18 Burst results for "The Art Newspaper"

"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:41 min | 3 months ago

"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Hello it's the weekend. I'm Ben League. This week as the effects of the coronavirus pandemic and the lockdown hit museums. We're seeing unprecedented layoffs on both sides of the Atlantic. We ask our museums doing all. They can to save their star. We've already discussed the future of museums after covid nineteen on the weekend, but only now is it becoming clear the scale of the financial burden of the pandemic and the effects on the people who work at the museum's. We'll look at the latest developments in the UK, and the US where hundreds of museum workers are losing. Their jobs will also took to Emily Butler from the White Chapel Gallery, which is just reopened for this episodes work of the week. Before we begin a reminder that you can read the art newspaper anywhere anytime with our iphone and IPAD APP. visit the APP store search for the art newspaper, and then you can install for. Yep, if you're a subscriber, only at content is available as part of your subscription. Now, to museum layoffs, Hannah mcgibbon is the museum's editor at the newspaper and she joins me now to discuss the situation at US and UK Museums Hannah before we talk about layoffs and job losses. Can we talk about the financial peril? The museums find themselves in. You've had conversations with lots of museum directors recently. Can you give a sort of idea of the scope of? The financial trouble they're in. I think it's clear that any museum. The earns a significant portion of its income, so self generates that income from visitors buying tickets, and from spending money in the cafe or buying things in the gift shop. All of that income has been wiped out by the enforce closures which have of dragged on for several months. During the lockdown periods, so that has been an enormous loss and we know that many museums don't have huge financial reserves. To kind of plug that gap, and in the meantime they still got high fixed costs. They've got run their buildings. They've got to protect their collections and staff is is a big outlay as well. Right and and just so the we can give the listeners sort of general idea. But obviously museums are all individual institutions. They have particular radio. Think Christie's etc, but it's fair to say that the US and the UK which we are predominantly focusing on today do have a particular reliance on money coming in from those sources right in a way that some European countries don't yes I mean the tradition in European countries is for heavily subsidized..

US Museums Hannah the art newspaper UK Hannah mcgibbon Ben League Emily Butler Atlantic White Chapel Gallery Christie editor
"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

01:47 min | 4 months ago

"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"We cannot. Necesary Christie's visit Christie's dot come to find out more about the world's leading auction sincerity sixty six. Private sale online art. Hello. It's the weekend I'm Ben League this week. Arson Social Media Now the votes gone digital house did engage with Lindsay's online. We speak to the so-called King of museum means to find out. No Museum or Gallery in the twenty first century can be without the various social media platforms to amplify its message and increasingly to deliver exclusive content to growing global audiences. This week we speak to Adam Khazari, who's in charge of the raw academy in London social media channels and created numerous viral moments there and elsewhere we also speak to the US born London based artists Rita Keegan who had it not been for the corona virus would currently have a show at the south London gallery. What's it like as an artist to have a major moment in your career, but on hold and in the latest Naseer is lonely works in which we split up behind the doors museum closed due to Covid Nineteen Judy Peyton Jones talks about Leonardo Davinci's during a cloudburst of material possessions also known as the reign of tools from about fifteen six to fifteen twelve. Before that a reminder that you can sign up to the newspapers free daily newsletter for all the latest stories go to the art newspaper, Dot. Com and the newsletter. Link is at the top right of the page. And while you're there, you can also sign up for a monthly newsletter..

"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

07:22 min | 6 months ago

"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"And finally this week. The latest in all series lemony works in which we look at artworks museums. Close because of the corona virus this week. We're returning to the met because the British artist one in has chosen Jackson pollock's autumn rhythm number thirty from nine hundred fifty one of the great drip paintings bullet made in a prolific period between nine hundred forty eight thousand nine hundred fifty one and you can see images of the work as we discuss the art newspaper. Dot Com Click on the link on the homepage and look for this episode. Why did you choose? Autumn Rhythm by Polit- well because of its initial impacts of of its continuing impact when I got him revisit. But it's very much attached to my memory of saliva went to New York in one thousand nine hundred eighty and mobike given over the entire building to a huge Picasso. Retrospective so the kind of abstract expressionism. One of the girls in New York a lot. What could be moved to the Brooklyn Museum at the back of a Metropolitan Museum in in quite a promising? I'm proficient kind of interim rooms and I think policy cafe remember even being displayed on a sort of a Hessian coverage cut of temples. There it was you know. And so I have a huge fullness for for that work and that moment and that was kind of one of the one of those completely satisfying experiences looking at work about actually was the sort of rather sort of unlikely slightly disjointed experience getting and then seeing what part of it in a way because it's an enormous is it's an enormous paintings and it's one of politics biggest. It is it. Is it almost fainting? And Yeah I'd probably dealing with my own fatigue kind of consuming so much all in the Metropol in the museum and you kind of lock in itself is quiet shattering and then yeah with the dossier of energy left. I found myself in this space and of course it it is its own kind of Zone bomb. Full that came before it. You know. It's one of the things I mean. It seems to talk about purity when it comes to pollock but it seems to me that ultimate Amisi in a way the period the paintings is this search finesse and elegance in those marks isn't there there is there is. I mean I think. Hearing about in reading about him. Looking at reproductions and but somehow in ones mind's eye early on you you have excellent deal pollock and quite often. Don't quite match up to this Pollock initially this is an Polo. It does everything that you have a high it would do. Yeah it it has nothing nothing. Impose opponent Blue Poles to the other things you know. It's that's a kind of like they feel a little bit too much of an imposition on. This is this is a a as a purist and the actually kind of confused onto the statements. He made about what he intended to do. The painting has a life of its own and he's obeying that sense. Yeah it's it's extraordinary. Moving experience I had you seen the namath film of Him. Making Autumn Rhythm before you saw the picture so in a way where you invested in the myth of Before you had this encounter with the word yeah I mean I think I think I saw it on foundation course so you know you have the missing and you kind of I think in my generation had to go drip painting and just an and the results Jerry horrible you know and and everything about that moment you know because you know he's painting up so then could be pretty turgid really you know and so it was like in one bound he was free and and you know inspiration revelation Everything in those terms come comes together And that move from the ground up on the wall. I mean this is a yeah. It's like a physical metaphysical shift. There are no other paintings that do lie. And and so so it's rhythms and it's a line is as much to do with between pollock's gesture what gravity and everything else add to movements it. It's a perfect summation really. Yeah Yeah and of course. It came to the tate in nineteen ninety nine for a spot of extraordinary Jackson. Pollock exhibition I want to do you remember seeing in that show did in a way you've seen in this space in the Matt as you say we've visited it but seeing in your on your own turf as it were wanted. That experience was like it was wonderful but actually quite attached to to to wear is you know I mean I suppose one thinks of the National Gallery and the Titan serves to the Matt a moment you know. Those are funny. Somebody at the end of a post impressionism beginning of cubism. The is somewhere between them between the remits. You know and so yeah because it feels bowl the only one of its kind species in that the natural history of painting in the in that place that I don't like to sink and that speaks to what the reason we're doing this because all these museums currently shot and we want to in a way bring people's minds and is back to these paintings and thinking about this is crucial. Isn't it the space in which works? It's one's memories of a work have also bound up with the physical. Experience is visiting not just looking at him absolutely absolutely. I mean I remember another time. I was staying with some friends and Canal Street early nineties and decided I was. GonNa walk away to the met and I've got some new sandals which would shredding my fate by the time I got sick to central park so it really was a very painful pilgrimage. You know still worth it. Did you feel like you're on the on the road to Yoga? Es Telling US statistic took it took Find out more about awesome at met Museum Dot Org.

Jackson pollock Brooklyn Museum Metropolitan Museum New York Museum Dot Org the art newspaper US Metropol Blue Poles Matt National Gallery Jerry tate
"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

02:38 min | 7 months ago

"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Off the newspaper put coasties brought to you in association with Bonhams. Auction is in seventeen ninety three to find out more visit. Bottoms DOT COM. Hello it's the art newspaper cursed..

"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

01:57 min | 7 months ago

"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Here though the focus is more on containing imported cases so right now there's a lot of people including a lot of people in the art world both Chinese nationals and foreigners who were based in China. Who were abroad for Chinese New Year and the just stayed abroad so people are coming back in droves like all of the existing flights are just packed with people now So each city has different rules in terms of quarantine China has banned anyone despite some reports. Everyone is allowed to come back but they will be forced to quarantine either at home or in a facility or in a hotel depending on their exposure and which country come to so in Shanghai there is sixteen countries currently that are considered hot spots including the US and anyone coming from there has to be subject to an extra strict quarantine. A friend of mine who works at a museum is in the line for that right now waiting to get tested and she keeps joking about how the all the Shanghainese are complaining that the foreigners are getting the exact same treatment as the local Shanghainese because everyone is being subject to the same rules since of course the virus doesn't care where you come from indeed. It doesn't am Lisa. Thank you so much for joining us and stay. Well yes thank you you too. And that's it for this week you can subscribe to the newspaper at the newspaper. Dot Com. Click on the subscribing at the top left of the homepage. And if you haven't already subscribe to this podcast please do so. And His rating or review. If you've enjoyed it the art newspaper podcast is produced by Judy housekeeper. Amy We do awesome and David. Clack and David is also the editor. Thanks to Anna Bendel Anti Lisa and thank you for listening Busey next week. Newspaper put dissociation with Bonhams near since seventeen. Ninety three to find out more visit booms..

