35 Burst results for "Thanh"

Seattle-Based Boeing Max Is Cleared to Fly as FAA Lifts Longest U.S. Grounding

DeaconLive

01:49 min | Last week

Seattle-Based Boeing Max Is Cleared to Fly as FAA Lifts Longest U.S. Grounding

"Boeing seven thirty-seven max has been grounded. Worldwide following two deadly crashes. The federal aviation administration on wednesday has approved for boeing's fixes on the airplane to clear the max to return to service. So if you're traveling out there now it's not going to happen right away but just think about in the next in the next year. The long delayed approved to mean that. The max is on track to fly passengers again in the united states. Before the year's end. I don't know if i if i want to be the first guy on that blaine after each plane and pilot meets requirements by the faa laid. Out in recent weeks boeing can resume jet deliveries and production of the renton ren thanh will begin to ramp up though very slowly since the first crash of the max two years ago has discovered the problems that has delayed this movement. Ceo dave calhoun in chicago in a statement says that lives had lost in two tragic accidents lessons. Learned from the max. Crashes have reshaped our company. The faa verdict says. That the jedis safe to fly. At least beginning. Of the end of the boeing crisis. For the max. But yet boeing grapples the logistics of getting more airplanes in the air the details because of the crashes tragedy surface. Over the past twenty months boeing reputation for engineers excellence has been shattered at the faa positions. The world as the arbitrator for for safety has seriously been undermined using flying the seven. Thirty seven max in the air. But they've made some changes they put a stick of gum on it. Put some duct tape over the things that said that the plane was what was it was an ultimate thing where it didn't didn't know how how close it was to the ground. Everything was off and all of a sudden you know planes crashing. So i guess boeing is going to let the seventh or actually the the. Faa's going to let the seven thirty-seven. Max a return to the

Boeing FAA Ceo Dave Calhoun Blaine United States Chicago
CONFERENCE PREVIEW: The ACC has Virginia in the catbird seat, with Duke, North Carolina, Florida State and Louisville all giving chase

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

03:57 min | Last month

CONFERENCE PREVIEW: The ACC has Virginia in the catbird seat, with Duke, North Carolina, Florida State and Louisville all giving chase

"So in our rankings, it goes Virginia North Carolina like you pointed out after that it's Florida State Louisville but you had those in The Opposite Order Louisville Florida State I. I think you can argue either way, but you mentioned you talk to the North Carolina staffer. Recently, I talked to somebody at Florida state. Within the past week and they were openly wondering if they if this team. was going to be better than last season's team and last season's team of course, won the ACC, and so I take that for whatever it's worth but. In Tallahassee they think they've got a they think they've got a team that's going to finish. Fifth in the fourth or fifth in the ACC. What's interesting here is I know and Louisville's also. I think quietly really in on their roster I. think There's a line after Florida State and Louisville another tier if you will. When we get to the teams after that? I listen. I. Have Been Wrong about FSU LIKE I say it was good humor here but be tournament picks or general projections I have been off on Fsu more often than been correct. Efficacy was twenty, six and five when the ACC last season and lost Trent forest loss Patrick Williams lost Devin for cell I mean those are the teams four best players they're not that it doesn't still have talent but. That would be just a hell of a deal there. If Leonard Hamilton could make that happen to combine them with Louisville, real, quick I I actually think. It's I think that Louisville can be close to what Lewis last season it was ninth and Ken Palm. It went twenty, four seven it loses all five of its starters but. I just again legit because we're doing this in real time like just like David Johnson Samuel Williamson are are two names that are that in my opinion need to be on our top one, hundred one players and then they bring carly. Jones in from Radford who apparently might be their best player and You know it could be a twenty two point. Game Guy. is going to have a different look to them this season. The top of the ACC is totally fascinating I. Really do think it's Virginia and the other four we've mentioned. Almost, put them in any order. I can't quite see Louisville being top team in the league I can't get there but I think it could be super competitive and everyone below Virginia they're is GonNa make for an interesting race we had in our voting Miami coming in at six and then Syracuse at seven and it's interesting like. Last season I remember talking about this briefly and then you know pain. Democrats and everything's over. So whatever. But. Here's Syracuse. Again picked seventh in our preseason poll ACC poll. In terms of the panelists, some people had them as low as nine. I think you had eight I had him seven. So I'm more of a believer than most but. How many times do you think Syracuse has finished in the top five in the ACC in the past six seasons? Trivia Thanh. Say Zero Zero is the answer two, thousand fifteen eighth two, thousand, sixteen, Ninth, two, thousand, seventeen seventy, two, thousand, eighteen, tenth, two, thousand, nine, hundred, seventh last season six, zero, top. Top five finishes in the League Past Seasons there are twenty, eight and twenty, eight in the. Past. Three seasons they had a surprising final four in two, thousand sixteen and a surprising sweet sixteen in two thousand eighteen. So that Ma- ask some of this, but it is undeniable that. For, one reason or another you know that's one of the biggest brains in college basketball and it hasn't been operating like one of the biggest brains in college basketball lately,

Louisville ACC Syracuse Florida Virginia North Carolina FSU Basketball Tallahassee Leonard Hamilton Trivia Thanh David Johnson Samuel Williamso Jones Patrick Williams MA Ken Palm Carly Radford
"thanh" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:47 min | Last month

"thanh" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The state's new cases, despite having less than 3% of the population. Supporters of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris rallied in Manchester, New Hampshire. Yesterday. W B. C TV's Paul Burton was there on a beautiful summer like day in New Hampshire, dozens of energetic Joe Biden Emma Harris supporters. How the social distance Get out the vote rally in Manchester. This's about turning people out to vote if everyone votes Democracy wins. Senator Elizabeth Warren led the charge, urging supporters toe hold President Donald Trump accountable for his failure to handle the Corona virus pandemic responsibly. I think health care is the biggest one that's at stake right now. 210,000 people have died from an infectious disease that we should have had under control. Warren also criticised Trump for holding his own rallies. Having just been cleared of Corbett 19. He thinks about no one but himself. He puts other people at risk. Turning now to Louisiana, where reporter Thanh trunk is in Lake Charles as it recovers from storm Delta, the second of two back to back hurricanes to hit the area. Damage from Delta is now mixing in with the impacts from Laura leaving behind a landscape scarred by storms. I just love Get back in my house. That's pretty much it and get back to work that Carothers has lived in Lake Charles for 20 years. Her fatigue and frustrations likely represent the thousands of people who have been displaced from this region. Two ties in six weeks is Pretty devastated, pretty overwhelming. A man is under arrest for setting fire to some bales.

Joe Biden President Donald Trump Senator Elizabeth Warren New Hampshire Manchester Lake Charles Kamala Harris Corbett Delta Paul Burton Emma Harris Thanh trunk fatigue Carothers reporter Laura Louisiana
"thanh" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:52 min | 2 months ago

"thanh" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Thanh, You have something going on this weekend? Um, I don't know. Do I? Yes, I have this weekend. I was like, Are you inviting me somewhere? Don't No, not really. I have an Alzheimer's walk. That's usually a target field. But we're all doing it separately in our own on our own trails and things. Sure, the Alzheimer's Association you could go to my Twitter Donna dark and find a link there, and we've had some trouble raising money this year. Yeah, because of the pandemic and just, you know, It's just different now. The so my talkers are always so great. Last year I raised about 5000. Wow, It's the biggest walk in the country. This one in Minneapolis are is It's just really, really great. Usually we have different colored flowers that we carry. That signify whatever process if if they've passed away, or if they're in the midst of this or air. If the person holding the flower actually is the person with Alzheimer's got it. And they spin and it's just a beautiful walk. We can't do that this year. So we're still doing it still raising money and I could really use your How do people find the place to donate? Well, though you can go to my Twitter donot dark. Um and you can find it there. It's the top post on the air. And if you want to, if you can't do it, I completely get it If you just retweeted for me. Oh, yeah, Helpful. Absolutely. Yeah, Everybody does that. So I can't believe it's already been, like, two years. Well, yeah, it goes by fast. Yeah. Anyway, Okay, So let's help dawn out if we can't even if you just can retweet Would be great. In the meantime, Steve has some tech talk. Here's an intro pick up Nailed it. Wait,.

Alzheimer Thanh Twitter Alzheimer's Association Minneapolis Steve
Sebene Selassie on Bringing Mindfulness into Every Part of Our Lives

Untangle

05:24 min | 2 months ago

Sebene Selassie on Bringing Mindfulness into Every Part of Our Lives

"Seven it is such a pleasure to have you on untangled today. Thank you so much for being with us. Thank you, Patricia for having me. I want to start by asking you a little bit about your childhood. So why don't you tell us what were you like as a ten year old girl? How would you describe yourself? Wow ten years old. So I was born in Ethiopia. My mom was GPO Oban, my dad's Airtran, and we came to this country when I was three. And we moved into a very white upper middle class neighborhood in Washington northwest. Upper northwest DC, and at ten years old I would say I was pretty confused though. I lived at home, which was not very assimilated. So we ate you in food my parents spoke to us in. Iraq, we were part of that point small community of Ethiopian xlt now DC the DC areas large huge argest community business country. But at that time, there were only a few families and. We were all pretty tight and then my world of the neighborhood and school was very white, very upper middle class and it was confusing to move between those two worlds. So I was a Latchkey kid both my parents worked a so at ten years old coming home and spending time with my intellectually disabled sister who I felt pretty responsible for even though she's four years older than me. And I was learning how to navigate these two worlds, the world of home and Ethiopian culture and then the world of school and American media I watched a lot of TV I think I learned a lot about the culture around me from TV in popular culture, which probably not the best place to start understand your life and world so shy introverted. I was smart but did not do well in school at all at that age, and honestly, if there could have been a diagnosis at the time I was probably really depressed or at least Melancholic I. Think it had to do a lot with not understanding how these two different realities together he added. So in writing because at ten years old to feel that split between. Your experience at home in your experience at school can be so overwhelming and do you feel like you tried to Numb your feelings and just do what you need to do every day help your sister go to school what was your experience going through that time in your life I was very athletic kid at that age probably found a lot of release and any joy through sports through climbing trees through riding my bike riding skateboards soberly through my body and I lost that in my early adolescence, which is interesting. That was probably where could find a sense of belonging or connection. But in terms of school and relationships, I was a tomboy. So I didn't fit in with my girlfriends I remember going to sleepovers and friends wanting to play Barbie or dolls, and I just had no interest in that whatsoever. And I in a neighborhood full of boys. So I think I took a lot of refuge in physical play in activity and when I didn't have that I remember being numbed by television I watched a lot of TV as a kid they wanna get to this later the themes of your upcoming book and these themes of belonging and identity, and it's so interesting that. Your world was so focused on this kind of split identity as you were growing up and I think I've read that you started learning to meditate when you were a teenager is that right? What was your first experience there? Yeah. My brother, who's eight years older than me was probably as confused terms of his sense of identity and he became what's colloquially known as. Now, when I was fifteen or sixteen So my first introduction to eastern religions and spirituality and philosophy was through him and he was reading the I ching back of Gita and. Also had some Buddhist books at the time. So I started reading those things also started going to the street temple in downtown DC where a lot of punk rock kids hang out too. So it was kind of a cool scene at that point and started going to Cure Thanh chanting going to lectures and started to meditate very berry intermittently I didn't know what was doing. So by the time I got to my first year university, I started taking religion classes and ended up majoring in religious studies with a focus on Hindus men but. My entry way into, but just philosophy and thought was through that.

Patricia Iraq DC Ethiopia Airtran Cure Thanh Washington Northwest Latchkey Argest
"thanh" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:53 min | 2 months ago

"thanh" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"So our job now wealth would get in weakness. What strong and I must tell you Zoom in Pella Thanh sticking out like sore thumbs. They may crack a Monday. Would just let you know. Right now, we would have been front and center on your screens right now. Because it's easiest to isolate strength when the market's week Why also a bunch of these stocks coming in like they are. Well, they got over owned over loved an over leveraged. Remember margin. You know what greed does the people Instead of owning $100,000 worth of stock When you have $100,000 they buy 200,000 worth of stock. Soft the account If if the stocks move up, 5%. They make 10%. But they forget if they dropped 5%. They lose 10% and due to the fact fear is a bigger emotion than greed. When things go bad. Guess what happens They gotta sell off their margin. And that 200,000 gets sold down. $100,000 worth of stock is sold, but he's still fully invested. Holy crap. She got a lot of that going on. And of course, something we call coast the coast. Excessive greed will goto excessive fear without any stop in between in markets. Especially when the excessive greed leads to a lot of leverage. And a lot of what we call omnipotence. You know what that is? Omnipotence you wake up in the morning. You think you are omnipotent because nothing could ever go wrong. Because you have been right for a little bit too long. So the biggest names now are under distribution feel from bounce today on I will tell you Tesla, hanging in there like a trouper bounced up nicely, almost back to the old ties. Well, the old high school 50 to its 4 42. Out on the first drop. It was for 50. But I got 200 to 250 names now that a broken support, if not more in the tech space. With the NASDAQ And as that 1/100 just below the 50 day in the socks just below the 50 day. What does that tell you? A lot of the big names have had a lot of influence. And there's still some strength out there. I can tell you, Qualcomm strong, no problem. Crouch strike..

