples really grow closer because they're depending on each other their reprioritising. What's actually important? They're spending time with their children. Maybe for the first time or maybe for the first time in a long time. They're really hyper focused on family and that improves the relationship. Have you seen challenged couples because of the situation get together? I absolutely have. I've seen couples really let go of some of their petty differences in the face of this more important life threatening situation. You know when you talk about the fact that suddenly we have this existential threat that we're facing when you think about our lives things that seem to be so important day in and day out and you're saying that people now are sort of redefining. What's really important? What can you do in your couples therapy that can help people continue to focus on? What's important once? This pandemic is over. My fear is we're going to just go right back to our same superficial lives focusing on those things that are really important and yet I somehow think has terrible as this is that it's an opportunity globally for us to start learning and focusing on really what's important as human beings. Initially I think we experience this is acute stress. This was new. It was different. It was frightening. It required a lot of transitioning and now people are starting to say things like well. This isn't a sprint anymore. It's a marathon. Yeah this is going to last longer than we initially anticipated. And it's going to require and new normal. Do you find that. The external stress that's placed on us in some couples is bringing them together and other couples has exactly the opposite effect. It ends up being kind of transference sort of thing where you end up putting stress into the relationship. Where the actual stresses outside. Absolutely because I find that a lot of people aren't very fluent in there are articulation of. What's actually going on emotionally for them? This is not created in pandemic. Our adaptation to stress happens in our childhood but then we carry it into our adulthood. And most of the time we can manage and have a mature cortex. That's called our adult brain. The toddler brain is the reactive part of the brain where all in toddler brain more or less right now because the threat is so unusual. It's so different than anything we've experienced before so we're having to adjust and the thing that I am hopeful about back to what you had asked Steve about you know. Is it possible that we're going to actually use this? As an opportunity to change is that I think if couples manage the stress right now together they can begin to heal some of the dysfunctional adapt patterns that they have and they can really get through this

Mary Kay Shero Steve Cook
You are But Dust, and to Dust you Shall Return

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:26 min | 2 years ago

You are But Dust, and to Dust you Shall Return

"As Western. Culture becomes more and more secular to use. Charles Taylor's fascinating were disenchanted traditions and practices. That were once largely normal. Now seem more and more strange. Large Families Choosing Church over little league. Foreheads these things just aren't as normal as they used to be and the second glances and raised eyebrows. They create reveal more than just a confusion about the thing itself. In fact I'm not sure. There's a Christian observance more directly in collision with the widely accepted values of secularism than the imposition of the ashes. A tradition that goes back about ten centuries and which marks the beginning of the season of lent on the Church. Calendar like advent. The season of lent is about preparation before Christmas are Christian forebears thought it wise to prepare a bit and by diving deeply into Old Testament promises and prophecies that we'd better understand the birth of Christ in the full context of redemptive history and so two in lent are Christian forebears. Thought it wise that we should prepare for holy week especially for celebrating to resurrection on Easter Sunday. Now key distinction is that lent and disciplines beginning with Ash Wednesdays reminder that you're but dust and to dust you shall return place our celebration of Resurrection in the context of our humanity both our mortality and our fallen nece even if the Church calendar and its accompanying disciplines is not part of your church tradition. Those two aspects of our humanity deserve our focused intentional and extended reflection of course most Christians would quickly reply of course in death affect us all post Eden. The problem is that in our secular culture these beliefs that are crucial to a Christian worldview can be subtly secularized in our own hearts and minds years ago when my grandfather was dying he suffered terribly for three or four months and saw. I asked my pastor. Why doesn't God just take him now? Expected him to say something along the lines of well you know God has his ways in his own timing but instead he said something. I'll never forget because your grandfather needs to know his mortality before he meets his maker. See what Ponts de Leon once sought in the waters of a fountain of Youth. We still seek today via genetic engineering eugenics or some other technology and other words we seek control over this world and even over death itself despite our search death remains the universal problem of our human condition. One that afflicts us all a secular cultures led by the reality of death feared death itself so that we either attempt to control death or distract ourselves from the thought of it. As a result we learn to live life in light of a moment rather than eternity the reality of death should instead remind us to fear God that after death we will meet the maker of life. That's something worth pondering. Not just at the moment of death but constantly throughout our lives the login Craig warned in his book the way of the modern world that many of us who believe in God lives if God were largely irrelevant to most of life the reminder of our mortality in the words you're but dust into dust you shall return. That's a wonderful antidote for what he called practical atheism just like with the idea of mortality. Our understanding ever own sinfulness is also under threat of being secularized in our own minds living in a culture committed in the name of freedom to removing categories. Like sin or guilt and one. Quick to give away nearly universal. Get Out of jail free cards in the name of sexual freedom to many Christians lose any appearance for that which ought to shock and shame us. Perhaps that's why the salvation. That's brought to us in Christ's life death and resurrection as so often described as a quote wonderful example of love and sacrifice or how to get purpose and perspective in your life but so rarely described the terms of judicial forgiveness and cosmic victory that Pau Peter Jesus himself so often used being confronted with her own sinfulness certainly no fun but God graciously does after all the cruelest thing. We can tell someone who's not okay. As that they are has both are secularized. Culture in our secularized churches too often do repentance is a gift. It's the only way forward for those on the edge of the moral abyss and it's proof that God is kind as scripture say. Unfortunately we just don't hear these things often enough so thank God for lent