China the art newspaper Lisa David Anna Bendel Judy housekeeper Shanghai Shanghainese US Busey Clack Amy editor
"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

12:40 min | 7 months ago

"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"The newspaper podcast. I'm Ben Luke. Thanks for listening like many of you. The newspaper team is now working from home for the foreseeable future due to the corona virus crisis. But we'll continue to produce this weekly podcast and this week. The theme is the Kobe. Nineteen outbreak and specifically its effect on our journalists took two members of the art newspaper family in the two epicenters of the virus thus far Lisa movies in China an Annus Cox in Italy will also begin a new series looking in depth at works of art currently in museums and galleries. That have been forced to close this week with the historian and broadcaster Bender grosvenor before we begin just a reminder that you can sign up for a free daily newsletter formulated stories. Go to the out. Newspaper Dot Com. And you'll find the link at the top right of the page now. The founder of the newspaper. Anna summa's cokes. Is currently under lockdown in to win Italy on the ninth of March? The Italian Prime Minister Sepe Kante imposed a national corentin requiring citizens to go out only when strictly necessary that is for work health related reasons or grocery shopping as I recall it. This new three thousand people have died in Italy from Kobe. Nineteen Africa rapidly approaching the number of deaths in China on Wednesday the eighteenth of March. It was announced that four hundred seventy five people who died in a single day. Anna joins me from on the line. Now and are just like to begin by asking you how you are extremely well and so's everybody. I know except for my step grandson who probably has corona virus. Which I'm happy to be able to tell you in. His case is a cough and a bit of a temperature. And he's just riding it out at home and his doctor says not worry but it is a case. Bring your body's in Lombardy which is a neighboring region and the the the the the death toll is now very high it some over two thousand and for the habitually but particularly nobody and people can't even say goodbye to their family when family members when they die so what the house is do is to do away slow drive past of the relations window so they can stand on the balcony and as it were wave goodbye. And that's that's it. It's very strange times. Because it's sort of like an enforced holiday and unexpected holiday combined with a horror movie and it's sort of lurking in the background. Can you explain to listeners? Why you're into in because they may not know you connection there all right well. Many years ago I started the art newspaper for Attorneys Publisher quarterback Talamante whom I subsequently and I I decided to stay in Japan and keep him company During this rather dramatic time and then got stuck by the total lockdown. You can't get in Wyatt. Can you guess? And can you give more details about the look down and how quickly was enforced to that sort of things already in? Somebody was called Red Zone a week before it started here by the Knights of March being imposed and I it was just you know stay inside. But and then and then they then they shut down everything so so offices and factories are still working on the whole people encouraged to work remotely. Obviously the factory workers have to go into the factories. You can't drive more than two in a car The person has a second. Now sit in the back of the car. They caught out. We have to keep them meeting between ourselves so the floor in the supermarket has duct tape stock meter intervals so we signed away from each other. The new shops open a food shops tobacconists newsagents and chemists and the police control. And Jud any time to make sure that you're not just out sort of about to go into a party or anything like that and actually titans are being very law abiding particularly in the North. Where a lot of people have been ill or are still and where in the south having a bit more of a problem because you know they they haven't come across it in the same way right can. Can you give us a bit more? Flavor of what? It's like to be on the streets to in an deserted to in. Well you know what to Carrico Cityscapes like that's what it looks like. I mean to carry was painting terrain when he did those those you know. Those extended captures with the arcade arcadia buildings. That's exactly what looks like it. Shadows It's It feels like a sphere clock in the afternoon in August when everybody's asleep And then you get the same feeling of not do that but I wanted I wanted to the only. The only buildings are open public buildings that were opened our other churches. Although they're not there no liturgies being celebrated which must be the first time there have been marcy celebrated in the Italian peninsula since you know Christian days we're not allowed to congregate but I went into our neighboring churches morning. It was absolutely beautiful. There wasn't one single sewed in there just perfect. And so you'll you'll taking solace where you can in the fact that you can. You can at least experienced culture. In in terms of the architecture of the city Ad Nauseam the churches. Yes yes but but you're not allowed just wonder about the secret. I have to carry this little document saying I've gone out for my health in case a policeman says why you about perjury. Of course but but but here's a slight deterrent from from from from being frivolous and just going to have a drink with somebody which people ready are trying not do those very strong sense that any one of us could communicate a deadly disease to somebody else or somebody who communicated dwells. Now tell me about the paper in Italy journalist Latin Which of course was the very first of these kind of newspapers. And can you say about their operations now and they still active in reporting as we are yeah there. There's a skeleton staff in the office with people sitting on way from each other and everybody washes their hands the whole time. Nobody touches each other in any way We always talk about how long the virus survives on tabletops that sort of thing but can drive you crazy. Everybody was working from home just as the art newspaper is doing seems to work pretty well in fact we. I rather suspect there might be a clam of wait for more of it later on because it's quite dog away in front. If you can get your act together it can you say about this sort of response of the world in Italy Obviously in various spices especially in the UK and in the US now there are lots of museums very actively talking to their audiences in terms of on social media et CETERA. Is it the same initially? Honestly it's so backward digital speaking you know the sudden we are now open to the public. Well you know I went to the custody Rivoli site and I couldn't actually get the youtube things to open You basically they've just got an old marine patio nice website Outstandingly good is the was eight would chills one. Who's rather a handsome director? Christiaan Greco immediately put a little video or nine of him. I stayed home. That's great refrain. Stay at home your restore. But he's he's talking about strange of letters between two ancient Egyptians of father and some the father has complained Ressam that he hasn't written a long time and the extraordinarily also suvival. And it's something I have written to dad but the seven hasn't put the letters in the post. Does it work full marks for kind of embassy relevance and all which that's very good The fundacion proud has quite good collaboration with Google The Uffizi has an excellent website. I looked at an exhibition. They had on on Africans in that paintings of Africans in their collection Rafael Exhibition. That's a huge tragedy. I mean this together. Those Great Raphael's it's the beginning the big event of Raphael. Yeah this is five hundred five hundred years. The Death Raphael there at all is in Rome opened on the fifth of March by the by the presently shot on the eighth of March and the shots on the second of June. By which time we may or may not catch a few weeks of it and that's got nothing online at all right. I mean as you say. That is most notable tragedy of I mean. Of course it's a tragedy the all these museums everywhere reclosing but that that event a real one of one of those Bam rare events that actually genuinely is a once in a lifetime experience. Is there any sense in which you get the it may be extended or it may be given another chance to exist in the form that it that it that it did just before we closed? I honestly don't know I would have thought it quickly difficult to do. Because there's some vevey valuable lanes for more Rhonda the world. I mean. It's a hard thing as coordinate. Something staffers. Come from major museums. Well you know there. Rafael is one of their star operates. The exhibition the collection of early seeks Chinese art at the custody. We also shot in fact. He didn't even open. But that's easier to extend because he's one man's collection I if he's feeling benevolent he can let it stay longer. Though it's going to be a great loss around the people who are the real real losers are togue guys are twenty thousand official tour guides insult who have nobody to Guide around and they're all self employed so they are literally without an income and our government to help out and Tourism tourism represents thirteen percent of GDP and these are not peak toys months. Obviously but you know the photographs of Venice was absolutely nobody in them. In our deeply moving I will but they also reveal how few inhabitants are administering But But the the economy is a is is cruel particularly to the to the you know the occasional labor union. The Bosnian they under cafes are all shot so the people were taken on to to wait at table just usually paid in. What's called black money? You know unofficially legislation it. Suddenly without work. There are lots of people who are really hurting at the moment. Andy and actually that is something that I think the art newspaper it throughout its history has done very well his point to the kind of ecosystems that underlying the art world that keep world going. And I think that's one of the things that am yes we're terribly sad about museums closing the livelihoods of so many people across the art world's a under threat right now. Well yes I mean the art world. I suppose they're artists. Who'S EXHIBITIONS AREN'T HAPPENING? And small small galleries that will will go under. There's going to be a massive Financial Crash I think What's a very rich? Old Man? Once explained to me who had lived through a big crash of the late twenty S. he said unity. It's not that the rich people become poor in a huge financial crash. It's a they wait for the market to bottom out which means that they didn't spend any money so dries up if people aren't buying and selling and now a sort of side Aspect civil with you've talked about the deserted streets of of to win but one of the things which is delighted little on on social media over the last couple of days. It's been images of Venice. You'll the former chair of the Venison Peril Fund and therefore you have a very close relationship to that city. Have you been monitoring all of this and seeing these apparent declare canals? And what do you make of it and do you? Do you know any of the science underlying what I do. Because We collaborated with Cambridge University and institutions in Venice at the time and I know you know what people are working on so I rang up somebody S and I said well..

Italy the art newspaper Kobe Venice China Anna summa cough Bender grosvenor Ben Luke Africa founder Raphael Google Annus Cox Rafael Exhibition perjury Cambridge University Prime Minister Sepe Kante
"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