Pella Thanh Qualcomm Crouch
Cyber Power Index highlighting Australian Governments gaps in cyber capability

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

06:22 min | 2 months ago

Cyber Power Index highlighting Australian Governments gaps in cyber capability

"Like any INFO Technology Sector security has plenty of indexes flooding around or get. Indexes collided by vendors and people trying to sell things to us I thought this for Senate index was. Useful because it doesn't come from I accompany product. It say independent academic attempt to benchmark Com, sub security capability and intent from nation sites It appealed to make per couple of reasons may not have had A to do with Bill Center in the past spend a little bit of Thanh. Talking to their academics in previous roles and particularly locked the way that This report sets metrics that up designed to objectively major subsidy maturity in nations So it says what are the kind of things that we could judge the intent of a nation in the obscurity spice and one of the kind of things that we could use to objectively major capability. And it tells an interesting story in Australia Australia's categorized in the higher intent, low capability quadrant and the reason for that is because when the the objective metrics this reporter applied to the statements made by by government ministers by government departments, entities about what our intent is. Assab security spice. Where about the most ambitious nation in the world for ask security attend? But. Then when you look at what our actual capabilities against that intent on again measured in a series of objective metrics. We fold anti sixteenth in that space. So, FA May that told a pretty familiar story because this over promising on delivering stories. One that I think is familiar to a lot of. People in the Strand security sector. In the context of these trying government's actions since the twenty six, Day sub, security strategy. A lot of announcement to be my bet when you follow up way those announcements. In the years after that have been made you say less deleted then was announced to the media. Will what's on the industry? Kodak in the two thousand, sixteen strategy that was undefended at least out of the Prime Minister's office. This one is looking out at a ten years. The two thousand twenty strategy is looking at at the ten year timeframe. And proposing one point six, billion, dollar funding. Backdrop, but a lot of that is going into law enforcement and as you say might be into that capability. What's your take on the strategy itself? Overall as you say, it's it's another announcement is on the strategy whether it's not as another thing but certainly yet your thoughts on the strategy itself and where maybe else we could have been in twenty twenty from the twenty six danes strategies. Have you have you seen that the two thousand twenty strategy's building on the twenty, sixteen or? Taking a completely new direction. While the that, you can certainly say the why the two thousand twenty strategy is reaction to experience the twenty six strategy That the twenty sixteen subsequently strategy had a very large number of of objectives and Nisha announced under it. I think the government found the experience of trying to implement those very large number projected initiatives again, adopted under outcome Tambo's prime ministership around the breathing bruising exercise because the twenty twenty strategy dramatically rationalize is temptation I'm say that the broad spread of of initiatives and objectives under the strategy a kind of a toddler. Your decide that the Gospel confessed about ninety percent of the funding. Associated with these twenty twenty strategy he's allocated to security agencies So it goes into building. Capabilities with particularly the is day but also other security agencies on. Enforcement agencies like the the I pay, and that's well and good We have I think outstanding internationally recognized capabilities within is. and this is the conduct that you have to keep investing in order to. Maintain those capabilities in my time that that international ranking. Suppose big Criticism that that libraries had is one that we've been exploring for at the loss twelve months and that's really When you look at security policy to strike the problem is the ability to project those capabilities out of the silos of how defense and security agencies. To the problems in Australia Com in terms of lifting a bench, mock the baseline up security security. Brazil and Sada resilience across the Australian government trying economy You know there's a lot of examples of that. Wall is day is absolutely world standard. Saab resiliency combined entities is as at the government's own description reminding at relatively low levels. you know the is days top full became mandatory in the. Seventies ago now. had a slew of a straight national ordered office inquiry since then. when you type them all up on like twenty nine percent of Kamal entities compliant with all the top four. Seven years after theoretically became mandatory say interesting. Is Connect between very high capability. Inside Is Day lower levels of saga resilience and more broadly throughout government not to sign story that we see in the corporate sector unites now at banks and Al. Telcos, absolately will class intends to their sub security posture. But you only have to sort of take one stiff through the down. In the I six navy top fifty. And you start seeing. Very, different levels of resilience.

Info Technology Sector Senate Bill Center Australia Australia Kodak Australia Prime Minister Saab Tambo AL Nisha Absolately Reporter Brazil
How To Stop Lamar Jackson in 2020 (Hint: Pray)

ESPN Daily

03:36 min | 3 months ago

How To Stop Lamar Jackson in 2020 (Hint: Pray)

"So Dominique I truly hate to butter up. You're already greasy ego but I summoned you here really to discuss Lamar Jackson and so I did two things. The first thing I did was look up his forty time, which was a self reported four, three four. And then I looked up your forty time and. The Internet done. Tells me that you ran. A four, three four. Well unlike Lamar Jackson I do not have an MVP trophy to show for it. I'M GONNA say it's because the Thanh hadn't caught up I was a high school quarterback. Position I'd be doing Lamar I don't even believe that. But as for Lamar Jackson. It is also fair to say that nobody bought stock in this kid faster than you. You call them a league changing prospect. Before he was drafted, you wrote about him last year when he was on his way to becoming the second unanimous MVP, an NFL history. So what did you see that other people did not? Think that he has the set that is. Transcendent to use an overused term in sports media. I think was more important in your piece that I wrote before the draft along with me times that we talked about how important it was that he landed in a perfect situation and when he went to Baltimore. Being that it was an organization that I played in a city that I grew up in I knew that that was an organization I was smart enough to build around his skills. But back, then people didn't really think that way and they thought Lamar Jackson wasn't a guy who could fit. So he clearly does or maybe he doesn't fit but they built a team around him that would fit him, which is the way that you do with ingrate player. So looking back now on his brief time in the league so far Lamar did face his fair share of skeptics doubters any even be competent NFL. Horrific performances we had ever seen I'm a Baltimore Ravens Fan I'm concerned has got a lot to prove but now dominique based on how he season ended last year. I can kind of feel some of those same doubts creeping up again. I mean, the Ravens scored twelve points in Jackson had three turnovers in that shocking divisional round loss to the titans. So on that Game I. What actually happened. Lamar didn't play his best game, but it's unfair to hang that on the Mar and I'm sure you've heard many stats of how long it took a lot of other great quarterbacks to win their first playoff game and even make it to the playoffs but Asaf Net if you watch that game again, tomorrow perfect. But it's six drops and that defense that had been stout all year was getting run all over by their Kendrick Henry breaks the tackle thirty. Henry ten Henry down an eight yard line and they couldn't stop anybody and Lamar and a tip ball for interception. Jackson. Taxi fires down the Middle Ball ticket buyer. Need through one later that was probably his fault and gave up a sack fumble. Taxing under. Pressure. grabbed. Compost. There's a fight for it. So he wasn't perfect but I think it's unfair to hang it all on sodas. He threw some really impressive passes some of which were some of which were dropped but to be this earliest career to have as much success as he's had I think is. is encouraging,

Lamar Jackson MVP Dominique NFL Baltimore Ravens Kendrick Henry Baltimore Thanh Ravens Titans Asaf Net
The Injustices of AI

Science Friction

04:55 min | 3 months ago

The Injustices of AI

"You are about to meet to Gutsy. multi-award-winning film directors with stories that connecting contrast to incredible confronting crucial films where artificial intelligence is being used in the service of good bad and possibly plein rotten. Lucia terrorism. Sleeve those. WHO ITS MUSCLE IS INSERTED GAVE David France director of the documentary. Welcome to Chechnya went underground to document the current persecution imprisonment, torture murder of lgbt people in Chechnya and the. Going rescue mission to get them out to safety. Kid Dot as facial recognition mis identification, and then you start. To search, this is an innocent child. System is becoming mechanized shall nation Thanh Director of coded bias documents the rise of this called Algorithm, ick Justice League. There are fledgling movement with this mission to rescue us from the insidious crepe of biased computer algorithms into pretty much every aspect of our lives. Now, they films both feature at this year's Melbourne International Film Festival and they join me from a Balmy summer in New York. City thank you for having us. Absolutely thanks for having us the injustices in these films. Real and raw and happening in the world right now, and there's this. Shopping, and shocking sense of urgency in both of these films for both of us. Why are these films that you were compelled to make? Now what drove you to these stories David? This is a story about an ongoing genocidal program in the southern Russian republic of Chechnya a conflict which we were all informed about in a series of articles published in a newspaper. In Russia back in two thousand, seventeen, it produce headlines around the globe. It was a horrifying revelation of a campaign to round up and eliminate all lgbtq people living in the. Chechen republic it generated our government leaders around the world were outraged by it and demanded justice. But the story immediately fell from headlines and what I discovered some months later was that it the the crimes themselves had not stopped. And in fact that ordinary Russians were responding to this in really heroic ways I spent eighteen months embedded in his underground network this underground railroad of people who were actually physically rescuing individuals from. Hiding them. Tending to their physical wounds in their psychological ones and trying to get them out of Chechnya if and to relative safety and other parts of the world the access you got. WAS INCREDIBLE THE TRUST In Janet easing credible Shalini what about you boss is this absolutely riveting vital interrogation of the wine which machine learning algorithms are effectively shaping lives in the most potent and yet most secret ways. Why will you compelled to make this film? Well, I think all of my work deals with how disruptive technology makes the world lesser more fair. And when I stumbled upon the work of joy Leney and Cathy O'Neil the author weapons of mass destruction I sort of stumbled down the rabbit hole of the dark side of big tack and came to realize quite shockingly. that. You know these computer systems that we give our implicit trust to and entrust with such decisions like who gets hired, who gets health care how long a prison sentence on someone may serve. have. Not Been often vetted for accuracy or for racial or gender bias, and that comes across in the making of this still where. Joy Leney is just trying to make something like a snap chat filter were right? And put a mask on her face and stumbles upon the fact that commercially available facial recognition doesn't see dark faces are women accurately she's

Chechnya Joy Leney David France Thanh Director Melbourne International Film F Ick Justice League Director Russia Chechen Murder New York Cathy O'neil Janet Shalini
A Song For Peace

The Promised Podcast

05:17 min | 4 months ago

A Song For Peace

"This is the story of a song that is in a way the story of this country in the spring of Nineteen, sixty-nine at a sidewalk cafe on Richmond Street tucked in from the corner of Dizengoff. Street in Tel Aviv a twenty four year old poet named Yakov or Janka wrote Blit met a twenty five year old musician and arranger named yet year Rosenbloom and the two men became friends the cafe was called California and the. Place, itself said something about the people who made a habit of spending their days especially, their long nights there. The first thing to know about Cafe California is what it wasn't just one hundred and twenty five meters up Dizengoff was a legendary Bohemian cafe called carseat. It had been in operation since nineteen, thirty five, and since then it was the place where you can find some of Jewish palestines and then Israel's greatest poets and writers. On Alterman and Lebron's Sean Ski. Lay. Goldberg. Alexander Penn great writers who had been young and who grew old drinking coffee in the afternoon and vodka in Iraq at night at the simple spare tables of cassette alongside these luminaries in the nineteen sixties. New Generation staked claims at the table, the actor or. The singer Oregon Stein the architect Yaakov wreck there and many others cafe California was not seat from its vantage half of long block away even the young people at seat where old carseat was yesterday's Bohemia California was today's Cafe California was founded in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thousand, nine by a man named Ab Netanyahu who was only thirty two. Then that had lived a good deal of life. Netanyahu was born in nineteen twenty seven in the southwest corner of what is now Iran in a place called Abedin on the Persian Gulf just. Across the border from Bosra not far from Kuwait at six he was sent to board at Saint. Mary's a Jesuit School in Mumbai where you had an aunt, his parents abandoned. Persia. For India when he was twelve at sixteen and Nineteen, forty three, he lied about his age and joined the Royal Indo British Air Force in time after he trained to watch the Second World War wind down at twenty one he came to fight in Israel's war of independence and never left taking a job as an El Al pilot when he was decommissioned. It was with a few restless L. Buddies that Netanyahu opened cafe. California soon, it was filled with the city's young wannabe writers, directors and poets the people most eager to knock from their sinecures the city's old writers, directors, and poets who argued and held forth at carseat. Ab Thanh was a magnet for Bohemians and he came alive when he was with Bohemians, their company produced in him at once a sense of satisfaction. He had found his people but also a sense of restlessness eighty, nine ton was in constant search of his next Gig in nineteen sixty five he ran for Knesset advice of a friend who worked in PR he pledged that if he was elected, he would fly to Egypt to meet with General Nasser to seek peace after he failed to win a seat in parliament, he anyway bought a nineteen twenty seven steer. Men by playing that, he named piece one on February twenty, eighth nineteen, sixty six, he took off and flying low to avoid Israeli radars he landed in Port Saieed the Egyptians sent him back the next day Nassar had refused to see him back home a retired David Ben Gurion told reporters that not tons trip was an event of moral and political importance and quote pope. Pious gave him a medal of peace and Robert Kennedy and Bertrand Russell sought out his company not much later the notion took hold of Natanz, that music held the key to altering. Israeli. In the summer of Nineteen Sixty Nine AB NATANZ bought a Dutch cargo ship named MVP SEATO MVP stands for motor vessel and he rechristened it the MVP piece from Holland he sailed to New York to raise money and set up a shipboard radio station. His plan was to anchor in the Mediterranean outside territorial waters of Egypt and Israel and broadcast songs of peace that might open the minds of Israelis any. Alike his sojourn to New York stretched biblically three years would pass before he returned with ship in good repair with mixers, turntables, ABC cartridge machines, reel to reel tape machines, and fifty kilowatt transmitter to help not on- by what he needed John. Lennon. And Yoko Ono signed hundreds of posters of the two of them in bed in Amsterdam their famous bet in which not on sold to raise money for audio equipment. John Lennon also offered not time yet. Rolls. Royce grads to sell at auction, but the practical impediments of shipping the grand car stymied the business, the carpenters, Johnny Mathis and other musicians recorded for non promotional clips in praise of peace. Not an idea was that new music might open minds in Israel Egypt. The station eventually began to broadcast in nineteen seventy-three as the voice of peace