Pau Peter Jesus Charles Taylor Ponts De Leon Craig
This Week in Nerd

Talk Nerdy to Me

05:25 min | 4 years ago

This Week in Nerd

"Dive this week at age of fifty seven. What a lot of people. Don't know. Is this dude had a couple of different degrees? He graduated from Humboldt state university eighty four with a bachelor's degree in natural resource planning and interpretation. He was working at Orange County marine institute. He got the idea that he wanted to start doing some animation. So he went back and say, hey, you know, what I was good another degree in eighty seven. He pursued his degree in experimental animation. At the California is to arts in Valencia and he earned his masters of fine arts ninety two quite of accomplishment. I mean, the dude was very educated. You wouldn't think that watching SpongeBob squarepants? But yeah, I mean, he he had multiple degrees. And he invented SpongeBob squarepants for so. Rest in peace, Mr. hill and Berg and thank you for bringing SpongeBob squarepants to us. Everybody knows Netflix will make a TV series out of anything. Lately, they've been cancelled stuff. We're talking about that later, but they they don't make a series out of anything, and they just ordered some episodes for avatar last air bender. So they're getting more to the anime now of making those series. They just got another one man they picked up cowboy bebop, there'd be making live actually Dapitan of cabinet bebop. It says here there ordered for ten episodes straight to series live adaption, if you're not familiar with cabaret bebop is one of the more prominent enemies out there. These intergalactic bounty, hunters, basically, go around and save save your world for the right price. This could go well or this could go really really bad. Honestly, I've I've kind of liked the live actual life death note. And I liked full metal alchemist alive actions. I don't know a whole lot about Kabbay bebop. But I think they can make this work on a firefly kinda way. Can't wait to see what they do with this. They are making so many of these adaptions now, I don't have a date when this is going to be available for yet net. Flicks is go roll it out. And if they do they always do they'll be the whole ten episodes at once that you can marathon watch it, they'll probably be half hour episodes. So it shouldn't take long. You can do it in a weekend. Get your cabinet bebop fix along with the enemy if you're not familiar with it. Now's a great time to go back and wash the cowboy bebop anime and get caught up. And while we're on enemy this next one is it's it makes sense after I hear it. But I would have never thought of it beforehand dole swim and country, crunchy roll going together to make a blade runner anime. Yeah. I didn't think about, but you know, the whole Bladerunner story leads itself. Very well. The anime in my mind, this Disney the away who. Is the Bladerunner director guy. He is said they optioned. Three stories that were take place between twenty nineteen when the regional Bladerunner takes place and Bladerunner twenty four nine which is the newest movie they put out. One of these was done by Mr. Watanabe. It's Bladerunner twenty twenty two. Blue's called blackout. I watched it a little earlier. It's it's really not bad it. It was pretty good. So those three stories if you Google I'm sure you can find somewhere online this anime series, though is going to be called Bladerunner black Lotus takes place in twenty thirty two. So it's before the events of twenty forty nine you're likely to see some of the characters, you know, making appearances in this anime, which is really cool. Like, I said shoot Chiro what Nabi I'm probably butchering. The name is going to be the creative producer on this series. Guy is great with anime. Can't wait. The Bladerunner story is just I love the whole Bladerunner universe. They had said that they were going to be expanding the blade runner universe. And we haven't seen that. Until now. I mean, they did a comic book that just didn't really take off. We haven't seen any television or or animates until this one. There will be thirteen half hour episodes. They're going Erla dole swim adults rooms going to maintain the worldwide distribution rights for the English dub versions, which means in my mind means they're looking at pushing it out in other countries. Also. So, you know, the Bladerunner universe is getting ready to expand. Again, we're going to be a little more backstory since this is kind of a prequel to twenty four nine but a sequel to twenty nineteen. Kind of weird in the time line there. I believe what Nabis going to do a job with this. I can't wait to see it myself. I love all the Bladerunner stuff. So let's hope that they do this from Justice. It seems lately the trend is for them to take old

Bladerunner Bladerunner Twenty Twenty Nabis Humboldt State University Producer Orange County Marine Institute Netflix California Valencia Disney Google Mr. Watanabe Mr. Hill Director Blue Berg