12:26 min | 9 months ago

"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Hello and welcome to the art newspaper curse. I'm Ben Luke. Thanks for listening in this first episode of Twenty Twenty. We're going to look at the year ahead I in the market and then in exhibitions Sion's before we begin. Just a reminder that you can sign up for a free monthly newsletter art market. I go to the art newspaper. Dot Com and click on the link at the top right of the page next newsletter will drop into your inbox on the thirtieth of January. Now delighted that the people behind that newsletter a here to talk about the year ahead in the art market. We the Anna Brady. Who's our art market editor? Hello Anna hallet them. And I'll deputy art market editor Margaret Carrigan. WHO's normally based in New York? But his here in London high. So let's let's begin. It is much easier to review the year in market as you did. Anna lost podcast Then to predict what's going to happen in the market but there are some clear themes that we can identify for. Let's talk about this ongoing and increasingly prominent issue which is how the art market responding to green shoes and to its massive carbon footprint. Do you WanNa give that yeah. I think it's really interesting because it's something we weren't even really talking about. I would say and say two thousand seventeen and the kind of mainstream in coverage of the art market and ready the large commercial galleries. I think ray just lost year. They actually started having to respond to these questions quite seriously and having to really think what. They're doing to try and redress balanced. Because as we all know flying to God knows how many Faz all over the world and taking a lot of wax them creates a huge carbon footprint as it would with any large event So I think a lot of them. It's starting to think about what they can do to scale back on that but for me it still feels like that still paying lip service to as and they're having to shave that they're thinking about is but you know mark glimpse of Pay Scotteri. He told us that whilst thinking about it he's base. He stopped flying. They won't stop going to these fares because they still the need to be there in person in his opinion. So I kinda wonder whether we're GONNA start seeing more of this sort of carbon offsetting so these galleries can afford T- T.. May well to stop throwing money at the problem. And paying sort of maybe making a thing of of paying large sums and two gay towards a Offsetting some of that launch cost rather than really changing much. In the way they did a slide from at an easing pay a copson nor easing much plastic. Nick Yeah I agree I think we you know a couple years ago. We started seeing a lot of artists making work responding to the climate crisis. And now I feel it can be really cynical. All their whole lot of people in the art trade that realizing that they want to represent these artists and keep their artists. Happy are like Oh yes. We're very concerned about this as well. But like like Anna said it is to a certain extent Just how the art market is bill. I honestly just play devil's advocate. The Art World in the art trade specifically are very small in in in the broader scheme of things and I think what what we are need to be talking about more is the industries st that kind of fuel the art trade which are the major money making industries that have the big carbon footprints. So I think what's going to be difficult for the art trade to overcome if they they really do want to take you know. Climate issues seriously. Is that their client base. Are The people buying the yachts taking the private jets. All these things like you can't change your clients necessarily Sahadi respond to that in real time and meet them where they are in different ways. This is Rudy fessing to what extent can can gallery Dictate terms to its client base. I mean are there any previous instances where you're conscious that Galleries would take. They can ethical lead in certain issues. I think thinking Conradi I think is kind of. I think it's quite interesting with the world because it's it's really it's it's quite left leaning. We like to think of left-leaning and a lot of these galleries trying to appeal the huge amount of talk about how to appeal to millennials because surveys began this huge wealth transfer So they need to be appealing. So worthy millennials. Well like Maggie and I really with a lot more cats and they need to be appealing to us in terms of what they're what the outwardly say but they might be left leaning ideologically but they're really quite rightly capital. Capitalism dependent hadn't as well so I don't think they can dictate terms or ethical values to their top end clubs. I I agree agree with that but then I also just want to offer an anecdote too. I think you were with me when we were in art. Basel last year We were at this party. A Golden Party and his artists told me that he had walked to Basel from somewhere in Austria because he was trying to reduce his carbon footprint. I I am so embarrassed to say that I laughed at him because I thought he was joking. And then he's like no no no no really I I did and I was like Oh crap we need to take like this. This is really going to change. Like he's doing got there as I'm part of the worst part of it because I was laughing I mean surely the the key factor in this is if we are to imagine a future world in which there are fewer flights being taken and fewer works being shipped the online provision needs to become more prominent right and is there any sense in which galleries are doing more online to as a kind of means of becoming more ecologically minded. Yeah I mean this this. This rise of the kind of online virtual viewing room that some of the galleries like Google and Houser houser wild. I think there hasn't been yeah severe doing these virtual being rooms online during fairs. I didn't know that that has anything to do with cutting back on a carbon footprint. I think it's just another south platform. So let's talk about a major fair. That's coming up on the rails which is freeze Los Angeles where where do we see freeze fitting into the ecosystem of the fares. Maggie and what is it doing in order A to propel itself up onto that higher echelon of I think freeze is a really interesting case. Study Right now because obviously there over the past several years. There's there's been a lot of resistance to the traditional fair model a lot of galleries saying that. It's it's not sustainable financially and wanting to find alternatives to that I don't know that freeze has drastically moved the needle on that In fact is open. You know freeze. La last year as second edition What we're seeing this year here though is They are trying to think build it into more of a entertainment slash media slash event Platform form a lot of that has to do with you. Know their new ownership stake which is endeavor based in L. A.. And working in meat across media things like that so that seems a logical move for them as they move forward but then with that comes new new kind of terms and It's a different playing field in LA. And I think we're seeing that mirrored especially this year with their crackdown on exhibitors exhibiting across fares. Generally there's been this kind of turn in a blind eye thing to galleries that want to participate in more than one fair. You see this at freeze London UC mini galleries participating in different fares across the city. Because there's so many going on you saw especially in New York last year where I think about ten percent of all freeze exhibitors were also exhibiting at tough off New York And then all of a sudden there is zero overlap in between Felix the other upstart fair in La and A lot of that has to do with freeze kind of saying look we WANNA take over this market. We've got a plan to do it. Here's how we got to do it. You gotta be you gotTa be on side with us to that end. Ah there are a lot of larger art. Basel is one of them. That does kind of keep a watch on and does ask galleries to refrain from participating in other fares but there are a lot of fairs that still do not ask that or if galleries do they just kind of like let it lie or maybe have like a backseat conversation. Later on me like you know if you can again again So I think it's really interesting the IT. It's so kind of clearly marked this time around what that means for freeze going forward is I think they're going to try. And you really take a a stronger. Lead within L. A. and further is that market professionalize is because it is still is a small kind of community artists and and dealer is Globally speaking but it has a lot of ways an interest behind it that I think that It's a smart move for freeze but it could. It actually proved difficult for exhibitors especially local ones. When I mean the question that comes to my mind is isn't freeze assuming that that it has a a sort of well of trust from its dealers in order to be able to begin enforcing this interesting in terms of the power balance? I think I think there's always a sort of slightly strain sort of power dynamic between fair organiser and exhibitor particularly when these galleries a really powerful that really debate as well. And there's a bit of a tussle. I was sent between them. So four fair to be outwardly telling mix it's exhibitors what to do is interesting and also I'll say what was the question about whether he was declined for not fair as well you know. Are they all the galleries their clients or visitors that clients and in this case of the galleries client. You'll sort of telling your client what they can't really do but it's interesting you do i. Do you want with results as well. Whether you from assistant sort of perspective you see the hand of Endeavour much more clearly when it comes to freeze the need in New York. London like I feel like that's endeavors fair. So it's their local market right saying the the game this sort of pulling rank a bit more in La. Absolutely okay. And I think it actually for me. I think it is really interesting to watch because I as I said more galleries fight against the traditional fair model if they they are able to leverage this into a more multi disciplinary platform especially as there's been a lot of attention also paid to Oh experiential artworks and performance and they're blending that with film. They haven't new filmmaker award this year as well for freeze. La I think we're seeing this diversification in what it means to the present art to a large audience through what their business plan and I. I'm kind of curious to see what happens. I'm intrigued by that. Because these he's automatically forums for selling out it's a trade fair. So what does that experience you more experience you. Experience that diversification of media actually do do for the galleries for the clans is more about showing off what they do then than selling these days is that is that is that the argument that fares shifting. What they're actually full? Let's tough question I would say. I think that we're trying to figure out what exactly it's doing That's the real time question mm-hmm overall I am. This is purely my opinion but I think it's just kind of mirroring other major retail detail kind of Branding strategies especially these here in fashion and whatnot like just doing the big pop up event that draws people that gets people involved solved then you can kind of sell a bunch off the back end of that as far as I say it's like the flip side to the online the growth of online as well. You have to provide something thing to make it worthwhile to take your flights to go and see these fast as well and yes they are trade fairs but they never liked to admit that eight fast but these are trade fairs in central purposes still to sell off because they caused a hell of a lot of money to do as well so people need to sell things but for for the past decade eight also because such competition machine these fares and also because of people like us because of journalists..

Los Angeles Anna Brady New York the art newspaper Basel editor Maggie London Twenty Twenty Ben Luke Sion Margaret Carrigan Google ray Rudy fessing Nick Houser houser Sahadi
"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Going alone. You know there was a very strong work actually estimator eight hundred three fifty. Now I've actually spoken to her about this. She's she's very concerned about this it's incredibly difficult and wearing syndrome. Young artists being turned over. Because there's just it's like it's like a washing machine isn't it that's a spin cycle And if you have the right connections and you're rich enough you get in at the beginning and then you get out in time And the rest is desperate to try and by the work and usually by too late and they get lumbered with this. And it's and this. This whole cycle whole this whole dynamic is very concerned for the market. As a whole I think with calls it's just bonkers and you had a really interesting piece that you actually usually root for for the art newspaper recently which is about kind of like populace Martin tasted are How how is that? Maybe shifted over the past few few years and how is that affecting the market his younger artists. Just wondering to what extent. S- those two wills into into sex. I think banks in Kohl's very very so separate markets from the super Super Hot markets will young anointed artists from fashionable galleries. I think not slightly different I wonder how long the calls things can go on for. I'm not sure sculptures particularly interesting. There was a big painting sculpture From edition of Ten plus two is estimated mated at three hundred made eight hundred thirty six thousand That the sculptured the paintings I sort of understand and but the sculpture. I just find completely anonymous and mad. Why is that well this thing and then his time you're going to be looking at the? This is losing me a Lotta money speaking city in the cool room make you look fool. I think Speaking of cause and banks You know we're obviously coming to the end of twenty nine thousand nine here moving into a new decade. Their markets have been the most astronomical made in the last decade. Are there some other artists that you know have had a miraculous rise or miraculous fall in some ways over the past decade or any larger your trends. That you've been noticing since you know. Obviously we were in a very different financial place. Sure back in two thousand nine right after the financial crash and now we're kind kind of staring down the barrel of possible. Recession trade war is brexit. The whole Shebang wonder if you're seeing any kind of trends that you can spot okay in the last ten years of the first thing to say though of course is the that there's no The people aren't losing any money right. Yeah the guessing guessing richer and richer and richer The that the context for all this is is Thomas Spaghetti wrote the script book called capital for century and antique came up with this one fulfilled relation which is aw is always greater than Jesus returns on capital are always greater than growth which is linked to contagious so the rich get richer and richer and richer so the money is all they just they just get distracted sometimes and they're a bit distracted moments and that's that's that's the the only problem no way but what is it from. The market is blue chip off and finding new blue chip artists because house Very interesting came back to this. Aunt net report on staggered to see that in the first half of two thousand nineteen coils made mort Olshan as you'll Michel Basquiat which is a bit of a moment. Now oversleep owners of of a Big Ticket buskers. Don't want to put them on the market and they're they're concerned okay. Let's understood but with with basketball top. Ask as not coming on the market. Warhol's Kuhn's the traditional blue chip where the auction houses GonNa make the numbers. So what I have noticed is the way. They're trying in to pump up secondary names as blue chip and in London in October album. Oland suddenly be was meant to be a great artist. uh-huh so we had to deal shows. We had Serpentine Gallery Exhibition which was sponsored by subsidies and Gagosian and there was a load of Alba Roland sales. which did all right? It didn't actually have a transformative effect. I think Edry Shea last night was another example of this Now he's interesting artist in academically and in terms of art history. That's in terms of Papa. You know he doesn't have the directs. The visual impact of Warhol Lichtenstein or Allen Jones Frogman. Say but what I thought was interesting was that they gave gave that painting. Take Pride of place where the Kuhn's Bundy had been in this shrine to blue chip timeless. Ause I thought they were really pushing the envelope there but on the other hand it made fifty two million now. Is that a reflection of well. Find the histories catching up with Trichet. All this just a hell of a lot of money in California. It's probably a mixture of the two but I think the trend next decade will be. The auction house is desperately trying to find blue chip names to replace Bacon Rick to all the others and I think they're struggling because we're not living living in a great period of I would say.