Ab Netanyahu Cafe California California Egypt Israel Dizengoff John Lennon Persia Bertrand Russell Tel Aviv MVP Johnny Mathis Alexander Penn Rosenbloom Bosra Iraq Yoko Ono Nassar New York Persian Gulf
The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Life Sciences

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

21:30 min | 5 months ago

The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Life Sciences

"Live. Let's kick it off as Glenn with Meta data. You're on the and business podcast. So Glenn Are we're GonNa talk a bit about the future. And we're in this wild time in your industry with the corona virus, but I wanted ground us in the now. When when you look even in the space for twenty years you look at where data are starting to transform processes in life sciences. How do you like to frame it? What's the state of affairs today? So I think if you. If you look at what happens in life sciences outside of data, we just look. People, the big trend that we're seeing is it's good trend. That's the world I. WanNa live in as a patient. Therapies are getting more. Effective therapies are getting safer, and it's because they're being designed very different. Way used to be that you try to create a therapy that worked for as many people as you possibly could, and you would maybe high fiving in the hallways. If you right for Outta ten patients, you know this. This was the world of the blockbuster drugs, and it was about as imprecise as possible like a patient has a blood pressure over this. Give him this drug. Patients got cholesterol over that. Give them this other drug, and now as you start to get into these more effective therapies because they're more precise. Actually start to create an interesting data problem, and that is you start to have smaller and smaller denominators. If I'm starting to in well, this drug isn't district people who have a blood pressure over this. They also need to have this gene. They also need to have or not have this pre existing condition. ETC, acceptance every time I come up with more criteria. The pool of patients who are going to bed. And remember. We're making things that people take. They put in their bodies, and we've to make sure that they're safe. Not just effective, and there's a good way regulatory bodies who are protecting that safety and efficacy. So now as these patient pools, who will benefit therapies get smaller. We also have smaller smaller pool of people who we can use from a research perspective would be volunteering. Stoke the specificity, which is great means that we have a scarcity of patients that we've got to deal with a new way and I think that's been driving at least I have a very kind of drug development centric view of the world. About a drug discovery. Can I find a new molecule I really focus on the will what do I? Do if I think I've got something that's going to cure this kind of cancer. Think about making more evidence, but with fewer people line. Smaller denominators I think that's a big piece of what's driving the data landscape in life sciences. The other thing that I'll tell you which is kind of interesting, is that the life sciences industry has not been really good about data, standardization and a guy. He was a big influence in the way I think about data medi data chief data officer starting from about five years ago, his name's David, Lee and He came out of the insurance industry. Any any taught me that data standardization. Doesn't sound sexy, but until you do that, you can't benchmark until you do that. You create a predictive model and the life. Sciences Industry hasn't been great about data standardization because everybody was doing stuff for this one drug in this one area, and so I see people outside of Medi data as well, but certainly the kind of stuff that we do is we try to use AI to climb that data value curve. How do we a figure out how to standardize data in different ways data from different sources about different things? Let me just give you one quick tangent example. I got asked very kindly to speak at a conference about Ab-. Stroke and I do not know anything about cardiology like I did cancer research before we started medi data I'm comfortable talking about oncology, so I figured I better. Get ahead of it if they're asked me to. Present and I got up on stage and I said listen I. Don't know anything about stroke. But if I was speaking to a bunch of oncologists, and they were trying to build a predictive model around cancer diagnosis, and they were only looking at cancer research. They're not going to be very successful because everybody already has cancer in those research studies, but if you were to be able to go and look at large-scale cardiology studies, stroke studies studies about hard tax. If I were to go, pull data from studies research about diabetes. Then I'm going to know what those patients looked like before their cancer diagnosis, and then I can start to use. Use that to build that model so when you put that Lens on things, you realize I need to standardize data across a lot of different kinds of patients and a lot of different kinds of research patients who are in research. I have to stack the deck. I don't mean that in a various way create to create the biggest possible denominator to create the most evidence generating. Data set that I can, and even just generating that data set requires ai tool sometimes, and then once you got that data set. I think probably inherently obviously you. You've got more traditional statistical tools and methods with frankly work great and a lot of the shared also can start to apply things like machine learning neural that works and look for look for signal that you might have missed or enhanced signal. That wasn't there traditionally so I. I do think that's happening I. Feel Pretty Good. There's a lot more we. We can do, but we're. We've started as an industry getting that right. Yeah, until there's couple of things to poke into here I. Like the landscape paint I'm going to dive into a couple of things. You mentioned one of which was around standardization, so yeah, I mean what a tough problem! I think everybody. We've interviewed in healthcare. You guys are in Pharma. If I was ever GONNA be selling a product, probably said the six time on the podcast never be selling artificial intelligence solutions to hospitals like a break one. One of the Pharma companies, but in healthcare, broadly whether they be life, sciences, or or diagnostics, or whatever the case may be just data, being goofy, and like in silos and locked up and not uniform sort of this big ubiquitous issue is this when you talk about the standardization, clearly from what I understand of our look into companies like the MERCS and the bears of the world. They're beginning to try to do this with their own big corpus's of historical information, whatever being able to streamline things so that it's. It's findable, maybe not machine readable yet. They don't necessarily know where that's going to add value just yet in most cases, but but at least make it more uniform. Is this something that the industry is GonNa have to get to the same page from kind of a regulatory or kind of soft law level, or is this just per company? We're GONNA have to come up with data governance policies within our firm and just be really steady about those across silos. Like how do you see this rolling out? Yeah, so? Well I. DO think that individual companies are working on that, but I also think that there's industry organizations. There's commercial entities. My own included who are trying to do that beyond the walls of an individual company and I think we're GONNA have to I. Don't think the data that one company has is going to be sufficient. Across all the use cases that we'd not just a good idea commercially, but we have a medical ethical obligation to create the best care possible when data sets and I do think that the data quality is a really important thing to think about if if it's a a regulatory prescriptive method of doing it or the way regulation works today, which is demonstrate to people that you've done a responsible set of work to standardize things and prove it, but a lot of people will point a finger at regulators and say they're slowing down innovation, sometimes particularly and Pharma and I do not believe. believe that at all regulators. Job Isn't to be like Glen, you're a great guy, so you know I believe what all your data and Algorithms put out. No job is to protect the public health and say Glenn proved to me on paper that you did something that was scientifically ethically responsible to jobs. Is So so i? Think if that requirement is there? What you'll see is individual companies trying to solve this on their own, and I've seen this before in life, science space with other technology things, even just the management data used to be every company tried to do it their way. Out of their basement, and then twenty years later, this medi data do Thanh, research and again we're not the only company doing it, but you see platform providers that are doing it at a larger scale so when I see everybody trying to do it individually get excited because that means that there's actually a market demand for that. And you're creating a marketplace where the best technologies, the best rhythms, the best data sources will create something that more and more people will come onto, and that's how that's everybody clearly. I think we could extrapolate that for those of you. Listening into almost any industry right I think people say this. Even about I'm just GONNA throw some random stuff at ya like automotives. Hey, if we're GONNA make safe self driving cars. Do we want Ford my develop something about some certain snowy driving circumstance like there's GonNa. Be Some things that are going to have to be transferable so that everybody's safer on the dam road and with drugs. Maybe it's the same way. Business Opportunities Hey if we can be the ones who even through kind of soft news. Can Be. The folks that people rely on to develop a system instruct sure that's going to build a really sticky market position in clearly from a business perspective. That's that's an appeal as well part of the challenge see in life, sciences and I know you've obviously you guys have dealt with this and found ways around or whatever there's there's a way to frame it, but you know I. Look at companies like we just did a piece on Johnson and Johnson for example looking at some of their current innovations and investments today I. Frankly we. We don't see a tremendous amount, but they're involved in a consortium called Melody Out in Europe somewhere from not mistaken where Santa a bunch of other big players are from what I understand exposing a certain amount of data is being trained on in some aggregate sense in everybody's GonNa get a little bit of the benefit from it. How do we do this? Hey, we all have the same uniform stuff. Hey, we're able to kind of like mould things across companies. How do we do that without giving away the secret sauce, because of course? Clearly as a drug development firm that there's a humanitarian side, and then clearly we have to make payroll in in. That would mean that we've got to keep some of the things that are secret. So how do we uniform things and maybe cross pollinate without the risk of US losing her crowned jewels yet? So that is not an easy thing to do I'm I'm super appreciative of it. The way we've at least tried to tackle that problem is by creating like a give to get dynamic. There are definitely companies out there that sell data. And I think there's a great place for them in the world. Probably doing and we'll do some awesome stuff I. think there's there's a great place in the world for not for profit groups who say hey just throw your data. Here will create naturally yet. For sure, that's all all good, but I also think there's a place for a model where you say look if you put your data into this, what is effectively proprietary bucket, but with a third party that you trust and let that third party that make sure that everybody who's putting their data into that pool is protected in terms of not showing the specifics of your individual data points, so in your example. You know Sanofi doesn't see Johnson and Johnson's data. But you've got enough people in there that you can do things in aggregate and let people compare their own specific data to the more generalized bigger denominator that Medi date, or whoever it is or you and it's done at the standardization is done for you in a way that this transparent and you can believe in the results I think that's a really interesting commercial model, and then must exist in other industries I just not an expert. Well, it's. The way you're talking about it makes it sound like it's kind of a Nathan idea, even for you guys where it's like well. We think that there could be a space for this like it's something that could have all right. It's like an I believe you're right I, think actually it absolutely. Could I just think you Mr Glanton? Whoever your your absolute best partnership guys, you know you'd better be drinking beers or some of these people because there's a lot of trust that goes into those kind of relationships. So. There's a lot of trust that goes along in life sciences anywhere for sure yet. You're dealing with data about patients in some way. Holly anybody in medicine right has a person's life in their hands, but if if we're working on a vaccine for SARS, come to I, mean literally billions of people are going to get it like you've got billions of lives in. In your hands, so he's already. A lot of trust is important in our industry and I. do think that what will see by the way. There's posters at scientific sessions that we've done. There's clients right now are taking some of these aggregated data sets to regulators, and they're using them to demonstrate exactly what I was saying before. Their drugs are safe and effective. But with different kind of aggregated denominator, we call it a synthetic control arm, and it's not that is android senator anything synthesis out of the people it, synthesizing people who are in lots of different research studies into a cohort they can be used as. As a valid competitor to the patients who you treated with your new drought, Nisa solving that problem, you're saying of the narrowness if you have some super niche allergy medication for people with a certain kind of whatever then yeah, maybe you really need to extrapolate in that kind of uniform data, way and and kind of square that circle that you. And I actually think that not only by I know this is happening. See it happening, but this is a harbinger of things to come because. I gave. Let's take it to its most extreme, so in all US oncology, because it's happening there I and cancer, but I think it's going to happen in almost every therapeutic area, probably even like analgesics, and what the next tylenol is, but we are all so interestingly I mean at biologically individual and people talk about cancer therapy, and almost every patient really is like an end of one problem. There is nobody who has your. Your exact same tumor right in your tumor has probably different kinds of cells that have different mutations even within this one problem in your body. So when you start to think about that, we have to use these techniques to extrapolate what the best therapy is for every single person at the right time down to individual. We're going to need as an industry and I'm not just talking about now. Life Sciences although I think by scientists. Imprint part of the for sure. It's GonNa. Pay For a lot of this Oh. Yeah, sure I sure, but but these mathematical models that we used to figure out what to do for individuals there being born right now using these techniques stacking up all this data and figuring out how to use as a group. We're GONNA use that against individuals, so this stacking I'm just going to clarify this point will move into the next question, but I wanNA nutshell this for the audience the stacking is it sounded almost like a combination of two things one if we can have some. Unification, around the data, we can combine it in certain ways where nobody's giving away their secret sauce, but maybe we were able to get bigger cluster of people who have a specific genetic condition, or whatever, and then use that for for our clinical trials. That's one side of it. You also mentioned Kinda the synthetic sort of element. was that kind of like you know what immediately came to my mind? was you know we're we're? We're training an algorithm to read handwriting. You know we'll come up with a bunch of programmatic generated handwriting. That might be slight variations of things like using that I. Don't think that's what you. You meant there, but what? What did you mean by synthetic again? No, so you got that stack. We've got stack of every patient and I'm coming to see you I say all right well. What am I going to treat Glenn while I got to figure out because Glenn's unique. WHO's similar to Glen and so what you do? Is You build these kind of like Matrix views, patients and you start to use algorithms to compare Glenn with everybody in the stack. Yeah Okay Okay you, you pull those people out of the stack, and you then synthesize them into a group of smaller stack, but that is purpose built. To make a guess about what to do best for Glenn Don or all them. You synthesize one of these smaller stacks from the big one to use as a competitor the same way if I had a group of patients who I gave my new drug to and I'll give another group of patients a placebo sugar pill right I, compare them with like. Well, should I be giving people sugar pills if we have tons of people who are in research, who already gotten the standard of care? Can I reset the CISE? Those people into a comparative instead of exposing a whole bunch of volunteer patience to something that. Does, not effective, and that's the synthesis of the group. Yeah, it's not robots. You're not talking about programmatic degenerate I wasn't suspecting were so. It is it is quite interesting. Because the direct analogy, some of our listeners are avid readers that emerged dot com, always covering use cases in different industries. We think about how a net flicks or Amazon does recommendations you know. You're stripping, you know. In their case, it's purchase behavior. Geo Location whatever else for you. It's genetic stuff in health history, whatever and yeah, you just find in those similar clusters and being able to extrapolate a little bit. You know the movie Gatica. People haven't seen it like the ideas like your DNA decides whether or not you're going to be an astronaut or somebody who's cleaning, toilets or something, cleaning toilets, and of course, of course, that's patently ludicrous, because your genes interestingly don't change that much there. In instances where mutations and things, but actually I I can't tell you much more about your health today than I could have told you about your health the day you. You were born because it's a static data. Set Your Connecticut Right. That is a very simple view of it. There's a lot more elaborate stuff, but if you think about all the stuff that is changing about you overtime, Gina Type, and then all of your phenotype, and you start to measure that stuff and you start to think about it. It really is a problem of finding not one needle, but the right ten. Ten needles in the haystack that allow us to make the best comparison between Glen or a group of patients and patients like them, and that's another place where these artificial intelligence tools are used, so we use them to create stacks, but we also use them to select the right needles out of those haystacks to create these comparative groups Yup I. See those reasonable applications I would be you know. BE FRANK WITH YOU IF If that struck me as not possible based on precedents and other industries, but that clustering strikes me as quite possible, particularly solve that data harmonisation issue. I mean that's a Lotta. The crux of it I know we're just about to wrap up I know you have seen a lot of things change with covid nineteen. Thinking about what that means for the future of your industry. Any closing thoughts before we wrap on. What this means for now in the near future in life sciences. Yes so at the risk of making Not Look that good? Because, I'm definitely including myself in this criticism wouldn't have been nice if we had all that patient data stacked up. And I mean they're. They're few million patients around the world who are in studies on the Medi Data Platform. It's all different companies doing the research with their data, but can you imagine if we had that stack? And we were paying attention to in the hundred fifty countries that we do research knowing some of these patients, genetics, and all of their pheno types in a better way than we normally do in medicine, because we see them consistently wouldn't have been great for layer on like who seems to be coming down with cove nineteen I mean no, no, no, no doubt, no young. And I think that that that's an interesting. You put like an exclamation point on why we need to do this. It's like there's an ethical imperative, not just a commercial driver to think about data in different ways. Yeah, yeah, well. To some degree you know my thought is like what you're articulating makes a tremendous amount of sense. Given Your Business Model. It makes slightly less if I work at Bayer. However like despite the biased tilt, I do understand the value prop and I do think that it is compelling and I think it does feel like it'll have to be the future. People are not going to keep distance silos forever. I do think it make sense. Air Because, if you if pharmaceutical a pharmaceutical company B. comes out with the same effectively drug, and and they're competing for the same group of patients, and neither of them knows that you might be better off taking drug Abe before drug be or drug be is better in a certain kind of of patient than drug. As than actually, you are not serving your customer and you're. You're not generating the revenue that you could be generating, and so you should be motivated with other companies to lineup tightly. In terms of what is the best way to treat patients I actually think it's in your best interest. i. e Clayton clearly is I mean there's a little bit more potentially to lose while in your firm, it's it's almost explicitly to game but I. I think he'd do things like you see things like melody you see companies like yours have been tremendously successful. You guys were acquired recently. You know massive congratulations for that and yes I think long term it's not against their interests by any means, and hopefully I think Glenn. It'll be part of the future. I know these are things you've thought about for. People are interested. Interested in some Glenn stocks is a book coming out in August called the patient equation by Wiley. It's about precision medicine in the age of Covid nineteen and beyond Glenn. If people are interested in in stay in touch following your thoughts, we live sciences I. Know We have a lot of people that follow that space. Where should they go on the web to find you? Cou. You could find me on twitter, etc, at captain, clinical a fictitious superhero for good science. And meditated accomplish our website for anybody interested. There's all kinds of papers and men links to publications. We do academic stuff, too, so it's not all commercial awesome, all right,

Glenn Cancer Glen Johnson Diabetes Europe Bayer United States Twitter Sars AI Covid Pharma Glenn Don
Anan Liu

Casefile True Crime

03:02 min | 5 months ago

Anan Liu

"Southern Cross station is the second busiest are always station in Melbourne with more than nine million passenger movements recorded between two, thousand, seven and two, thousand and eight. As well as Bang served by the city center and train services. Southern Cross is the terminus for the state of Victoria's regional rail network. A shopping complex joins the station and Dunton. Eighth is a coach terminal, providing bosses to into state and regional destinations as well as the Scott boss shuttle service that travels to Melbourne's Tullamarine import. Fist security pepe says a number of closed circuit television cameras applies to strategic locations throughout. On Saturday September fifteen, two, thousand, seven, just stopped at ten am and notably Chinese couple will walking through southern cross station when they noticed a female toddler standing alone need the escalator. Shay, was evasion appearance and to look to bear around three years old. She had short doc hair, cutting a Bob and wore a red denim, hooded, jacket and Akwa, colored vest with a red and pink dormant patent and brought pink Corduroy Pants. thinking that tall blonde lot of Bain lost the Koppel approach ten attempted to speak to her. When she didn't respond, they beckoned a Victoria royal employee named Marina Meshu Glue I've to save. Hey could help. While trying to speak with the Child Marino patted her on the head, and immediately noticed that her hair was very gracie as though it hadn't been washed in some Thanh. No sign of any frantic parents looking Fidel lost child San Marino decided to summon police to the same. Responding offices also attempted to communicate with the child that she was thereon, willing or unable to tell them her name. Noticing that the best shows wearing was made by popular children's clothing brand. Cold Pumpkin Patch. They decided to nickname her pumpkin until a proper identification could be made. The girls clothing provided no real clue to her identity. As although the pumpkin patch brand was based in New Zealand it was sold widely throughout Australia. Despite Horon washed. Pumpkin appeared to be a healthy well-cared-for child who was appropriately dressed in clean clothing. The police took her into their care, hoping she was mealy lost, and her parents would soon come fullwood to claim her. When no one did, they scoured C. C. TV footage from Southern Cross, station. And quickly realized that Pumpkin had been deliberately abandoned.

Southern Cross Station Pumpkin Southern Cross Melbourne Shay Victoria Bain Marina Meshu Glue Marino Pepe San Marino Dunton Fidel Horon Australia New Zealand BOB Koppel
Starting to Write with Louise Tondeur

The Rookie Writer Show

05:27 min | 6 months ago

Starting to Write with Louise Tondeur

"Hello Welcome to season two episode twenty, two of the rookie writer show I'm Robin. Cable and I will be your host today you can find me on twitter at Lacan twos and on Instagram as Robin Canadial I wanNA dedicate today's review to all the new writers out there who are listening Kudos to you. Forgetting started a lot of the time. PODCASTS or videos that discuss writing are talking about submissions, queries, getting an agent or polishing the manuscript. You've been working on for the past few months or longer. So, today's review is going to go over the basics. I'm going to tell you about starting to write a free class offered by Louise Thanh Dur Unu- to me for beginner writers. Her focus is to get a new riders started with the basics, though there are a few helpful reminders and tidbits in there for season writers or writers who have gone astray who are in need of regaining some focus and getting back to their craft. The entire course is only an hour long, and it is broken up into eight sections Louise does a great job giving detailed synopsis at the Individ- Section as well as instructions, if needed for the activities, she suggests. She is extremely engaging and likeable, and if I were a new writer, she would be an excellent first teacher. Louise has. Two novels has been teaching for twenty five years. She offers six classes on Unani two of which are free of charge. She also has published a book on Time Management, a short story, collection and several writing guides. If you enroll in starting to write, you will be eligible to receive two of Louise's e-book writing guides free of charge. This class is a total win for new writers. She has a variety of resource pages to pull up and a variety of exercises to get. You started as well. I'd also like to admit something. One of my favorite parts of this class was just enjoying Louise's beautiful accent and some of the British. British lingo that I. Don't get to hear every day. It made it even more enjoyable not to mention her generous gift of two free e books is great. I look through my copies and feel like they have a lot of good information. I do have three tips and a hack. That will be sharing today. The first tip is to start where you are. Don't wait until you feel like it. Everyone has moments. Moments when they say I'll do such and such when this happens or when that happens or when my desk area looks like a writer's desk, or when everything is just so louise encourages you to start now. Don't wait for the perfect conditions because they never happen also right down why you want to start writing and be really specific if you have written in the past, but haven't in a while be kind to. To Yourself, also you can still start again. You can carry your notebook with you and build time into your day to right when you have free moments. Perhaps you get some writing in while you're on a bus or a train. Maybe you can take a few minutes to jot down. Some of the word sketches Louise Talks about in her class. While you're sitting at your favorite cafe, the second tip is turning up. As. The most important piece of writing advice she can give is to turn up. Show up and start writing. Establish a habit that works for you with a time you can identify some people enjoy being part of the five am writing club. That's not me yet, person. Some people prefer to work at night. When everyone else is asleep, whatever works for you, put it in your calendar. And as Lewis says, turn up, the third tip is to collect writing prompts as you're starting out a great way to get story ideas is to collect those problems. You can even make a scrapbook of it helps you collect images postcards things you might usually throw away like bus tickets or advertisements gather objects from nature anything that you can think of. Of that's GONNA. Kick off your writing. You can also get books of writing prompts or find websites online. One of the free e books from Louise has prompt ideas in it as well once you have some prompts, sit down with one of them and a lot yourself an amount of time to work on some of the exercises she shares. Then you can try another the next time with prompts. The possibilities for creating stories are endless. Today's hack is something called. Habits stacking. Each of us has something that we do every day. Perhaps a multitude of things may be in the morning or even throughout the whole day you enjoy a hot beverage. This is where you can stack a habit that you want to start onto an existing habit for instance. Put a notebook beside your tea kettle, or maybe your coffee pot, and as your drink is brewing, you can write while you're waiting. Perhaps you have to use the laundromat when it's time to do your laundry. Put your notebook in your basket and use that time to your advantage. Make you writing a habit by stacking it on top of your current habits whether they are daily or weekly. Find whatever works for you.

Louise Writer Louise Talks Louise Thanh Dur Unu Time Management Robin Canadial Individ- Section Lewis
US pilot jailed in Singapore for breaking quarantine order

America's Morning News

00:37 sec | 7 months ago

US pilot jailed in Singapore for breaking quarantine order

"New this morning an American cargo pilot who admitted to poor judgment and breaking a quarantine order to buy medical supplies has become the first foreigner imprisoned in Singapore for breaching its restrictions meant to curb the spread of coronavirus lawyer Ronnie Thanh said FedEx pilot Brian Dugan year again was sentenced to four weeks after he pleaded guilty to leaving his hotel room for three hours to buy masks and a thermometer Singapore has the largest outbreak in Southeast Asia more than ninety percent of those infected are foreign workers living in crowded dormitories while the government recently began easing restrictions for the local population the tiny city state has strict penalties for those who breach quarantine

Singapore Ronnie Thanh Southeast Asia Fedex Brian Dugan
Hand Cream Call Ins

Forever35

03:58 min | 7 months ago

Hand Cream Call Ins

"On a lighter note a later note we are. Dory you intro this I was just GonNa say. We have a voicemail that wanted to clarify some things high indoor. I am calling from Sunny. South Florida for Thai caller. Her had to pause the pod in of my diamond painting That I do in the morning which is really nice anyway. There was some dilemma about how to pronounce a company. It starts with an L. I worked for this company all through college. They do have fantastic. Cancun infantry if you have tried that we should definitely try it so the way you pronounce the company is locked e ton so locks by bagels and lox bright e e talked like a dark off. Luxy. Tom Okay of the foul inside of Luxy. Tom luxy Thanh Luxy. Don Loki tain like saying my head for forty one years. John Dory did you. Have you ever heard of diamond painting kits? No I have not okay. Listen do yourself a favor and give it a Google because you're essentially painting with tiny stones. It's like paint by number. But instead of using paint plus pike place little stones into the spots that align with their number. I'm very intrigued by this. Wow Yeah now. Are they real diamonds. But I'm dumb enough to believe that they might be. Oh Wow this looks like are even try to make. You could like ruin your eyesight. I know you're like literally using little tiny little tiny beads to paint like starry night. And you can do a custom like it looks like you can do a painting painting. I know what getting you for your birthday. Is it a painting of my dog? No Oh okay well. I'll just let it go. I hope it's the earth wind and fire diamond painting that I'm looking at right now on the Internet. All right well. Continuing with the theme of hand cream and hand lotion received another voicemail. That really just warmed my heart. My nineties heart. High didn't do are I was just listening to an episode. Where you guys were asking for. Handcream recommendation And I definitely have a favorite wanted. To share it by crabtree. Evelyn and I mean. Honestly there's everyone remember how popular that like. Maybe the nineties. I don't know anyone still really shopping. But they still exist and they have my fever a hand cream that I loved when I was a teenager for some reason on and then we discovered about five years ago. It's their gardeners hand. Therapy comes in it. Hand colored top league too And enriching the I actually reserved us as my nighttime hand cream and so I only use it right before bed hustle using it more often recently all that hand washing and they tend to reserve it for night ten to four but I actually put on a little bit of oil beforehand and then I haven't seen on top on and wake up with really more strike hands and they'd be like your preventative Mature handcream approach. You can kind of stave off that train at that Is happening lost it because of all the wash again at tree an Easel and gardeners hand therapy? I use the original formula. Other original spent have tried the other ones. But that is so. I hope that this hope folks In this eighth ladies.