Kuhn Martin Edry Shea Kohl Oland basketball London Warhol Lichtenstein Bacon Rick Thomas Spaghetti Trichet California Serpentine Gallery Exhibition mort Olshan Warhol Allen Jones Frogman the art newspaper Alba Roland Michel Basquiat Bundy
London's National Gallery plans major Artemisia Gentileschi show

The Art Newspaper Weekly

13:01 min | 1 year ago

London's National Gallery plans major Artemisia Gentileschi show

"Returned to Artemis Magenta Leschi in two thousand eighteen the National Gallery in London announced that it had bought Genta Leschi self-portrait to sink Catherine of Alexandria that work has just been on a tour of unusual British venues from Glasgow Women's library to a doctor's surgery in Yorkshire a Catholic High School in Newcastle and a prison in send Surrey Tori is now back at the National Gallery ahead of a survey of gentlest work that opens at the Gallery in twenty twenty in January nineteen. I was joined by not at Travis the National Gallery's curator of later Italian Spanish and French seventeenth century paintings to talk about Artemisia and that remarkable new acquisition the teacher. Can you tell me I more we're about Artemisia. Gentle Leschi the woman and the artist. She's obviously a name now that many people have heard of not just people sort of in the art world or interested in art and I'd I'd say that's quite a recent occurrence <hes>. She was really sort of rediscovered in a way <hes> in the nineteen seventies. She featured an exhibition in L._A.. On women artists artists and a number of her works exhibited then and so she sort of came to the fore then and number of feminist historians focused on her and her work <hes> throughout the latter part of the twentieth century but it's only really since she started being the subject of shows monographic show in two thousand and one in New York and then more recent exhibitions that I think she really came to wider public. I think now she is not necessarily a household name but I think people have heard of her a third of her as an artist but also her life story and I think a lot of the interest around her sort of people's view of her as a kind of empowered women derives from her biography rather like carbohydrate zone biographical stories somewhat somewhat sort of overshadows the art but I think Artemis as an artist now is coming to the fore and I think that's I'm looking forward to working on this show in two hundred twenty because I think it's very much focusing on her. As a painter ops you can't ignore what was happening in her life and the big events that the that obviously influenced that's how life in Harare but it is very much artistic abilities. Can you tell us something of that biography then before we get into into the to the painting the nationals occurred. Uh ultimately has seen very much as a sort of exception. I think it's important say she was quite exceptional that she wasn't the only woman autism the seventeenth century. I mean there had been other successful artists before her. Aha but she was born in Rome to Aratu gentlest who was a well established painter in Rome and a lady prudence and Artemis mother died when she was just twelve so she was actually brought up in a male household so brutal by her father and she had three brothers she was in fact one of five to two died <hes> and the brothers and Artemis rule trained by rats here in his own workshop but it's clear that she was the one that he saw had greater talent than than the brothers <hes> and a and sort of everything changed when she was raped by Agostino. Tassie Passy was <hes> an extremely successful painter of SORTA Trompe l'oeil architecture and who was working at that time without C._E._o.. On a large project the casino limousine he was brought in to teach Artemisia Perspective and he raped her <hes> and they Taylor have sexual relations for some months and then he was brought to trial buyouts and this is very famous as perhaps the most famous episode in Artemis Life because remarkably all the trial documents actually survivor a large portion of survive so you can actually read optimizes own words in the witness box and you read the accusations against us. It's quite extraordinary to have that kind of sort of documentary evidence still survive from the seventeenth century and he's effectively found guilty of de flowering her because what what is bringing against Casey is the fact that not only did he rape his daughter but he didn't do the honorable thing and marry her afterwards and this is sort of idea the lack of honor the the so dishonor on his family. That's very much motivating the trial so he's found guilty although his punishments never enforced and Artemis married off two days as later to the brother of her defense lawyer and with him moves to Florence and obviously this episode was obviously a great tragedy in her life when she describes in in her own words is really violent attack on her. It is quite harrowing but I think if that had never happened. Her life would have been very different. She would have carried John. Working probably in her father's studio in Rome but as a result herbs sort of enforced moved Florence really was the making of her and it's incredible things that how she turned the situation around and really I mean I like to think in Florence. You really became Artemisia. She found her own sort of autistic voice and it's why she really gained independence in Florence and she's there for about seven years and then she comes back to Rome very different sort of person she's very much in demand very successful and we know this from letters says from her husband that survived saying you know they've got cardinals and princes around the house all the time. She after music doesn't even have time to eat. She's so busy and then in sixteen thirty she settles also in Naples where she lives till the end of her life at least sort of twenty five years and runs a very successful workshop. I says you pretty much stays in Italy except for a brief trip to London in the late. Sixteenth extent thirties which in itself is quite unusual for women to be traveling internationally. Elaine indeed just one thing about the biography that makes her have a certain currency. Today is as you say in those documents around the trial. It's clear that she is being put on trial. In the trial and and in fact is is is tortured a- as as part of that process I mean laws be made of that and I think there's been a very much more measured reading of those documents in a wider sort of frame. If you like particularly particularly <hes> one social historian Elizabeth Cohen quite a lot of work on actually the documents relating to the trials of young virgins in Roman that period and it seems as a sort of standard way of leading these trials and actually it falls quite within that I wouldn't call it a pattern but within that but if you really read carefully the words mean she was tortured by using the which were these ropes tightened around her fingers while she was in the box but the judge also beforehand is it will right if we do this and it's clear if if you really read the the original Italian it is clear that it's in a way that they're asking if they can torch her to in a way prove her innocence in a sense sort of <hes> just to make sure that what she's saying is actually true and and it is while she's the torturing her with a C._B._S.. That she says you know it's true. It's true it's true. She repeats the what she says is true and so I think in a way it was sort of in supportive her innocence in this situation. I think you can already read in the language. That's used that. It's in a way away to catch tassie out right now. The the making of her in artistically say was was her moved to Florence say something about her experience there what kind coin of Education for instance did she did. She have there and will she in another painter studio straight away. No I think the really remarkable thing is that she sets up independently. She was trained in her father's studio. You know these sort of kind of family workshop tradition existed since the Renaissance and not just in Italy but it was often a father to Assan workshop so it's quite new female members of the family would be involved but as I say after means is not the first loving Fontana. Her father was very successful. So do you know in a way has sort of training. Rome wasn't unusual as perhaps be unusual because she was a woman but the whole learning from your father your trade from your father wasn't unusual the fact of her moving moving to Florence and having to set up independently is the thing that really made her. I think we have no real indication of having a student with with pupils assault. She worked effectively from her has junior. It wasn't her home. Her husband was apparently a painter but very sort of modest kind of renown. She was the very first female MEL member of the Academy in Florence. She was member from sixteen sixteen so you know she. She arrived in around sixteen thirteen within two three years. She's already really established herself. That's a really shows incredible determination but also kind of recognition of her skill and I think it's partly to do with her resilience. I think it will start to do with who she came into contact with in Florence. Not you say how education but also the circles. She moved in one of her great sort of protect us. There was Michelangelo Buonarroti younger who is the great nephew of Great Michelangelo and Artemis is only documented picture in Florence is in the ceiling of one hundred thirty still today and there she is alongside other Florentine artists of her of her time so she seems to have integrators of quite quickly and Florence <hes> and one of her close friends was Christopher. No Laurie won the greatest painters in the seventeenth century in Florence who is also godfather to her son Christopher so she clearly immediately set us you know sort of entered into autistic circles intellectual circles because she was a friend of Galileo and she worked for the MEDICI and did did she carry her Caravan Jasko style that she would have learned in Rome with her two phones or did she very much incorporate new styles and influences from her surrounding same sex. It's such a hot topic. That's so discussed because she has been called a chameleon and and I think as a result of this now many pictures get attributed to her that aren't necessarily by her because you can still use it as a dolphin well. She's communiqu. She changes all the time I think in the kind of broad sense she is quite community. She can adopt US style but it's part of her sort of business strategy. I think so you know she spent twenty five years. Working in Naples pictures look look really neapolitan but of course they would. She's been living in Naples. She's working for Nipples and patrons and I think when she moved to Florence. I think actually more than Caravaggio it is her father is rats. Here's pictures and rats. Here's handling of paint that's most of present in her mind and in the picture the the National Gary bought <hes> <hes> you know the thing that became very clear as as the pitcher was being cleaned as just that technically the way she paints the flash and so on. It's very ratu still very present in her mind. I think we'll sure influences. She's looking at these Florida artists. She's frequenting. She's using Carter analogy that you see in Florentine painting at that time she's also painting pictures for Medici tastes so that it also makes sense but when she comes back to Rome in sixteen twenty that's when Carava Chisholm off to Caravaggio is death ten years after is when cartridges is really the height of its popularity and I think there is definitely a renewed interest in this heightened naturalism start lighting and you can see that in the pictures of the sixteen twenty s can can you say more about the circumstances in which he would have created the specific work which the national now has well. The conservations been really interesting because you know I think a lot of living has been spilt on Artemis but not a huge amount of being written about her technique and I think this is actually played such an important role in actually understanding after media. It's been a lot written about you know dating's and attributions and also sort of the Mall gender-specific interpretation of her pictures in the iconography but I think had technique is absolutely fundamental understanding astounding to me. It's not Jason. Weeding out the pictures that aren't by her that are currently sort of sitting in this sort of limbo so during the conservation the National Gallery painting. We noticed similarities with obviously rats. Here's painting technique we notice differences. The pictures very closely related to two paintings one. That's in Hartford <hes> Connecticut at the Wadsworth which shows is a self portrait of her playing the lute and the other is a sin Catherine in New Jersey and the the suit of similarity between these pictures is not just sort of superficial fullness similarities but she's taken direct borrowings from one and the other. This is almost kind of amalgamation of these two other pictures which she knows sheds. It's light on her practice. You know how did she did. She transfer these designs to choose tracings. I mean we know how far the rats here uses tracings a lot <hes> did she have these three pictures which is in the studio once <hes> did the pro sort of composition evolve in the national painting. Does she know exactly what she was doing. From the very beginning I mean there are certain technical aspects of the pitcher the suggest it did evolve into Katherine. I'm perhaps didn't start its life as Catherine so I'm very interested also in how she uses her own image so the picture in halt that is clearly a self portrait very characterized face and all is a little bit idealized and I think there's been too much discussion in the post about whether picture easel isn't a self reporter. I think there's a kind of disguise self portraiture in a lot of her works where <hes> she would clear have expected people to kind of vaguely recognize her features a note. It was painting by women of a woman who looked like Artemisia but it doesn't necessarily have to be a self Putin a very literal sense. I think that's that's a really interesting aspect isn't it because how much of it is in that is almost like an advocate for for her capabilities and also for for her personality for her strength or strength of character and it's very easy easy to read biography into it isn't it because it's such a striking image and we know about this history of hers. Yes I mean I've had inquiries from the public. Since we announced the acquisition was saying you know other you know signs of torture on her fingers.

Florence Artemis Rome National Gallery Naples Artemis Magenta Leschi Tassie Passy Italy London Harare Caravaggio Artemis Life Travis The National Gallery L._A Alexandria Newcastle New York Genta Leschi
"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Yeah. These people put Costes brought to you in association with Bonhams auctioneers since seventeen ninety three to find out more visit bombs dot com. Hello. It's the art newspaper coast. I'm Ben, Luke. Thanks for joining us later in the cost. I talked to Christopher Spencer. The man behind this tirico images that are taken Twitter by storm over the past couple of years under the name, Cold War. Steve capturing perhaps more acutely than anyone else. The madness of Britain in the Brexit era. But I this week. There's no doubt what the big cultural stories the fire not Dom in Paris, which United many of us in despair at what appeared at one stage to the destruction of one of the world's greatest monuments to human civilization. It turns out, of course, that much of the building was Mercifully saved. Jonathan Foyle is an architectural historian writer and broadcaster. He's a former curator of historic buildings at the historic role. Palacio the UK and has written books on England's greatest gothic buildings including the cathedrals in Canterbury and Lincoln Jonathan joins me on the line. Now Jonathan we were all in varying states of despair on on Monday night. It seems like it's not as bad as we at least one. In point were fearing is that your assessment. Of course, the first impression is one of two chaos, and destruction and despair. And of course, you can't predict the outcome with a with a fire that big in that fierce one tends to anticipate the worst with a large building like that. It's a very complex picture. We can look back on other examples of major buildings that suffered FIS like Windsor Castle in nineteen Ninety-three. And of course, we're out the other end of that. And we can see the silver lining of archaeology. We can see new design and new chapter life at Windsor. But the point of damage to what extent it is a wound or whether it's crates the entire collapse of the building. Of course, you cannot anticipate that and frankly, it's still too early to say what the extent of the damage is. We tend to think the next morning when the smoke clears all the wiser. But in fact, that's when the. Alice's starts to begin. Indeed. So what do we know at this point? What what damage you? Are. We certain has been done. Okay. Well, it's again to Hobbs with great buildings like this we've seen numerous cathedral fires in the twentieth. Century through war, the roof rigs ample Reims cathedral was lost during the first World War. So we have seen the complete loss of volts coming crashing down into Checchi's wool still stand in the reconstruction of votes in the refurnishing of those churches is part of the story of the twentieth century. We've seen for example, utter destruction places like Coventry where a new building has replaced the shell. Now in this case what we're looking at with gothic buildings is something quite new because this is not bombing an Tillery fire as seen in the twentieth century. It is a fire on the. The roof which is a forest of timber in the French coast cool at Ruth the forest and when limestone reaches temperatures of something above nine hundred celsius. It's does to Kelsen. This is where the complications come in. Because the damage is immediately obvious the council nation is the chemical change of limestone that he begins to change to kind of powder. Basically, the constituent of mortar. Now, there's another issue, and that is intense heat on volt which seems to be the savior of this of this thing seems to protected much of the interior of of Notre dumb will actually when you subject a volts like that too intense hate and then pump thousands of gallons of cold water on it. You can end up with a lot of heat fracture. And of course, then there's a long cooling down process from such temperature take several days to cool down. And it's in that time. That one shouldn't be surprised to find further volt collapses. In fact, that's what happened when the fire was out still smoldering, that's when the crossing of volt seemed to fall in. And of course, we know that they're they're other holes where the volt Webb has collapsed. It may not be the end of it. Because the process of the building cooling down settling again and trying to rebalance those stresses is an ongoing issue, and in particular, that's the case with these giant gothic buildings because they are in engineering terms their network of captain equillibrium, the cage like structure is close to home together. Because the way to those volts pushing outwards counted by the flying buttresses pushing the weight in to create an eco Librium forces now when you take away half of the weight than the other half wants to push in into the void. And that's. No doubt part of the equation that structural engineers having to wrestle with. What is the effect for the first time ever of the loss of weight from those volt webs having disappeared? What does that do to the full season the outside of the building pushing in? So what I'm saying is yes, we've seen destruction before, but the destruction hasn't ended yet not until the building settled down and until structurally in engineering terms, it stabilized Oviously like any very oh building to dumb has been through

Jonathan Foyle Twitter Christopher Spencer Windsor Castle Costes Luke Reims captain equillibrium Windsor Lincoln Jonathan the art newspaper Steve Britain Paris Canterbury Palacio writer Hobbs Alice
"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Yeah. Each people house brought to you in association with Bonhams auctioneers since seventeen ninety three with experts more than sixty categories of collecting it specialists will connect you with your passion. Find what defines you at Bonhams dot com. Hello and welcome to the art newspaper put cost. I'm Ben, Luke. It's our last podcast of twenty eight teen as we did last year. We're going to look at the top art world stories of the last twelve months later in the podcast also to Nancy Kenny and Margaret Carrigan from anew York team about the big issues in the US and the Americas. But I I'm joined in our London studio by Martin Bailey. Melanie girlies Martin's long-term correspondent for the newspaper based in London. He's also the author of a number of books. The most recent being starry night fangled at the asylum. Must also has a blog all about van Gulf on the newspaper website melanie's, not market columnist of the financial times and at the newspaper, and she's the author of artisan investment survey comparative assets, we're going to begin by talking about the story of the year from last year as well, which is the Leonardo sale last year. Christie's New York for four hundred fifty million of Salvator of the Salvator Mundi. You might one might have imagined that after the gavel went down, and we. Learnt who had acquired the work that the story would dim down. And it would just be up to the public to look at it. But Martin as you know from the story that you've written in December issue of the newspaper. There are still lots of questions abound about this work. Yes. And particularly on the provenance, and obviously we want to trace back as far as we can. Ideally to Leonardus studio. And when Christie's sold the painting, the produced a very large insubstantial special catalog with chapter or section on the provenance, and they argued that the pitcher had belonged to Charles I of England now that gave it a wonderful British Royal provenance, and it got back not quite Leonardo time. But quite a long way what we did in the newspaper in the December issue with to reveal that it may not have been in the British Royal collection because there is another painting in Moscow in the Pushkin museum of the similar subject. The Salvator Mundi, and it's no longer believed to be by Leonardo. But it was believed to be by Leonardo in the nineteenth century and on the back of it. There is the on the back it so wouldn't panel this the stamp or emblem of Charles I and therefore the references in the Royal inventories may. They refer to the Moscow pitcher and not to what we now. Call the ABA Darby pitcher. That's why because there's this reference to a piece of Christ isn't there in the in the role inventories which were made when chose the I was executing. There was the come. We'll say exactly Christie's obviously seized upon that say that's Archer which was selling. And obviously the cashier that being a role collection added to its value. So what what are the implications of this information? Well, I think the experts of fairly universally. Agreed. It is indeed a Leonardo. I mean, the Ressam question about the exam proportion of the work. That's by the masters handle the studio. So I don't think there's very much serious question about the tribunal. But the is serious questions all the are serious questions about the provenance and where it came from. And it is interesting and important to establish that and all sorts of theories flying around as to exactly how it ended up. In the nineteenth century in collection. And then, of course, we know little bit more about disappearing to America and turn up in an auction in New Orleans where it sold for a pittance. There's this other question, which is that is now in the collection of a museum. The Louvre Debbie soom. So what we assume? And yet it has not gone on display, and there have been announcements made which I think it was in September said it. It's been delayed its appearance. So there was speculation that it might be put on view on the anniversary of the opening date of the leave every Dahbi, but that doesn't seem to have happened. What's going on? Well, I think this is one of the mysteries essentially going to take over next year rather than the past year that we're reviewing, but it is most bizarre that the picture was virtually mcquaid by Darby, and then not put on display and they've made no announcement as to what is happening or or or when it will go on show. I mean, we can speculate speculation isn't very useful. But there's obviously possibly a legal problem over ownership possibly possibly some problem over payment. But there's no indication of either of those things some people have suggested that. The painting might need further conservation work on it. But if so you'd expect them to be quite open and to say, you know, we're doing conservation work doing x and y to it, and it will go on display in the spring order and the final question is is you know, other questions of attribution about it. And they haven't really been seriously raised, but it is most mysterious, and I think we'll just have to wait and see what happens or else, maybe the art newspaper do some digging. You're in touch with auction houses time, what Christie said anything about it. Then not saying I think official, but I my understanding is the sale has gone through Christie's has been paid which when it sold for four hundred fifty point three million dollars is quite an important thing to have happened. But I can't prove that other people in the market say could, you know, the the issue could simply be that these things take time, but I agree with Martin. If that is the case, then why not be open about it. We're not even sure where it is. That's the big question. I mean, the being rumors that might be in Switzerland. And we're hoping that it was being kept in the proper environmental conditions next year is going to be something of a loner though extravaganza because it's the five hundred anniversary of his death. Martin. Do you think some occasion will be found in twenty nineteen on which we will finally see this tool Mundi in? Space whether a lot of exhibitions organized for the anniversary. But the most important will be that organized by the Louvre. Which of course, ends the Mona Lisa among other pitches. And it's known that they want to borrow the Salvator Mundi. And there's no reason why they shouldn't have access to it as it supposedly live Abreu Dombi. So they're going to want the pitcher. And if they show the painting, it will actually give more status to it. It will show that it's been accepted by the French experts. If it doesn't show up in Paris, and I think the show is next autumn. There will be even more questions than we're all skiing. Now watch this space there mainly oversee that was an extraordinary price. How has the market responded in two thousand eighteen and we seeing similar extraordinary process rather things we haven't seen anything like