Tom Okay John Dory Thanh Luxy Cancun South Florida Don Loki Luxy Google Crabtree Evelyn
Novelist Viet Thanh Nguyen on Cultural Authenticity

Asian Enough

08:33 min | 9 months ago

Novelist Viet Thanh Nguyen on Cultural Authenticity

"You grew up in San Jose California. Your parents open a grocery store tells about that experience. What was that like in? What was their journey like what what brought them here. Why did they come to California? My family fled the Vietnam War. But I'm thirty thousand other Vietnamese refugees because we were on the losing side and my parents in particular. Were were hardcore Catholics and Hardcourt Catholics Communists. And so they fled from the communist twice in nineteen fifty four when the country was divided and they were in the north to the south and then they fled again in nineteen seventy five so the refugees twice and then they came resettled in Harrisburg Pennsylvania For few years And there you have to realize my parents have been very successful. In Vietnam. They'd been born. Peasants work their way up and became wealthy and then lost a lot of that coming to the United States arrived here as refugees and their American sponsors expected them to be poor refugees. Who would be satisfied with class or even menial jobs and that's what they did in Harrisburg for a few years. But they'd obviously we're not satisfied with that and a good friend in San Jose who said this is a promised. Land and weather's good. There are a lot of Asians out here and I just opened up a grocery store so they came out and worked with her at probably the first Vietnamese grocery store in San Jose in nineteen seventy eight and then opened the second Vietnamese grocery store right down the street for some reason. I don't have their friends all about that. But you know we live the Classic Refugee or immigrant American Success Story. Which meant you know? My parents climb the ladder yet again. Rebuilt their wealth and that exacted huge physical and emotional toll on them and emotional toll on me. I'm thankful they didn't make me work in the store because they didn't want me to do that. They wanted my brother to get an education but what I saw growing up. Was My parents working twelve to fourteen hour days almost every day of the year and working in a very dangerous environment you know there was shot in their store. We were robbed at gunpoint at home. My parents were always very paranoid about these kinds of issues. And I'm saying we had this class classic immigrant refugee story because they spent all their time working in order to support my brother and me and and and give a good life but of course what that meant. Is there no time to spend with us? So that's just the classic immigrant or refugee double bind and that's part of what it meant to be having this lonely traumatized childhood for me. Which in the positive sense gave me the requisite emotional damage necessarily become a writer thankful for that inherited trauma you mentioned earlier. And it's something that's really hard to explain to the everyday reader because it sounds a little bit academic you know but like when it comes down to is basically like what your parents went through and how it affected you. I don't know if you could kind of talk about the specifics of that any sort of characteristics that your parents might have passed down well. My parents were devout Catholics and Catholics. Like to suffer so in a sense we were very well equipped to deal with being refugees and immigrants because my parents suffered a lot Both in terms of just having to work really really hard and and also of course they. They survived thirty years of war in Vietnam from Nineteen forty-five to nineteen seventy five which which killed millions of people. So I have no what they had to go through to become the people that the Rx conceptual way. That's the consequences of that. Just in terms of their refugee shopkeeper lifestyle and even though they became very successful financially in the inheritor of that I also grew up feeling that we were poor made a lot of money but they were not spending it on anything and I think that watching them suffer in watching them work as much as they did. Made me not want to do what they did? But ironically I've turned into someone almost exactly like them in the sense that I work constantly now working very nice job being a professor and being writer but I'm always working and I suffer in my own way. Not Getting not in the grinding way that shopkeepers have to go through. But writing has kind of a a suffering for internal suffering journal suffering right but if you ask any writer will most writers. They're tormented by the struggle being a writer and as elite of a lifestyle as at as it is Nevertheless I think I've I've been quipped to deal with that. Based on what? I saw my parents go through and just absorbing the workaholic Catholics lifestyle. I think in my life own family. Like the way that my mom is very sort of pathological about saving money and maximizing it and that's because she grew up very poor now. I find myself thirty two earning enough money to buy a pair of shoes. The costs more than twenty dollars. Now that make you feel free. Can't do you really can't you know and and somebody told me that? I had the shoes of a restaurant worker a couple years ago now. I need to fix this and even my dad. You know when you go back home and they do your laundry for you. Here's looking at my clothes. You know it was like you need new clothes. Why don't you buy some new things you know so these things will leave a mark guy off of that what year work is in the kinds of writing that you do require so much self-knowledge as well you grew up in the bay area which is a diverse place. I also grew up in East Bay. Your south by East Bay But for me being Asian American as a kid in a very diverse place was great in some ways because it's diverse and I didn't stand out in the ways that frank for example in Tennessee has talked about very different but by the same token there are things that you've written about your experience growing up. I really relate to in that I was so intensely aware of the otherness other people perceived when they looked at me and it gave me a chip on my shoulder head a lot of like anger and resentment about the and it was really hard to know what to do with that for a long time so then to become a writer who writes about these things. You know. You're not running like fairy tales or SCI FI movies. You're you're writing is very close to these experiences in. I wonder how did you process what enabled you to get to that point? And and what was your experience like growing up. Well it's kind of interesting they'll give hearing about both of your life experiences because you could see where Franks experience would mean that. He would obviously feel like a complete other yet. We grew up in the multicultural bay area and I grew up in Vietnamese and Mexican neighborhood and so on but I still felt that that sense of otherness. And I think that's because even if we did live in a multicultural environment Dominant American culture is still was and still is dominated by white people inside like to say. I didn't really experienced that many direct episodes of racism experts if you've small ones but nevertheless I felt like we were all irradiated by racism. Just out there on the airwaves you know from. Tv Movies Radio Shock. Jocks this kind of stupid stuff that was going on. And so I felt that on absorbing that another hand also receiving support from the Vietnamese community and from an implicit Asian American community. So I went to this all white high school mostly. What High School Bunch of us? Who were of Asian descent? We knew we were different. We just didn't know how so. We've gathered a corner of the campus every day for lunch and we call ourselves. The Asian invasion reclaimed didn't have the language we knew her Asian. But we most of those guys never became political like I became political. So what happened. I think it was a combination of this Catholicism that I was raised with the suffering and the sense of sacrifice willing sacrifice I'm going to be a martyr and then I went to Berkeley and I was already an atheist. I couldn't be a Catholic martyr. Became an Asian American martyr. You know at Berkeley became immediately radicalized there and that was partly through political activism on the campus but also wanting to be writer in the context of the traditions of Asian American African American literature but also American literature I did a PhD in American literature. And I thought I'd I'm not going to refuse being Vietnamese or Asian American but I'm also at the same time going to claim my Americanised as well. I'm gonNA write stuff that goes in both directions. I did have big chip on my shoulder. Still do around about people just aren't angry enough. I came out of a Berkeley tradition. Where anger was good. Being radical was good. And then you look out at the landscape of Vietnamese and Asian literature. Sometimes you think well it's well written but maybe there's enough anger that's not enough politics in there. There has been in the past so I wanted to be someone who would incorporate both the politics of the Asian American tradition with what I imagined to be the highest levels of aesthetics and literature. That was my

Writer Vietnam San Jose California Franks California San Jose Harrisburg Pennsylvania Berkeley East Bay United States Harrisburg Americanised Sci Fi Professor Tennessee
Modern lifehacks

Pass It On

06:34 min | 9 months ago

Modern lifehacks

"Headphone shudder you. I'm trying I'm trying to Steve. The volume control on your smartphones headphones can be used to such release this way. You can take a picture with your camera without your camera shaking Christopherson brought by ferry. Andy Right WHA- okay. I know so the Plus Button. Yeah the plus and minus button. You hit for more in line in line remote control when thanks to camera can also click the shutter on your camera so you say your camera up somewhere tripolar slightly making something and if you if you act of pressing the sharp button with your fingers with. Chiku camera is we. Using a like effective August photographers would use a remote lease shelter. And you can take that. She can alternatively at airports. That does it. Doesn't you right attentively? If you have an Apple Watch then you can see on your watch. What camera you're seeing so up. Go back to join. The group praised the three second timer casually hands in your pockets having check the freemen. Take a job son. Drake Group selfie right on there. Like Saudi full Griffey okay. How many times of US Postal weekend zeal? Coney deal right. I'm going to is that. The is that the metric for us. I'm going to introduce an innovation to the puzzle and tips podcast. I'm going to stop just because it seems to me and for this week only I'm going to introduce a scoring system so I'm giving but them I'm giving that tip to Tim O. My God harsh. I knew Jake rival Harvard over but no I don't think I would use video of I understand. I can see saying but when when I said tips and hawks I meant clever little things what people have discovered and have found useful. No that's take that was invented by UPPAL as I was the operating system of a piece of technical but not everybody knows that. I didn't know that you'd iphone could do that. So I should apply. I think having no Shared the Katina for success with us. The had some guys life is about teaching house. You don't you're not gonNA clever whatsoever because you're not going to understand it whatsoever. Yeah I'M NOT GONNA go and Miss Steve. I can't read. I like Steve. Rc At lake. Steve Fake Tan move. I mean he's aisling ordered count so hard to get off and would deliver yes. Yeah Yeah exactly. So you kind of have to this. This is more of a story than a tip but I might let down to Monday. I'm going to have to explain. Fake Tonto Steve. And that's a whole entire podcast concept of. Yeah Okay So. It's hard to so if you want to take off an old layered and put on a newly are for an eye or whatever you have to take off so have you seen those scabby things that you get that you put the Lid Fadi. Let quit and two. They're totally several times. You say yeah so I use one of them. Like Scouts Scouting pods felt with victim over what she can buy an score and actually works. Very well obviously distill your tip to. It's very sick to get this stuff of your skin you know. Don't boss. I scar point. Leslie will bleed but once you take that many layers of skin on with with a this scatter ADESCO Dr. The delivery mechanism built into it. Sorta stop so. When you need to take de ton DEATON BEC- be Thanh on. But you want to take off on Morton which is against you back to the same place. I am the point right so use you wash vigorously with a fairly vigorous sponge like thing so uteck pint. Dusk is this guy with with the with the sun in the handle is being dispensed through the sponge. I think was it a such a thing as speak Tundra move. Oh Yeah I mean it's not belly and you still need to give up available. Spa Alpha also known to use 'em to they call it cream am I just couldn't stop. I've ever heard of the pink stuff. They'll top of 'em pink makes full like like scoping for like using on. Pvc and stuff of us. That and I'm going to have no skin left by the time in theory. I think it's a clever thing this scattered thing with the insight. I know feeling I was Louis really harsh. I was overly harsh. Calibrate your scoring system like trust you've been elevated to fool and I'm GonNa get you don't you all during the to your deck. Come on you're doing something that doesn't need done with something that sneak. John was on with the old fake ton. What's wrong with snobby? Look at Skopje known. What's on with not having just being you know so scotch. You're not giving me all you know. One did think of a one. But I'm giving you tonight. Okay can I. Oh you're going again. No score years. You certainly can.

Miss Steve United States Andy Right Steve Fake Tan Christopherson Skopje Apple Rc At Lake Harvard Griffey Drake Group Coney Tim O. Jake John
Exposing a War Crime with Justin Watt

Casefile True Crime

08:16 min | 10 months ago

Exposing a War Crime with Justin Watt

"On March. Twelve two thousand six during the height of the Iraq. War full members of the Janabi Family forty-five-year-old forty-five-year-old Qasim. He's thirty four year old wife Factoria and two daughters six year old at deal and fourteen year old. A B were murdered in their home in the Iraqi village. Village of USA fail south of Baghdad. Be had also been right and her remains set a lot. It was widely accepted. The attack had been carried out by local insurgents as such violence was common in the area that was referred to by occupying. Foreign Military is the triangle of death. The American soldier Private First Class Justin. What was stationed in Iraq? At the Thanh months off that Janabi family slaying. Ajayi sajjan confided that one of their fellow soldiers was responsible for the brutal crime. Justin pussies friendships Corre- and David. He's lot but risk but conducting talking. He's uncovered investigation into the matter. He discovered several of the soldiers were involved to varying degrees and made the difficult decision to expose posed them for the American soldiers. Sergeant Paul Cortez Specialist James Baca Private First Class Jesse spillman private first this class Brian Howard and Private First Class Steven Green with band to of planned carried out and covered up the ripened murder of be as well as the massacre of her family. Ole Five individuals faced charges by their involvement and received varying convictions. Green had been discharged from the US army mental instability prior to the crime's coming to lot and was consequently trod in civilian court while the other four perpetrators is faced the US army general courts Martial Green. Who was responsible for carrying out? The Med is sentenced to life imprisonment with no possibility. PF parole he took his life shortly after the remaining perpetrators was sent to military prison to serve a varying sentences. You just what's actions led to mixed opinions from the American public some viewed as a hero while others accused him of being a traitor data and sent him death threats. His decision also impacted the Iraqi paypal creating hostilities. Between the locals insurgents and touring military three Justin has since been medically discharged from the army and has spoken with US candidly about military experience including the Janabi family family murders adding additional context to our episode on the crime. Justin started by telling us how he came to join the military before nine. Eleven by buddy names all and we're GONNA do the steel challenge together. They had a program in the navy. That dead allowed you to join with a friend. She going at the same time in guaranteed you a selection slot to go to buds went through got qualified for that. What I was seventeen at the time and I showed up to maps like the process for joining the military? Here in America's like you'll go through talk to a recruiter you'll do. There's some preliminary testing then you have to go up to maps for you know. Some physical batteries stuff apt to batteries. Stuff like that on the day that I was supposed go to maps. And that's where you sign your contract. My buddy bailed on me completely so I went up there on my own and as it turns out the job it was like a crypto does slash networking like computer type position. That wasn't available anymore and so I was like okay. I'm not going to do this because I was seventeen. you can't join into your eighteen hours in what was called the delayed entry program so you get all your stuff done when you're seventeen and then basically as soon as you're eighteen you ship out. I basically dumpstered the idea. Nine nine eleven happened and like in a serious relationship. You know I had a pretty decent job I was a blackjack dealer. Casino pit boss. The relationship ended and I remember just being in a position where I was just Kinda like okay. Like what am I gonNa do now because like all of my plans kind of like based around future with that person listen and you know. I had no idea what I was going to be doing. And I was like cleaning out my room and I found my body and my original ship date was supposed to be on September eleven and at that point I was just like while somebody else's probably like in my place. I just watched band of brothers. Zoom may be sound like the biggest cliche ever. But you literally after watching that I was like you know I want the hundred and first airborne infantry and if you're not going to give him I'm not going and at at that time the Iraq war kicked off this is like two thousand four. I want to say so it. It just really kicked off in Iraq. Ans- dance they couldn't find people join just as Iraq was a lot bloodier then Afghanistan. And so I got like a twenty thousand dollar bonus for joining the infantry which is unheard of because it's a it's a low like agr- apartment job. Yeah twelve days later from that data I found that I D I was on a plane for Benning to get into training so went through that then Amelie after that the air assault school school has learned a robot of the jobbers which is a big part of the hundred and first does and then got on my unit you know and it was. It was a very different thing to go through all the training knowing that. You're going to war like everybody. They're sergeants that were teaching. Just got back. It was their first combat deployment. mm-hmm there's people that were in the logistical infrastructure of basic training. They were headed down to the hundred. I with me so I know there was a lot of camaraderie. I I think apprehension everyone. Everyone knew with certainty that they were going. Everyone knew that it was popping off over there. So yeah yeah I mean it was. It was a crazy time for sure when we sent in Iraq so the way it worked out is I got down to one hundred I I I. And that's where I linked up with my unit and you get assigned to accompany and everything and that's how I ended up in First Striker Bravo Company the unit that the book was based not got down there on the mmu pre-deployment spin ups. you go out and do more training. You know out in the field and like these stimulated urban combat villages at the National Training C. C. Out in Louisiana we see Anna and you do training pull unit and then as smaller elements. Then you go. I mean usually get stood down a couple of times just because they don't like people knowing exactly when you're going to be leaving with how many people you're going and everything like that just operational security stuff so I wanna say so. From the day that we're seagoing. There is like a couple of week variation we went and we stopped in Germany on the way there and then landed in Saudi Arabia. You did our last combat zero before getting down into into theater which is like make. Sure Weapons Still dialed in. And then yeah. We're down to Iraq doc. We landed in Baghdad. It just a different world. I mean you land there and the war machine is is pretty pretty sophisticated so like by the time we got down there. We'd only been in Iraq in that kicked off two thousand. Three's basically the end of two thousand and four early two thousand and five. They already had this. Main kind of super base built up in in Baghdad. was called striker at the time and there was like a Pizza Hut and green bean copy. It's just weird but then you're like walking around in this area. That feels kind of like you know a military base and then you'll be talking with your friend and then all of a sudden you hear like a a huge explosion. A few hundred meters outside the perimeter. Then you'll hear a bunch of machine gun fire and from a couple of different areas and then you it'll just go silent right and you're like somebody has died at their like. That's crazy I it was just a a weird transition.

Iraq USA Baghdad Justin Janabi Family Factoria Ajayi Sajjan Private First Thanh Janabi America Green Steven Green Martial Green Sergeant Paul Cortez Saudi Arabia Murder Army Pizza Hut
"thanh" Discussed on WWL

WWL

02:56 min | 11 months ago

"thanh" Discussed on WWL

"L. TV's Thanh trong tells us what happened yesterday in memory what a fifty three year old man was attacked by a sixteen year old son your veterans in power castigated say the team remained violent during the arrest and bit one of the deputies they also say the teenager suffered a medical emergency later was pronounced dead at the hospital the corner will conduct an autopsy to determine the teenagers cause of death White House lawyers urge the Senate to reject impeachment charges against president trump CBS news update it's unlikely that the Senate will follow president trump's called to immediately dismiss his impeachment trial so was legal team is outlined its strategy CBS is Ben Tracy has details they plan to argue that an impeachable offense has to be a violation of established law they say that abuse of power is too vague a term it's open to the subjective winds of Congress on the second one the obstruction of Congress the president's team is basically saying that the president was simply trying to protect the separation of powers that is his constitutional right CBS news legal contributor Jonathan Turley the White House is laying out a defense that not only was effectively the call perfect but you can't even impeach a president for abuse of power those are two positions that some senators even Republican senators may not be keen on adopting CBS news update on Pam Coulter mail to I. Cantrell today health kick off Martin Luther king junior day celebrations Hey okay and that's a lot it starts with the celebration was followed by a March this morning in central city Louisiana governor John bel Edwards is the most popular democratic governor according to poll numbers gathered by morning console W. wells Jim hands reports at fifty four percent approval the recently re elected Edwards has the eight highest rating blood due to Tice's fifteenth most popular among is respectivos hers the fourteen governors above him are all Republicans the info comes from polling data taken between October in the end of last year so one governor ahead of them Mississippi's Republican Phil Bryant has since left office Super Bowl fifty for a bit the San Francisco forty Niners versus the Kansas City Chiefs CBS's Gary nonsense ticket owners are already demanding high prices the resale market is already in high gear while costs constantly fluctuate single ticket asking prices are averaging between five thousand and six thousand dollars Lois does in the four thousand dollar range with a few approaching seventy thousand dollars by comparison the average ticket last year for the patriots rams game was about twenty five hundred historically prices do drop as game day approaches fifty three years ago all the face value of a ticket to Superbowl one in Los Angeles was twelve dollars and it was not a sellout Gary.

Phil Bryant patriots Gary Kansas City Chiefs San Francisco Louisiana Martin Luther Pam Coulter White House Los Angeles Lois Thanh trong Mississippi Tice John bel Edwards I. Cantrell Jonathan Turley
Open Titan: an open-source secure chips

Daily Tech News Show

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Open Titan: an open-source secure chips

"GED Mobile Security Nouveau Thanh Technology and western digital have partnered to create open titan an open source security chip design project open source hardware. The idea is to build some secure chips for things. Like data centers storage computer peripherals. They can be easily inspected for back doors and be therefore very secure open. Titan will build off Google Titan chip design. They use that in their android phones as well. As in the multi factor security keys open titan will be run by a nonprofit called the low risk community. That's our I. S C low risk community Mutiti.

Titan Ged Mobile Security Nouveau Th Western Digital Google
Searching For a Lost Maya City

Science Magazine Podcast

14:33 min | 1 year ago

Searching For a Lost Maya City

"We have contributing correspondent lizzie wade and she went on a hunt for a lost city high lizzy hazara. Can you talk a little bit about your journey of course so we met up in a city called kami thanh in campus and then we drove about seven hours to part of the mexican guatemala border order. That's a little corner that we were staying at this eco lodge. We had guides from that eco lodge who took us into the reserve montessori so we went up i in a motorboat for a few hours when we set up a base camp but basically from there we were kayaking and hiking in the jungle and it was extraordinarily difficult. If there is no trails carved the guides would michetti through through the jungle but everything has fines. Everything is so different from each other. There's so much information and all the plants are so yeah heterogeneous and there's just like so much stuff around you that it's hard to even interpret individual things who is very easy to grab onto a tree that was covered in spines and not really even realize until your hand was also covered in spines they had to cut every out of the way every step i've been in some pretty remote places before but never a place where humans really hadn't been for for decades or potentially centuries and that was very very hard and it felt like the environment was just pushing us pushing pushing us out you know and making it impossible in the rivers were also completely covered in in brush and had to be the machete from the kayaks and late. It was really intense okay. Should i spoil it. Say whether or not you found missing city yeah i mean i think it's hard to talk about it. If we don't say what happened yes so spoilers. You did not find a long last jedi. Wha- what were you looking for. I went to chapas mexico wisdom archaeologist gal just who were looking for a city called sock belong which was the capital of the condone my there's two groups named <unk> condone one one exists today and one is pre columbian maya group when we were looking for this previous maya groups last capital sok-bom means the white jaguar and the lacandon built it basically to hide from spanish invaders which say successfully did for over over two hundred years. Wow what what's the timeline here and i guess i should ask. What century are we him. Yes so the spanish i come to mexico coach central mexico in the early fifteen twenties so to not mind which is now mexico city the aztec capital falls in fifteen twenty one and that's a pretty straightforward holmquest story aztecs were an empire the spanish also empire or wanted to be so they over that all that outland but when you get to the maya world. It's really really different because there's not really a centralized control. Every city is independent of each other and they're all in this elaborate web of allies and enemies. This finished can't come in conquer one city like <unk> or whatever and then everything passes is to them. They have to do it one at a time getting back to this missing city sock belong the lack unknown live there but they didn't always live there. They actually remove their city to this harder define location yeah though i condone lived on this island in lake miramar which is also a a were attacked by the spanish at least once. Maybe a couple of times. I can't quite remember and they had held out but they knew they weren't going to be able to do that forever. So preemptively the late fifteen hundreds they pack up move really deep into the jungle and built this other city called soccer mom but eventually cycle was taken by <hes> the spanish. Can you talk about how that happened by this point. It's the sixteen ninety s the english colonies in the u._s. Are firmly established at this point. I think harvard university has has been founded. This is very much the world we live in now most of the quote unquote conquest that are going on right now are not huge military invasions asians. It's more proselytizing so these two priests are like we have to convert the people of south <unk> devoted to the idea they hire these local maya ed guides who lead them around in circles for five months without them realizing it because the local mayor are so scared of sock belong like the people insect belong have been rating other my <hes> months and months go by of them just like walking around in circles and then finally they realized some things going on and they hired the leader of another local niagara and we don't really know what his motivation was but if you think of the condone being scary and potentially having attacked this town. This guy may have been like whatever ver- enough with this he takes a spanish. They're it's mostly diplomatic. They're not immediately killed. As previous spanish visitors were they convince serve a retinue of the lacombe leaders to come with them to sit in guatemala for more diplomacy basically but on the way they are on the way back almost all <unk> die get sick and die and it sort of clap says and there's not like a big battle this vantage descend on this town of a couple left one hundred thousand of their soldiers and their allied mike holders cycle. I'm gives really easily at that point and then it is is a spanish town for another fifteen twenty years and then everyone is relocated to closer to the pacific coast of water malla which was part of the the spanish colonial policy of it's called reducing might communities so murray by out of where they've always lived in make them live in his new communities where they easier easier control was surprises me then after all of those events is that the location of sack llamas not known yeah. No it surprised me too because it is done some spanish maps. I mean these are like seventeen hundred maps or not satellite abs- you know it was connected to the spanish world for a while but only only for pretty short time so they didn't really have a huge investment in the place when they move people out the jungle stays the jungle like there's not a huge amount of clear cutting so today the location of sucked plum is within this national park in mexico monsoon ways and it's considered an extremely extremely remote part of mexico. There are no trails no roads. Nobody's allowed to live there while you went with a group of archaeologists to try and visit this lost city what what made them think that they could find it and be what would they get out of finding it despite them existing for overlapping with the spanish colonial state for a couple of centuries. There's really no information about what it was like to live in sok-bom or any of the other independent my capitals that existed existed around this time sochua wasn't the only one was but it was the second to last two to be conquered. They wanna know who they were trading with. How connected they were to the outside world. How not connected they were headed they do this. How did they live in such isolation for so long so the reason they thought they could find it is or the method breath <unk>. They used was looking at the spanish documents from the time. After sokolow had been conquered. 'em spanish visitors would go and then they would go other places they would record their roots and how long it took them to travel to different landmarks lakes or rivers or another town's so you can construct a possible zabul arc of locations of the city and basically we were trying to get as close to that as possible so you have your starting point and then they ceo we traveled for seven days you know about how far they went in a circle exactly he's going to be on size herbal and not the other like you can make some inferences and they didn't record it in kilometers or anything that ban measure of distance we would use so you'd have to estimate how far they could walk in a day and it's quite fuzzy but it's a starting point you do have a description of what the spanish a how described cycle on when they arrived yeah it is about a hundred houses which primative adobe so they will not have survived until now there were three community buildings not quite temples but like city halls and those would have had stone foundations and that's what the archaeologists are interested in finding the region today is known for scarlet macaws the sort of iconic red parrots and apparently condone had semi domesticated them in every day at five p._m. They would fly out of the forest land on all the houses and the spanish. I thought that was amazing and so do i do feel like you were able to keep the same pace as the people who had traveled to suck palumbo for you know when you're looking at a previous trips yeah. It's hard to say i mean we weren't hearing oliver stuff. They would have been like did set up base camps. They probably would have been wearing stuff that was really tough to walk around and you know like lots of wool and potentially metal. This is not easy for them either. That was one of the major her things. I was thinking about in the jungle. I don't really care about the spanish confuses blake we i think we pay far too much attention to their experience in history because they're the ones who who got to write it but i was really taken aback by how similar are experience would have been there because of course a lot. Condone knew what they were doing and like we it ends so we we have we were much more similar to the spanish and i felt like if you have a city a few hundred people hiding out in the jungle against a globalizing belies ing empire like it's only a matter of time until they will be found and incorporated into that empire came away thinking that that really wasn't true at all. Oh it was so hard to do this that the conquest of cyclamen basically every other place in the americas was basically the historical accident and a fluke luke. The conquistadors had to rely on locals to help them find the city. Do you think that that's something that the archaeologists are gonna pursue while help was doc vital for the spanish and vital for y'all just now the ones sort of discovery quote unquote that they were able to make on this trip was the classic period read my it ruins which is a thousand years before sock bolom would have been founded but this town in the region knew about some ruins in this little patrick forest that they protect the reserve and they took the archaeologist they are in. It was really amazing. I mean i've seen a lot of unexcavated archeological sites in this was really special one and they never would have known it was there of the local people hadn't been willing to trust them and and tell them about it was tackle on the hard part is that nobody lives in monte. Sicily's there are people who go in there like their firefighters who might know the reserve. There are people who have lived there as refugees like from the guatemalan civil war are a lot of people took refuge there. There are people who know montezuma's ways a little bit better than average person in chapas but because has nobody lives in it. It's just so hard to find those people in it so hard to find the help that you really need to be able to do efficient archaeology. Let's say how far did you travel in all of this. I think we kayaked ninety kilometers in four days. This is a round trip so we went up river forty five kilometers that was already from the base camp. I think a lot of kayaking on in my life the walking was it was really shocking. How slow the walking. It was about a kilometer an hour which you know if i'm walking in a city i go ten minutes. You know the walking. I think it was like eight kilometers things hype it was it was it was not very long but it felt like we climbed mount everest. A lot of archaeology is don don with lighter these days using radar from planes to find hidden structures. Would that be helpful here in this area. It could potentially work. I think it it'd be really great to do it over months away. I know the archaeologist would love to do that to national geographic funded this huge light our survey of a very similar place in guatemala all and it revealed tens of thousands of of structures that archaeologists didn't know about the thing about lighter is that it's pretty expensive <hes> and it takes a lot of coordination and also when you do light. Are you still have to go out to the potential site and see it so it doesn't totally save you from the explorer our jungle adventure that we that we had one of these archaeologists going to do next. Are they going to go back. They are going to go back which i found a little bit mind boggling wing but they're really committed to exploring this area of chapas <unk> swiss and what stood was a give them some information about how how fast the spanish could travel like. Maybe it was a little slower than we thought. Maybe dot com is closer to these landmarks. If you have to go so slow a lot of the information on the satellite maps about the exact routes of the rivers turned out not to be totally right so it made making a more accurate map much easier and i think the most important thing it did probably was bringing these archaeologist in closer contact with the communities down there both the communities who who live in the towns and the guides themselves who know the reserve very well it takes a lot of work to to build a kind of trust you need to have people both agreed to show you what they know especially since archaeology in mexico as in so many places is often connected to the state and official narratives of off the country and potentially land expropriation and things like that people can be very wary of archaeologists for pretty good historical reasons yeah yea so you know you really have to spend a lot of time. They're showing them that you care about these places and you care about the current people's connection to those places in you're going to respect. That's