Martin Bailey Christie Salvator Mundi the art newspaper Leonardo London Charles I Americas Moscow melanie Luke York Louvre Debbie soom US skiing Pushkin museum Leonardus studio Nancy Kenny
"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Benny Syrian-Lebanese Jourdain's, John John is to cut people out like this like piece of cake again, like the colonial people did this to us. Now, we are doing this to others. I mean, it's really really harsh unacceptable. You have families who are have beheaded his half. So these children are being born where they have to go to Saudi Torri Renner renew their passwords. So I mean, it's really unacceptable. I think. Thriving? And of course, everything is seeing from that angle on and I think for them it's very important to achieve things beyond those borders. And I understand, but so every country has its political agenda and things that you don't understand are not revealed. And I don't think any country is innocent of anything. From all those regions. So but. If you want the Matt have and artists who work with, but the collection of Madhav is really important. They have like artists such as engineer LA tone, which is from Egypt. They have an she's really, you know, a very important artists. They have like that where they're they have on tomb have shitting shot from Iran. It's a really international has this Middle East. But it has. But lection artists, of course, from the region, and you notice when you're there, and here also that this far of the world is really it's really very interesting in all those connections. And it is a Twas port is a port harbour where things come in and things get mixed in with harbors. You always have that chance of mixture an opening up. So. Usually unless there's an embargo force much harder. But hopefully, come. Yeah. I mean, there are wars everywhere today. So I don't know. Yeah. Thank you. Retooling, terry. The center is now open to the public and Muneer Al souls autism room at the center is on view until the ninth of February her show, I strongly believe in our right to be frivolous. Is it matter in Doha until the sixteenth of February? And that so for this week, if you haven't already do subscribe to the podcast, let us know what you think on Twitter where you can follow us Aktan Odia. That's at ta audio. Mine Twitter account and Facebook at the newspaper, and you can find us on Instagram at the art newspaper dot official, and you can

Twitter Saudi Torri Renner Benny Syrian-Lebanese Jourdain Muneer Al Aktan Odia Middle East John John Iran Madhav Egypt engineer Matt Facebook official
"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

08:37 min | 2 years ago

"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"You can read more on this story at the art newspaper come and in the Catholic, the exhibition early Gainsborough from the obscurity of a country town. The show opens gains perhaps sub Bree on the twentieth Tober and continues into seventeenth February. Now we thought we'd use this opportunity to talk to the art historian Ben Dor, Grosvenor regular contributor to the art newspaper about gains more widely bender joins me on the line bender, what do you make of this story about the murders and how that affects how we now see him? Oh, I think it's fascinating evidence. I mean, I'm I'm always impressed when people find out things like this, and it's also surprising in the way that it hasn't come out before. That might reflect on some of the sort of wider research skills of of art historians. But it's really interesting. Whether it makes us look again at gains early pictures. I'm not so sure. It depends how far you won't go into his psyche ready. Probably I think I think in terms of his early development, I think there are more important things like the the handsome in Unity's it. He had access to when he married his wife in seventeen forty, six, the images, mature of juke. She brought with her new two hundred year, and I think that probably allowed him. You know, more freedom to do development as an artist's than than the legacy given to implies on core of just thirty quid. And if if these murders had had an impact on Gainsborough immediately, I think we saw would have heard about it by now. We'd see something in his pictures. There's no hint of of of murderous struggle in any of his. That's right. I mean, when when things about it when things about grace and in the landscapes extrordinary fluency of his language and there isn't much angst is not. There isn't the only thing one might say is that you know, we have all those charming stories of of Gainsborough playing truant in his early life from school and going into the field to to draw a treason and landscape in maybe that was the reflection of of a turbulent domestic lifestyle. And maybe that's why he felt he wants to get out of the house and spend time time amongst trees, which wished dog your back is intriguing question. Let's look early gains in the context of his life because you know. You know, I love those later pictures and the the kind of fluent language of those those these later works. But certainly I find his early works. If if promising I find them quite stilted and difficult to look at in lots of ways. What, what, what do you make of them overall? I know I love against pro. I did little especially games for some some years ago in London with Lindsay Stainton. And I think actually his his, his early landscapes amongst his best, this sort of pure in a way there's less sentiment about them. And our love is only portrait to is as sort of almost caricature figures that so expressive. There's none of the weariness about his some of his later portraits. You know, when you know he famously says he gets bored of painting faces. You don't get that sense in his early portrait. So I am a great fan. Is there a sort of. A clear path between the early in the late pitched you see, stall developed very steadily or their giant leaps in his career. Well, that's extrordinary thing about gauge bazaars development is is really quite varied. And the fact that when he dies apart from his pupil bridge upon nobody is really able to carry on what we call, you know, gains per style, that sort of feathery staccato take Nique and that in turn is so different from his early works, which are very, like Hayman who goes that sort of style. So he is an artist who really quite dramatically. And I think that reflects his sort of rather curious, unconventional personality. He was very witty personally, never minded being rude to even the grandest of his patrons. He was fond of the bottle and so on and so forth. That's an interesting fact there is this sort of. Battle the heart of eighteenth century painting as it's been characterized between Gainsborough and Reynolds and gains was perceived as sort of free spirit and more natural and all about sensibility. Whereas Reynolds doctrinaire and all that kind of stuff. What do you make of that is some of that myth? Will you even get a sense? It is. It's a famous thing about artists being great rivals. We we see that today and it's all great for publicity and hive up for Monday's gains rentals, kind of new, wanting each other up and getting articles on the press. Did them both good deal of favor. I mean, they did have a famous rapprochement and and Reynolds board games was pictures and gains record as being a great admire actually of how various Reynolds technique walls. I have to say probably in the end, I'm I'm more of a gains per person because I find him an artist of greatest sensitivity. I think you know Reynolds. Mr. grant, Matt or anything being very grant and imposing he's, you know, he's the night. He surprised roll academy. One guest slight sense that he slightly constrained by that, whereas gains more the free spirit, a new c. in this marvellous portraits of his daughters. You see in artist, great sensitivity, and of course we mustn't forget, you know, he'd been, he'd lost child very early on, and I think all of these things make him slightly more rounded painter. I wonder if one of the other things that attracts you to gangs above Reynolds is also his gains was clear. Love of vandyke use of couse. Your great hero. Oh, yes, absolutely. And if I lost that long to be surrounded on my deathbeds by adoring family, I'll be echoing gains passwords, which were were all going to heaven and vandyck is of the party. Can you sort of detect the clear Mark Van Dyke in his work in terms of the language. I think you can in certain of the poses in the cage Nally. He indulges in Van Dyke dress, but for me, it's more on the technique gains does go for that sort of thin, lazy application of paint. You see in fantastic's later English works in particular. And of course he does lots of copies of Van Dyke and what what I think there are clear echoes in in canes, prevent Dyke's both artists in order to get through vast numbers of patrons Sapp before them developed a very speedy style painting. And has basically how the only way they could cope with it on both pulled it off Ray successfully. We should point listeners in direction of some of the best paintings that they can see in public galleries. I can think oversee the National Gallery has the most extraordinary creation in London, but there's also the picture gallery. Where else would you recommend that they go wherever you know in the states or in the UK. Is was house. There's the Frick collection way. You'll see those series of wonderful lengths which are not any brilliant books about, but also in ever accuracy to conditions. So they shimmer in the way against when he's working does? Yes. The remarkable things in the Matt has a a decent gains collection to from right. Yes. If you go around the man at his, it's amazing how that huge galleries devoted to English artists eighteenth century against Reynolds, Anne Rumney. And it's a real reminder of how English eighteenth century porch dislike gains per took America by storm. In the first part of the twentieth century. Mendel thank you very much for joining me. Okay. Find

Reynolds Gainsborough Mark Van Dyke the art newspaper London Bree Ben Dor Van Dyke UK National Gallery America Lindsay Stainton Nique Mendel vandyke Hayman Mr. grant Anne Rumney
"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