Mexico Chapas Guatemala Lizzie Wade Kami Thanh Harvard University Soccer Lake Miramar Lacombe Adobe Sicily Water Malla Mount Everest Sok-Bom Sokolow Palumbo
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Lieberman Govan And Israel discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

03:29 min | 1 year ago

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Lieberman Govan And Israel discussed on Morning Edition

"Israel will hold elections again. It seemed like Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is certain to get a fourth consecutive term, when his party won elections last month. But then came a stunner, he failed to form a governing coalition at his call. Israel's parliament voted last night to hold unprecedented new elections on September, seventeenth NPR's Daniel estrin is on the line from Jerusalem, Daniel, you had a late night. I started. Hey all so Netanyahu failed to get what done. Exactly he failed to form a parliamentary majority. He needed just one more party to get on board. A right wing party led by former defence minister of ignore Lieberman and Lieberman wooden. Join Netanyahu got furious have listen to this. A victim Lieberman Govan at them up my pillow. The Hamilton shield. Now, said Lieberman is dragging the country to new elections. His conditions for joining the coalition were way too high. He wanted to conscripts ultra-orthodox Jews to the military. That's now is saying, but that's not really the main issue. The main issue here is that Netanyahu is probably about to be facing criminal charges for corruption, and he tried to build a coalition that would allow him to make some pretty dramatic moves. So a sitting prime minister cannot be indicted and to form a coalition that would help them. Do that was a really big ask and it just complicated all these negotiations. So when he couldn't form the government, he did something else. He pushed for new elections. He wanted to block the Israeli President from being able to pick someone else to form the government. This sounds fairly chaotic Daniel, what, what is the reaction like there? What are people saying it is? I think people are in shock. It's the first time this is ever happened in Israel to have elections. And then a month later to throw all that away to call new ones, and there were in the last few days. These threats of new elections. And but there was a sense that it was kind of this big game of chicken last second Tahu, this brilliant tactician, that everyone knew would figure out a way to get a majority and he didn't Netanyahu as you point out has had some scandals following him around. Is he expected to win the next round of elections or vulnerable? I think he's in a very vulnerable position. The last election was very close. And if some of his previous voters, this time around blame him for dragging the country to elections, again his party could lose votes and he does win again. It will be harder for him to form a government. He'll be even more desperate than this past round and his political or his potential coalition partners will will be even more demanding in what they want in return. So all of this political chaos could be signalling to us than Thanh with all of his legal troubles is no longer a strong figure that a majority of lawmakers or at least on the right wing are willing to rally around this is not just a shock for Israel. It's also surprise to the White House. President Trump is a close ally of Netanyahu's today, members of Trump's team, working on a Mideast peace deal are into Roussel has this them, right? Well, it could be a major blow. Jared Kushner, Jason green Blat landed in Jerusalem last night to advance their peace proposal. Seems like the worst possible timing the last time there were Isreaeli elections, the White House, delayed its peace plan that could happen again. And by the time you haven't Isreaeli government. You're in November and US primary season starts twenty twenty presidential elections. Coming up the peace plan

Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Lieberman Govan Israel Daniel Estrin Jerusalem Prime Minister Hamilton Shield White House Jared Kushner President Trump NPR United States Thanh Jason Green Blat Roussel
"thanh" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"thanh" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Traffic and weather together Roger brands in the steeple traffic center that water main break, Tom it's on west force and at high Mons. That's what's force in south of chambers in the Ferguson area, reportedly icy conditions because of the temperatures outside so be careful there. Westbound seventy in Orange County just a little heavy through the whole fairy area pass what's worse than it's not that bad. Eastbound seventy you've got some heavy traffic around lake Saint Louis at slow K to seventy nine heavy little pocket through Zimbabwe brings in the seventy seventieth. Heavier on K just north of and the reporting an injury accident sixty four through the boulevard, you have some slow stuff, and that's a little heavy right past to seventy jams west McKnight through Hanley westbound sixty four approaching Hampton big van to stop it. Go south one seventy delays the Parkway south to seventy stola backup through page. We had a stall south of there. What else going on Maria northbound fifty five years so now before Potomac to arsenal northbound seventy it's all jammed up from past fifty five right on through pretty much loft. Probably. Got an accident on the right shoulder at Thanh ferry there as the on ramp right before the on ramp for eastbound thirty drivers your sewing on the approach to two seventy eastbound forty four showing via now from Larkin Williams up through west of the Merrimack a little bit of a slowdown before locally station. And as you make your way into downtown silicon pretty good just the usual slowdown receivers of day from Hampton not quite to kings highway at this point, what about your watch Roger quilt downtown. We have an accident westbound seventy Missouri end of the musical veterans bridge. That's what's jamming traffic on westbound seventy all the way back onto sixty four to twenty fifth street. Westbound sixty four west of the seventies split still jamming from merely Cambridge closer to the poplar. Begin. Leaves bridge was still backed up deal annoy side northbound route three heavy from queenie up to Monsanto next update at seven thirty from the steeple traffic center..

Tom it Roger quilt downtown high Mons lake Saint Louis Thanh ferry Ferguson Zimbabwe Hampton McKnight Orange County Larkin Williams Maria Missouri Cambridge fifty five years twenty fifth
"thanh" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"thanh" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Town of who should Thanh setting out again at three AM to take advantage of cooler temperatures. They're still weeks away from the US border. But the first of what could eventually be fifteen thousand US troops deployed there have begun arriving. Bob Costantini has more on that the president willing to double in almost triple the number of regular military personnel. He's sending to the border to prevent Central American migrants from trying to get into the US. Our military is out. We have about five thousand eight we'll go up to anywhere between ten and fifteen thousand military personnel on top of border patrol heights and everybody else border. Nobody's coming in that higher number is about three times account of migrants still believed to be willing to make the trek from southern Mexico to the American border. The soldiers will not be able to make arrests but can help shore up entry points. Mr. Trump might order closed. Bob Costantini, the White House resident heads to a campaign rally. Early in Missouri today, nearly one hundred ten thousand homes and businesses lost electricity as a line of storms moved across the deep south this morning. Taking down trees and power lines in parts of Louisiana and Alabama at least two people hospitalized after a possible tornado touchdown at Bogalusa, Louisiana. Google employees are about to conduct a job stopping action in San Francisco protesting what's been called a frat culture allowing sexual harassment. They're more from Jim Roope. A recent New York Times article said the company stayed quiet about sexual misconduct allegations against three top executives in the past decade, including Android creator. Andy Rubin who left the company in two thousand fourteen with a ninety million dollar exit package. The company responded by saying forty eight people including thirteen exacts have been fired over similar allegations says two thousand sixteen employees say that's not enough. They're walking out and demanding change the suspect in the Pittsburgh synagogue massacre is expected in court today to face additional charges even as three more sets of funerals get underway. I'm Michael Toscano. This is a court ordered notice current and former Ford Lincoln and mercury owners or lessees can receive payments and other benefits from a legal.

US Bob Costantini Louisiana Thanh Ford Lincoln Andy Rubin Pittsburgh synagogue Michael Toscano New York Times Mexico Mr. Trump Bogalusa Missouri president Jim Roope Google White House San Francisco harassment
"thanh" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"thanh" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Promo code aided Thanh Glickman's infra Craig Allen this morning and some flooding is occurring right now. It is. Let's start a New Jersey. I Paul ocean Middlesex Monmouth county's that's where the warning is in effect. But the rain is starting to let up in central New Jersey at this point. I wouldn't be surprised if that warning was lowered sooner than noontime to sooner than ten thirty this morning when it's currently set to expire. We'll we'll wait and see about that. But for the five boroughs across to Long Island, lower Westchester, southeastern Connecticut and southwestern Connecticut that is that's where the heaviest elements of rain or carrying right now. And for queens, Richmond kings county, Nassau County of Long Island. We have. A flash flood warning in effect until seven thirty this morning would not surprise me. If that gets extended over into western Suffolk before long because the heavy elements just now starting to move into their Brentwood, for example, you're under the gun at this point. And there's some very heavy thunderstorms. Just to the south of the south shore moving to the north and east. They could affect the twin forks about two or three hours from now. So as the morning progresses. The rain will get lighter from west to east this afternoon. Just showery. Maybe even a polka to a sunshine. That'd be nice. And once it's gone. We are golden right through Tuesday mid sixties today sunshine tomorrow Sunday Monday and Tuesday each day in the seventies. But moderate rain, sixty three degrees right now midtown urologist Todd Glickman down where this flood warning is happening down the jersey shore. The Manila English town regional school district is asking parents to do something a lot of Paris probably would like very much to do keep their kids off social media sign a pledge to keep them off until they're thirteen superintendent, Dr John Marciano, they clearly not. Not ready emotionally developmentally to deal with the title of interactions that they're going to run into you told channel two he knows because there was March when Clark mills elementary was put on lockdown because students were threatened an app chat room on a Friday morning at six twelve you've been there. Right. You put on that. Jack, six months reach into the pocket and find a McAfee brewed coffee. Well, not really, but there is a crumpled.