11:38 min | 2 years ago

"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Starry night. Van Gogh for the asylum is published by white lion publishing the herbeck is twenty five pounds and it's valuable. Now you could also read Martin Bailey's weekly blog adventures with van Gough at the art newspaper dot com. And Martin Bailey is also co. Q. rating take Britain's exhibition fan, Gough in Britain. Opening in March. Next year. Martin gave us the yellow house is still imprint of years after it was first published and his latest books are modernist Mavericks bacon. Freud hooked me a melon painters published by Thames and Hudson, and Lucian Freud, a two volume opus published by fighting. I'll be back to into Krisztian Markley after this. The art newspaper podcast is brought to you in association with bombs this year. The hundred fiftieth anniversary of the Meiji restoration. Key event on depends path to modernism out when the militaristic took go as shogunate, which will countries in sixteen hundred income semi constitutional government under the emperor Meiji in the new capital Tokyo to celebrate this verse. We Jeff Olson ritual Japanese autobahns New York of a twenty treasures Japanese metalwork from a private collection. One of the highlights of the auction was an outstanding bronze. Incense burner with a classical style winged Pegasus motif, not seen in traditional Japanese. Now earlier this week, Christie, Mark lease the clock opened at Tate. Modern this twenty four hour video installation is a moving image Co. large pondering thousands of clips from one hundred years of film and television history that depict clocks or reference time. One of the first masterpieces of twentieth century art. It was made in a three year period between two thousand seven and two thousand ten. It premiered at the white cube gallery in two thousand ten and has since been shown all over the world to enormous public and critical acclaim, potato quiet work with this entrepreneur in Paris and the Israel museum in Jerusalem into twelve and this is the tights first showing the work in a dedicated space and its new extension. I went to take modern early this week to Christian. Christine, the clock as far as I was made in London, and yet it's the first time that it's been shown a tight model, which is the national institution of of of modern art in London. Does it? Does it feel like hung coming for this work. Spend eight years since it was shown in London, so very excited to have it back here. Yeah, it was made in London. It features big Bama lot. And. It's exciting, especially in this new building, and especially the fact that it's free and people can come back to it as as many times as they want to. If the if they're lucky enough that there isn't too much of a cue, the fact that it was made in London. I wondered if that affected the actual nature of the clips that were used in the sense that you had you and a team of people research. Do you feel that some of the inevitable? So to buy a series of collections of videos in London affected the nature of the material with anywhere? Absolutely. Yeah. I mean, it's very much in a way. Portrait of all the video rental shops that have since disappeared in the last ten years, or you know, gone, everybody downloads their films. So it's very much about what was available available in London during those three years. That was making the clock. Yeah, very much. So. And and like I said, Big Ben, a lot of a British movies were featured in and. Because they were available. And of course, they if if the action happens in London, you pretty sure there's gonna be a Big Ben shot. Tell me about the process between conceiving of this idea and the actual making of it. Was that a speedy transition, or did you have to Mallow over how you going to do it for quite a while before you actually put it into action. I have one year that I was just basically messing around to see if it was possible. I didn't believe it was. I didn't totally believe it'd be possible and only after a year of experimenting finding material and seeing how I could put it together to make an interesting series of sequences and into blended all together. Yeah. So it was bit of a gamble at first and but it it worked out after year was convinced it could be done. And if I was missing a minute, I could find a way to. Replace it with something else. You know, did you find yourself so the carrying like Booker remedy will noting down moments in films that you've seen the clock call? No, no. I didn't watch any of the films I just edited. I was busy enough doing that, and I had a bunch of assistant who. Were watching films on day and bringing me these these clips. And now I was I was totally focused on the editing and finding ways to link all these fragments into to create this illusion of continually. And that was in a way that the more interesting part I think of kind of knitting all this fabric. I mean, I think that's that's one of the most joyful things about this. It's not just a selection of random clips of certain times of day. You've actually found ways to almost correct mini narratives between the individual clicks in a way. That's the most inspiring part of it from my pun view. Yeah, but you know when because everything is sink to the present, so I tend to him, I will, of course, see a lot of similar action taking place at ten AM and finding the links between these these clips is sometimes easier. I mean, if if it's noon and everybody's eating or starting to cook, you know, there's a lot of scenes happening in restaurants kitchens. So there is. It's easier to link them. And yeah, midnight. There's a lot of clips. Of course. I mean, the, there's always a build up in a way to the hour because that's the material that I found. So I had more choices, you know, leading up to to the hour being midday or midnight. Or three in the afternoon or three in the morning. That was a bit harder though three in the morning. It's different sort of Pisces occurred during the films they sort of, you know that you have long sometimes longer sequences clips. It's sort of love, but then these amazingly frenetic moments of activity. Yeah. I mean, it's very much based on the material that I found and. You know, sometimes the hardest I think was just before five AM from, let's say, three to five at five AM everything starts people wake up. They go to work. And, but after three. It gets a bit tougher for two five is difficult, but it's also just before you wake up is the time when you dream a lot, and there's a lot of fabulous dream scenes in history of film that I could use. And those maybe fillers when I couldn't get the exact clock on the bedside the before the alarm clock went off. But there's a lot of things idea. Lot of people unable to sleep tossing around hearing sounds. So I was always a way to to fill that time. I wonder about during the editing process would affect it had on your mind? I mean, we having strange straightens at the time that you doing the editing? No, it was more physical. You know, being in the same position editing sitting down front of the computer. I had some problems with my hand after seven point calluses. I had to start yoga to relieve the tension and which was a good thing because I still do it. So physically it was it was tough. And now it's been ten years since I started or eleven years since I started that project. I don't. You know, I find sitting front of computer all the editing more and more difficult you know and the origins of this worker manifold, but there were still seeing it seems to me. So the two landmark moments one is the nineteen ninety five film telephones. And then video kotecki which seemed like a big leap in the direction of the clock is, is that the sort of secrets that you are? Did you see? All is continuum from your very earliest experiments, collage music. Yeah. I mean, all these, these things influence my way of working and definitely the. DJ and sound editing. I always been, you know, collage fragments from from found sounds so that was very much there and especially in the soundtrack, which is so important and. You know, it really came out of that experience and and and that that knowledge that you can sort of force things together, even if they don't quite fit and try to make something interesting out of all these fragments. And yet telephone was my first kind of video. Collage and video quartet was also quite a an important piece. And yeah, that led to the clock. Tell me about the importance of muscle de show in terms of the aesthetic of your work run away through into, in other words, the found objects in how that sort of is to fundamental principle of your work to certain degree. Deschamp is gnarly, said Meyer lart, and he has opened a lot of doors away, allowing us to work with whatever is in front of us and and.

London Van Gogh Martin Bailey Lucian Freud Krisztian Markley Britain The art newspaper Big Ben Tokyo Israel museum Hudson Jeff Olson Jerusalem Bama Meyer lart Mallow Christine Paris Booker Christie
"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Masterpiece favors from the twentieth of genes the full of july and now from the queen of performance out to the king of pulp this week the national coach gallery launches its latest buster which takes it subject the pop culture phenomenon that is michael jackson the show entirely on the wall clues works by four our tastes from anti warhol to ease against capture the musician ability ny korn all his guises touching on his trials as a child performer his metamorphosis into the king of and his ever changing african american identity taking on this hugely influential and at times controversial figure is a bold move i went to the national portrait gallery to meet the curator nicklaus callanan and discuss jackson's impact on our so dr callanan this is such an original concept that were will appeal to all sorts of audiences how long have you been in this idea well i had idea but almost ten years ago and when i was working on an exhibition at tate modern pop life which was about andy warhol and his legacy and in doing the research vacs vision i began to realize how many autism whoa ho on had been drawn to michael jackson had depicted him and so that's the idea i began i've been nurturing it for quite some years it's interesting you you've said previously is rare that there's something new to save someone so famous but year that is the case he's a cultural phenomenon who he died in two thousand nine is he an autistic phenomenon nothing well i mean i think two things to say to that number one is that i don't think before this exhibition the the impacted hads in this fear of contemporary arts had been really remarked upon in any substantial way and in fact even the michael jackson the states weren't aware of it obviously knew about his impact and legacy in this fear of music dance and choreography in fashion but not in terms of contemporary arts so i think that's one thing but the other thing is just not just the caliber of autism have been drawn him depicted him but just the sheer number of artists from different generations out just working across the globe in different mediums often with very different perspectives so this is not about any one person's take of michael jackson's and especially not my own but it's really about a multitude of different perspectives and voices coming together to think about what he symbolized and in a way it's about michael jackson but it's not about michael jackson's about the image of michael jackson what that meant to many different people at different periods and just the other thing i would say is that as far as i'm aware in terms of let's say cultural figures i think he is by far and away the most depicted i would imagine the second figure intensive just again caliber quantity of artists would be similar marilyn monroe think about the images made of her by warhol or by pulling boaty by richard hamilton but i mean this is forty authors and it could have been even more so what what has the research process been like has it been easy to find the works this a real discoveries few in the show yeah well i just typed in google michael jackson artists and that's what you see no there was so over the last ten years i've been keeping notes and obviously i knew the warhol was the first artists who've been drawn to him in nineteen ninety two and of course they knew each other and as a whole room in the.

ten years
"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"To be a consumer and never entered my head that the two can somehow bef used in any way it just seemed they seemed alien worlds but it also seemed early moves because i never thought that this was these were avenues that i would be allowed to pursue you know to to walk down to you know because i think already by then you were becoming aware as a young personal collar there are certain protein patience let's say prescriptions about what was possible in what was to remain impossible in your life and so i think then waking up to the possibility that that there was a a prologue to be written first act to be to be undertaken which would involve clearing some space for that the the involvement the neither feels to be possible and he's only really much later that i started to be where they were these affinity especially as i watched more and more films you started to see the ways in which you know directors photography or filmmakers where drawing from from the quota world and was only that i thought okay this is this is a possibility and if it's a possibility than one needed to look at it very concretely at something received but that was in my twenties i wouldn't i didn't think anything like that was possible before no thank you so much for talking to me pleasure take okay confront signs of empire continues until the second of september the nimes eum in new york city and that's it for this week do subscribe to the podcast if you don't ready and let us know what you think on facebook or twitter at the art newspaper you can find our instagram posts at the newspaper dot official thanks for listening.

facebook the art newspaper official nimes new york twitter
"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Yeah. These paper put cost brought to you in satiated with Bonhams with a historic and modern equally valued. It's the art newspaper weekly pulled curse with me Ben league. Thanks for joining us this week with o'casey again on the art market and looking at very different ends of it will look at the results from one of the most hotly anticipated options in recent years that David and Peggy Rockefeller sale, which took place earlier this week. We talked to an art market economist about what such cell, say about the market as a whole. And we talked to a gallery who has a small space in of all places. Piccadilly circus tube station. I, though the Rockefeller auction, regular listeners will know in February we interviewed the roof Avella arc of is Peter Johnson about the collection of Peggy and David. Rockefeller, what's been taking place all this week. And I should say that we're recording this Wednesday afternoon. So if anything spectacular happened since and forgive us for not mentioning, but the main event of the week was always going to be Tuesday nights auction of nineteenth and twentieth century art, featured forty four works by. Leading figures from della through Koro many Monay Gauguin Picasso Matisse and many more and the auction as expected set a new record for a single owner sale raising six hundred forty, six million for various charities designated by the late couple. The biggest sale of the night was a Picasso girl with a flower basket. Arose period painting from nineteen zero. Five owned by Gertrude Stein, and then acquired by David. Rockefeller sold for hundred and two million dollars in the sail room rising to one hundred fifteen with fees. His Peter Johnson talking about that painting in February, but it was a great story. The fact that this girl with a basket of flowers had to owners in the twentieth century and that was in and into the twenty first century makes it a remarkable thing. And it's a remarkable painting as well Judean Adam who's the author of big bucks and dark side of the boom to looking at the explosion and the accessories of the art market. This century is with me now Georgina six hundred forty six million. It has to be regarded as a big success. Doesn't it? Oh, absolutely. Yes. If well, well over the presale estimate and of course it's only the beginning because as an enormous amount of Rockefeller consignments to come as part of this huge one thousand six hundred lot sale. And the idea is that it will probably Fitch in total around one billion or even go over. Well, it's actually it's bit was step up. You've still got to make another three hundred fifty million. And the rest of the consignments particular things like furniture silver are not fashionable. So Christie's is being under a bit cautious about that. They don't like you to say a billion we shall see now. I'm just looking at the results from Tuesday nights auction. It seems very front loaded since that all the big prices happened in the first most of the big process happened in the first half and then it sort of rather sacks towards the end. Is that fair? Yes. I mean, I don't think that sagging entirely. Covers of senior puts making thirteen million, you know, or. Or Kandinsky. That makes six point. Five million did very well as well. But yes, compared to the fireworks at the beginning, these huge prices that were made eighty million over eighteen million for that wonderful sense. US Matisse the thirty five point. One million made for my particular favorite. The Gauguin lavar which was an extraordinary picture and went way over its us too much which was published was it was a what they call a whisper estimate. It was on request, but it was seven to ten million compared to those huge prices. At the beginning, it's true that some of the works towards the end didn't do as well, some of them wind underestimate. But you have to think that there was really what the French colon Ombo hurdle. He shares. There were so many good works coming on the market all in the same time, and it is conceivable that there was just too much that bias had to make the choice and have. Being

Peggy Rockefeller Rockefeller auction David Monay Gauguin Picasso Matisse Peter Johnson the art newspaper US Gertrude Stein Ben league Fitch Gauguin Georgina Christie two million dollars
"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

13:38 min | 2 years ago

"the art newspaper" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Living with Leonardo is out now and published by tens in Hudson. Now, the three hundred addition of the newspaper is just out the paper was first published in nineteen ninety, and it seemed enormous changes in the world. Since then I spoke to its founding editor now chair of the art newspaper and his cokes, and it's the three hundred addition of the newspaper. Can you describe why you wanted to start the art newspaper in the first place? I wanted to start it because at the time I was the editor in chief of Apollo magazine. I realize it there wasn't such a thing as a general reader for bits of art history, and also that art history like the sciences at fragmented into different specializations Odin astroid as print sales, but even listen sewn. And suddenly this newspaper in Thailand arrived on my desk, your knowledge elastic, which had been founded in nineteen eighty three by an Italian called on Monday and. I saw new soul. This incredible wave putting the art world together what he had done. He said, what is this? It's all art as art has happening in the world as embraces. Archaeology embraces the market. Owed art, new artists, not about any single kind of autism. The visual arts and things relating to the culture pertaining to visualize including architecture Asami said, as they happen in the world and as the world affects them. So. I ended up being asked to launch the art newspaper on the model of the analogy, lasted with different kinds of stories in it. So what was the art world like in nineteen ninety? It was much smaller because the market hadn't extended it to the general public. In the same way, there was more numbers of people getting to the museum's old art. In other words, art before nineteen hundred played a much much bigger role. Contemporary was rather specialized. That's right. So would you say that to a certain extent, the art world is now I'm recognisable from the days when you started the newspaper, or is it just what it was but expanded exponentially? No, the art world has concertinaed forward as being a huge loss of knowledge and interest in art before nine hundred in fact refers about should gyros lamenting. There's a great lack of knowledge of art before nineteen forty five. It's partly the way in which history is being taught or not taught. It's partly because the huge inferences the market has made the contemporary see much sexier, and I think we've genuinely lived through a change of of EPO. For example, in nineteen Ninety-one, I started French furniture stills. Each two. Different phone show is still what which people spot live with. Well, that isn't the case anymore. Unless you have a very, very grand piece of French world furnish yourself, a lot of money. You know, perfectly decent eighteenth century French armchairs are really rather treat now. So one of the big factors in that is this avalanche of money that's coming into the art world from lots of different sources in a way, one of the great idiosyncratic elements of the newspaper is very following the money in and finding out more about that money, isn't it? So so in a sense you've been tracking those developments very carefully over those twenty eight years. I was very important to look at the market, but without influencing the rest of what we wrote about there was I say, quite sleazy art market writing at the time is still on a bit with magazines where feature revision by by about artists who are being being advertised in the same magazine that was very important to separate. But of course, y'all mart is incredibly important. It's one of the main movers. It's one of the reasons why things surface. I'm fascinated by having surface on the market was told, journalists newsies, what's happening, what you see. But I think it's not coincidental that we have had the period of Neo liberalism, which has generated huge quantities of money cash that does not equate to actual real tangible wells. And this money has been rushing around trying to find places to put itself, and we've had property boom. An art has become one of those things in which people are speculating. Now. Until the late nineteen. Ninety S there was no data on contemporary art, really contemporary art being sold at auction because it wasn't being sold at auction moment the auction started. Then you saw get prices and you could start having art indexes onto art indexes. You can stop pretending that you're dealing with a market that is like the market for showers. Would you say that the interest in contemporary art is damaging the scholarship of work before nine hundred forty five as the professor suggested, I think it's a lot of energy out of earlier research because. God quantities of money a useful up to a point, but then they begin to sort of flatten out the light on the shade. I didn't know how to put it. Exactly. It doesn't seem so sexy to go somewhere. Looking at art isn't worth a very large sum of money. So for example, perfectly decent, Hungarian artists, nobody studies them outside Hungary because there's basically no market for them. This is always been slightly the case study artists from countries youth or small countries far away, but but I think that he's dump and down curiosity. It has certainly created a crisis in universities where every all all people applying to study liter are not the only around how has the yacht newspapers reporting being affected by global events was such as the go. I go on the second Gulf war, the events of September. Eleventh. For instance, I was very struck because shortly after we started out newspaper, we had the first Gulf war. And one of the American general's said that if need be, they would bomb Iraq until it was like. Box baby powder, and I thought you can't do that. This is this is this is. Cradle of our civilization, uh, Suma and so on. So we went to ask the Pentagon with the reserve is fact where they'd given instructions and we'd they hadn't and this striking because in the second World War, the troops were given very clear instructions about which were the monuments in which places had to be avoided on. So we reported on that, and I wrote a headline which was Armageddon over Eden because the garden of Eden was sought to be in southern Mesopotamia. Other words, southern Iraq. Then September eleven's, terrible, terrible moment and bought something that suddenly kindle people's interest in this world and the Middle East, and quite a lot of the interest in the Middle East derives from that, and I suppose over the Middle East. Since then has been sort of on the one hand catalogue of tragedies of lost heritage. On the other hand, this burgeoning market burgeoning museums of burgeoning world of art in the Middle East, isn't it? Scene is the emphasis in the Middle East moved from what I call the old, our countries, Egypt, Iraq Syria, as they have gone down one by one as it were and the rise of Gulf with all its wells and it's increased fisticuffs. It's desire to have museums Louvre project, you know, the art fairs, art auctions, which being successful sanctions against Iran against Iran, which means that Iranian buys have been been buying sued by because the has not been part of the sanction system. So you have to look at the art market Innova Broadway. Another fascinating phenomenon of Saudi Arabia and the young crown prince Mohammad bin Silom. Deliberately putting four the art world in order to encourage the young young young population, and because it is actually a very good rather rather hip sort of conceptual art weather has developed quite spontaneously there through contact with the internet. And now he's going to have a lot of Royal patronage and we hope that that doesn't mess it up the to what extent would you say the newspaper is a journal of record, and to what extent would you say it's campaigning newspaper? Well, I find a gel record or something where the news in it is reliable news can be given that it's has short time. I don't think we ate, we can aim to cover absolutely everything. The. We have tried to make it very, very, very full of news. But that role is relatively on my way the website which is continual flow of news. Sometimes I'm rich, the diary of news. So I think that the paper will like most people's become more. A place where you where you reflect on things that have happened indeed. But one of the things that's striking about the newspaper is that the newspapers still very much thriving part of what we do in a world where, for instance, with national newspapers in Britain, you can just see them dwindling in terms of their importance. Do you see that continuing in the future or do you see the the newspaper may pass follow the same fate as I don't think it will because I think being monthly people are happier too. To have an actual product which is solid in the hands. You can't. You can't consult the guardian Muncie news. It would. You'd never wet, never know where it was going to stop. At least when you have a newspaper or your book, you know this page one and as page this last page, you know what the editors have decided that you, they think, you know, what do you see is the sort of continue matters of concern within the art world. I think the people only just not beating to realize the fact that work of art is relatively recent paps. Theoretically thirty years doesn't guarantee that it's Centric on the country. Quite lot of we start. He's action credibly, easy to fake. And so the question of fakes he's become key that could undermine the speculative market drastic. There's a second point, which is a lot of contemporary art is incredibly poorly made because factor has not been part of the philosophy and so once massive, massive conservation problems, for example, of graphic works already fading these limitations in you should not be able to print anymore. And then there is a greater underlying problem which derives precisely from this huge influx of money into the world which may take some of the glory of. There's been huge respect for for over one hundred years. It's been considered a kind of God sub substitute. But if it becomes too close to mammon, then people may begin to feel at a slight aversion. You already have some rather enlightened donors who have been in the contemporary art world, like Agnes Gund, sending their works of art in. Or to put their money into. Other projects such as helping defend young black blacks, accused and not being well defended in the courts. I think this Mabel become a tendency now is maybe a good thing for the world, but it which is going to be great for the world. Now you've, you've got addition, three hundred, but you are now going to retire. Can you tell us what you're going to do. I. Somewhat reduce completely different tell you buddy, but I would like to do some very long form journalism, for example, the effects of seed aval rise on the hold of northeast. It's not just Venice, the scientists know what's going to happen, but Donna how to explain it. And most journalists don't have the time to go into in great depths, but I think that there are some topics like that that really need to be tackled, and thank you very much. Thank you for us. We just we hundred is use of the over. The newspapers. Three hundred addition is now a new conscripts the newspaper online at the newspaper dot com. And that's all for this podcast, you can tell us what you think on Twitter or Facebook at the newspaper, and you can also see our updates on Instagram at the newspaper does official. Thanks for listening next week.

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