Long Island New Jersey Craig Allen Thanh Glickman Dr John Marciano Todd Glickman Middlesex Monmouth county Connecticut Nassau County Manila English town regional s McAfee Brentwood Westchester queens Suffolk Clark mills elementary Jack superintendent Richmond
"thanh" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

05:29 min | 2 years ago

"thanh" Discussed on 790 KABC

"We're back and we're dishing imaging thanh dre is here the author of a compendium of recipes that is more an encyclopedia than a cookbook is entitled cuba the cookbook and we are immersing ourselves in the cuban culture chef jamie gwen in your radio imaging as you were saying there are other recipes that we wanted to include like borsch and be struggling because they were very popular at the time that there was a heavy presence from the soviet union which of course is not the case today but they had their their moment in history and in the the kind of general cuban food memory of a of a certain generation you eat so many of the things i was surprised to see that are very i guess considered a american favorites there's pizza and neo key and you can see the influence from different cultures but there are some very great standards it's not just rice and beans right well i mean some of the some of those recipes pizza for example has become very common because dating back to the nineteen seventies when cuba was getting their wheat from the soviet union and the rest of the ingredients were easy to come by into the state setup a chain of pizza parlors and and they became very popular and people make pizzas at home too and i would say that the private sector have mir's those those the chain of pizza parlors that were that were initially run by the state and there are you know pizza fans all over the place and it's also just a fast easy affordable option if you're on the go and you need to grab a quick bite to eat but the love of course who doesn't love pizza there are some really beautiful recipes that i saw great cuban you know like the field at the heart of it and i'd like to talk about those dishes because i think making them and talking about them keeps their tradition alive of course the momentous for the book but is that how you pronounce the traditional cuban stu yes so i he acco is is considered the national dish by many it was compared to the number who's this very well respected anthropologist and historian call the national dish because it's as if it the influences of eighteen gradient comes from a different ethnicity and the contributions come from the indigenous population the spanish influence and african slaves and so all of that together kind of represents the ethnic mixture of the cuban people of course as i mentioned earlier there are other groups of immigrants but that those are the kind of the main three and it's this thick succulent stu there are a couple different recipes in our book because there are different ways to make it it is commonly repaired at the end of june for saint john and saint pedal festivities but it's also it can be prepared whenever it sure it for a while it was hard to find like restaurants because it's has so many ingredients but there are some great restaurants now that that are are making it and some of the ingredients will be original recipe for soho which is as we put in the book salted dried beef now originally it was horsemeat but can be substituted with with dried beef and and there's also pork either lawyer tender line chicken i mean there's lots of ingredients and then corn cassava root terror route yellow or white sweet potatoes another small yam green pains and right plantains though it's it's very and and pumpkin so so it's it's got a lot of ingredients and it's very it sounds it sounds like melting pot stew right like the best taste and flavors from all of the influence that come together and it is quintessentially cuban before i let you go could we toast to cuba with a mo hito please because i know that the first mosquito is said to have originated in cuba and i assume it was to keep cool i would hope yeah pretty refreshing yes definitely i mean i would i would say it's it's kind of like the goto cocktail right or a dakhari right right the dockery was also created there and then you can have that on the rocks or blended and you know i always say white rum is good when it's in a it's served in a mixed drink but dark rum is so smooth that you can just sip it maybe just one of ice and and a nice dark rum is one of my personal favorites but yeah the the.

thanh dre
"thanh" Discussed on The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"thanh" Discussed on The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

"All right let's i actually think idea to her last year when she followed me and i got nothing back but i'll try try okay what's a food that a lot of people like that you have either never tried or don't like what can i can i say shui or does that know how you cannot say shui 'cause i don't think a lot of people like oh that's right okay fair enough tongue what kind of a beef tongue i i just can't do tongue can't do thanh can't deliver liver and deliver can't do heel okay how do you feel about that fish general seafood love it okay i'll eat all kinds of just not heal the colors weird it's like orange once that but okay i'm gonna colorblind but it looks to me brown those are three that come to mind i don't have pork i think that's probably a bigger yeah i don't have pork bacon we'll have turkey bacon i will not have like canadian bacon or ham or like some kind of pigro say you people like to eat completely barbaro you people who you talking to those are those are the ones that come to mind i used to be very strict i used to be like really strictly kosher and no meet outside the house all that stuff but i've used up a little bit how about you mine is coconut coconut don't love don't love kokin wow especially oh really.

thanh
"thanh" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"thanh" Discussed on WTMA

"Wow well tell me the mystery of what you're trying to pull off here well we we booked through major carrier our flight and originally we were going to fly into hana lulu the la and then kona so it would go la conan the the big island and then thanh lulu and as we start looking at things and talking to people they got the suggestion of well he needs to spend some time on the big island go the volcano what have you so i thought that would be fine and in looking at it you know we're going to be on kona and i thought well you know either we can make a change where we can with the airline or i'll just let you know let that portion of it go not require any type of refunded then catch a later flight because flights between the islands are not that expensive and so when i went to call the the airline to let them know that you know we probably wouldn't be taking that lasts leg but we doing something later they informed me that if i did that that they would cancel the rest of my trip that's right and and to to make a change it was gonna cost me close to four thousand dollars and you know a a friend of mine actually warned me about this before i even books so i actually called the major carrier ahead of time told them exactly what i was doing and said you know i is this for real you know is there going to be a problem with this if i if i decide to make some kind of a change and they just showed me that there wasn't the person you talked to was not informed that that's what i've come to find out so as you can imagine i was very very frustrated when i was informed that that this case i i didn't realize that it was a you know a industry standard and you know i i.

thanh lulu four thousand dollars
"thanh" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

WCBS-FM 101.1

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"thanh" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

"Information you need to know the traveling one thousand dollars sauna in out of wendy today i thirty nine maybe forty of her lucky in fort myers florida winndixie clerk crystal but thanh was approached by a guy walked in to restore with a lottery ticket he handed the ticket to christo to see if he wanted any money she told whom eighty you got it you have five bucks nice she took the hours out of her own wattet and gave it to the yeah which she win the man may of one she lost turns out he was on the floor ry of florida lottery commission blue secret shopper people gather secret jazz though it it was a winning ticket and she snag at yeah she snagged it is ticket was worth six hundred dollars a home man he was working undercover he was the secret schapper indeed that after all the time i saw that on on on all 2020 they do that all the time people say it in waiting they throw it in the trash i wanna when you check your own ticket while some people do but other people just let them chadian attempts yet explosion alive especially the scratch officer some of them are just really confusing you can't skins gratchev's in the front they have to skin for you whom that seventy actually in the guy scanning go you do when i'm like no i know i did this brilliant but they just they he was trying to pocketed now no they had they had several people they had million dollar tickets relay here and they told the person nate they actually they go like this you see it on the video they check it in his in yeah i ran into your located and gain things are and you see him thrown in the trash can well then we'll should have been like like here were not allowed to win shouldn't be if you sell lottery tickets you're not allowed to win the newly met they give it to their friend that's what they do so in a camera is cameras on.

wendy officer fort myers florida thanh christo florida lottery one thousand dollars six hundred dollars million dollar
"thanh" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"thanh" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Now that is thanh force them guest the raise last ride its gansta race now that is dr or'spam as the raise last riders danced race and that's why guys it's time for the raise the number one games are going to close audubon guys on we read a blades august molumba go we as our contestants to in this case caring for shiny shanty two guests raise and sometimes the chat room was long in a racist all right let's get into the article and alleged internet player busted for a drunk fight with southwest at laguardia airport authority we could have happened eight thirty seven year old brooklyn man with an internet rep for using lies to charm women in a having sex with him allegedly leaving at least one pregnant and then china his phone number oh was arrested at laguardia airport at the he was too drunk to board a plane in made a scene the long hoskins now was taken into custody around what i don't think lumps who was left black cares gone black bears no white deadline day you have broke the matrix all right cares and they're if uruguay gelanteh he's walking the pizza hut miffed like a mother for his why donald delivered him up for two west side he was taken into custody around seven pm tuesday as at terminal b of horror at the port authority cops will call to a southwest airline gate two four reporter of a six foot tall 230pounder may being drunk and disorderly the airline told police staff uh wouldn't let him get on the plane and the destination of which was unknown because of his intoxication he went next cursing making obscene gestures and causing a ruckus at port authority amee port authority cops tried several times a score hoskin from the boarding area was as he resisted by flailing his arms hoskins was eventually handcuffed and brought to elm hers hospital for behavioral valuation and to be treated for the tax keishing he faces charges of resisting arrest sorely conduct and trespassing no officers were afraid he has a number prior arrest including a july 2016 dwi charge in brooklyn and a february 2017 casing queens though details of the latter.

chat room hoskins reporter brooklyn thanh laguardia china uruguay donald port authority eight thirty seven year six foot
"thanh" Discussed on Crave with Charlotte Mei

Crave with Charlotte Mei

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"thanh" Discussed on Crave with Charlotte Mei

"They crave with charlotte may kello we're back to discussing sugar with shift jason thanh pastry chef and baker at at sunrise global chef academy we were speaking previously about sugar replacements in baked goods and today we will be finding out more on the latest changes in desert trends chef jason with spoken about sugar substitutes both artificial and natural and how some can give you a desirable outcome and some others not now what are some products which absolutely will not withstand a sugar replacement the ranks and miranda usually found in a lot of our pastry repertoire for example the sponges that we do some of them have meringue and to give the irish in for the sponges so if it's something that we cannot do without the be meringues i see what about macaroni will ever duchesne cause much change structure there is a lot of shooter lacquers and the only recipe that i thought be in be able to reduce sugar in is macaroni because it fall macken luke like american each sufficient sugar for it to form the crust that it has and during the baking perform the feat which is a signature of the macro interesting with more people watching the eat nowadays would you say that chefs are watching more of what they put into their foods and our pastry chefs like yourself ready to slash sugar in your baked goods i think has no these understand the responsibility give into that because.

miranda jason thanh sunrise global
"thanh" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"thanh" Discussed on KOMO

"Facebook certainly has more advertising by i guess revenue and traffic than twitter does yes does so for facebook to really take the thanh mediocre could could be a really big step lorde go on facebook account for studying hub share of the online advertising market and it's only growing sodas or something but for those two elti to get on board with uh with the idea like this could be a really big deal for old secret advocating a transparency as tom hutyler speaking with washington post tech reporter brian fong from abc news tech trends reviews are infra googles latest flagship phones by most accounts the second times a charmed the pixel to in pixel to excell represent google second generation of smartphones and there are delivering on what some tech reviewers a calling android excellence dana waldman is with the tech blog and gadget really across the board a strong performance are we were happy rookie camp performance they're both what are resistant the android eight software is great she says the cameras in both owns are truly impressive but in gadgets review is did have a few minor complaints neither of them have very hard slots or had on jaksic has always bummer especially on android found as for the battery life the to excell does have a longerlasting cell but the same can't be said for the smaller device some users have also taken to social media to complain about bernie in problems that's when a ghost immature maine's on the display after the images have been removed google says it's investigating with tech trends i'm daria albinger abc news commodious each time.

Facebook twitter lorde tom hutyler brian fong dana waldman social media bernie maine google thanh online advertising washington post tech reporter android
"thanh" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"thanh" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"All right well let's safe they have the categories if they'll meld them as i believe canada goes to us wrecker innocent over still suffering the stage this wind wreck the i feel like i feel like canada will get their before before we get there because i don't think we've ever gonna say about it right remember the your burton cummings performed the genies and saying american woman that was uh those what a day time yeah i feel like somewhere that song is still going as it just never he just he keeps threatening to leave but he never goes above and i we hear you banana good j what i'm going to idaho eerily gas oh all right we good burton cummings lenny kravitz hand the thanh monnet oh hold on a second quite hot it's like i didn't think i could hate lenny kravitz anymore in delhi cover that song but to be fair to him i don't think he thinks is a good song i think he does every song in front of fulllength mirrors with a guitar or broomstick or something and box it up any goes how would i look playing this song is uncovers the probably the coolest guy you wouldn't want to hang out with a not involved him playing music i i i just remember hollins in his prime i remember clearly on my bachelor party we went on a boat and had a cd and it was the the best of lenny kravitz us and i was it was an ep yeah and i i sat there now he's had a lot of i i hate all well at airline artas best of rhianna sat there and i just started thumbing through the notes and the pages and stuff and at some point i got interested and i counted the number of images of lenny kravitz on this thing and then i ask everyone on the boat you know james dixon and daniel kelsen and jeff ross and jimmy kimmel everyone gas how many pictures of lenny kravitz single pictures of lenny kravitz are on this it's a jewel case know it's a little liner and they're like.

canada burton cummings thanh monnet lenny kravitz hollins rhianna jeff ross idaho james dixon daniel kelsen jimmy kimmel
"thanh" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"thanh" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Thanh charene you know you're cutting your hair trimming your beard down looks directions they did copying and leaching and other kinds of things you know considered skills it took a certain amount of dexterity and practice to do and this it's went through the middle ages that way and there was kind of a precept herships system where you know the more experienced practitioner taught the the the newcomer to to to do these things but how did medicine hud medicine as we define it without dental care how did that sort of like trail off or or or how did the work was their time were they were more integrated and these separated well it's like this moment of of clarity came when these two dennis in baltimore and 1840 went to the medical school in at the university of maryland and ask the physicians that they would consider adding like formal dental training to the course of of medical school that they had and the physicians as a story go said that the subject of dentistry was of no interest to them so these two dentist went off and started the first donald college in the world across town in baltimore and a whole separate educational system and professional system grew up around that i school you know other dental colleges opened um the physicians in the dentist were trained separately they had the dentist had their own peerreviewed magazine or journal and their own dental society and.

Thanh charene dennis baltimore donald college peerreviewed magazine university of maryland
"thanh" Discussed on Deadcast

Deadcast

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"thanh" Discussed on Deadcast

"Those is game of thrones characters the fiveseat is jeff rosenberg thanh versus his brisk trusted hedman dad's z search so jeff rosenberg is all one word jeff r o s e n b biaggi not so as not that's is middle name is full name is full for seems jeff rosenberg town which is it up it's no it's pretty funny uh the fourseat his dallas cream her oh going up against a thirteenthseed free bao boda dow's creamer another fantastic bore name out for the for ackerman by the five see this tina touch versus the eleven syed bird love god the third seed is on his of god played in the sun raw orchestra are as popber possibly the cousin of god shammgod the third seed is allies of fox teats elisa fox teeth sweat the foxes our middle name so it's not fox teats is not the last name its allies of fox breasts against fourteenthseed boats both but either break this down so it's boats like the v like the vessel boats in then but the last name is b o t e s so boats boats like boutrosboutros na the sevenseat is login ious wisdom williams login yesler geniuses l e a posture fiji against the 10seat taco divots taco divots and now we have our our final match up well they may be the weakest region yeah i'm sorry we hendrick great names yet you're degrading on a curfew reds true but we've were ending with others the twoseat effort daddy body congo fifteenthseed harmony excellent so those those are all your names in the bracket uh i would probably have uh i think my championed is farraj for us.

jeff rosenberg dallas boda dow fiji jeff rosenberg thanh hedman ackerman hendrick